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Not the Seriously Bitten Thread !!!

Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#2
Some members from the " NOT a serious thread " want to begin a thread where you can post about the stories of Not being bitten. View attachment 47363

Enjoy my friends.
Peter, such a great invitation! After a few seconds of deep thought (!) I will share about my first ever ‘albergue’. My friend’s father drove us both to Roncesvalles for a 07.00 departure. He picked us up in Larrasoana and back we went to his home where we had the best hospitalero in the world! Next day he drove us back to end point of first day, and he picked us up in Cizur Menor, and same albergue conditions were repeated. On the third day, once more we were dropped off at starting point and picked up in Puente La Reina. That was our last night in the best albergue in the world.. next morning we set off without a backward glance... we had carried our full packs each day and we had met the same people, getting to know them and beginning our interaction with some with whom we walked every day till Santiago and Finisterre. It was a very gentle introduction to the Camino, and we peeked in at the albergues in Larrasoana and Cizur Menor and Puente La Reina so we knew something of what awaited us. After that, we were lucky to always find a bed in the municipal or parochial albergues, and never a bedbug. Thanks again, it has been a nice walk back in time...oh, I forgot: on the day we should have stayed in Portomarin, there were no beds anywhere so we had to go on an extra 13km and found a private albergue, where we met up with a bunch of folks we had been having a great time with along the way...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#3
FIve caminos and nary a bite.
It's not a very entertaining story, I'm afraid. There's not even a story to tell, actually.

On the other hand, ask me about mud and cold and rain and wind, and finding a famous Hollywood cemetery in the middle of nowhere because I got epic-ly lost? These are much better stories...

[Edit...I have been bitten by BBs and do react...lest someone jump in to suggest that my not-story is the result of being unaware of having been bitten...]
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#5
The mud, wind, and rain are pretty universal.
But the getting lost...

So there I was, early one morning, on the tail end of the Lana, blissfully taking off up the hill out of Santo Domingo de Silos after following a waymarked sign at the top of the village. I had a GPS on the phone backed up by screenshots of someone's wikiloc track - but hadn't tested the GPS in Spain and wasn't even looking at the screenshots. The sign had pointed to Covarrubias, after all, and that was the next town - so why bother? Never mind that the distance seemed suspiciously long. I figured that was just a wild mis-measurement.
(So many assumptions...what could possibly go wrong?...)
After a while, when it seemed like the path was going in totally the wrong direction, I found out that the GPS didn't work without an internet connection. Oh, well. The screenshots were OK, though, so I merrily followed them, 'bending the map' to agree with what I told myself I was seeing.

More than an hour later after a very nice wrong turn that led to a dead-end viewpoint, and convincing myself I was someplace else altogether, I came down a hill to a sign that said 'Sad Hill Cemetery'...which was a complete surprise. Sad Hill Cemetery?! Like...The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly Sad Hill Cemetery??
Well. How bizarre.
It was completely surreal. And it was so strange that no-one had mentioned this - but how in the world could they have missed it? I told myself a story that they were intentionally not saying anything for the surprise effect. Which it was, of course. I didn't linger, though - I had set out early without breakfast, and was eager to get to Covarrubias for something to eat.

So it was even more of a surprise when I came to the nearest hamlet to find that I wasn't at all where I thought I should be. It wasn't the cute tourist town full of restaurants and places to eat that I expected to find. There were several houses but no bar no nothing...which was 'interesting.' There were some people cleaning up after a fiesta from the night before who kindly told me where I wasn't. And Covarrubias was many kms away.

Well, no breakfast for me. (Nor lunch, either but that's another story.)
But I saw Sad Hill Cemetery!
And the view getting there was stunning.

So if you're on the Frances and go to Santo Domingo de Silos, and decide to walk back to Burgos...
First eat breakfast.
And pack a lunch, because there's no-where to eat. But the 'wrong way' to Covarrubias on the GR 82 is stunning. And you get the Spaghetti Western attraction thrown in for free.

And please tell the good folks in Contreras that the peregrina did get safely to her destination. They were concerned, the elderly ladies and clucking over me like mother hens.
It was the best day ever.

View media item 4869
 
Camino(s) past & future
2012 SJPP-Burgos, 2014 Burgos-Leon, 2018 Leon-Santiago
#9
That happened to me too, the day the guy from Peru, who was walking with leg braces beat me to the last albergue in the rain. It was dank and steamy, and the peregrinos from Peru were sitting around a chair in the cramped room with bread and sausages and a single dim bulb above the chair on which the sausage was sliced and the bread distributed. I went out to the bar next door through the freezing fronton, got something to eat and a beer and watched soccer, and with my last cash I paid for another beer, nursed it until the match was done went back to the omnipresent top-bunk fug of sausage and wet pilgrims. I awoke next day covered with no bites, and walked 12km in the rain to a breakfast of white asparagus, a croissant and orange juice, after visiting the ATM next door. I brought my self unbitten to a place to stay and I remain unbitten before and since.

Stay bug free my friends.
All the best,
Paul
 

FLEUR

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
#10
Every year since 2012 I've walked various stages of the Camino Frances, Voie de Tours and recently the Camino del Baztan. I stayed in a variety of auberges / albergues , both municipal and private and small hotels. I've thankfully never met any bed bugs and not been bitten by them. Maybe they're not partial to my particular flavour.
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#12
The mud, wind, and rain are pretty universal.
But the getting lost...

So there I was, early one morning, on the tail end of the Lana, blissfully taking off up the hill out of Santo Domingo de Silos after following a waymarked sign at the top of the village. I had a GPS on the phone backed up by screenshots of someone's wikiloc track - but hadn't tested the GPS in Spain and wasn't even looking at the screenshots. The sign had pointed to Covarrubias, after all, and that was the next town - so why bother? Never mind that the distance seemed suspiciously long. I figured that was just a wild mis-measurement.
(So many assumptions...what could possibly go wrong?...)
After a while, when it seemed like the path was going in totally the wrong direction, I found out that the GPS didn't work without an internet connection. Oh, well. The screenshots were OK, though, so I merrily followed them, 'bending the map' to agree with what I told myself I was seeing.

More than an hour later after a very nice wrong turn that led to a dead-end viewpoint, and convincing myself I was someplace else altogether, I came down a hill to a sign that said 'Sad Hill Cemetery'...which was a complete surprise. Sad Hill Cemetery?! Like...The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly Sad Hill Cemetery??
Well. How bizarre.
It was completely surreal. And it was so strange that no-one had mentioned this - but how in the world could they have missed it? I told myself a story that they were intentionally not saying anything for the surprise effect. Which it was, of course. I didn't linger, though - I had set out early without breakfast, and was eager to get to Covarrubias for something to eat.

So it was even more of a surprise when I came to the nearest hamlet to find that I wasn't at all where I thought I should be. It wasn't the cute tourist town full of restaurants and places to eat that I expected to find. There were several houses but no bar no nothing...which was 'interesting.' There were some people cleaning up after a fiesta from the night before who kindly told me where I wasn't. And Covarrubias was many kms away.

Well, no breakfast for me. (Nor lunch, either but that's another story.)
But I saw Sad Hill Cemetery!
And the view getting there was stunning.

So if you're on the Frances and go to Santo Domingo de Silos, and decide to walk back to Burgos...
First eat breakfast.
And pack a lunch, because there's no-where to eat. But the 'wrong way' to Covarrubias on the GR 82 is stunning. And you get the Spaghetti Western attraction thrown in for free.

And please tell the good folks in Contreras that the peregrina did get safely to her destination. They were concerned, the elderly ladies and clucking over me like mother hens.
It was the best day ever.

View media item 4869
@VNwalking
I think that you had this interesting adventure before I posted an article on the forum in August, 2016 called "Mind the Trap: Five Ways our Instinct can Fail Us." I remember your being interested in how people can persuade themselves (ourselves) that we are where we intend to be , regardless of any information which the environment can give us. I do not trust myself in this, since I had one experience of believing that I knew where I was in Banff Park and ignoring all evidence to the contrary. Since then, I have tried to make it a practice to reread this article before heading into the back country, but I have become careless about this recently. Your post has reminded me to be consistent, when walking alone, in evaluating the evidence rather than thinking that I am where I want to be. This can result in an interesting adventure, if all goes well, but disaster if it does not. Buen camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2018
#14
Some members from the " NOT a serious thread " want to begin a thread where you can post about the stories of Not being bitten. View attachment 47363

Enjoy my friends.
I've not been bitten on 99% of my camino nights...but then there's that 1% night...which I won't talk about because then I couldn't post on the "Not the Seriously Bitten" thread :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
So far...
2012 ~ 2018
#15
The mud, wind, and rain are pretty universal.
But the getting lost...

So there I was, early one morning, on the tail end of the Lana, blissfully taking off up the hill out of Santo Domingo de Silos after following a waymarked sign at the top of the village. I had a GPS on the phone backed up by screenshots of someone's wikiloc track - but hadn't tested the GPS in Spain and wasn't even looking at the screenshots. The sign had pointed to Covarrubias, after all, and that was the next town - so why bother? Never mind that the distance seemed suspiciously long. I figured that was just a wild mis-measurement.
(So many assumptions...what could possibly go wrong?...)
After a while, when it seemed like the path was going in totally the wrong direction, I found out that the GPS didn't work without an internet connection. Oh, well. The screenshots were OK, though, so I merrily followed them, 'bending the map' to agree with what I told myself I was seeing.

More than an hour later after a very nice wrong turn that led to a dead-end viewpoint, and convincing myself I was someplace else altogether, I came down a hill to a sign that said 'Sad Hill Cemetery'...which was a complete surprise. Sad Hill Cemetery?! Like...The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly Sad Hill Cemetery??
Well. How bizarre.
It was completely surreal. And it was so strange that no-one had mentioned this - but how in the world could they have missed it? I told myself a story that they were intentionally not saying anything for the surprise effect. Which it was, of course. I didn't linger, though - I had set out early without breakfast, and was eager to get to Covarrubias for something to eat.

So it was even more of a surprise when I came to the nearest hamlet to find that I wasn't at all where I thought I should be. It wasn't the cute tourist town full of restaurants and places to eat that I expected to find. There were several houses but no bar no nothing...which was 'interesting.' There were some people cleaning up after a fiesta from the night before who kindly told me where I wasn't. And Covarrubias was many kms away.

Well, no breakfast for me. (Nor lunch, either but that's another story.)
But I saw Sad Hill Cemetery!
And the view getting there was stunning.

So if you're on the Frances and go to Santo Domingo de Silos, and decide to walk back to Burgos...
First eat breakfast.
And pack a lunch, because there's no-where to eat. But the 'wrong way' to Covarrubias on the GR 82 is stunning. And you get the Spaghetti Western attraction thrown in for free.

And please tell the good folks in Contreras that the peregrina did get safely to her destination. They were concerned, the elderly ladies and clucking over me like mother hens.
It was the best day ever.

View media item 4869
Such a great story of a brilliant adventure you were meant to have!!!! I read this article some time ago (posted earlier by @mspath ) and have wanted to visit ever since.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/20...bad-and-the-ugly-graveyard-back-from-the-dead
I look forward to getting lost and finding it :)
 
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Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#22
I’ve never been seriously nearly bitten by the bed bugs but I’m prone to be seriously bitten by the mozzies on the coastal regions!
Anyone bitten on the coastal regions knows how much it hurts and this results in a visit to A&E the day after for a powerful injection of antibiotics in the place normally reserved for sitting down.
Anyway, quinine in tonic water is my deterrent
Mixed with large quantities of gin so that when bitten....I don’t care!!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
The Camino Frances 2005
The Portugese Camino 2014
The Camino Ingles Easter 2015
The Camino Ingles April 2016
The Camino del Norte/The Primitivo 2016
#23
The BB have no interest in me, I have not been bitten by one BB while walking the caminos in Spain for years.
But in Scotland I was viciously abused and attacked by midgets for several days. I had to wear midget combat clothing and use chemicals to combat the attackers, who were out in full force in the Highlands.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
#24
The BB have no interest in me, I have not been bitten by one BB while walking the caminos in Spain for years.
But in Scotland I was viciously abused and attacked by midgets for several days. I had to wear midget combat clothing and use chemicals to combat the attackers, who were out in full force in the Highlands.
Are you sure they were midgets? Double positive? My Scottish blood is rising in defence of midgets...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#27
I had to wear midget combat clothing and use chemicals to combat the attackers, who were out in full force in the Highlands.
Defenders of the West coast, arise! Smite the outlanders!!!
:D
Are you sure they were midgets? Double positive? My Scottish blood is rising in defence of midgets...
Of course. Scots can pack an outsize punch, yes? Who needs to be big to have an impact?
(Midges or midgets, the effect is the same...:cool:)
 
Camino(s) past & future
The Camino Frances 2005
The Portugese Camino 2014
The Camino Ingles Easter 2015
The Camino Ingles April 2016
The Camino del Norte/The Primitivo 2016
#28
Are you sure they were midgets? Double positive? My Scottish blood is rising in defence of midgets...
Oh yes, the pesky little flies, they were midgets! Skin so soft from Avon did not do anything! I do love the Scottish Highlands and I will go back in 2019 to walk the Isle of Arran.
 

Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#33
So glad all the mossie and midget reports seem to be coming from the UK...not Spain! Now back to the regular programming of NOT being bitten by bedbugs! :p... Actually say anything you want, that's the beauty of these "special" threads!
Yep....had a chat with my postman the other day and he’s not been bitten by a dog either!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#34
So glad all the mossie and midget reports seem to be coming from the UK...not Spain! Now back to the regular programming of NOT being bitten by bedbugs! :p... Actually say anything you want, that's the beauty of these "special" threads!
I've seen neither mossie nor midgets in Los Angeles.

Thank goodness!
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#35
Midges are a group of insects that include many kinds of small flies. They are found (seasonally or otherwise) on practically every land area outside permanently arid deserts and the frigid zones.

Midget (from midge, a sand fly) is a term for a person of unusually short stature that is considered by some to be pejorative. While not a medical term, it has been applied to persons of unusually short stature
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#36
I have looked bedbugs squarely in the eye about 6 times on various caminos. They take one whiff of my Permethrin coated sleeping bag and take off running.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#38
Midges are a group of insects that include many kinds of small flies. They are found (seasonally or otherwise) on practically every land area outside permanently arid deserts and the frigid zones.

Midget (from midge, a sand fly) is a term for a person of unusually short stature that is considered by some to be pejorative. While not a medical term, it has been applied to persons of unusually short stature
I live in the US and we say small flies, horse flies, noseums, gnats and mosquitos. Never heard the words midge or mossie used prior to being on this forum.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#54
I haven’t been bitten by a dog either! :oops: Well... not for a long time and not on a Camino...
Does that count? :p
I was bitten by a dog ten years ago, but I probably shouldn't have mentioned it on this thread since it's only for sharing our experiences of NO bedbugs encountered on the Camino. ;)
 

Peter Fransiscus

Do good and good will come to you.
Camino(s) past & future
All that we are is the result of what we have thought.
#55
The BB have no interest in me, I have not been bitten by one BB while walking the caminos in Spain for years.
But in Scotland I was viciously abused and attacked by midgets for several days. I had to wear midget combat clothing and use chemicals to combat the attackers, who were out in full force in the Highlands.
You have to be sure about the midgets , @kirkie gets a bit nervous about this.
 

Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#56
I was bitten by a dog ten years ago, but I probably shouldn't have mentioned it on this thread since it's only for sharing our experiences of NO bedbugs encountered on the Camino. ;)
Oh not being bitten by anything counts!...but not being bitten by bedbugs counts even better :p
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#58
I live in the US and we say small flies, horse flies, noseums, gnats and mosquitos. Never heard the words midge or mossie used prior to being on this forum.
Oh, that's what other ponders were on about. I thought they had some European insect found only over there.

I read this just as I left my dad's. Laughing so hard had to double back to his house and retrieve his paperwk bound for post office.

That's correos in Spanish speak.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances ( March 2015 )
Camino Portugues ( September 2015 )
#62
When I walked the Frances we only came across one person who had been bitten by bed bugs. The poor lass was referred to as "the girl with bed bugs". ( We eventually started calling her Gabriella )

As we stood outside a shop in Triacastela eating ice creams, we watched as she laboured her way up a steep
incline in the boiling afternoon sun. Feeling pity for her I jogged down and took her backpack from to carry up the hill. Waves of panic swept over me. Did she still have her companions with her? Were they in the backpack? You could still see the little circles on her arm where the doctor had drawn around the bites!!
People fell back as we arrived, more out of fear than respect. Divesting myself of the backpack she then hugged me! A small act of charity repaid with infestation?

Nah. Never been bitten yet.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF: (2001, 2002, 2004, 2014). Hospitalera: 2002, Ponferrada. 2004, Rabanal del Camino.
#63
When I walked the Frances we only came across one person who had been bitten by bed bugs. The poor lass was referred to as "the girl with bed bugs". ( We eventually started calling her Gabriella )

As we stood outside a shop in Triacastela eating ice creams, we watched as she laboured her way up a steep
incline in the boiling afternoon sun. Feeling pity for her I jogged down and took her backpack from to carry up the hill. Waves of panic swept over me. Did she still have her companions with her? Were they in the backpack? You could still see the little circles on her arm where the doctor had drawn around the bites!!
People fell back as we arrived, more out of fear than respect. Divesting myself of the backpack she then hugged me! A small act of charity repaid with infestation?

Nah. Never been bitten yet.
Is that what Gabriella means: the girl with no bed bugs?
 

zrexer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
#65
Just finished my fifth Camino with the Primitivo and not a bed bug issue ever.

But this was my first fall Camino and mosquito's were an issue on many nights. So I will ask, 'Why are window screens not a thing in Spain?'

I only see window screens very rarely in Spain.

The lack of them just seems very strange.

Thinking I will start a company selling window screens in Spain. Who wants to get in on the ground floor of this venture with me?
 

Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#68
When I walked the Frances we only came across one person who had been bitten by bed bugs. The poor lass was referred to as "the girl with bed bugs". ( We eventually started calling her Gabriella )

As we stood outside a shop in Triacastela eating ice creams, we watched as she laboured her way up a steep
incline in the boiling afternoon sun. Feeling pity for her I jogged down and took her backpack from to carry up the hill. Waves of panic swept over me. Did she still have her companions with her? Were they in the backpack? You could still see the little circles on her arm where the doctor had drawn around the bites!!
People fell back as we arrived, more out of fear than respect. Divesting myself of the backpack she then hugged me! A small act of charity repaid with infestation?

Nah. Never been bitten yet.
The hug got rid of the remaining bed bugs...caring and sharing.
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#87
I live in the US and we say small flies, horse flies, noseums, gnats and mosquitos. Never heard the words ...
Tongue in cheek (or is it cheekily) I ask, if you live in a "central" state, when was the first time you saw the open sea? Travel, even if only done at your computer, certainly broadens the mind. And walking in northen Spain, or south-west France or anywhere well away from home will, if you want it to, broaden your understanding in so many ways.

While the word boot might refer to footwear, in my, and many other parts of the world, it refers to that part of a motor car where I put luggage. And to make my car go I need petrol. But in Spain (and elsewhere I will need to understand another word.

So @Camino Chris I wish you well in your continuing discoveries.

And I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
 

Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#88
Tongue in cheek (or is it cheekily) I ask, if you live in a "central" state, when was the first time you saw the open sea? Travel, even if only done at your computer, certainly broadens the mind. And walking in northen Spain, or south-west France or anywhere well away from home will, if you want it to, broaden your understanding in so many ways.

While the word boot might refer to footwear, in my, and many other parts of the world, it refers to that part of a motor car where I put luggage. And to make my car go I need petrol. But in Spain (and elsewhere I will need to understand another word.

So @Camino Chris I wish you well in your continuing discoveries.

And I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
And in some parts of the world “trunk” means a place to put to put luggage but here on the “not serious” side of the world “trunk” has a much more hidden meaning...
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#92
Tongue in cheek (or is it cheekily) I ask, if you live in a "central" state, when was the first time you saw the open sea? Travel, even if only done at your computer, certainly broadens the mind. And walking in northen Spain, or south-west France or anywhere well away from home will, if you want it to, broaden your understanding in so many ways.

While the word boot might refer to footwear, in my, and many other parts of the world, it refers to that part of a motor car where I put luggage. And to make my car go I need petrol. But in Spain (and elsewhere I will need to understand another word.

So @Camino Chris I wish you well in your continuing discoveries.

And I say kia kaha (take care, be strong, get going)
I have traveled the western world quite a lot and stood on many different coasts. But it's been on this forum, conversing with many of you who live elsewhere, that I have learned various words and expressions for saying the same thing...so much fun!
 

Bristle boy

Here,There and Everywhere..Nowhere in particular.
Camino(s) past & future
2019
#95
10.000 dollars....seriously??? I didn’t hear the bedbugs complaining!!!! They thought the in flight catering was worth every penny!!!!
yes but I’d have paid 10,000 dollars to see the post dinner entertainment...must have looked like a multi-cultural Bhangra dance (without the synchronisation)
 
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