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Quit again. Maybe for good.

2020 Camino Guides
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lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
Hand holding ends eventually.
As it should, especially when positive feedback is constantly being rebuked with more and more negative comments. We all learned to walk holding the hands of our parents or siblings to help us keep our balance but eventually they let go and we have to try it on our own ending up on our bums more often than once. We may need a hand up to our feet again. We would never get anywhere on our own if hand-holding continues. We have to learn balance the hard way.

I would *highly* encourage you to retract or edit your response.
He did edit it but it's preserved for posterity in your post.

I just explain that I'm a vegetarian, and after the ususl primero of ensalata, can they please make something easy - and there have been a few times when I have been happily surprised at what comes. But to be honest, I only worked up the courage to do this recenty.
I'm just curious did you ask in Spanish or English? I think it would be important for future vegans to know this and maybe learn how to ask the question if you did ask it in Spanish. Our OP does not speak Spanish so clarity might help.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
It is good to be kind. It is good to be gentle - but sometimes the best gift one can give to a person in a certain state is to be an ice-cold bucket of water, emptied over the head.
Kindness, helpfulness, in this way is not always immediately apparent as kindness, and it can also be seen as not being helpful; as being rude, antagonistic, angry, unkind - but what it can actually be is a true kindness, a deliberate shock aimed at waking that person up ... don't you think?

...... the universe, reality, is not as we want it to be, it is what it is. It is therefore a waste of a life to try and project our immature desires onto the universe and complain when it will just not conform to those desires.

To swim in the ocean of life is not to stand ankle deep and complain about how cold it feels, it is to plunge in and from that breathless shock moment of immersion to feel the utter Joy of being alive, whatever may come - which was why I made my earlier posting which I then deleted because of negative feedback on here .... but I still think that I said the right thing, at the right time, to the right person. ❤

I would ask the OP to watch this and mull on it ...

Well said. Not much else to add.

Thanks to all those who have contributed to this thread. We will probably never truly know the impact it had or may have (in the future) on the OP, but it does surely reflect on the diverse community we call the Forum.

The comments say more about us than anything else. I know that I refrained after my first response as I heard myself saying: "just get on with it and stop b*tching".
I guess that's when I decided to leave the discussion and chose to follow on the sidelines. But sometimes that too needs to be said, but maybe a bit more eloquently 😉
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Some useful phrases for Vegans and Vegetarians on the Camino:

Soy vegetariano.
Yo no como carne o pescado .
Jamon no es un vegetal.
Pollo no es un vegetal.
Percebes no son verduras.
Sólo una ensalada para mí.
Atun no es una planta de ensalada.
Voy a tener el plato de judias.
Chorizo no son judías .
Una botella de brandy por favor.
 

Pelegrin

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo June 2013
SJPP - Logroño June 2014
Ingles July2016
Some useful phrases for Vegans and Vegetarians on the Camino:

Soy vegetariano.
Yo no como carne o pescado .
Jamon no es un vegetal.
Pollo no es un vegetal.
Percebes no son verduras.
Sólo una ensalada para mí.
Atun no es una planta de ensalada.
Voy a tener el plato de judias.
Chorizo no son judías .
Una botella de brandy por favor.
Vegans don't eat cheese and eggs.
Many salads have cheese.
No quiero queso.
No quiero huevos.
 

André Walker

Never loosing my way: always standing on it
Camino(s) past & future
Holland-St.Jean, Frances, Del Norte, VdlP.
I've read some previous posts encouraging VeganCamino to not give up and continue.

Sometimes however, giving up is just what a person needs. On my 2014 Camino I met a woman from Austria shortly after Astorga who was also struggling with continuing ... or not (the exact circumstances are irrelevant).

Talking to her, she told me not only about the difficulties she had while walking the Camino, but also her personal situation back home. Turned out she had a very sick husband who needed a lot of care, 2 young children and a fulltime job. And she had already managed all of that for a number of years. Taking care of her husband and children, the household and the income without complaining, never giving up. At last she managed to organise things in a way that made it possible for her to walk the Camino Frances. Only to find herself on the mesetas, struggling with continuing or quitting.

She decided to quit, take it slow and continue along the Frances by bus. Taking rest days and expore the towns, churches, and so on. We stayed in touch and arranged to meet in Santiago.

I asked her if she was sorry that she quitted (I think I kind of automatically assumed that she would). But she said giving up walking the Camino was the best thing that happened to her. Because she was used to a life where she never said 'no', always going on and on and on and on, never taking care of herself and her boundaries. The Camino and her struggle had taught her that it's actually ok to say 'that's enough'.

I'm still in touch with her. Looking back on this experience she's very thankful for it, because she has learned to quit in her personal life too every now and then. She has learned that saying 'stop' actually makes that she's able to continue taking care of her husband and children without forgetting about herself.

This experience is not to be used as an 'excuse' to quit. It only goes to show that quitting is not always a defeat, but can be a blessing. Just as continuing can be.

Which applies to VeganCamino? I can't tell. I don't know him. But I do know who can tell what's best. And his name is VeganCamino...
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2017, 2018, 2019
Sometimes however, giving up is just what a person needs.
True. I regret that I was raised to view perseverance as an unqualified virtue. I remember being taught to admire Robert the Bruce, who inspired his troops with these words: "If at first you don't succeed, Try, try, try again." I wish that my teachers had given me a more balanced and nuanced view that takes account of "sunk cost fallacy," and "fail fast, fail cheap," philosophy.
 

halfbask

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: Sept 2-29, 2016
del Norte: Spring/Summer 2017
So I'm on a hot, crowded bus to Ovideo instead of walking in the cool, crisp air looking at scenery that looks like a Celtic dream. I walked from Comillas to San Vicente today. Only my third day on the Norte. My shoes have worn out and this town looks too small to have a shoe store. I walked all over town in my flip flips but they are falling apart too.

Heading to Oviedo. To re-group or something. This scenery is beautiful and I'm finding the Norte hard. I keep losing the path and I rarely see other pilgrims. All the churches are closed.

Is there an app that follows the Norte? A luggage transfer service here? I can't find one.

I know in my heart it feels sad to be leaving and beyond the shoes this has been so hard. I've never traveled anywhere where I've struggled like this. I don't speak the language. No problem in Mexico. Grande problema aqui.

I'm also vegan and really really struggling to find food. Another banana for dinner tonight.

Not sure what to do now but I'll feel sad not to try again. Not sure if Norte or Frances or Portuguese is best for try number three.

Or... Fly to Greece and say screw this, it's been really hard. I thought the walk would be hard but I'm finding being in Spain hard. Nothing is ever open and info online is often incorrect, and you can't eat dinner until sometimes 9:30 pm. I just can't seem to get on that schedule.

I felt like this adventure picked me and now I don't know what will be a decent balance of respecting my body's needs and also being on an adventure and open to new things. I don't want to leave Spain and just think Spain sucks. But so far it has, if I'm honest.

Thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks community.
At Oviedo hop on and enjoy the (slow) FEVE to Ferrol, rest up, do the Ingles.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) Portugues(2013)
San Salvador (2017) Ingles (2019)
True. I regret that I was raised to view perseverance as an unqualified virtue. I remember being taught to admire Robert the Bruce, who inspired his troops with these words: "If at first you don't succeed, Try, try, try again." I wish that my teachers had given me a more balanced and nuanced view that takes account of "sunk cost fallacy," and "fail fast, fail cheap," philosophy.
Was that Robert the Bruce? Oh my goodness! All I remember is a cobweb covered cave, and himself watching the antics of the spider... for crying out loud, we are talking 50+ years ago here. Let;s say I was 8, so be honest, S, and tell the truth: 66 years ago! Thanks for the memories. History was so controlled. I guess it still is. We were taught what ‘they’ wanted us take in. Will this cause a fierce argument here? Let it begin...
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Good Old shoes and David have it. I walked the Norte in 2004 with my donkey. No chance of Camino shopping or catching a bus. Not much infrastructure then, much less than when I cycled it five years ago. I took a tent, stayed in fields and stables, sometimes a refuge or a hotel. The donkey was often more comfortable than I was. Guidebook? Yes, well I lost mine about a week out from San Sebastian. Way marking? Not a lot. Keep the sea on your right. I didn't have a mobile phone. Your food problems can be solved by going shopping. I didn't speak much Spanish when I started, but I soon learned enough. As for shoes, you try finding a blacksmith when you need one.

It wasn't specially easy. It was one of the most rewarding things I have ever done. I met some wonderful people, nearly all of them locals. In all, I met about twenty pilgrims, Norte and Primitivo combined.
But then at that time there weren't as many people walking the Camino or posting in internet forums.
Just accept it for what it is. Or do something else. Please.
 

bobbogram

Member
Camino(s) past & future
El Norte San Sebastián to Santiago; Portuguese Lisbon to Porto; Porto to Santiago; Geneva west
“Failing to prepare is preparing to fail” is a well used axiom from a famous US basketball coach. Self inflicted problems, like bad shoes and flip flops or beginning during Europe’s current heat wave, are examples that come to mind.
My first Camino was El Norte four years ago and we followed Divide Guidance and rested on the 7th day - each week. I terminated my first Francigena attempt early after descending the steepest section from San Bernard in the Aosta Valley 825D0560-F74B-4FDB-BBCE-CA6AD370A762.jpegon the first day during that year’s heat wave. That was my personal lesson on bad planning. I’m going back later this year to complete the less strenuous Lucca to Rome section.
Learning from your mistakes is just one of the Camino’s greatest gifts - but only in retrospect.
 
Camino(s) past & future
2018 Camino Portugues (Valença to Santiago)
2019 (planned) Santiago- Finisterre-Muxia
If you found the Norte hard I wouldn't advice you to try the Primitivo. It is physically harder and you won't find more pilgrims than on the Norte, you will also find closed shops and similar vegan options. To me it sounds like the Frances is your Camino. Many pilgrims, hardly any language problems, impossible to get lost, more shops open, more churches open, more vegan options and you can walk smaller distances.

Buen Camino!
I agree.
Maybe you should change to a more populated Camino like the Frances?
I agree. Based on what you have said, the camaraderie, support, and encouragement of other Peregrinos is a better remedy. You will also meet fellow vegans and there will be many more food options and English speakers along the most popular and populated of all Caminos.
 
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
Somebody earlier described how bad things can happen, it snowballs and then you start seeing everything through a negative lens. I know what thats like and how hard it is to interrupt that process.

I came into a small town once that the guidebook called "charming" and delightful". First i saw trash in the stream, then somebody gestured angrily out a car window at me. I went into town and it looked ugly. Unlike everywhere else in Spain, even the People were unattractive. Then, sitting at an outdoor table, a pigeon landed on the chair by me who looked like he was drenched in motor oil. His pal joined him who was missing half a foot and half the toes on the other side.

By then, i had no energy left to find or see anything good or beautiful.

The beauty of travel is that you can completely change your scenario the next day which can make it much easier to jump start your attitude, as opposed to when you are at home. Hope that happens!
 

Attachments

Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
this will be my first. Norte September 2018.
Thank you. It could be that I don't start walking until 8:30 or 9 am but I only saw three pilgrims today and one group of four yesterday. Thanks for the link.
True, most people start early to arrive early at the next albergue. Also siesta is really a thing so arriving early gives you a chance to check in shower and wash clothes then you can hit the bars for food/ or a supermercado or tienda for your needs. I had a little plastic dish I often prepared food for the trail the evening previous after shopping. The trail app I used most was Wise Pilgrim . Also used Gronze. Com only got lost once. Found company by getting started earlier and being inquisitive. Good luck!
 

mick...

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugese from Oporto (2016), Frances from SJPP
So I'm on a hot, crowded bus to Ovideo instead of walking in the cool, crisp air looking at scenery that looks like a Celtic dream. I walked from Comillas to San Vicente today. Only my third day on the Norte. My shoes have worn out and this town looks too small to have a shoe store. I walked all over town in my flip flips but they are falling apart too.

Heading to Oviedo. To re-group or something. This scenery is beautiful and I'm finding the Norte hard. I keep losing the path and I rarely see other pilgrims. All the churches are closed.

Is there an app that follows the Norte? A luggage transfer service here? I can't find one.

I know in my heart it feels sad to be leaving and beyond the shoes this has been so hard. I've never traveled anywhere where I've struggled like this. I don't speak the language. No problem in Mexico. Grande problema aqui.

I'm also vegan and really really struggling to find food. Another banana for dinner tonight.

Not sure what to do now but I'll feel sad not to try again. Not sure if Norte or Frances or Portuguese is best for try number three.

Or... Fly to Greece and say screw this, it's been really hard. I thought the walk would be hard but I'm finding being in Spain hard. Nothing is ever open and info online is often incorrect, and you can't eat dinner until sometimes 9:30 pm. I just can't seem to get on that schedule.

I felt like this adventure picked me and now I don't know what will be a decent balance of respecting my body's needs and also being on an adventure and open to new things. I don't want to leave Spain and just think Spain sucks. But so far it has, if I'm honest.

Thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks community.
 

mick...

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugese from Oporto (2016), Frances from SJPP
I hear you, VeganCamino. I've not done the Norte. I hear it's less well served and very up and down. But I've done the Frances from St Jean and the Portuguese from Oporto. Both were beautiful in all ways. You are fairly close the Frances so why not switch? I dont post much on here but I really wouldn't want anyone to have to give up and miss out. The Norte is acknowledged by many as a major challenge. Maybe you just outstretched yourself. We all do that. It's easy to put right. Wish you good fortune
 

VeganCamino

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future Frances from Saint Jean Pied du Port to Burgos, starting in June.
So I'm on a hot, crowded bus to Ovideo instead of walking in the cool, crisp air looking at scenery that looks like a Celtic dream. I walked from Comillas to San Vicente today. Only my third day on the Norte. My shoes have worn out and this town looks too small to have a shoe store. I walked all over town in my flip flips but they are falling apart too.

Heading to Oviedo. To re-group or something. This scenery is beautiful and I'm finding the Norte hard. I keep losing the path and I rarely see other pilgrims. All the churches are closed.

Is there an app that follows the Norte? A luggage transfer service here? I can't find one.

I know in my heart it feels sad to be leaving and beyond the shoes this has been so hard. I've never traveled anywhere where I've struggled like this. I don't speak the language. No problem in Mexico. Grande problema aqui.

I'm also vegan and really really struggling to find food. Another banana for dinner tonight.

Not sure what to do now but I'll feel sad not to try again. Not sure if Norte or Frances or Portuguese is best for try number three.

Or... Fly to Greece and say screw this, it's been really hard. I thought the walk would be hard but I'm finding being in Spain hard. Nothing is ever open and info online is often incorrect, and you can't eat dinner until sometimes 9:30 pm. I just can't seem to get on that schedule.

I felt like this adventure picked me and now I don't know what will be a decent balance of respecting my body's needs and also being on an adventure and open to new things. I don't want to leave Spain and just think Spain sucks. But so far it has, if I'm honest.

Thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks community.
Just a quick update that I'm on night four back on the Frances. In Ponferrada after a grueling descent down the rock filled mountain today. Sore. Tired. Blisters. Sunburned feet. No meals today, just felt, nuts and bars-- not intentional. Exhausted and pushing on, at least not giving up tomorrow. Thanks for all the support. I feel your love when I'm shlogging along in the heat and it's much appreciated.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2020? Looks like.... nowhere! 😁
Just a quick update that I'm on night four back on the Frances. In Ponferrada after a grueling descent down the rock filled mountain today. Sore. Tired. Blisters. Sunburned feet. No meals today, just felt, nuts and bars-- not intentional. Exhausted and pushing on, at least not giving up tomorrow. Thanks for all the support. I feel your love when I'm shlogging along in the heat and it's much appreciated.
Thank you for coming back! We’re with you all the way 🙂 Take care and all the best.
 

lynda2017

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
start end aug 2017
I've read some previous posts encouraging VeganCamino to not give up and continue.

Sometimes however, giving up is just what a person needs. On my 2014 Camino I met a woman from Austria shortly after Astorga who was also struggling with continuing ... or not (the exact circumstances are irrelevant).

Talking to her, she told me not only about the difficulties she had while walking the Camino, but also her personal situation back home. Turned out she had a very sick husband who needed a lot of care, 2 young children and a fulltime job. And she had already managed all of that for a number of years. Taking care of her husband and children, the household and the income without complaining, never giving up. At last she managed to organise things in a way that made it possible for her to walk the Camino Frances. Only to find herself on the mesetas, struggling with continuing or quitting.

She decided to quit, take it slow and continue along the Frances by bus. Taking rest days and expore the towns, churches, and so on. We stayed in touch and arranged to meet in Santiago.

I asked her if she was sorry that she quitted (I think I kind of automatically assumed that she would). But she said giving up walking the Camino was the best thing that happened to her. Because she was used to a life where she never said 'no', always going on and on and on and on, never taking care of herself and her boundaries. The Camino and her struggle had taught her that it's actually ok to say 'that's enough'.

I'm still in touch with her. Looking back on this experience she's very thankful for it, because she has learned to quit in her personal life too every now and then. She has learned that saying 'stop' actually makes that she's able to continue taking care of her husband and children without forgetting about herself.

This experience is not to be used as an 'excuse' to quit. It only goes to show that quitting is not always a defeat, but can be a blessing. Just as continuing can be.

Which applies to VeganCamino? I can't tell. I don't know him. But I do know who can tell what's best. And his name is VeganCamino...
Just a quick update that I'm on night four back on the Frances. In Ponferrada after a grueling descent down the rock filled mountain today. Sore. Tired. Blisters. Sunburned feet. No meals today, just felt, nuts and bars-- not intentional. Exhausted and pushing on, at least not giving up tomorrow. Thanks for all the support. I feel your love when I'm shlogging along in the heat and it's much appreciated.
Hey VeganCamino, glad you have replied. I have just read (well skimmed some as it’s long) just now. I’m hoping to do the camino frances either September onwards or April/May next year. This would be my second time but I might not make it this year as I have ankle problems I’m working on.
But I quoted André incase you missed the comment as I felt it especially relevant, I was going to post similar.

When I was doing the frances in 2017 I met a woman right at the start, we walked together with others for a few days, then we split off and then I split off from the others. She occasionally walked with some of the people again. But later on I heard she quit at Leon and went home! Tbh totally honest I thought, wow why did she quit?! She FAILED! I thought this as I’m not a quitter but actually there are times in my life when I should have quit! So I thought, well I never had sore feet pretty much my whole camino ( one blister the day of getting to Santiago) so I was lucky, I wasn’t ill and the weather was perfect! But she had sore feet and a limited time off work (I had no deadline) and maybe some other worries so actually I have massive RESPECT now for her to have the courage I quit knowing it’s not working out for whatever reason. Why waste your holiday if it’s not enjoyable?! Sure there are testing days and you can get through them but there’s no point in my opinion in carrying on if it’s gone beyond the point of no return where you can’t get past the negative thoughts. That is my opinion and that is the advice I will try to follow myself on my next camino :)

I don’t think I could walk in the heat so I wouldn’t go do the camino at this time personally. But when I went it was really busy and I worried about not getting a bed (I nearly didn’t but it worked out and I learned from it!) So there are pros and cons whenever you go. But I’d say that it is best to start early morning, say 7.30am if you can, then others will hopefully be walking then so you won’t get lost. Two times I was alone in the morning and it was dark, once as I got up too early so I waited for people as I felt a bit scared and the other time, well some people that I thought were nice and had agreed to walk with me just left when I went to fill up my water :( but I found another nice couple to walk the first dark bit with and looking on the plus, they were much better company than the other two!!!

Also if you have no deadline how about doing shorter days? Use the afternoons to learn Spanish if you have access to internet do duolingo (get obsessed!) or the “futurelearn course” (you’ll have to pay for part 1 as it’s finished but part 2 to 6 are still available free)! Alternatively take a week off in a city and do a weeks beginner spanish course? I’m trying to learn spanish and when you get into it it’s fun! And I’m rubbish at languages!

Sorry this is so long, best wishes!
 

lynda2017

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
start end aug 2017
Also vegancamino, just wondering what your native tongue is? Mine is English and I really don’t think second languages are taught well in uk (well not from and early enough age when u was at school) so I think languages are especially hard and since many people speak English there is less motivation for us in UK.
Also, please try to plan less and go with the flow, stop earlier in the day if you are tired or sore. I know it’s hard if you’re a planner and like to be in control, that’s the way I am anyway :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2016
Thank you so much. I went to decathlon and replaced the towel I left in Roncesvalles. I also bought from another store a pair of Ecco shoes. Thought they were a fit and now wearing them for a few hours walking around Oviedo OMG redness and ouch. 🙄 Ugh ... I thought this was fitting. Thanks for the support.
Go to a pharmacia and look for Farmalastic brand gel pads you put onto hotspots. Put them on in the morning, take off in evening and re-use for a week or more. They are great at preventing blisters.

Also, sounds like you’ve not been able to eat well. I don’t know if vegans do this but maybe get some multivitamins as they can help.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Just a quick update that I'm on night four back on the Frances. In Ponferrada after a grueling descent down the rock filled mountain today. Sore. Tired. Blisters. Sunburned feet. No meals today, just felt, nuts and bars-- not intentional. Exhausted and pushing on, at least not giving up tomorrow. Thanks for all the support. I feel your love when I'm shlogging along in the heat and it's much appreciated.
Well done, @VeganCamino, hang in there! I'm happy to know how you're doing...so thanks for the update.
And I hope you got some sustenance in Ponferrada. There are albergues coming up that have vegetarian shared meals...
The worst descent is behind you now. Up and over O Cebreiro is not as painful as that downhill into Molinaseca.
Take care, and pace yourself...buen camino!
 

Jersey

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
July 2017
I’ve spent a decent amount of time in Spain the past three years with picky eaters.
Sin gluten, no fish, no meat etc etc and not knowing the language?
Wow, bad combination. A few times I came close to losing my temper with them.
Eventually I just said, I’m going out to eat, no reason for me to suffer.
Hopefully this will be a warning to picky eaters, you have to do extra homework.
 

Ctshagr

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances- Sarria to Santiago (2017)
Camino Portugués - Porto to Santiago (2018)
So I'm on a hot, crowded bus to Ovideo instead of walking in the cool, crisp air looking at scenery that looks like a Celtic dream. I walked from Comillas to San Vicente today. Only my third day on the Norte. My shoes have worn out and this town looks too small to have a shoe store. I walked all over town in my flip flips but they are falling apart too.

Heading to Oviedo. To re-group or something. This scenery is beautiful and I'm finding the Norte hard. I keep losing the path and I rarely see other pilgrims. All the churches are closed.

Is there an app that follows the Norte? A luggage transfer service here? I can't find one.

I know in my heart it feels sad to be leaving and beyond the shoes this has been so hard. I've never traveled anywhere where I've struggled like this. I don't speak the language. No problem in Mexico. Grande problema aqui.

I'm also vegan and really really struggling to find food. Another banana for dinner tonight.

Not sure what to do now but I'll feel sad not to try again. Not sure if Norte or Frances or Portuguese is best for try number three.

Or... Fly to Greece and say screw this, it's been really hard. I thought the walk would be hard but I'm finding being in Spain hard. Nothing is ever open and info online is often incorrect, and you can't eat dinner until sometimes 9:30 pm. I just can't seem to get on that schedule.

I felt like this adventure picked me and now I don't know what will be a decent balance of respecting my body's needs and also being on an adventure and open to new things. I don't want to leave Spain and just think Spain sucks. But so far it has, if I'm honest.

Thoughts or suggestions?

Thanks community.
My take Oviedo would be the place for shoes a large town. Best app for the Norte IMO is Buen Camino you can download the Norte and follow it from there and it is easy to use. If I can do it anyone can it has relevant information for eating, places to stay etc. From Aviles it isn’t easy till you get close to Arzua on the Frances but still easier than the Primitivo. I speak no Español but managed to get by smiling and being polite helps. If you think no one is walking try March when there is really no one around I walked by myself everyday but two. But really you get used to it and would usually meet people at night for dinner or at least a bite to eat. One of my favorite nights was staying at the albergue in Tapia with the ocean out back and no one there but me. Some nights I bought things for dinner and ate in the albergue. Ensalada mixta is ok for a vegan just ask for without the atun and egg. Lastly try the correo’s for sending your bags ahead. Good luck on your Camino.
 

Luka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pelgrimspad I, Via Monastica, Via Podiensis, Via de la Plata, Camino Francés, Camino del Norte...
I’ve spent a decent amount of time in Spain the past three years with picky eaters.
Sin gluten, no fish, no meat etc etc and not knowing the language?
Wow, bad combination. A few times I came close to losing my temper with them.
Eventually I just said, I’m going out to eat, no reason for me to suffer.
Hopefully this will be a warning to picky eaters, you have to do extra homework.
Being allergic or having principles is not picky.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Thank you, Luka.

For some reason the topic of food preferences can bring out the worst in people, on both sides of the issue.
Snarky comments by omnivores, self-righteousness by vegans...and those things always say more about the person saying them than about the topic or person they're about.
And of course self-righteousness and snark create the perfect storm of each feeding more of the other. And that's not what we come to the Forum to do, most of us.

Picky is a judgement; @Jersey, you can dine out on that all you like, but I'll pass, thanks. Omnivores are good people, and so are carnivores, and so are vegetarians, and so are vegans. Holding it all that way is a more pleasant place to live than choosing judgement.
 

Jersey

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
July 2017
I did not mean to offend anyone. In my circle we don’t consider the phrase picky eater to be a bad thing.
The two people I was referring to describe themselves as picky eaters.
The point I was trying to make is if you are careful about what you eat for any reason, being in a foreign country and not knowing the language can be difficult.
 
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