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Post Camino Blues?

Jerome74

Active Member
#1
I don't want to sound like whining, but how did you cope with your Post Camino Blues?

I miss the Camino, the walking, the friendliness, the community, the people, ...

But I guess we'll just adapt again. And thanks to the internet you can at least somewhat keep in touch with the wonderful people you met and maybe get an uplifting comment if you need one.

And I'll try to bring some of the Camino Spirit into my everyday life.

Love,

Jerome
 

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evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
#4
Like Lora had said, just plan another one. Try other routes instead. You will get to meet pilgrims that are already on their second or even seventh camino. The walking, the friendliness, the community and the people are nice but ultimately it is up to everyone to find for themselves their own answers.

http://camino.wificat.com
 

Jupp

New Member
#5
Jerome74 said:
I don't want to sound like whining, but how did you cope with your Post Camino Blues?

Just plan the next one, either a part of Camino Frances or a new one.
We had the same feeling in October after 5 weeks Camino and started again for 3 weeks mid-may this year, (Pamplona-Leon) it was a different season, other pelgrims, and as nice as the first. But be aware there are more and more pelgrims, (let's see how long the Kerkeling-effect will last) and though new private albergues open, it will sometimes be hard to find a bed late in the afternoon. This was our experience this year, compared to September 07.

All the best,
Jupp
 

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#6
:-(

Tell me about it! I've been back for a week now. At first, I didn't really feel it because I was flooded by work during the first 4 days after returning, and didn't really have time to think about it. But it set in over the weekend and now it's awful. I miss the Camino so much! We've been presenting the photos to friends and everytime I see parts of Navarra or Rioja, I want to go back RIGHT NOW!!!
Everything was so unpredictable. We never knew where we were going to sleep, what we were going to eat, whether we would make it as far as we wanted to go that day.
Now, I can rest assured that the supermarket is just around the corner (positive), my bed is just waiting for me to lay down (very positive) and that my employers (translation agencies) will be calling me morning till night with work (positive from the financial aspect). And that this will be repeated day after day until September, when we are going on another holiday, this time hardly adventurous, to Greece.
I don't know if I want to start planning my next Camino yet. I don't want to do it again next year, that's for sure. But maybe I could start thinking about next year's holiday already. And I assume things will get better in a while. Must keep myself busy.
 

Minkey

Active Member
#7
I've waited since 7th September to return and now I'm only 6 weeks away... I can't wait to leave my everyday life behind, throw a couple of things into my tiny rucksack and go... I don't mind not having much with me! People at work think it's all very strange to go off to another country on your own. They think it's weird that I take up virtually all my annual leave in one go so that I can disappear for weeks on end. They think it's weird that I don't sit my backside on a sun lounger in Magaluf.

Ah well... Our little secret, eh?! :)
 

marktqm

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2006)
#8
Yes Minkey, our little secret. Only us pilgrims will understand. I've entertained quizzed looks since I arrived ("You did what?!", "You walked how long again?"), and there's no point in explaining any further.

Mark
 
#10
Thanks Jerome for bringing this thread and glad to know that i am not the only one.
It has been more than 2 years and i still think of camino quite often.
i know all this camino blue thing actually means that i want to escape from my work and reality which life camino is really about, but i still can't shake off the idea of BACK TO CAMINO, NOW!!

planning the next camino is a temp cure, but the most important thing is to move on...to face the LIFE camino... i know i know. but it's really hard to....even 2 years later.

gosh...i am reading camino forum again...:(
 

grilly

Active Member
#11
Re:

Lora said:
well, my way of coping with post camino blues, is by planning my next one! I must be hooked!!

Lora
I could not have said it better, Lora. I do pretty much the same. Otherwise at times the angst would get too much. I loved to meet people in their 70s and 80s (not many 80s) walking the Camino. Great, I thought, there is no end to this! (70s is a bit like when you can see Cirauqui in the distance).

Yes, the Camino Blues does exist. I wonder whether anyone has ever written a song or a poem about it?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#12
Re: Re:

grilly said:
Yes, the Camino Blues does exist. I wonder whether anyone has ever written a song or a poem about it?
Where's Bob Dylan when you need him?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
#13
On a more serious note I cope by giving talks on the Camino to church and community groups.

I use a data projector to show the photos and work on the basis that every photo has to have a short story to tell.

I take items to let people see, touch and hold.

While answering questions I let a series of landscape photos roll by on the continous scroll.

I always find out how long does the group expect the talk to last and how long do you allow for questions and tailor accordingly.

I offer to go to two consequetive sessions - which many groups love as they struggle to get speakers - and that allows more time to explain the richness and the complexity of the Camino. At the first session I speak for longer and take fewer questions.

If nothing else the emotions evoked by your Camino will be rekindled as you talk about your experience.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#14
My Picasa photo albums give a slide show all day long on my computer Home Page.

My DVD slideshow has stopped friends from accepting dinner invitations! :D Unless that is a good thing, I suggest putting photos on the Web and sending the link to those who might be interested, so they can look at them at their leisure. I like watching my photos, but it is not clear that everyone else does.

Planning the next walk is a great way to remember the past as you prepare for the future.
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#16
I have only just come across this thread. The theme is not a new one but it always bears bringing back because Post Camino Syndrome is not by any means anyone's imagination but very real.
I am a practicing psychotherapist but the following comes from Me as a pilgrim: take the Camino with you. Yes, there will be people who grow bored hearing about your experiences, and you must expect that. But friendliness will be found where you are friendly; trust where you are trusting; generosity where you are generous; simplicity where you are simple, and Wonder where you are open to the Gift of the Ordinary.
Many of us come back year after year. The reasons are varied. I for one learn something more about myself every time. But perhaps the most important lesson I am learning is an ongoing one: Simplify your life. Give and be able to receive love. Smile when you enter a room (it's the "normal" equivalent of "Buen Camino"). The effects are always worthwhile.
And be as forgiving of yourself as you are of others...
That's about it.
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.blogspot.com
 

grilly

Active Member
#17
Priscillian said:
Many of us come back year after year. The reasons are varied. I for one learn something more about myself every time. But perhaps the most important lesson I am learning is an ongoing one: Simplify your life. Give and be able to receive love. Smile when you enter a room (it's the "normal" equivalent of "Buen Camino"). The effects are always worthwhile.
And be as forgiving of yourself as you are of others...
That's about it.
I agree very much with everything you wrote, Priscillian... A fabulous description of why I walk the Camino :)
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
#18
Ahhh the blues. THey are so very real, but I love what Tracy said..some of it is what we project...so be the Camino here at home too. One of the funniest things though is realizing...I haven't set foot in a mall since I've been back, a month now! I just can't do it...It's all I can do to go into the major supermarkets...I get sensory overload...instead, I go for a long bike ride or a walk and take my camera...

and plan another !

Some excellent suggestions here. But thanks Tracy for allowing this isn't just a post vacation reaction...something more, as the Camino is considerably more than just a walk in the woods...

Now I'm gonna go sing me some sad songs...and then get on with the day... :)

Karin
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#19
I have a question for all of you; not just those who have already posted but the 2000 or so who have clicked on this post so far. It is a serious question as it affects my future.
I am currently trying to buy a little house near Muxia. It is a 15 klm GORGEOUS walk through eucalyptus and pine woods or even along the most beautiful beach I have ever seen.
If I were to offer a "Post-Camino" sanctuary for 2 or 3 pilgrims to stay for 2 to 5 days - somewhere to stay and write, to read, or sketch, or play the guitar, or commune with the corn fields (or the donkey next door). Somewhere to reflect, talk about your experiences with a four time pilgrim (who won't tell you all about her Camino: it's Yours that is important) and therapist (and hypnotherapist): me. Or, to simply be silent. Somewhere practical to arrange homeward arrangements, talk to friends on Skype. Eat good food and try local wines. Or just sleep! In short, a "refugio" de verdad.
What do you all think? Would it work? I would have room for a maximum of five.
Muxia is 90 klms north west of Santiago and reachable by bus as is the nearest town. Finisterre to Muxia is 30 klms and a wonderful walk. I personally much prefer Muxia (which remains unspoiled) to Finisterre.
The house is small, stone and wood, 100 years old and in a small village near a larger river town. It has no garden but is surrounded by fields, woods, and a trout stream (which doesn't surround it - that's a moat. You KNOW what I mean!) The sea is 3 klms walk (that beach!)
Would you welcome a chance to stay at a place like this? (There will be a job jar though. Work is part of the Post Camino Therapy!) I am thinking of a minimum of two days, a maximum of five, on a "donativo" basis.
Please continue this thread and post me a PM.
Many thanks
Tracy Saunders
http://www.headstartcentres.org (my therapy site)
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.com
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.blogspot.com
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#20
Re: The above.
I have posted this response onto two new threads in MISCELLANEOUS and FINISTERRE/MUXÍA so please do go over there and leave you comments so that this discussion can continue on topic. I have already received some very nice PMS and believe me your encouragement is VERY MUCH appreciated as it won't be easy to pull this off. Many thanks, Tracy
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#21
PLEASE DON'T DISCONTINUE THIS TOPIC JUST BECAUSE I HAVE THROWN A RED HERRING INTO IT! IT'S A VERY IMPORTANT THREAD...



Concerning the idea of a Post-Camino Sanctuary and your very much needed input: To make things easier I have created a separate thread with a LINK to a questionnaire about this idea of a "Post Camino Sanctuary". The new thread is here in Miscellaneous and is called Post Camino Sanctuary Questionnaire. It only has 9 multiple choice questions and will take you less than five minutes.
PLEASE, do take that time and complete it for me, whether you have ever experienced Post Camino Blues or not. The more interest I can generate the better chance I have in convincing the bank that I am not a nutter! Banks, as you know, lack vision, and although this is certainly not designed to be a main source of income (for that I have my writing and my teaching) and kind of Free-lance or "autonomo" (Self-Employed) work here in Spain is looked upon as a risky bet.
So please be a sweetie, and make your voice count.
Thanks a big bunch.

http://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MNQ93PN
 
#22
We organized a group of returned pilgrims in our local area (San Francisco). Getting together for tapas,wine, hikes and general sharing has been a great tonic to camino post partum.

Rennie
 
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
#23
I think the answer to this is the same as the answer for anyone suffering a low point that sends them inward... Find a worthy project and throw yourself into helping out someone who needs a hand. Join a Spanish language "intercambio," or teach someone how to read, visit forgotten old folks at a care home, or sweep up at the homeless shelter (it may be rather familiar to you, if you´ve been staying in albergues!) Nothing gets you out of your own head better than doing something for somebody else.

It is, fundamentally, what that slippery, evanescent "pilgrim spirit" is made of... people outside their comfort zones, sharing a common goal and helping one another without expecting repayment.
 

Priscillian

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 1999, Aragones 2000, Desde Le Puy 2002, Portuguese 2009, hoping RDLP 2014
#24
I'm with Reb on this one: I believe strongly that work of some sort or another is an essential part of integrating the Camino into your "normal" life. That can just as easily (?) be done in Manhattan as Moratinos or Muxía though it might take a bit more imagination.
One of the things that has occurred to me today about this "Post-Camino" idea is that around the little house I am hoping to buy, there are many people well into the 70's and 80's who still have heavy farm work to do. Would it be possible, on a voluntary basis of course (though the little job jar stays!) for those who would like to, (and have the skills in some cases) to help out with the donkey, or stack the firewood or plant the potatoes, or fix the back fence? I am going to explore this possibility when I go back at the end of September. Perhaps the villagers would resent it as an "intrusion", but I have a feeling not only would they welcome it with open arms but that it would be very good for Inter-Gallego/Pilgrim relations!
Vamos a ver ...(And PS. If your haven't yet filled in the Questionnaire concerning this very topic, please do go to http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.blogspot.com It'll take you 3 minutes and I've be very, very grateful.
 
#25
Bass Player looking for other blues travelers......Bringing a very small acoustic bass with me looking to hook up with fellow blue's lovers to play at all crossroads along the way will be in Roncevalles september 7th.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2016
#27
I have a question for all of you; not just those who have already posted but the 2000 or so who have clicked on this post so far. It is a serious question as it affects my future.
I am currently trying to buy a little house near Muxia. It is a 15 klm GORGEOUS walk through eucalyptus and pine woods or even along the most beautiful beach I have ever seen.
If I were to offer a "Post-Camino" sanctuary for 2 or 3 pilgrims to stay for 2 to 5 days - somewhere to stay and write, to read, or sketch, or play the guitar, or commune with the corn fields (or the donkey next door). Somewhere to reflect, talk about your experiences with a four time pilgrim (who won't tell you all about her Camino: it's Yours that is important) and therapist (and hypnotherapist): me. Or, to simply be silent. Somewhere practical to arrange homeward arrangements, talk to friends on Skype. Eat good food and try local wines. Or just sleep! In short, a "refugio" de verdad.
What do you all think? Would it work? I would have room for a maximum of five.
Muxia is 90 klms north west of Santiago and reachable by bus as is the nearest town. Finisterre to Muxia is 30 klms and a wonderful walk. I personally much prefer Muxia (which remains unspoiled) to Finisterre.
The house is small, stone and wood, 100 years old and in a small village near a larger river town. It has no garden but is surrounded by fields, woods, and a trout stream (which doesn't surround it - that's a moat. You KNOW what I mean!) The sea is 3 klms walk (that beach!)
Would you welcome a chance to stay at a place like this? (There will be a job jar though. Work is part of the Post Camino Therapy!) I am thinking of a minimum of two days, a maximum of five, on a "donativo" basis.
Please continue this thread and post me a PM.
Many thanks
Tracy Saunders
http://www.headstartcentres.org (my therapy site)
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.com
http://www.pilgrimagetoheresy.blogspot.com
God how I wished I had known this before I left Santiago!! I mainly walked alone grieving the loss of my son, staying in private rooms to be able to process all that I needed to. At the end I really found no one to share my experience with, much less speak english. I would have so loved this and even extended my trip to do so. I guess it wasn't meant to be. It is was it is... may your offering bring much peace, joy and happiness to all who have the opportunity!!
 

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