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Introduction

Mr. Pride

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2017)
My name is Pride Tompkins and my wife, Kay. We absolutely know nothing about what we are doing but we are interested in new ventures and meeting new friends during this life. We recently saw a movie and read several articles about hiking this trail. We are an older couple and welcome any information. Thank you.
 
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You are at the right place for information. Search and read. When you have a question, ask freely! Buen camino.
 

NualaOC

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
A few and hopefully lots more. See signature.
Welcome to you both! Good luck with your research and planning - you can search for information here, or ask questions on specific topics.

You might also like to check if there's a local pilgrim organisation in your country. Some have very informative websites and may also hold information sessions from time to time. This can really help with the early stages of your preparation.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(SJPdP: 2015, June2020!) (Eng Way: 2015)
Hello! It's quite incredible. I'd recommend getting used to long walks if it isn't your thing yet. Start walking 30-45 mins a day.
 
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DreamHiker2

DreamHiker2
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Welcome to the Forum and Buen Camino. You will not only find great information to read old and new but will find yourself being buoyed along with the excitement and dreaming for your impending Camino. You are in for the information ride of your life. :D So many amazing, experienced people in here to help you out. Enjoy your planning and hope to see your next post announcing your travel dates. :rolleyes:
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Please know that there are no age limitations or requirements. In fact, there are no rules. There is etiquette and common sense. But, if you are in reasonably good health and can walk, even with a cane, you should find a way to accomplish a Camino.

Here, in the Forum, you will find a HUGE amount of information and useful advice. We usually suggest that you use the search window at the top right of this page, or any page, to input key words, phrases or short questions to search through this Forum for answers to the most common questions and advice on most topics.

For example, if you wanted to ask about the best shoes or boots to wear, you might type into the search box, "what are the best shoes to wear?" The search capability is very good. You will get results that are spot on as well as not quite a right fit, as it were. Or, you could just type the key words "best shoes," or "best rucksack..."

Absent finding your answers in this manner, ask away. We are here to help. That is what we do.

Many of us, veteran pilgrims are well into our sixties and beyond. Certainly many more are younger than this. I completed my first Camino in 2013 on my 60th birthday at the Cathedral in Santiago. But, whilst on Camino it is not at all rare to meet pilgrims who are in their 80s, even walking solo.

Also, pilgrims with physical limitations abound. Sight challenged persons either walk very near to or tethered using a dog walking sort of arrangement to a sighted person.

Last summer, a youngish British fellow with MS walked using full-arm crutches from St. Jean Pied de Port all the way to Sanitago de Compostela, unassisted, and carrying his own rucksack.

Weekly, pilgrims in athletic wheelchairs end up at the Pilgrim Office to claim their Compostelas. Some, but not all, are accompanied by able-bodied friends or relatives.

I even met, in two successive years, a pilgrim who, in 2010, had suffered a stroke affecting his entire right side. His therapy, after three years, advanced him to be able to walk by taking a step with his good leg and sort of half-dragging his "numb" leg along, at a half-a-meter-per-step pace. Using a single walking staff in his affected hand, he walked from Strasburg, France to St, Jean Pied de Port, rested up for a week or so, then continued on to Santiago, again, on his own. He did this both in 2013 and 2014 that I personally know of. I did not happen upon him in 2015 or 2016, but we were likely at Santiago during different months.

Diabetics find ways and means to maintain their insulin insulated and cold enough. Apnea sufferers tote their CPAP machines with them. Anything is possible if you set your mind to it, and just ask for help. One of the basic "rules" along the Camino is that "the Camino provides..." Try it, and you will see what we mean.

My point in all this is that, regardless of age, and almost regardless of physical limitations or health conditions, where there is a will, a way can be found.

BTW, "that movie" made the Camino look a bit easier than it is. Certain "literary and cinematic license" was taken during the filming of the movie to enhance and preserve the plot . While is is not quite a walk in the park, it is not overly-difficult. You just need to remain flexible, and modify your expectations.

I hope this helps, and we see you out there.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
We recently saw a movie and read several articles about hiking this trail. We are an older couple and welcome any information.
The movie you saw was, most likely, The Way. At the same time it was being filmed a documentary was being filmed too, Walking the Camino: Six Ways to Santiago. A few years ago, before walking our own camino, Peg and I did see the documentary in a theater when the director was doing a tour. Before showing the film she asked the audience for a show of hands of those who were thinking of walking the camino. After the showing she asked again saying that sometimes there were more hands up and sometimes less. Maybe you should see this movie too to better see if the camino is for you (though I hope you raise your hands afterwards.)

Ivar, who created this forum, sells some products, including a DVD for this documentary, from his online shop at https://www.santiagodecompostela.me

As for being older that may mean that you are retired and that may mean you have the time to walk the camino in two months instead of one and have twice the fun.
 

Mr. Pride

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
(2017)
Thanks for all the information. I just ordered a book about it. My wife and I are seriously considering doing this. Take care.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Uh-oh, by you actions to date I think you are coming down with "the bug." The only "cure" is to actually follow through and DO a Camino.

Unfortunately, once you do one, you become rather addicted, at least most people do. Many, or most of us find our first Camino to be a life-altering experience, on many levels. Once that realization sets in, we are hooked.:eek:

Regrettably, (NOT) the only effective treatment for "Caminoitis" is to do another Camino. The good news is that this condition is treatable with a non-prescription method...just put one foot in front of the other, repeat as necessary. Stop when you arrive at the Plaza de Obradoiro in Santiago de Compostela, as that is the large square in front of the Cathedral.o_Oi

If you are a die-hard and continue on to Finisterre and / or Muxia (moo-shee-ah), do remember to stop at the ocean. There is no more land for nearly 4,000 miles...;)

Welcome to our "club" of functional but slightly warped pilgrims...
 
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Please know that there are no age limitations or requirements. In fact, there are no rules. There is etiquette and common sense. But, if you are in reasonably good health and can walk, even with a cane, you should find a way to accomplish a Camino.

Here, in the Forum, you will find a HUGE amount of information and useful advice. We usually suggest that you use the search window at the top right of this page, or any page, to input key words, phrases or short questions to search through this Forum for answers to the most common questions and advice on most topics.

For example, if you wanted to ask about the best shoes or boots to wear, you might type into the search box, "what are the best shoes to wear?" The search capability is very good. You will get results that are spot on as well as not quite a right fit, as it were. Or, you could just type the key words "best shoes," or "best rucksack..."

Absent finding your answers in this manner, ask away. We are here to help. That is what we do.

Many of us, veteran pilgrims are well into our sixties and beyond. Certainly many more are younger than this. I completed my first Camino in 2013 on my 60th birthday at the Cathedral in Santiago. But, whilst on Camino it is not at all rare to meet pilgrims who are in their 80s, even walking solo.

Also, pilgrims with physical limitations abound. Sight challenged persons either walk very near to or tethered using a dog walking sort of arrangement to a sighted person.

Last summer, a youngish British fellow with MS walked using full-arm crutches from St. Jean Pied de Port all the way to Sanitago de Compostela, unassisted, and carrying his own rucksack.

Weekly, pilgrims in athletic wheelchairs end up at the Pilgrim Office to claim their Compostelas. Some, but not all, are accompanied by able-bodied friends or relatives.

I even met, in two successive years, a pilgrim who, in 2010, had suffered a stroke affecting his entire right side. His therapy, after three years, advanced him to be able to walk by taking a step with his good leg and sort of half-dragging his "numb" leg along, at a half-a-meter-per-step pace. Using a single walking staff in his affected hand, he walked from Strasburg, France to St, Jean Pied de Port, rested up for a week or so, then continued on to Santiago, again, on his own. He did this both in 2013 and 2014 that I personally know of. I did not happen upon him in 2015 or 2016, but we were likely at Santiago during different months.

Diabetics find ways and means to maintain their insulin insulated and cold enough. Apnea sufferers tote their CPAP machines with them. Anything is possible if you set your mind to it, and just ask for help. One of the basic "rules" along the Camino is that "the Camino provides..." Try it, and you will see what we mean.

My point in all this is that, regardless of age, and almost regardless of physical limitations or health conditions, where there is a will, a way can be found.

BTW, "that movie" made the Camino look a bit easier than it is. Certain "literary and cinematic license" was taken during the filming of the movie to enhance and preserve the plot . While is is not quite a walk in the park, it is not overly-difficult. You just need to remain flexible, and modify your expectations.

I hope this helps, and we see you out there.
This post should be "required" reading for all new pilgrims. It's upbeat, crammed with ways "to" walk the Way and a prime example of the kind of person that populates the Forum. Sadly, the civility and avoidance of rancor on the Forum leaves precious little for we Mods to do other than welcome new members.;)
Buen Camino,
Arn
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
My name is Pride Tompkins and my wife, Kay. We absolutely know nothing about what we are doing but we are interested in new ventures and meeting new friends during this life. We recently saw a movie and read several articles about hiking this trail. We are an older couple and welcome any information. Thank you.
Welcome, Pride and Kay. You have received good advice and encouragement from so many responders so far. You did not say where you live, but another source of information in many countries are the local confraternities, which are groups of past, present, and future pilgrims who support the Camino and those considering walking this ancient pilgrimage path. Here in the US the confraternity is called American Pilgrims on the Camino, or APOC for short. The website for the APOC is http://www.americanpilgrims.org/. When you visit that website you'll see that there are many local chapters in larger cities throughout the country, and a list of the activities such as information sessions, local hikes or other gatherings, mentoring, etc, sponsored by these chapters. If you're not in the US, there are similar organizations in most major countries world-wide, and the international community here on this forum will surely step in and provide you the website addresses for their own country.

Buen Camino,
Jim
 

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