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Lycian Way in Turkey

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#1
My turn to ask questions and get some feedback...

I am giving some serious thought to walking the Lycian Way in Turkey - mid April to Mid May 2014.

I have reviewed a number of websites on the route and I know Kate Clow is probably the best expert on the route itself.

Has anybody in the last 1-2 years walked the route and if so can they offer some current information about the route, accommodation, etc?

I understand the network of places to stay is now well established that it is not necessary to carry a tent?

Is there a pack service in place?

Thanks
 

stratophile

Active Member
#2
I did the Lycian Way in spring 2011 (all but the three-day leg across the mountains that can't be done without camping gear). I still stay closely in touch with others who have done it (or are planning it). Accommodation is generally no problem - from what my friends in Turkey tell me, it is getting better each year. Of course, it partly depends on what kind of accommodation you consider acceptable!

There are a handful of remote villages that have no accommodation, but if you inquire politely at the mosque usually something will be arranged. They will often call ahead to other villages for you too.

I found the people to be extremely accommodating and helpful -- almost to the point of being annoying! :) For example, when hiking alongside roads people would want to 'help' by giving me a lift into town -- very, very hard sometimes to get across that you do, in fact, want to walk! Still, hard to fault people for being *too* friendly... LOL The people in the many small villages along the Lycian Way are still far from jaded by people trekking through -- I got mildly lost near one remote village and the family that 'rescued' me sort of adopted me and I ended up 'stuck' in the village for the entire day. Needless to say, that was one of my favorite memories of the trip. I encountered similar people everywhere. Shepherds that I met in the mountains were also amazingly friendly - they look and act gruff until you smile then their entire demeanor changes - I shared lunch with many of them.

I notice you are from Canada; me too -- I carried a little bag of Canada flag-pins with me as give-aways, which the shepherds in particular seemed to love receiving - maybe you'll spot some of them!. :)

There are back-pack services between many towns. Most are done by tour operators and are consequently a bit expensive. However, most hotel operators can arrange it for you. I never came across any transfer operators that handled the entire trek, though there are probably a few (I never actually looked). Personally, I often booked into a hotel (for example in Ölüdeniz), then would walk 15-20 km (or whatever I felt up to that day), then would head out to the road and wave down one of the inter-city buses (usually frequent and cheap - more often than not someone would simply stop and pick me up), then head back to my hotel. After a nice night's sleep, I'd grab an inter-city bus back to where I stopped the day before and continue a bit further. Eventually, I'd get far enough from my hotel that I'd check out, grab a bus to the next suitable town, check in, and then continue the same process. This saved me from having to carry my full pack on many of the stretches; instead I just used a day bag with lunch, GPS, and emergency supplies for the walking. Unlike the Camino, I needed to have a full pack with me in Turkey because I also went elsewhere for hikes where day packs weren't an option.

Waymarking is still very primitive over many significant stretches. The worst parts are around 'civilization' -- ever-present construction simply wipes out waymarkings and even entire sections of the route. However, if you are an experienced trekker you won't have any problems. Learn the Turkish words for Lycian Way - when you get lost put on your biggest, friendliest smile and simply say 'Lycian Way' (in Turkish) and look suitably sheepish. Someone will point you in the right direction. Indeed, don't be surprised if they insist on walking you back to the route... (happened several times for me). I never had any actual 'issues' anywhere on the Lycian Way - or elsewhere in Turkey, for that matter.

Good luck with your planning! If you have time, try to get to a few other parts of Turkey too - great country for hiking!
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#3
Hi stratophile

Thank you for this information

A couple of questions:

In terms of budget what would be an average number to use for two people (my wife and myself)?

In terms of days - most information I have read, suggests it takes 25-28 days to walk the entire route?

Thanks again
 

marusia

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
(2013)
#4
I have a friend from Australia who's planning to walk the Lycian Way in April, and I may join her, along with two other peregrinos who walked the Camino Frances in April-May 2014. I too am from Toronto. Perhaps we can share information either on this forum, or by email.
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#5
makes perfect sense. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#6
I would dearly love to walk this camino. I spent three years of my childhood in Izmir, and a piece of my heart is still over there with those lovely people in that beautiful place.
Alas, my conscience won´t let me go there -- not so long as the current government continues jailing journalists for doing their jobs.

Perhaps those who have done this trek, or who plan to, can post some links and maps and such, to give us armchair travelers a better idea of where and why and how?
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
#7
I have not done the walk but have gazed wonderously at the the Lycian Cliffs from Dalyan…. yes the Turks are very hospitable people … hahaha Stratophile I know what you mean almost Tooooo hospitable…….MOST want others to see their country and experience their hospitality without the politics of the day…..daughter has married a Turk and it has been a wonderful learning experience/ journey for all of us …...

A great place to visit…… I intend to do the walk there as well……. at some time in my schedule……so much to see and do :)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
#9
That sure sounds interesting. Will have to look into that, because I have marvelous experience with Turks (and Kurds as well!!!). Several years ago I did some mountaineering in Kackar Mountains and Mt.Ararat. Pristine, unspoiled, simply wonderful!!!
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#10
I would dearly love to walk this camino. I spent three years of my childhood in Izmir, and a piece of my heart is still over there with those lovely people in that beautiful place.
Alas, my conscience won´t let me go there -- not so long as the current government continues jailing journalists for doing their jobs.

Perhaps those who have done this trek, or who plan to, can post some links and maps and such, to give us armchair travelers a better idea of where and why and how?
You should walk this camino if you would love to. Countries are about the people not governments. There are so many countries I would not visit if I were to base them on their governments and that would include my own. Put it on the Bucket List. :)
PS. It looks like a fantastic walk, I'm putting it on my list.
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#12
I myself did a presentation about 18months ago on this trail ( along with some others ) at our Victoria based camino chapter.

However time has past and I am sure things are a bit different since then, so getting some more current information is much appreciated.

Here is the presentation for what it is worth:
http://littlegreentracs.typepad.com/files/five-countries-five-caminos-abridged-version.pdf

I will start digging through my notes (used for this presentation) to post what I find.
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#13
#14
Hi jirit,

Suggesting per-day costs is always tricky because so much depends on your personal needs and style, how you plan to get around, accommodation requirements, and so on.

I was in Turkey for a little under three months. I'd have to check my trip notes for exact figures, but I think I spent about C$3,500 in total, including costs to move around the country, gifts for family / friends, and phone calling cards (a big cost for me as I still needed to run my business - couldn't completely shut off the rest of the world!). I spent a few days in Istanbul (a city I know well as I used to go there on business a lot in a previous life) - it's relatively expensive compared with the rest of Turkey. I went down the west coast, stopped off at a few historical sites, then to Bozburun where I stayed for a few days doing 'training' hikes in the hills to get my legs ready for the Lycian Way, then to Fethiye. That's where I started the Lycian Way (technically it doesn't start until Ölüdeniz, but I walked from Fethiye).

I was on the Lycian Way for a little over a month (including hanging out in a few places simply because they were fun and interesting). Depending on your walking speed, you could definitely do it in well under a month. I mostly hiked it alone and I tend to hike slower when alone (a subconscious safety thing, I suppose). I spent about 3 days in Kas plus a day offshore when I visited one of the Greek islands. I spent a day on the beach in (blanking on the name -- Patara?? -- amazing beach south west of Kalkan, and I'm not normally a beach person). Note that I technically didn't do the entire trek as I skipped the mountain stretch past Olympos - I went to Olympos and hiked up past the flames but then back down and took a bus around the mountains (didn't have camping gear with me -- that is the only stretch where there are no accommodation options at all and you are also not close enough to a road to grab a bus to the nearest town).

Other than Fethiye, Ölüdeniz, and Kas, most of the Lycian way is not expensive so long as you avoid the obvious tourist hotels / restaurants. If you are not churning through phone cards and spending way too many hours at Internet cafes like was necessary for me, you should be able to do $35 - $50 per day for the both of you (again, depending on your personal requirements). Ölüdeniz is probably the most expensive place but that's only because it isn't actually in Turkey. It's actually part of the UK but nobody got around to telling Turkey so they still think it's part of their country (you'll know what I mean when you get there!). Ölüdeniz also has the distinction of being the only place in Turkey that I've ever seen a butcher shop selling pork! :)

Costs in the villages are very, very low -- you'll be able to stretch your lira a very long way without ever having to be stingy (frugal, yes, but not stingy). If you are planning on bringing tents, costs will be very low. You can camp pretty well anywhere without issue - however, some of my friends who camp on the Lycian Way have told me that they suggest stopping at the mosque in villages and asking permission to camp somewhere around the village (simply as a courtesy - the answer is apparently always 'yes'). My friends have commented that dogs are the biggest problem when camping near villages (dogs in general can be a minor nuisance throughout the Lycian Way).

I have several friends who live along the Lycian way (in Fethiye and Kas) -- if you need to know anything specific about current conditions let me know and I'll see if I can get answers for you.
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#15
Hi stratophile

Many thanks again!

The daily budget numbers agree with what I kind of determined from other accounts. And the time seems to agree with what I had thought too.

So overall looks good. Might end up doing the same as you and taking some extra time to visit other places in Turkey, after the walk

I guess it is time to order the guidebook.

Cheers
 
#16
My turn to ask questions and get some feedback...

I am giving some serious thought to walking the Lycian Way in Turkey - mid April to Mid May 2014.

I have reviewed a number of websites on the route and I know Kate Clow is probably the best expert on the route itself.

Has anybody in the last 1-2 years walked the route and if so can they offer some current information about the route, accommodation, etc?

I understand the network of places to stay is now well established that it is not necessary to carry a tent?

Is there a pack service in place?

Thanks
The Lycian Way is a wonderful adventure & you're not going to just want to walk there! I only did parts of the walk following Kate Clows book & maps( there is also an accommodation supplement) & The Lonely Planet enriched the rest of my journey. Staying at Montenegro in Faralya was memorable and Bayram who runs the place has done the Lycian way. He is well informed & transports people & or their luggage. At Sidyma I stayed with a rural family, Carmine. In Kas Dennis & his family were wonderful......www.santosapansion.com.They are all keen to assist with any arrangements and there are many places to stay except for a three day stretch as mentioned.
Then there's also Cappadocia's stunning valleys to walk in.
Unlike the Caminos you'll need to carry water. I trust you'll have a wonderful, stunning walk & adventure!
P.S. appreciate your posts!
 
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Camino Yogini

Camino Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring 2012); Norte Costa (Fall 2013); Del Ebro/Francés (Fall 2014); European Peace Walk (Spring 2016)
#17
Jirit, did you and your wife eventually do the Lycian Way this past spring? One of my peregrina angels and I are thinking of doing it this fall. But several people (who haven't done it) expressed reservations about two women walking alone in a Muslim country, especially in the rural areas. Both of us have walked Caminos alone in Spain so are not concerned about solitary walking per se. My personal experience has been people in the countryside are more likely to look out for you than in the anonymous cities but I may be naive about that.

I was also going to ask for info about the St Francis of Assisi pilgrimage route as an alternative but a quick search pointed out several resources so I'll check them first. I love this forum!
 

jirit

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007,
Via Francigena Italy, 2008,
Jakobsweg Austria 2010,
Camino Frances 2011,
Le Puy to Lourdes 2012,
Via de la Plata 2013,
Future:
Ökumenischer (Via Regia), Germany,
Lycian Way, Turkey
#18
Hi Camino Yogini

No we have not found the time to walk the Lycian Way, so I can not offer much in terms by way of personal experience, of whether is safe for two women to walk alone. However based on what I have read and given that the person who has been responsible for the development of this trail is a woman from the UK, I think it should not be an issue. I know of a number of women that have travelled by themselves through Turkey without issue.

With respect to the St Francis of Assisi paths in Italy, I suggest you check out our blog. Some time ago I posted a series of entries on the different networks of paths that make up the St. Francis of Assisi way.

http://littlegreentracs.typepad.com/my_weblog/2011/03/the-cammno-di-san-francesco-in-umbria.html
 
#20
amorfati1 - the link you posted is for Kate Clow, the creator of the Lycian Way trail. That is her company's site. Kate has done an amazing job with the trail - she also has a great reputation for helping people with their treks.

Camino Yogini - Regarding two women walking alone: I've spent a lot of time in recent years on the Lycian Way. In terms of safety, my personal experiences on the trail are probably not helpful (I'm a 6'4", 260 lb guy), however, as part of a project I'm working on relating to the Lycian Way, I've talked with many women who have walked all or parts of the trail alone and they have indicated minimal issues and no actual threats to their safety. Keep in mind, though, that we are talking a small sample of walkers!

Of note, though, was a point raised more than once: If a threatening situation *did* occur, many parts of the Lycian Way are in extremely remote areas where there are not many people to give you assistance. You could find yourself very isolated for very long stretches. That said, the women I spoke with felt more at risk (certainly more 'hassled' if not actually threatened) in the urban areas than they did in rural areas, though even there the problems were described as less than typically encountered in western cities. One person (who I did not personally talk to, but I read on her blog) described a creepy incident where she accepted a ride up the base of a mountain with the owner of the pension she was staying in - she described becoming extremely uncomfortable over the course of the ride and it left her a bit shaken, even though nothing actually 'happened' other than comments and looks that made her realize how vulnerable she was. That was one of the few 'negative' experiences I was told or read about.

The most common feedback I received was that dressing conservatively but carrying yourself with an air of confidence seemed to cause the least hassles. In your case, you'd be walking with another woman which should significantly reduce problems / risks.

jirit - if you are still thinking about going to do the Lycian Way, let me know. I've been back multiple times since you and I last chatted back in 2012. I've also been actively compiling a massive amount of research data on the trail (accommodation, route directions, etc.) and I've been creating GPS tracks of the whole thing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Via de la Plata (2010, 2011) Camino Madrid (2013) Camino Mozarabe (March, April 2015) Camino Madrid (October 2015) Camino Mozarabe de Almeria a Granada (March 2017)
#21
But several people (who haven't done it) expressed reservations about two women walking alone in a Muslim country, especially in the rural areas. Both of us have walked Caminos alone in Spain so are not concerned about solitary walking per se. My personal experience has been people in the countryside are more likely to look out for you than in the anonymous cities but I may be naive about that.
I walked the Lycian Way in September 2011 from Oludeniz to Kas - I started out alone, but ended up walking with 2 other people for much of the journey. In one of the smaller towns I stayed in the home of the muhtar (the head man of the village) and paid them about 30 Lira for bed, dinner and breakfast. They didn't ask for money but I offered and they said pay what you think is right. I had similar experiences to Stratophile all the way. I walked much of the way with a Turkish person, Murat, who gave me a great insight into what was going on locally. Turkey is a fascinating place with a lot of layers. I found it to be very safe. The way marking was good - although it helped that there was an ultra marathon on the route at the same time.
I have some blog posts here:http://mariannecamino.blogspot.com.au/2011/09/lycian-way-day-1-fethiye.html
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#22
Some extended family members have just moved to Istanbul for a two-year term and so my mind immediately went to "walking in Turkey".
Lycian Way looks interesting but I like the look of the Saint Paul Trail even more.
Do any of you have any further information about this particularly regarding accommodation. As I understand it, you can stop in villages for the whole route except three days in the mountains when you would need a tent.
If we were to take a tent, then we'd probably want to use it more than three nights - so is it rude to ask to pitch it in or near a village?
Marianne I read your blog posts - it seems it was pretty tricky to find the trail. Do you know if this has changed? Would the Kate Clow guide be sufficient or do you really need to take maps and compass too?
 
#23
The Saint Paul trail is very beautiful and pleasingly rugged. However, personally I enjoyed the Lycian Way much more. There are accommodation options in most villages along the way on the Saint Paul, though if I recall correctly there is more than just one stretch where camping is required. That said, I was camping all the way on that trip so I wasn't really looking specifically at what was available in the villages. My experience with Turkey, though, is that if there is a village you can almost always find a place to stay - talk to the village headman or go to the mosque and even if you don't speak any Turkish at all, something will usually be arranged for you.

Pitching a tent is almost always acceptable. My approach, and what my Turkish friends have recommended, is if you want to camp in or near a village is to ask permission of the headman or at the mosque. Alternatively, just pitch your tent a slight ways from the village itself. Once in a while someone will come and ask you to move -- usually because you've pitched your tent on their livestock grazing route. Normally, there is no issue at all.

For either the Saint Paul or Lycian Way trails, I highly recommend you take a GPS device with you (or simply your smartphone). The waymarkings overall are quite good -- especially for a new trail in a country that has no history of trekking. However, waymarkings get bulldozed or otherwise lost on a regular basis and some of the 'open' stretches can be very confusing -- crossing large fields, flatlands, or broad valleys tend to be the worst because you can lose sight of the waymarkings and then easily wander onto incorrect goat trails. Mountains are actually much easier. If you have a GPS and a good reference track, you can tell at a glance which way you should be going and can generally figure things out even if waymarkings are completely gone.

I have detailed GPS tracks (for the Lycian Way) that I've created if you need them. They also include locations of a good collection of shelters and services, major waypoints on the trail, some side trips, and so on. (Basically the same as I've done for the Camino - see my link below).
 

Camino Yogini

Camino Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (Spring 2012); Norte Costa (Fall 2013); Del Ebro/Francés (Fall 2014); European Peace Walk (Spring 2016)
#24
Hi all,
Thanks very much for your advice, especially to Stratophile for your very detailed information and jirit for your links. We ended up deciding against doing the Lycian Way. It was just a little too much like camping for us -- the need to bring a small camp stove, and iodine tablets, and the stuff about snakes and scorpions, never mind all that stuff about camping! All of a sudden, it looked like we would need very different gear. We prefer our albergues and peregrino meals!

So we're going to meet up and walk part of the Camino Frances together. I've walked the whole way from SJPP but my peregrina friend first started in O'Cebreiro, then did the section from Leon (beginning in Madrid) so we will walk Burgos to Leon together. We know our limits!

Thanks again!
 
Camino(s) past & future
2013 (Pamplona to Burgos)
2014 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
2015 (Villafranca to Santiago)
2016 (Le Puy to Conques; SJPP To Pamplona)
#25
Kay Smith wrote a very entertaining and detailed blog about her Lycian Way trek in April/May 2014. She found Kate Clow's guide confusing in parts and several times got lost. There is nothing like Brierley's book, and accommodation and food were sometimes hard to find. See:
www.plodslycianlog.blogspot.com
 
#26
Hi Camino Yogini - you don't need to camp on the Lycian Way. Almost the entire trail can be done without camping. The exception is the 3-day section from the ruins of Myra to the town of Finike. That is 38km over the mountains. However, you can just take a dolmuş (mini-bus) to bypass that section. On my first walk on the Lycian Way I did not camp at all and had no issues.

That said, the Lycian Way is a very different hike / experience from the Camino. I love both, but the Camino has significant infrastructure, is very well waymarked, and the trail surface is easy. It is also a more 'social' hike (since there are always crowds of people around!). The Lycian Way is a new route, the trail is rugged, there is much, much more ascending and descending, and waymarks are not always great - however, the historic sites, extreme friendliness of the people, and the frequently jaw-dropping scenery make up for any limitations.

I've done long-distance trails all over the world and both the Camino and the Lycian Way are among my favorites. Which one you do really depends on the specific experience you are looking for. If the infrastructure (albergues, pilgrim meals, etc.) is your main priority right now then re-doing the Camino Frances sounds like the best option for you.
 

easyhiker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan 2016-17
#27
Hi Stratophile, I found this forum and saw your posting about Lycian Way. It is amazing that you did the whole way except the mountainous stretch without the commercial support. My friend and I are planning to hike/walk part of it with tour operator providing hut-to-hut baggage service. There are two options, one is on the east, the other is along the coast on the west. I am wondering how do you rate them? If you are going to hike only one, which one do you like? We both of seasoned hikers and live in Vancouver, BC. We love mountains! Thank you.
 
#28
Hi Easyhiker - I've done many hikes in BC (I'm from Toronto but lived in Vancouver for a while about 25 years ago). There are so many great trails in the area!

Both ends of the Lycian Way have much to offer. If you particularly like mountains, though, the east end would probably appeal to you most. It's more rugged and 'wild' in my opinion. However, if mixing history with ruggedness appeals to you more, the west end has much more to offer in terms of ruins while still being plenty rugged (just not *as* rugged). Both sections have very friendly mountain villages, beautiful scenery, etc. Personally, if I had to choose only one end I would pick the western end mainly because I like the mix of ruins, changing terrain, different types of communities, available infrastructure, and so on. Fethiye to Kaş is incredibly nice. Elsewhere on the trail, highlights for me include Karaöz to Adrasan (ie Gelidonya peninsula - very beautiful!) and then onwards through the Olympos ruins / Çıralı / Chimaera (burning rocks), and, near the end, Yayla Kuzdere to Göynük Canyon.

Note - commercial support isn't specifically *needed* along the Lycian Way. There is nothing overly difficult about the trail for anyone of moderate fitness and with even modest hiking experience. These days almost every village has accommodation options, making it logistically easy to do except for the one 3-day stretch (which can be by-passed if you aren't camping). Waymarkings are often iffy, so a GPS track is recommended. Using a tour operator eliminates the need to carry a full pack (though you should carry a day pack with emergency supplies anyway of course) and reduces the logistical considerations associated with the language barrier if you are not comfortable communicating through smiles, gestures, and phrasebook-ese.

Let me know if you have any specific questions about the trail. I've created GPS tracks for the entire trail, including optional / alternative portions, and have details on accommodations, etc. Am happy to send along whatever would be of help.

When are you planning to depart?
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#29
Hi Stratophile, would you consider uploading these GPS tracks to the Resources section.
 
#30
Hi Wayfarer - I can, but aren't all the resources in this forum specific to the Camino??? (though I also have detailed GPS tracks for the Camino that I can upload if there is interest)
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#31
Hi Wayfarer - I can, but aren't all the resources in this forum specific to the Camino??? (though I also have detailed GPS tracks for the Camino that I can upload if there is interest)
So far I suppose they are but then again we discuss other walks like the Lycian Way and walks in Ireland and other places so I don't see a problem from a forum point of view. I have seen the Camino tracks on your website and they are excellent as is you detailed guide. I am looking forward to your Android app coming online.
Pat
 
#32
I'm happy to upload them then. Give me a couple of days to organize two archives, one each for the Camino and Lycian Way. As you've seen for my Camino GPS tracks, I tend to break them up into fairly small GPS files (typically covering only a few kilometers each) to allow people to 'assemble' them into whatever route is most suitable for them. I also have 'community' GPS tracks each of which contain the locations (albergues, attractions, restaurants, etc.) within a specific community. I'll add everything to a single archive for each trail.

Regarding the Android version of my app, that is still probably three months away (though I am starting to feel like a broken record telling people that!)

FYI, I'm also working on creating a similar set of resources for Le Puy (I have several people helping me with the research). Hopefully that will be ready soon.
 

easyhiker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan 2016-17
#33
Hi Stratophile, thanks for your insight. We are going in May for 3 weeks. With your input and the other research that I have done, we decided to do the west coast with the tour operator (with a group of 4 other friends). But, we will do a separate DIY hiking on the east. Our plan will base out from Cirali and do three or four hikes. 1) Ulupmar up to the Chimera and see eternal flames. 2) Cirali-Chimaera--Ulupinar-Cirali to see waterfalls and 3) Cirali-Olympos-Adrasan-Cirali: climb up the Mount Musa. 4) Cirali-Maden Beach-Cirali-Tekirova 5) Highland of Beycik-Peak of Mount Tahtali 6) Cirali-Olympos-Adrasan-Cirali
Do you think these are doable on our own? I believe they are all day hikes from Cirali. Again, how do you rate them?
Do you have any recommendation for accommodations in Cirali?
Cheers... Easyhiker
 
#34
Hi Easyhiker,

May is a good time to go -- it will only just be starting to get really hot around when you leave. All of the hikes you listed are easy to do on your own other than possibly the ascent to the peak of Tahtalı Dağı.

Çıralı is a very nice place. Note, if I recall correctly there is no ATM there so make sure you bring sufficient cash. There is a car rental place, though, so keep that in mind if you want to drive to some nearby attractions.

For the day walks from Çıralı, my recommendations / rankings would be as follows:

1. Olympos Ruins
Depending on how long you are planning on staying in Çıralı, consider doing Olympos as a non-hiking day of its own. It is only a short walk from Çıralı. The ruins are extensive, plus you can explore the river it is on and the nice beach. You can explore without being rushed that way. Alternatively, you can do a shorter visit as part of a hike to Adrasan. Many people rave about the ruins at Olympos. I quite enjoyed them, but they weren't actually high on my list compared to other locations along the Lycian Way. Still, if you are a history buff or just like ruins, a non-hiking visit is worth considering.

2. Chimaera / Ulupınar
Chimaera is a given if you are in Çıralı. However, you don't need to do it on its own. Simply visit it as you continue on to Ulupınar. Bring marshmallows.

You'll also pass the 'upper flames' near the high point of the climb. They are not as impressive but you'll likely be the only people there, which is nice. There are some beautiful streams / pools along the climb and at Ulupınar. Ulupınar has some really nice restaurants that specialize in fish (caught from the streams). Great place to relax after the climb. Note: rather than climbing up and then back down, one option to consider is to have your pension owner arrange a ride up to Ulupınar and then just walk down (though personally I actually prefer to climb than to descend, foolish person that I am).

3. Tekirova (and optionally Phaselis)
The coastal route (ie to Tekirova) is under-rated in my opinion. While I prefer the mountain route, I also really enjoyed walking along the coast. It is not a 'beach walk', though there are numerous beaches. It is fairly rugged. Maden Koyu ("Koyu" means cove), where you'll find the beach you mentioned, is gorgeous. Much of the walk is along forest roads which might not appeal to you (though for much of it 'roads' is probably a generous description). Note, you listed the walk as Çıralı-Maden-Çıralı-Tekirova -- I assume you meant Çıralı-Maden-Tekirova-Çıralı. As with the climb to Ulupınar, one option is to get the owner of your pension to arrange a drive for you to Tekirova and then hike back. This is a full-day hike for most people (8 hours or so - one way). However, if you are a fast walker or don't mind a long day, consider starting at Phaselis ruins about an hour past Tekirova and walking back to Çıralı from there. The ruins are quite nice and the walk to Tekirova is an easy one along beaches.

4. Adrasan
The hike between Adrasan and Çıralı is nice. There are some beautiful vistas. The trail itself is good-quality and easy to walk despite the climbing and descending. Despite the fact that you are climbing over Musa Dağı, for me this section has more the feel of a pleasant woodland walk than a 'mountain' hike like you'd experience around Yayla Kuzdere. For the return, consider hitch-hiking through the valley - very easy to catch a lift.

5. Tahtalı Dağı
Visiting the peak of Tahtalı is highly recommended (I don't rank it higher only because of the relative difficulty involved in getting to it). The views are unbelievable. The 'best' way to do this is as part of a hike between Beycik and Yayla Kuzdere. About halfway through the hike there is a turn-off to go to the peak. The hike from the turn-off to the peak is a bit under 3km (plus the same distance back, of course) and about another 500m of ascent. Generally, a morning ascent gives you the best chance of clear weather. Note, though, that hiking to the peak from Beycik without camping along the way makes for a tough day -- only recommended for very experienced / fit hikers. It is easier to do if you camp near the turn-off and make the ascent at the start of your day, then continue on to Yayla Kuzdere (or back to Beycik).

The easier way to visit the peak (and also incredible in a different way) is to take the cable car up from the coast. It is apparently one of the longest cable rides in the world, covering more than 4km. You can arrange shuttle service from most of the communities along the coast (such as Tekirova). There is also a shuttle pick-up spot by the road close to Phaselis. A creative option might be to take the shuttle up to the peak and then walk back down (haven't done this myself yet though). There is a café / restaurant at the peak. For details on the cable car / shuttle (and webcams!), plus the shuttle schedule: http://www.olymposteleferik.com/en/home/

Again, have your pension owner arrange transport to/from Beycik or a shuttle pick-up location (I don't think the shuttle goes to Çıralı).

6. To Base Or Not To Base...
Given the day walks you are interested in doing around Çıralı, you might want to consider not really doing a 'base' at all. Instead, maybe do the following itinerary:
a. Start at Adrasan, overnight there (giving you time to explore the area around Adrasan)
b. Hike to Çıralı (passing Olympos), overnight there
c. Do a day trip to (or from) Ulupınar, overnighting again in Çıralı
d. Hike to Tekirova, overnight there
e. Hike to Phaselis and then catch the shuttle from the nearby stop to the cable car station and go up to the peak of Tahtalı and back down.
f. Continue onwards to your next destination.

This approach would mean you'd need to carry your full backpacks, though if hiking light is a priority I'm sure you'd have no problems getting your pension owners to arrange a 'pack shuttle' service for you to each of your next destinations. The main benefit of this would be eliminating all the back-tracking to Çıralı at the end of each day. The problem is that dolmuş service between these communities isn't as frequent / reliable as it is along the western portion of the Lycian Way. That is the one drawback to using Çıralı as a base. Note - if your plan was to hike the way back too, that would only be an option if you are very fit hikers able to keep up a good pace. Most of these hikes are full-day hikes *one way*. Don't be deceived by the distances - the rugged terrain usually means the pace is fairly slow.

As for pensions in Çıralı, I stayed once at Barış Pansiyon (www.barispension.com) and found them good. I was also happy with Kıyı Pansiyon, run by a very nice family (www.kiyipansiyon.com). There are a lot of pensions available, most of which are family-run, and I've generally had good feedback about people's experiences in Çıralı.

I hope the above helps. Have a great trip!
 

easyhiker

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan 2016-17
#35
Thank you so much Stratophile, this is very helpful for us to plan our itinerary.
You have given us a lot of details from a hiker's point of view.
Much appreciated.... and will let you know once our final plan is done.
Cheers and thanks again!
 
#36
@wayfarer - Sorry for taking so long but I've just posted the KML files for the Lycian Way to the Resources section of the site. I've also posted my Camino KML files as well.

The Lycian Way files are here:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/gps-tracks-lycian-way-in-turkey.285/

The Camino files are here:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/com...cks-camino-francés-extension-to-fisterra.284/

Hopefully these are helpful to others. Feedback and improvements / corrections are always appreciated!
 

wayfarer

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP-Santiago-Finistera-Muxia. April/May 2012
Sarria-Santiago Sept. 2013
SJPP - Almost Orrison April 2014
#37
@wayfarer - Sorry for taking so long but I've just posted the KML files for the Lycian Way to the Resources section of the site. I've also posted my Camino KML files as well.

The Lycian Way files are here:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/gps-tracks-lycian-way-in-turkey.285/

The Camino files are here:

https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/resources/gps-tracks-camino-francés-extension-to-fisterra.284/

Hopefully these are helpful to others. Feedback and improvements / corrections are always appreciated!
Thank you for these. I will have virtual walks for the next while.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#38
I will be doing the Lycian Way hike in late September this year. I am doing a whole bunch of hikes and walks over 6 months and the Lycian Way is the 2nd last one. I will keep this thread in mind if I have more questions, I am awaiting the guidebook right now. I also booked 5 nights at an all-inclusive in Antalya @ the end as a reward. ;)
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#39
I will be doing the Lycian Way hike in late September this year. I am doing a whole bunch of hikes and walks over 6 months and the Lycian Way is the 2nd last one. I will keep this thread in mind if I have more questions, I am awaiting the guidebook right now. I also booked 5 nights at an all-inclusive in Antalya @ the end as a reward. ;)
Looking forward to any update you can provide.
 
#40
[QUOTE="...I also booked 5 nights at an all-inclusive in Antalya @ the end as a reward. ;)[/QUOTE]

Hi, will you share the name of the hotel, please?

Kind regards,

Soren
 
Camino(s) past & future
January-February 2016: Burgos to Santiago de Compastella
#41
I will be doing the Lycian Way hike in late September this year. I am doing a whole bunch of hikes and walks over 6 months and the Lycian Way is the 2nd last one. I will keep this thread in mind if I have more questions, I am awaiting the guidebook right now. I also booked 5 nights at an all-inclusive in Antalya @ the end as a reward. ;)
Hi :) We might meet each other along the route. I arrive in Istanbul on 17 September and will fly to the south to walk the Lycian Way from West to East over the course of about 25 days. I haven't booked my domestic flight yet as my guide book and maps only arrived in the post on Friday. I will be camping in a bivy bag along the way. I'm an Aussie. For one week in the middle I will be walking with my parents. Say g'day if we bump into each other :)
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#42
Awesome!

I will be in Istanbul on 21st Sept 3 nights, Bergama 1 night, Pummakale 6 nights, Fethiye 1 night, start Lycian Way on Oct 1st and left myself 22 days.

I have a black pac with a Camino fforum badge on the back next to a couple others and a Canadian flag and some shells.

Say hi if you see me


Hi :) We might meet each other along the route. I arrive in Istanbul on 17 September and will fly to the south to walk the Lycian Way from West to East over the course of about 25 days. I haven't booked my domestic flight yet as my guide book and maps only arrived in the post on Friday. I will be camping in a bivy bag along the way. I'm an Aussie. For one week in the middle I will be walking with my parents. Say g'day if we bump into each other :)
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
Future (God-willing): Madrid, Salvador, Primitivo (2018)
#43
If you guys could keep an eye on costs for food (and non-bivvy-bagging options), I'd really appreciate the info.
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#44
If you guys could keep an eye on costs for food (and non-bivvy-bagging options), I'd really appreciate the info.
Yep will be there in a couple weeks.
 

Lucy Chen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Lycian Way (2012)
#45
Hey! This is Cultural Routes Society. We were mentioned several times on this forum, mostly through the reference to our founder and creator of the Lycian Way, Kate Clow.
So a short summary about who we are: We were founded in 2012 to establish, develop, and support Turkey's culture routes and so far, our efforts have extended to publishing guidebooks, maps, and mobile applications (this is the app for the Lycian Way). Here is the page for more information about us, as well as relevant links on the left on how one can help us with our mission.
If you want any information or advice about the Lycian Way (or any other cultural hikes in Turkey for that matter), we're always available from our contact page, though if you're ever in Antalya, you can always stop by our office for coffee and a chat. We also hold luggage while you hike and can provide a piece of camping gear or two if you're in need.
It's wonderful to see how popular the Lycian Way has become and we're grateful to the community of trekkers that made it possible. We're looking to do anything to help support the community or provide a better experience for the individual hiker so let us know! And have fun on the trail :)
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#46
Okay so I finished my Lycian Way yesterday and wow it is far far more difficult than the Camino. I did basically all the walk with many of the alternatives that make it tougher (skipped a couple beaches though)... except I learned late the way has been extended another 30 kms north and I did not do that part but did walk Fethiye to Oludeniz as well as Hisarcandir to Antalya (and across Antalya to the resort i am now at).

For those asking pensions were generally between $20-$35/night (with breakfast). I camped 5 nights out of 19 I walked.

There are lots and lots and lots of Germans... if you can speak another language besides Turkish you could do very well with German. Few people running pensions in small towns spoke English but most spoke German.
 
#47
Okay so I finished my Lycian Way yesterday....
Many congratulations to you! I am planning to walk at least half the LW next spring so please allow me a couple of questions.

Did you really do the whole route as described in 19 days? That seems really fast to me. Have you calculated your average daily distance walked? Did you have any rest days and if so, are they included in the 19 days?

Soren from Denmark
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#48
Many congratulations to you! I am planning to walk at least half the LW next spring so please allow me a couple of questions.

Did you really do the whole route as described in 19 days? That seems really fast to me. Have you calculated your average daily distance walked? Did you have any rest days and if so, are they included in the 19 days?

Soren from Denmark
Yes I did do it fairly quick but I have been on long walks since May. I had a lot of foot soreness near the end and a couple of bad cramp days at the beginning but nothing serious. Also it is very very very hot... very hot... even in October (at least for me). Here is my schedule that I did from my journal (I plan on writing a book later):

Day 1: Fethiye to Oludeniz 25kms
Day 2: Oludeniz to Alinca 29 kms
Day 3: Alinca to Gavuragili 27 kms
Day 4: Gavuragili to Gelemis (and Petara): 32 kms
Day 5: Gelemis to Campsite (jast past Kalkan about 10 kms) 41 kms
Day 6: Campsite to Pinarbasi 31 kms
Day 7: Pinarbasi to Kas 13 kms
Day 8: Day off in Kas
Day 9: Kas to Aperlai 30 kms
Day 10: Aperlai to Demre 33 kms
Day 11: Demre up into mountains past ruins up up up to about 1600 ms to camp 25kms
Day 12: Camping to Finike 31 kms (I stayed in a hotel about 3 kms east out of Finike to cut down the next day)
Day 13: Finike to Karaoz 30 kms
Day 14: Karaoz to Adrasan 25 kms
Day 15: Adrasan to Cirali 21 kms
Day 16: Day off in Cirali
Day 17: Cirali to Beycik 21 kms
Day 18: Beycik to Gedelme (+ side option up Olympus another 500 meters) 31 kms
Day 19: Gedelme to Goyuck (via gorge) 29 kms
Day 20: Goynuk to Hisarcandir to Antalya (outakirts) 48 kms
Day 21: Antalya to far side Lara (where I am staying) 30 kms
 
Last edited:
#49
Yes I did do it fairly quick but I have been on long walks since May. I had a lot of foot soreness near the end and a couple of bad cramp days at the beginning but nothing serious. Also it is very very very hot... very hot... even in October (at least for me). Here is my schedule that I did from my journal (I plan on writing a book later):
Thank a lot for the detailed information. Man, you really ARE fast especially considering that the terrain is quite challenging in Places, or at least that is what I have understood from other posts. One person mentioned that the LW is much tougher than, say, the Camino Frances.

Soren
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#50
Thank a lot for the detailed information. Man, you really ARE fast especially considering that the terrain is quite challenging in Places, or at least that is what I have understood from other posts. One person mentioned that the LW is much tougher than, say, the Camino Frances.

Soren
Yes the Lycian way is much much much tougher than the Camino Frances... but it is also 300 kms shorter.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CP
#51
Okay so I finished my Lycian Way yesterday and wow it is far far more difficult than the Camino. I did basically all the walk with many of the alternatives that make it tougher (skipped a couple beaches though)... except I learned late the way has been extended another 30 kms north and I did not do that part but did walk Fethiye to Oludeniz as well as Hisarcandir to Antalya (and across Antalya to the resort i am now at).

For those asking pensions were generally between $20-$35/night (with breakfast). I camped 5 nights out of 19 I walked.

There are lots and lots and lots of Germans... if you can speak another language besides Turkish you could do very well with German. Few people running pensions in small towns spoke English but most spoke German.
Hi Rometimed
Did u take a tent with u or did u just sleep on a mat?
Cheers
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#52

ogresmash

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances (September 2016)
#53
Hi there!

I am planning to follow-up my first Camino by walking the Lycian Way in late October to November this year. I'm planning on bringing a hammock system to camp out of with me on the trip and wanted to ask anyone that's done the Lycian Way whether there are many trees along that part of Turkey? I suppose if there aren't then I would need to plan on a tent.
 
#54
Hi Ogresmash,

In some areas there are plenty of trees. However, along many long stretches of the trail you will struggle to find good locations.

Just a suggestion, if using a hammock system is something you would have been OK with, perhaps consider just taking a bivouac and a tarp (you then use one of your hiking poles to create a shelter with a lightweight tarp).

Either way, have a good hike -- the Lycian Way is very quiet this year, so don't be surprised if you see hardly anyone on the trail (tourism is down massively).
 

ogresmash

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Frances (September 2016)
#55
Hi Ogresmash,

In some areas there are plenty of trees. However, along many long stretches of the trail you will struggle to find good locations.

Just a suggestion, if using a hammock system is something you would have been OK with, perhaps consider just taking a bivouac and a tarp (you then use one of your hiking poles to create a shelter with a lightweight tarp).

Either way, have a good hike -- the Lycian Way is very quiet this year, so don't be surprised if you see hardly anyone on the trail (tourism is down massively).
Hey thanks for the advice and for all the information you've shared in this thread. I may just end doing as you suggest then.

Do you know what's driven down the tourism this year? Are there any security concerns that have come up or is it something else?
 
#56
I would assume it is due to the political instability. While everything seems to be quiet and stable in that region, Istanbul has been having big issues. My contacts in Cappadocia tell me that region has also been quiet all season. :-(
 
#57
Do you know what's driven down the tourism this year? Are there any security concerns that have come up or is it something else?
I returned three weeks ago from hiking the Demre-Güynük part of the Lycian Way. It was great! I did not find the trail all that quiet but I may not have a good reference point. I met people on the trail every day and some days I met hiking parties from 10 to 50 persons, especially on the stretch between Karaöz and Tekirova.

Regarding your plan to use a hammock.....I experienced rain regularly while on the trail. Luckily only one time with heavy rain but I would expect the time you plan to hike to be potentially wet at times.

Soren
 
#58
Hi Soren,

A group of 50 people would definitely not be considered 'quiet' on the Lycian Way! I don't think I've ever seen a group that large, other than right around the tourist resorts. :)

A lot of pension operators tell me they are really struggling this year. From what I am told, tourism by Turks (i.e. in-country tourism) is only down modestly but foreigner tourism is just a small fraction of what it was 2+ years ago. Published stats (such as # of airport arrivals) show this as well. It's a shame because it is a beautiful region with very friendly people (especially in the small villages).

I was contacted last week by an American couple that were walking the St. Paul Trail and had decided to switch to the Lycian Way because they were finding so many of the pensions had simply shut down due to lack of business this year. I had a few other people report the same in May. The Lycian Way region has many tourist destinations along the coast so pension operators aren't as dependent on thru-hikers, but it is still taking its toll there too. Ditto for Cappadocia. Those are the three regions that I track, so I can't speak to what is happening elsewhere in Turkey but I assume the same trends apply.

Hopefully the political situation stabilizes soon.

When you started at Demre, did you do the three-day mountain stretch or did you follow the coastal road to Finike? If you did the mountain stretch, what were the conditions like?

Cheers,

Stratophile.
 
#59
Hi Stratophile

What you write makes perfect sense.

The larger groups I met were turks. Two groups were doing 2-day hikes around the peninsula with the light tower. I stayed in Adrasan with one of the groups and most of them seemed to be from Istanbul. I did not expect to meet many Turks on the Lycian Way but all in all Turks were the most frequently nationality I met. Surprisingly the second most frequent nationality was Ukrainians. I talked to one Ukrainian couple who told me that traditionally the go to Krim on hiking holiday but Krim is not safe anymore, sadly. And so they go to Turkey. Funnily they all seemed to use the same paper based map with a version of the route which was not aligned with the 2014 edition of the book.

I started out on the Demre to Finike hike over the mountains but on the first night, which I spent at Alikalise, it rained from 1 AM onwards and also when I woke up in the morning. As I was hiking alone (or rather me and my GPS :) ), I had to decide whether it was safe for me to continue on day two alone in the rain and cool weather over the mountain. I was sad but I let my cautious self win and so I packed up in the rain and hiked back to Demre. Then I made a really good decision because I took the bus to Finike, stayed there for one night (cozy town IMO) and hiked from Finike up to Belos, with its absolutely astounding view from the ligthtower in the East to ......I dont know where but very far along the trail towards the West. I pitched my tent and stayed at Belos overnight and hiked back to Finike in the morning. The sunset from the Belos outlook post was amazing.

I really hope that tourists realize that Southwest Turkey is very, very peaceful and there is absolutely no reason to not go to that area. My colleagues here in Copenhagen asked me, "Did you meet many refugees?". It just goes to show how wrong an impression most people have. And even if I did, which is highly unlikely, so what?

Soren
 

rometimed

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP: May/June 2015; English Route Nov 2015; Lycian Way Oct 2015; Coast to Coast Aug/Sep 2015; West Highland Way July 2015; Hadrians Wall June 2015; Westweg Jul/Aug 2015..... ..... .... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2020; A Coruna 2020... ... .. . SJPdP May/June 2025... .. . SJPdP May/June 2030... .. . SJPdP May/June 2035... .. .
#60
Hopefully it starts picking back up.

I'm not surprised the busiest section you saw was from Karaöz to Tekirova Soren, that was my experience too though I must say I am a little surprised by you having busy days out of Demre because I saw no one AT ALL from just outside Demre until I got to a town just up behind Finike and certainly didn't see any hikers up there.

I agree with groups though by Karaoz as going up to the lighthouse I ran into a tour group of about 2 dozen old Germans which surprised me as I hadn't see anything like that up until then on the trails.

I am working on my book now about my walks in 2015.

I am also reading a book written by a women who is also from here in BC, Canada about her walk on the Lycian way solo in 2014.
https://www.amazon.ca/Breaking-Fourth-Wall-Uncertain-Journey/dp/0988117533
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean 2017.
#61
bucket list it is. Once the government is changed, and freedom of press is restored.

(I will not get political on Ivar´s board.)
Hola Rebekah - the Lycian Way is one of the three treks on my bucket list - and the planning starts as soon as I get home from Camino Frances (in mid-June). The Pilgrim Trek in Japan and the Inca Trail are the others. Would love to discuss over a cup of coffee - see you at Peaceable Kingdom next May (if you are home). Cheers
 

Barbara06

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy - Pamplona (2011-14)
VDLP (2015)
Portuguese (2015)
Francigena (2016)
Primitivo (2017)
#62
Hello Stratophile,
Thanks so much with all your information and GPS tracks, etc..
Do you know what the weather is like on the Lycian way in winter (December, January or February) ?
I would like to walk it this winter (but not camp only in pensions)

Also a question to all those who have walked on this way (Stratophile, Rometimed, Soren,..) : did you have any problems with dogs ?

Thanks so much

Barbara
 
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2017
#63
Hi all, I'm planning to walk the Lycian Way coming up here in October 2018. I'm not going to carry any camping gear but I was wondering if I need a sleeping bag since I'll be using pensions, guest houses, or wherever a villager offers me to sleep ??? I walked the Camino last year so I know how that works, but this seems likely that sheets/blankets would be provided. Does anyone know the answer to this? I would love to leave that bulky sleeping bag at home! Thanks
 
#64
Hi Jeff - In general you won't need to worry about sheets / blankets along the Lycian Way. Most guest houses will have plenty of linen for you. I like to carry a thin liner but that is only because I sometimes opt to bivouac; you should be fine without a sleeping bag (or liner).

Note, if in doubt, it is common in Turkey to ask to see a room before you book. Use gestures to convey that you would like more linen – they'll catch on quick and are usually very accommodating.

The exception can be with cabins. Even there, you'll usually have lots of linen but I suggest checking in that case.

One caution – by late October some guesthouses and small hotels will start to shut down for the off-season. You'll normally have no problem finding accommodation (and usually at very good rates) but be cautious in regions with limited options, especially in remote hamlets in the mountains.

Have a great hike. Drop by and let us know how it goes.
 
#66
Hi @vlogan - it can be walked at any time of year but during summer it gets very hot, especially at lower elevations. The Lycian Way is much, much more strenuous than the Camino which makes very hot weather that much more challenging. Definitely do-able – I was emailing back-and-forth with lots of hikers throughout this past summer. However, I don't think there was a single one of them who wasn't bemoaning the heat!

Some tips: try to hike early in the morning (adding days to your hike if necessary to allow for shorter hiking times), minimize your load (a challenge, because you'll be carrying a lot of extra water), and perhaps skip some of the coastal sections to focus on higher elevations.

Good luck with your planning.
 

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