A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Luggage Transfer Correos

Kick Scooter

Camino Badges

ggtree

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis June 2018
Next summer I will be doing my third Camino, planning on doing the Via de la Plata. In my previous Caminos I have seen walkers, bikers, horses, donkeys, in-line skates, and people with dogs but never anyone on a kick scooter. The VDLP has a lot of flat, a lot of cities and a lot of pavement. Has anyone ever seen anyone using a kick scooter to get around the towns and cities?
 

André Walker

Never loosing my way: always standing on it
Camino(s) past & future
Holland-St.Jean, Frances, Del Norte, VdlP.
I’ve walked the VdlP last year, but I haven’t seen anyone use a kick scooter.
But I also remember walking a lot on sandy paths and gravel roads. Not so much pavement. Except of course in the cities, but (considering the total length), there weren’t that many of them.

Or is my judgement obscured by the fine memories I have? 😁
 

MinaKamina

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Jacobspad 2017
Edith Frost traveled the CF carrying a kick scooter a few years ago, but it was of very little use ~ though it made a great video on the one (1) occasion that she could ride it.

She did not take it with her when she returned to the next Camino.
 

ggtree

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis June 2018
Edith Frost traveled the CF carrying a kick scooter a few years ago, but it was of very little use ~ though it made a great video on the one (1) occasion that she could ride it.

She did not take it with her when she returned to the next Camino.
The kick scoot I have is an “off road scoot” which has air tires so it can go on dirt. I think it could be fun.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015, CPo 2016, VDLP[Sev-Các] 2017, VDLP[Các-Sal] 2018
I met two young Spanish pilgrims who came from Cadiz (I think) to SdC last year on kick scooters. I think we marked them down as “en bici” for the pilgrim office stats. They said it was pretty difficult work but they were young and fit so got there in the end.... i would expect that it would be a pretty difficult task especially if planning to do it in the summer heat. Though I guess it depends on where you plan to start etc
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018
I do not know what a kick scooter looks like, but in 2010 in Brem-sur-Mer on the French Atlantic coast, as I was heading for the Norte , I met a fairly young German who was going from Berlin to Santiago and back on the contraption you see in the photo. I followed him on his website and he made it there and back. He was a survival instructor…

At the time you could find him at “kickhard.de” – have just checked and he is still there, even in an English version! Will try now to include the photos I took at the time.....
 

Attachments

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
A kick scooter would be acceptable, provided you did not break your neck in the process. However, any battery powered scooter is NOT permissible.

The operative concept is human effort is required to propel you forward. Bicycles are the same. An e-bike is okay as long as it only assists when you pedal, and you MUST pedal. A wholly electric bike, or any other motorized device is not Compostela-legal.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances
SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia, May 2016
C. Frances, Sept 2017
Camino Portugues, June 2019
You saw inline skates? I cant picture those working on any surfaces in Spain. I saw a group of people on electric bicycles on the Portugues. They had a sag wagon that would go ahead and set up a picnic lunch for them. It was nice because very old and very young could keep up with each other. (not everybody is a pilgrim or needing a trophy compostela)
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
A kick scooter would be acceptable, provided you did not break you neck in the process. However, any battery powered scooter is NOT permissible.

The operative concept is human effort is required to propel you forward. Bicycles are the same. An e-bike is okay as long as it only assists when you pedal, and you MUST pedal. A wholly electric bike, or any other motorized device is not Compostela-legal.

Hope this helps.
Just curious, Tom...how does the 100km/200km rule fit into this? Even though a kick scooter is human powered, it has a big advantage over walkers on the downhill grades -- assuming a surface that's suitable.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
The distance requirements are the same. In my view, and there is no written policy covering push scooters, I feel they would determine that this was assisted walking. This is similar to roller blades. THAT has been done. The pedestrian rules apply. Lest you think this easy, YOU try wearing roller blades on the Camino walking trails. Point made...

Similarly, there have been a few folks on unicycles over the years. As this is a form of bicycle, they apply that distance requirement, and treat it like a bicycle.

This week, while walking up Rua Azerbache, towards Plaza Cervantes, I saw something that at first did not register but then caused me concern. What I saw was a pilgrim with a rucksack riding, NOT pedaling, what appeared to be an electric powered unicycle.

I have never seen such a thing before, and I only got a glimpse as he was moving downhill towards the Plaza Obradoiro at a pretty good clip while dodging pedestrians. I specifically recall NOT seeing pedals. This fellow’s feet were not moving. He was riding.

My assessment is that this is a gyro-stabilized unicycle version of something like a Segway. If anyone knows more I would appreciate a lead, so I can do some research and alert the office staff to this new development.

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
As the OP's question was "Has anyone ever seen anyone using a kick scooter to get around the towns and cities?" I suspect the honest answer would be "yes". perhaps with a qualifying " and some of them were nearly ready for senior school."

But if the OP wants to carry an L shaped lump of metal with a wheel at two corners over the hump before Almaden de la Plata, up to Monasterio, over the Puerto de Bejar or any of the other not so flat or urban bits of the Plata who are we to seek to dissuade them.

Those who believe that Camino is a pilgrimage may wince, cringe or even experience outrage but I do not recall any reference to "scooters" in Dante's Inferno ;)
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
I just remembered that last summer, a Korean family arrived at Santiago in early August, having walked from St. Jean Pied de Port. The family was mom, dad, an eight-year old daughter, and a six-year old son. The little boy had used his “Razor” folding kick scooter ALL THE WAY.

We’re talking slightly less that 800 km, or about 500 miles. I don’t know about you, but when I was six, NOTHING could bribe or induce me to do this. This was a singular and very memorable incident.

In my experience, Korean pilgrims are among the most serious, committed, even stubborn and motivated pilgrims. But THIS took the cake!

I asked, the mom spoke good English, about the six-year old and the scooter. She explained that her son rode the scooter at every opportunity, but folded and carried it up hills or on rough terrain. The parents carried his rucksack load out in their packs.

Normally, the minimum age for a youngster to receive their own Latin Compostela is 10 years of age, or having received their First Holy Communion if the child is Catholic. The issue is being able to comprehend good vs evil, and the seriousness of the Camino, or some similar construct. I felt this young fellow deserved something IN HIS NAME to commemorate the huge accomplishment.

I recall arguing with the folks behind the counter that the kids should get some specific documentation of their really over the top achievement. My best recollection is that the parents received Compostelas. The kids got desportivo certificates in their own names, in lieu of the Compostela. But they ALL got distance certificates.

Hope this helps flesh out the discussion.
 
Last edited:

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
As the OP's question was "Has anyone ever seen anyone using a kick scooter to get around the towns and cities?" I suspect the honest answer would be "yes". perhaps with a qualifying " and some of them were nearly ready for senior school."

But if the OP wants to carry an L shaped lump of metal with a wheel at two corners over the hump before Almaden de la Plata, up to Monasterio, over the Puerto de Bejar or any of the other not so flat or urban bits of the Plata who are we to seek to dissuade them.

Those who believe that Camino is a pilgrimage may wince, cringe or even experience outrage but I do not recall any reference to "scooters" in Dante's Inferno ;)
Honk!

Honk!

Scoot over!
 

TaraWalks

Peregrina without a skateboard
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018, planning for Le Puy 2019/2020ish and for some shorter Caminos stacked
I just remembered that last summer, a Korean family arrived at Santiago in early August, having walked from St. Jean Pied de Port. The family was mom, dad, an eight-year old daughter, and a six-year old son. The little boy had used his “Razor” folding kick scooter ALL THE WAY.

We’re talking slightly less that 800 km, or about 500 miles. I don’t know about you, but when I was six, NOTHING could bribe or induce me to do this. This was a singular and very memorable incident.

In my experience, Korean pilgrims are among the most serious, committed, even stubborn and motivated pilgrims. But THIS took the cake!

I asked, the mom spoke good English, about the six-year old and the scooter. She explained that her son rode the scooter at every opportunity, but folded and carried it up hills or on rough terrain. The parents carried his rucksack load out in their packs.

Normally, the minimum age for a youngster to receive their own Latin Compostela is 10 years of age, or having received bed First Holy Communion if the child is Catholic. The issue is being able to comprehend good vs evil, and the seriousness of the Camino, or some similar construct. I felt this young fellow deserved something IN HIS NAME to commemorate the huge accomplishment.

I recall arguing with the folks behind the counter that the kids should get some specific documentation of their really over the top achievement. My best recollection is that the parents received Compostelas. The kids got desportivo certificates in their own names, in lieu of the Compostela. But they ALL got distance certificates.

Hope this helps flesh out the discussion.
Wow! on the CF in 2016, I saw two young Korean boys with skateboards. Not long boards or any kind of board that is stable but those little Penny style banana boards! They had a lot of gravel rash. When I saw them they were hammering down a hill at full speed - one of themgot pretty bad death wobbles but managed to get it under control. I was suitably impressed!
 

Via2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
06/07 & 12 Camino Francés, 08-10 Via de la Plata, 13/14 & 17 Camino Portugués, 18 Camino Primitivo
I walked Seville-Zamora this June and I can remember long stretches where a kick-scooter would not only have been of no use, but a burden. E. g. Guillena to Castilblanco de los Arroyos (first you ford a river, then you walk on washed-out sandy paths), second half of Castilblanco de los Arroyos to Almadén de la Plata (very steep hill "el Calvario"), then again between Almadén de la Plata and El Real de la Jara (very steep sections and narrow paths), before the Alcantara Lake, in the Forests before Puerto de Béjar, climbing up el Pico de la Duena after Fuenterroble and again, approaching Salamanca.

These are only the sections which come to my mind, in which you may have to carry the kick-scooter on your back.

There are few sections on roads, but then again it may not be advisable considering the traffic around you (e. g. Cáceres to Casar de Cáceres, Aldeanueva del Camino to Banos de Montemayor) or you have to be careful not to miss any arrows (Mérida, Cáceres, Salamanca).
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
The distance requirements are the same. In my view, and there is no written policy covering push scooters, I feel they would determine that this was assisted walking. This is similar to roller blades. THAT has been done. The pedestrian rules apply. Lest you think this easy, YOU try wearing roller blades on the Camino walking trails. Point made...

Similarly, their have been a few folks on unicycles over the years. As this is a form of bicycle, they apply that distance requirement, and treat it like a bicycle.

This week, while walking up Rua Azerbache, towards Plaza Cervantes, I saw something that at first did not register but then caused me concern. What I saw was a pilgrim with a rucksack riding, NOT pedaling, what appeared to be an electric powered unicycle.

I have never seen such a thing before, and I only got a glimpse as he was moving downhill towards the Plaza Obradoiro at a pretty good clip while dodging pedestrians. I specifically recall NOT seeing pedals. This fellow’s feet were not moving. He was riding.

My assessment is that this is a gyro-stabilized unicycle version of something like a Segway. If anyone knows more I would appreciate a lead, so I can do some research and alert the office staff to this new development.

Hope this helps.
Something like THIS?
I've only ever seen them in a TV commercial for B&Q (think Home Depot) in the UK. Can only imagine the conversations in the queue to charge tablets, smartphones and ipods while one of these is blocking the plug in socket!

Edit: just noticed 11.4kg (don't think that includes the charger)
 
Last edited:

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Something like THIS?
I've only ever seen them in a TV commercial for B&Q (think Home Depot) in the UK. Can only imagine the conversations in the queue to charge tablets, smartphones and ipods while one of these is blocking the plug in socket!

Edit: just noticed 11.4kg (don't think that includes the charger)
I would testify that, THAT is what I saw. It had orange or red trim, in place of the blue in the photo. But otherwise, it appears identical to what I saw yesterday.

Thank you. I will pass this along to the responsible parties here in Santiago.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018
Something like THIS?
I've only ever seen them in a TV commercial for B&Q (think Home Depot) in the UK. Can only imagine the conversations in the queue to charge tablets, smartphones and ipods while one of these is blocking the plug in socket!

Edit: just noticed 11.4kg (don't think that includes the charger)
I have seen them several times around here, did not notice the details. They were just standing rolling along effortlessly and I was wondering how they can keep their balance. But then looking at THAT in Jeff's post , there it says "self-balancing"....
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
I have seen them several times around here, did not notice the details. They were just standing rolling along effortlessly and I was wondering how they can keep their balance. But then looking at THAT in Jeff's post , there it says "self-balancing"....
Essentially the same way as you balance a pedal bike - you might not notice it but as you're about to fall over on a bike you subconsciously tweak the handlebars the other way to correct. Similarly you don't need to use the handlebars to turn (at speed at least) - you just lean into the bend (works even better on a motorbike!) it's the gyroscopic effect.
 

pelerine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2010j, Primitivo (2013), Plata (2014 + 2015), Salvador (2016), Torres 2017), Portugues (2018
Essentially the same way as you balance a pedal bike - you might not notice it but as you're about to fall over on a bike you subconsciously tweak the handlebars the other way to correct. Similarly you don't need to use the handlebars to turn (at speed at least) - you just lean into the bend (works even better on a motorbike!) it's the gyroscopic effect.
I appreciate your explanation, but somehow cannot follow - those people did not seem to tweak anything - now I come to think of it, your explanation reminds me of my efforts trying to reverse(?) a car with a trailer at the rubbish dump - no amount of tweaking could keep it straight! This is leading us into the “not a serious thread” section! So I will shut up now! Goodnight!
 

Book your lodging here

Get e-mail updates from Casa Ivar (Forum + Forum Store content)




Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 15 1.4%
  • February

    Votes: 5 0.5%
  • March

    Votes: 43 4.0%
  • April

    Votes: 162 15.3%
  • May

    Votes: 261 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 81 7.6%
  • July

    Votes: 21 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 22 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 304 28.6%
  • October

    Votes: 129 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 13 1.2%
  • December

    Votes: 6 0.6%
Top