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LIVE from the Camino Starting the Camino del Norte January 30th 2024

Time of past OR future Camino
Frances: February 2020.
Hi all, I walked the CF in February 2020 while covid was ravaging Italy and prodding Spain. I had time constraints and often did two "stages" a day, I got shin splints pretty bad and kept walking. I am not a fast walker, I was always the last to arrive at the albergue (which wasn't a problem that time of year). SJPDP to Finisterre in 26 days. I don't recommend that pace to anyone but have zero regrets. I'm planning my second Camino now, going to walk Del Norte starting on January 30 in Bayonne and finishing in Muxia this time having 36 days. I don't expect much to be open and don't care, you always find your way on the Camino, I have never heard anyone not finding their way, just people who never read Meditations complaining about the way that they found. One foot in front of the other and you'll cry in front a cathedral or the ocean.... whichever you hold sacred because it's over.
 
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Hi all, I walked the CF in February 2020 while covid was ravaging Italy and prodding Spain. I had time constraints and often did two "stages" a day, I got shin splints pretty bad and kept walking. I am not a fast walker, I was always the last to arrive at the albergue (which wasn't a problem that time of year). SJPDP to Finisterre in 26 days. I don't recommend that pace to anyone but have zero regrets. I'm planning my second Camino now, going to walk Del Norte starting on January 30 in Bayonne and finishing in Muxia this time having 36 days. I don't expect much to be open and don't care, you always find your way on the Camino, I have never heard anyone not finding their way, just people who never read Meditations complaining about the way that they found. One foot in front of the other and you'll cry in front a cathedral or the ocean.... whichever you hold sacred because it's over.
You'll find your way, for sure!! Sounds like you are very excited. That's awesome. Enjoy!
 
Thanks Linda, You're awesome! and your positive and reassuring words are great for a forum people go to to gleen information on all things Camino!

I don't see much online on walking Caminos in February other than people who walked in April or September and comment on Albergues just opening or already closing for the season or on the availability/lack thereof of food every few kilometers. That is not useful or productive information. I walked the CF in February 2020 and am going to walk the Norte in February of 2024, I'll talk a little about my experience in 2020 and how that is informing my plans for 2024. This will take a few posts. I enthusiastically encourage responses from anyone who has been on Camino in February.
 
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1.) On February 1st 2020 in SJPDP at the Camino association office I received my credential, a shell and a list of OPEN Albergues, that's right, a list, on paper that I carried for the duration. I ALWAYS knew where the next open albergue was and they were not unreasonable distances, I often leapfrogged the list as my pace was ridiculous. I don't expect a list on the Norte, If I get one, sweet. I do plan on knowing (through my own due diligence, gronze, Booking, the current night's accomodation,etc.) where the next open albergue and/or reasonably priced accomodation is when we start walking any given day.
 
My advice is to check Gronze as well as Wise Pilgrim and Buen Camino. No app or website has every place to stay, and none are more than about 70% accurate on open/closed. Call first a day before to be sure and sometimes check a couple of days out when you are going through less populated areas.
 
Thank you It56, I will verify ahead with a phone call, good idea. One day on the CF in 2020 I put stock in an app that said there were two Albergues open somewhere past Pamplona, well they were wrong and I crested the big hill overlooking Pamplona and scrabbled down a treacherous path in the dark to get to the next one on the list(the list was bulletproof). There was only one other pilgrim in that albergue that night who had befallen a similar fate. We shared a laugh with swollen feet and slept like babies. Which kinda brings me to...

2.) Camino families. They are there, even in February. I walked the first two days with the same crowd and then pushed on to make kilometers. Throughout my journey I traveled with different people for sometimes a couple days, sometimes a couple weeks. It was wonderful getting to know them and I always felt a loss saying goodbye, some of them I'm still in contact with. I met one guy from Australia who's wife made him promise, as she was ill/dying that he would walk a Camino. He had no idea what a Camino was at the time but followed through. He started in December in Le Puy, I met him in the middle of Spain over two months later, he had lost 60+kg in that time. Flabbergasted, I said "so you've had to buy new clothes?" His response, "yeah I've bought a lot of clothes". I don't plan on finding the numbers of people on Del Norte that I found on the CF but there will be some and they will be doing the same thing I am.
 
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Hi all, I walked the CF in February 2020 while covid was ravaging Italy and prodding Spain. I had time constraints and often did two "stages" a day, I got shin splints pretty bad and kept walking. I am not a fast walker, I was always the last to arrive at the albergue (which wasn't a problem that time of year). SJPDP to Finisterre in 26 days. I don't recommend that pace to anyone but have zero regrets. I'm planning my second Camino now, going to walk Del Norte starting on January 30 in Bayonne and finishing in Muxia this time having 36 days. I don't expect much to be open and don't care, you always find your way on the Camino, I have never heard anyone not finding their way, just people who never read Meditations complaining about the way that they found. One foot in front of the other and you'll cry in front a cathedral or the ocean.... whichever you hold sacred because it's over.
It’s a blessing walking this early…..Ultreia!!

((And moderators…..this is not selfpromotion but sharing of valued memories….have some consideration please…))
 
It's nice to see some photos of a wintertime Camino, thanks for that!

3.) Availability of beds. This was a non issue on the Camino CF in February, one might think with all the talk of Albergues closing for the season, pilgrims having to keep walking because of full Albergues or needing to get up at 5am to get a bed at the next one that it might be hard to find a bed, or at least a lot of work. I experienced none of this. Beds available per capita pilgrim are abundant, I only got stuck with a top bunk (the last thing sore feet want is those little ladder rungs!) a couple of times. Even with local celebrations (Carnival in Melide, for instance) the albergue was not busy. On the Norte I will verify ahead each day that my destination Albergues/pensíons are open but I'm not worried about finding full accomodation or racing to get the last available bed.
 
Good luck Amigo. I did the Norte in September/ October this year - Biarritz to Muxia - 36 days with 1 rest day. Although this wasn’t a winter Camino - I had no problem finding accommodation. Prepare for a few hills but you’ll be fine. My next Camino will be a winter one, either Norte or CF so would really like to hear how your journey goes. Buen Camino!
 
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Good luck Amigo. I did the Norte in September/ October this year - Biarritz to Muxia - 36 days with 1 rest day. Although this wasn’t a winter Camino - I had no problem finding accommodation. Prepare for a few hills but you’ll be fine. My next Camino will be a winter one, either Norte or CF so would really like to hear how your journey goes. Buen Camino!
Thanks Paul, I hope our time frame is reasonable, I'm glad to hear yours was roughly the same. I will post daily when on the Way so there's an account here of a February Pilgrimage on the Norte.
 
Ok, morning of day one, we are on the Camino! we arrived yesterday 5pm in Bayonne. We (myself and my two Camino companions, Christine and Alyssa) checked in with Socorro Aguirre at her albergue, then she took us to the Cathedral to get our credentiales and a blessing from the priest. Socorro fed us soup, played a game with us and we got a much needed sleep after traveling for two days. Today we walk to Guéthery and stay at auberge GEO where we have made reservations. The weather is supposed to be nice today.
 
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Going to bed in Guéthery, we left Bayonne at 8:45am and arrived in Guéthery at 2:45pm, wonderful 6 bed albergue, the weather was sunny and 17°C /74°F degrees
Did you met any pilgrims on your way or in the albergues?
First i planned to walk a part of the Norte and then joining to the Primitivo (since i'm around Santillana del Mar at the moment) and then i started to thinking about the Portugese instead, because i had a feeling that nobody would be around. I like to be alone, but i like to have the opportunity to be sourrunded by nice people.
I walked the Francés in '22, all the way from SJPDP to Finisterre, started on 1 of March and there was always like 20-30 pilgrims around me during the day. It was just perfect.
 
No, Camera we haven't met any other pilgrims but there is three of us so we're not all alone. Jean Luc, the hostelero in Guéthery said we were the first of the year, Socorro in Bayonne said we were the second. I don't expect to see many, maybe any until we get on the Primitivo in 2 to 3 weeks.

We made it to Irùn today, we tried to take the coastal route to St Jean de Luz and at one point it was almost too overgrown to manage. We took the gr8 from Socoa to where it met up with the Camino track, most of the Camino was overgrown along the coast so we had to stay along the highway. Long day, good day, good to be back on Camino.
 
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No, Camera we haven't met any other pilgrims but there is three of us so we're not all alone. Jean Luc, the hostelero in Guéthery said we were the first of the year, Socorro in Bayonne said we were the second. I don't expect to see many, maybe any until we get on the Primitivo in 2 to 3 weeks.

We made it to Irùn today, we tried to take the coastal route to St Jean de Luz and at one point it was almost too overgrown to manage. We took the gr8 from Socoa to where it met up with the Camino track, most of the Camino was overgrown along the coast so we had to stay along the highway. Long day, good day, good to be back on Camino.
Thank you for your answer! It's nice that you have your own company! I try to be patient then and arrange a camino in October with more people around! Buen Camino to you and nice weather on your way!
 
Yesterday, Feb 1st, we left Pension Gema in Irun and walked to San Sebastian, staying at A Room In The City Hostel. We also met another lone pilgrim on the way! It was by far the most difficult stage so far, we don't have our trail legs yet. The whole day was overcast and a little cooler than the two previous, it was windy on Mt Jaizkibel and we had some amazing views before the marine layer engulfed us. It misted a light "rain" at times all day but not enough for me to put my pack cover on. Today it's on to Zarautz.
 
February 2nd, we left beautiful San Sebastian in 90 percent humidity in 12ish degrees walked to Zarautz where we're staying in Hostel Galerna. On the way, before Orio, the sun came out and we came upon a pilgrim stop and were invited in for coffee and homemade bread and the warmth of a fire, the warmth wasn't really needed but the dryness was really appreciated. Wonderful people. We opted for the coastal deviation into Zarautz and it was well worth it
 
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Day 5, we left Zarautz and opted for the coastal route to Zumaia, a beautiful walk by the sea. We also opted for the coastal route from there to Deba which may have been the most stunning yet, and also the most brutal, the apps we are using to navigate (buen Camino and Gronze Maps) show the profile of the southern (official?) route and we weren't aware of that until looking more closely at the waypoints and such. I still would have taken this way but it's much easier to be mentally prepared. It was sunny and got to 14°, perfect weather. We stayed at the Deba albergue in the train station and our stay coincided with some celebration in the village. I love Basque country,🙂👍
 
February 2nd, we left beautiful San Sebastian in 90 percent humidity in 12ish degrees walked to Zarautz where we're staying in Hostel Galerna. On the way, before Orio, the sun came out and we came upon a pilgrim stop and were invited in for coffee and homemade bread and the warmth of a fire, the warmth wasn't really needed but the dryness was really appreciated. Wonderful people. We opted for the coastal deviation into Zarautz and it was well worth it
What was hostel galerna like?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Like a cheap place to rest your head. It was better equipped than most municipal albergues I stayed in on the Frances, it was a little dingy but it fit the bill perfectly for a Camino stop. I will give it credit for free towels, very hot water, location, a dishwasher so you don't have to do dishes and I slept like a baby. I know it has horrible reviews on Hostelworld but I would think many municipal and donativo albergues would fare worse if they were on that app. It's the logical stay for the pilgrim on a budget, I will also note there is an electric hotplate I didn't notice or was absent in pictures.
 
Like a cheap place to rest your head. It was better equipped than most municipal albergues I stayed in on the Frances, it was a little dingy but it fit the bill perfectly for a Camino stop. I will give it credit for free towels, very hot water, location, a dishwasher so you don't have to do dishes and I slept like a baby. I know it has horrible reviews on Hostelworld but I would think many municipal and donativo albergues would fare worse if they were on that app. It's the logical stay for the pilgrim on a budget, I will also note there is an electric hotplate I didn't notice or was absent in pictures.
Thanks, will be following your updates.....Buen Camino
 
Day 6, February 4, I left Deba in humid cool air and after a steep climb out of town was down to a long sleeve t-shirt. The tavern in Olatz was open so I sat and had a couple coffees and enjoyed the tranquility. The walk to Markina Xemein was less demanding than I expected, the descent into town was pretty steep, I wouldn't want to do it in the rain (muddy/rocky). From there the walk to Bolibar was a nice slow uphill grade. We stayed in Usandi Hostel, Gronze said it wasn't open until March but due diligence searching proved otherwise. A very nice place to stay, top and bottom sheets with pillowcase.(it's the little things 😉)
 
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I have walked that section of the Norte twice and that tavern was never open. Lucky you!

Deba to Bolibar 👏
And on a Sunday morning to boot! Maybe that was why, with the church across the street.

Day 7, February 5th, I got a late start leaving Bolibar (8:45) but made good time even stopping for a picnic lunch at the church in the valley before Marmiz and having coffee in Gernika waiting to time my arrival in Pozueta for after 4 at the Caserio Pozueta Hostel. I opted for dinner there (a bed 15€ plus dinner 12€) awesome! I'm writing this completely sated from a four course homecooked meal (soup, huge salad, cooked peppers with fried pork, and dessert) in a hundreds year old farmhouse complete with chickens run by a lovely couple. The weather was overcast in the morning and sunny all afternoon, high of around 13°/14°, it's giving the same for tomorrow.
 
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Day 5, we left Zarautz and opted for the coastal route to Zumaia, a beautiful walk by the sea. We also opted for the coastal route from there to Deba which may have been the most stunning yet, and also the most brutal, the apps we are using to navigate (buen Camino and Gronze Maps) show the profile of the southern (official?) route and we weren't aware of that until looking more closely at the waypoints and such. I still would have taken this way but it's much easier to be mentally prepared. It was sunny and got to 14°, perfect weather. We stayed at the Deba albergue in the train station and our stay coincided with some celebration in the village. I love Basque country,🙂👍
Tell me more about the brutal coastal route to Deba😀
 
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Day 8, February 6, I walked from Pozueta to Bilbao in cloudy turning into sunny weather, the signs read 16° I stopped for coffee in Larrabetzu and Lezamo before going over the hill to Bilbao. It was an easy walk compared to the previous stages and I completed in shorter time than apps estimated while taking my time. We stayed in Ganbara self check-in hostel which had a picture of a kitchen but wasn't available to us (maybe low season self check-in time?).
 
Day 9, February 7th, we walked from Bilbao to Portugalete taking the official route. It was a short relatively easy, mostly urban walk, which is good because tomorrow will be a long one. We are staying at the Bida Ona albergue in Portugalete, there are two other pilgrims here as well, we exchanged information with them as you do. The mercury said a high of 16 but the overcast skies and a wind made it feel much cooler.


Tell me more about the brutal coastal route to Deba😀
I'm not surprised to hear the coastal route to Deba is a UNESCO site. Beautiful vistas, one after another(because you're going up and down) rock formations reaching into the sea, bright green pastures dropping off to sand and stone cliffs, then over another hill to a sewage treatment plant with a final, stage ending crescendo up up to a chapel on top a hill where you'll say a prayer of thanks for the water spigot there followed by a steep descent to Deba. It's worth it. Just be prepared.

IMG-20240207-WA0002.jpgIMG-20240207-WA0001.jpgIMG-20240207-WA0005.jpgIMG-20240207-WA0004.jpgIMG-20240207-WA0003.jpg20240203_135447.jpg20240203_171643.jpg20240203_101333.jpg
 
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Day 9, February 7th, we walked from Bilbao to Portugalete taking the official route. It was a short relatively easy, mostly urban walk, which is good because tomorrow will be a long one. We are staying at the Bida Ona albergue in Portugalete, there are two other pilgrims here as well, we exchanged information with them as you do. The mercury said a high of 16 but the overcast skies and a wind made it feel much cooler.



I'm not surprised to hear the coastal route to Deba is a UNESCO site. Beautiful vistas, one after another(because you're going up and down) rock formations reaching into the sea, bright green pastures dropping off to sand and stone cliffs, then over another hill to a sewage treatment plant with a final, stage ending crescendo up up to a chapel on top a hill where you'll say a prayer of thanks for the water spigot there followed by a steep descent to Deba. It's worth it. Just be prepared.View attachment 163619View attachment 163620View attachment 163622View attachment 163623View attachment 163624View attachment 163625View attachment 163626
Lovely quality of light in those photos 📸 👏
 
Day 10, February 8, we left Portugalete in 30 or 40 km winds and they didn't let up all day and I'm listening to them howl now outside the hostel in Islares. We opted for the coastal route because, well, I'll always opt for the coastal route, and today it shaved a few kilometers of the official stage and provided some beautiful ocean views. Christine said it was the first time a beanie was ever blown off her head. There were a few scattered rain drops but not enough to get wet(I never put on my rain jacket). We're staying at Islares pilgrim Hostel, it nice, it's only 8 months old so new everything.


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Day 11, February 9th, we left Islares in 18°, it was still a little bit breezy but nothing like the gales of the night before. We opted for the coastal route again (always) and were rewarded with some more spectacular views, the weather held out until we reached the Municipal hostel in Colindres(5€). We went out in the rain for a nice meal with money we saved on our beds for the night. This is the first real rain we've seen so far, there's been a few drops a couple evenings but I put on my rain jacket today for the first time since my layover in New York on the way here. There are wind advisories for tomorrow and a good chance of rain in the forecast so it will be.... interesting 🤔.20240209_134445.jpg20240209_141717.jpg20240209_131953.jpg20240209_124005.jpg20240209_095643.jpg20240209_151826.jpg20240209_140136.jpg20240209_145611.jpg20240209_141752.jpg
 
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Day 12, February 10th, We left Colindres with a good breeze in 10°. For the next couple hours it drizzled a little bit and when we got to Escalante, a foreboding darkness convinced me to put on my rain jacket. We were hit with some sideways rain for about half an hour and then it lifted and was dry for the rest of the walk, albeit windy.... very windy. We're staying v in Father Ernesto's Albergue in Güemes, this place is amazing, it's a donation based stop organized by an old priest in a communal style. We got a private heated room with a bathroom (probably because of low season. There were three other french pilgrims here tonight so it was a nice intimate dinner with them,Ernesto and his As couple winter volunteers.

On the walk today we had to backtrack twice, once for following arrows that weren't yellow and once for following yellow arrows because different apps had different routes and I think there are
arrows on all of them.
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Hi all, I walked the CF in February 2020 while covid was ravaging Italy and prodding Spain. I had time constraints and often did two "stages" a day, I got shin splints pretty bad and kept walking. I am not a fast walker, I was always the last to arrive at the albergue (which wasn't a problem that time of year). SJPDP to Finisterre in 26 days. I don't recommend that pace to anyone but have zero regrets. I'm planning my second Camino now, going to walk Del Norte starting on January 30 in Bayonne and finishing in Muxia this time having 36 days. I don't expect much to be open and don't care, you always find your way on the Camino, I have never heard anyone not finding their way, just people who never read Meditations complaining about the way that they found. One foot in front of the other and you'll cry in front a cathedral or the ocean.... whichever you hold sacred because it's over.
Thanks,@OdysseusSympath. Much appreciated. I completed my first Camino last September and am already planning my 'del Norte' for May/June next year.
Go well!
 
Day 13, February 11, we had breakfast with Father Ernesto and company and had a late start as a result. The sun came out, the wind toned down and we had a beautiful walk along the coast to Somo where I thought I knew how to read a ferry schedule, thought we missed it and walked to Pedreña and deeper water hoping to get one there. We did get one there but had to wait for it to go to Somo and come back 😂. We took the ferry to Santander and continued on to Boo de Pielagos where we arrived at dusk at the Piedad Albergue, stuffing our faces in the associated tavern with big burgers with all the fixings complete with bacon and an egg(6€ each). It was a relatively flat walk in good weather, i.e. wearing sunglasses and no rain jacket 😎, the high was 14°
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Day 14, February 12th, I left Boo de Pielagos at 8:30am because I still had my alarm set for 7 from the night before and couldn't resist a coffee at the Albergue tavern. I walked to Comillas, my app said it was 46km, that is the longest day yet but I made good time and arrived before sunset. It was crazy windy, like lean into it wind, they were saying it was 75km/hr and while I could see rain clouds around me, I only got rained on for about five minutes, I never put on my jacket. The sun also came out now and then and the wind kept me dry and cool. We got a hotel in Comillas due to no albergue availability for this section, it looks better after this.20240212_133235.jpg20240212_171352.jpg20240212_114715.jpg20240212_142948.jpg20240212_183050.jpg20240212_175148.jpg20240212_100615.jpg20240212_083925.jpg20240212_172556.jpg20240212_093039.jpg
 
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Just found this post. Great updates, im doing the del Norte in April so will be avidly following your posts. Keep up the good work. Bien Camino.
 
These pictures are excellent, thank you! We'll be back on the Norte in about a month to resume our camino in Gijón. These pictures and my morning coffee get the heart racing every morning when I check on the forum. And yes, respect on that 46km day.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Day 15, February 13th, we left Comillas with a great forecast and the weather folks were right on(it happens now and again). We inadvertently took the coastal route at Ria de la Rabia(no regrets, there was a sharp turn we didn't notice admiring the beautiful river scene). We stopped for coffee in San Vicente de la Barquera and called the albergue in Colombres that Gronze said was open but advised to confirm in the low season, it was closed so I had to push on to Pendueles where there were two Albergue options that were both open, I opted for Albergue bar Castiellu. Albergue bar Castiellu was great, the rooms are above the bar, I got a home cooked meal and a warm reception, arriving as night had fallen because I took the slightly longer coastal route from Franca to Pendueles through pastures along the cliffs, along small gravel farm roads by secluded beaches fed by caves from the sea, once coaxing a cow to get out of my way.20240213_185427.jpg20240213_184502.jpg20240213_090146.jpg20240213_181938.jpg20240213_091438.jpg20240213_124203.jpg20240213_113556.jpg20240213_185808.jpg20240213_181746.jpg20240213_180809.jpg
 
February 2nd, we left beautiful San Sebastian in 90 percent humidity in 12ish degrees walked to Zarautz where we're staying in Hostel Galerna. On the way, before Orio, the sun came out and we came upon a pilgrim stop and were invited in for coffee and homemade bread and the warmth of a fire, the warmth wasn't really needed but the dryness was really appreciated. Wonderful people. We opted for the coastal deviation into Zarautz and it was well worth it
That's a cult from the USA btw...
 
Day 16, February 14th, I left Pendueles as the sun came up, the yellow flechas led me to the coast and more spectacular scenery. The walk to Llanes was enjoyable in more nice weather, there were a lot of clouds, little to no wind and the temp got up to 20° today, at certain moments it even felt muggy. I had coffee by the canal in Llanes and moved on, my day ended in Piñeres de Pria at the Albergue La Llosa de Cosme where I have the whole wood stove heated cabana to myself. For dinner I picked up some eggs, sausages, a steak and some peppers and an onion in the town before (both Gronze and the albergue folks warned that there wasn't a restaurant or shop) and cooked a feast in the outdoor kitchen on the side of the cabana. They also washed my clothes as part of the 12€ package, thumbs way up for this place.
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Day 5, we left Zarautz and opted for the coastal route to Zumaia, a beautiful walk by the sea. We also opted for the coastal route from there to Deba which may have been the most stunning yet, and also the most brutal, the apps we are using to navigate (buen Camino and Gronze Maps) show the profile of the southern (official?) route and we weren't aware of that until looking more closely at the waypoints and such. I still would have taken this way but it's much easier to be mentally prepared. It was sunny and got to 14°, perfect weather. We stayed at the Deba albergue in the train station and our stay coincided with some celebration in the village. I love Basque country,🙂👍
Hello Odysseus

Is this coastal route very difficult to find / follow please? I am walking alone and am not 100% sure I'll find the way. Is it marked or can it only be found using GPS?
 
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Day 14, February 12th, I left Boo de Pielagos at 8:30am because I still had my alarm set for 7 from the night before and couldn't resist a coffee at the Albergue tavern. I walked to Comillas, my app said it was 46km, that is the longest day yet but I made good time and arrived before sunset. It was crazy windy, like lean into it wind, they were saying it was 75km/hr and while I could see rain clouds around me, I only got rained on for about five minutes, I never put on my jacket. The sun also came out now and then and the wind kept me dry and cool. We got a hotel in Comillas due to no albergue availability for this section, it looks better after this.View attachment 164034View attachment 164035View attachment 164036View attachment 164037View attachment 164038View attachment 164039View attachment 164040View attachment 164041View attachment 164042View attachment 164043
For those of us who can't do 46ks is there a halfway stop you'd recommend? Many thanks for all your words of advise on here it's amazing, I feel like I'm there with you!
 
Hello Odysseus

Is this coastal route very difficult to find / follow please? I am walking alone and am not 100% sure I'll find the way. Is it marked or can it only be found using GPS?

For those of us who can't do 46ks is there a halfway stop you'd recommend? Many thanks for all your words of advise on here it's amazing, I feel like I'm there with you!
I would definitely recommend using Buen Camino or Gronze Maps(it's an app that only does the map function, separate from the website) for some of the coastal routes. @Perigrina2000 on this forum has a downloadable pdf of many of them, I don't know if the ones I've take recently are on it but it's worth a look. They are marked but the ones through pastures are literally just through pastures often times with gates for walkers to pass from field to field. I use the apps when I'm in doubt.

I am passing a lot of albergues that are closed because I'm doing this in February, many of them that I pass say they open in March. Gronze is the go-to for looking at options. There are always many options but many of them are pensions that cost more. If you're going to walk the Norte in the busier season there will be albergue options for any distance. If I don't stay at it I'm not going to say anything about it. Thank you for your well wishes, I appreciate it 🙏🙂
 
Hello Odysseus

Is this coastal route very difficult to find / follow please? I am walking alone and am not 100% sure I'll find the way. Is it marked or can it only be found using GPS?
I strongly recommend having GPS for the coastal alternatives — not so much for finding the trail once you are on the coast, but frequently the camino is a km or so away from the coast and the access will not be obvious. One exception would be Zumaia to Deba on the Ruta del Flysch. That is so well know that everyone in town will be able to point you there. I didn’t walk the coast from Zarautz to Zumaia, but it’s on my list!

For those of us who can't do 46ks is there a halfway stop you'd recommend?

Gronze shows many places to stay between Boo and Comillas.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Day 17, February 15, I left Piñeres de Pria before sunrise trying to get an early start because I had a long day ahead of me. There was rain in the forecast but not until afternoon, the first part of the day was the warmest I've seen yet, it got up to 24° or more with warm gusts one minute and chilly gusts the next. I found myself trying to find my way up a grassy pasture with no apparent path, dodging(or not) piles of animal dung in the early morning darkness (joys of the Camino). I stopped for coffee in Ribadasella and moved on. By the time I reached Berbes, my pants were rolled up to my knees, my shades on and I needed a break so I sat down all sweaty at a little cafe and had a coffee (what's wrong with me). I needed another rest and wanted to check the radar in Colunga, by now the gusts were all cold and there were ominous clouds about. While sitting under a cafe awning with a coffee the sky opened up so I was able to put on my rain gear in shelter and continue on my way to Sebrayo and the year round municipal Albergue here. I've had some very long days of late getting to open albergues and I'm happy the next couple days will be mid 20km between stops and relatively flat, I need and want to rest/recouperate before tackling the Primitivo and the inherent ups and downs.
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For those of us who can't do 46ks is there a halfway stop you'd recommend? Many thanks for all your words of advise on here it's amazing, I feel like I'm there with you!
Santillana del Mar is beautiful with cobblestone streets and amazing ancient buildings and well worth a stop if that is an option for you, it is about 15km before Comillas. Then the next day it is about 30km to San Vicente de la Barquera which is another beautiful place in this beautiful part of Spain.

As a caveat, I have not walked the Camino Norte! But have visited and stayed in the above places many times!
 
Day 18, February 16th. The municipal Albergue in Sebrayo had a nice hot shower and no heat, so I had a long rejuvenating sleep wrapped in the ample supply of blankets they had(I prefer sleeping in a cool room). I left at 9:00am and walked to Villaviciosa where I lazed around and had coffee at a couple different cafés enjoying the park and plaza scenes there. I opted for the walk to the monestary at Valdedíos because Gronze suggested it but the grounds were closed and apart from looking through the gate the high walls prevented me from seeing much. There was a pretty good climb after Valdedíos and with the Rocky theme playing in my head I got an awesome view from the top of the hill just past Alto de la Campa. I finished my day in Vega de Sariega at the municipal Albergue here. It was sunny and 15°🌞

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Day 19, February 17th. I left the albergue in Vega de Sariega after sunrise and another long deep sleep, in a long sleeve t-shirt because the forecast was good and it gives incentive to warm up. It was a relatively flat easy walk and I stopped for coffee in Pola de Siero, El Berrón, and Colloto before arriving in Oviedo at the Green Hostel. I got there early enough to get out and see the town, getting filled in on a lot of the history there by Christine who had bussed ahead and visited the museums and historical sites. That night coincided with the town partying till all hours, complete with mc concert, parades with lots of drums and everyone in costumes of all kinds, it was like Halloween. We asked one man with son, both in costume what the occasion was and he said " I don't know how to translate, it's a party". The weather was great again, sunny and 16ish.
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Day 20, February 18th. I left(a very clean) Oviedo, dodging a few street sweepers(they must have been doing their final pass because there wasn't a cigarette butt to be seen) on the way out of town. Another good forecast come true had me wishing I'd have put on my only short sleeve t-shirt. I stopped and had coffee in a couple small towns I wasn't expecting that option, heading for San Juan de Villapañada. I knew there wasn't any services at my destination so I planned to buy snacks and food for my evening meal in Grado where there are plenty grocery stores. There are plenty of grocery stores in Grado but the only thing open on Domingo was the petrol station mini mart with a less than stellar selection. I grabbed what I could and ate a big double burger with bacon, egg and cheese( not ideal right before a good climb to the albergue) at a local cafe and headed up the hill. I arrived at the Albergue minutes before it started to rain. Domingo had left the door open for me (I had called ahead, and yes, Domingo on Domingo 😁) , he showed up a little while later to take payment and show me the ropes. I was able to do my laundry there as well, although I had to get creative in drying it. There was also some food for a donativo available.
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I left(a very clean) Oviedo, dodging a few street sweepers(they must have been doing their final pass because there wasn't a cigarette butt to be seen)
This never ceases to amaze me. I remember leaving Lugo very early on the morning after the final shebang of the Arde Lucus festivities, and a little army of workers had everything pretty much cleaned up. Leaving Salamanca one morning, I came across a guy driving a vaccuum machine about the size of a fork lift, something I had never seen before, while all the apartment building entrances were being cleaned and swept by the porteros of those buildings. It is pretty astonishing.

Domingo had left the door open for me (I had called ahead, and yes, Domingo on Domingo 😁) ,
Domingo sometimes gets a bad rap, but he is a dedicated and kind hospitalero! Were you all alone in the albergue?
 
Domingo sometimes gets a bad rap, but he is a dedicated and kind hospitalero! Were you all alone in the albergue?
I was all alone, and I concur, Domingo is a kind and dedicated hospitalero. I needed to do laundry and he strung up a clothesline, standing on chairs and resourcing the corner of the vending machine here and hook on a wall there as it was raining outside. He was also very thorough in explaining all the albergue had to offer. Even after I told him " no bebo alcohol" he went through the extensive selection of bottles available for purchase while I had redrum visions of an Austurian Shining in a lone albergue in the mountains.....all said and done I'm glad I stayed there and I'll remember him kindly.
 
Day 21, February 19th. I left San Juan de Villapañada after a breakfast of scrambled eggs and cheese cooked in a heap of butter and washed down with a few swigs of cream( yes, I said cream). I'm doing this low carb and burning fat and I'm upping my fat intake which I'm having to be creative about. I'm in the mountains now and services are farther apart than before so I'm making sure I have a good supply of snacks with me and stopping on benches or picnic tables on the Way when I come across them. It was cool and overcast all day long like I was walking inside a cloud (I kinda was) but it never rained a drop. There is a lot more dirt path and my body appreciates it. I stopped for coffee in Salas and stocked up on food before walking the last 8km or so with a 420m climb to La Espina where I stayed at El Cruce albergue there. There was a hotplate setup so I bought some food at the store below the albergue and had a good meal.
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Day 22, February 20th. I left La Espina with the sun already up and burning away the fog. Another good forecast left me in no rush to beat rain or with any other reason to hurry. My walk was beautiful, the altitude gave for amazing views and the sun lit them up like magic. I stopped for coffee in Tineo and headed out of town, as I was leaving, I was looking ahead for a shop to resupply for the next day's unsupported stage given there was only a cafe/bar at my destination (Borres). I couldn't see one one the map so I backtracked to the Alimerka and stocked up(*there are two shops in Campiella 3km before Borres I wasn't aware of) and added a couple km to my day. I caffeinated again in Campiella and continued to Borres and the Barin bar to check in and eat, meeting another peregrino planning the same Hospitales route I was the following day. The weather was gorgeous.
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Day 23, February 21st. We left the municipal albergue in Borres hoping I had enough water for the trek to Berducedo via Hospitales(1.5L, and yes, it was enough). I also had an ample supply of snacks because there is essentially nothing until Berducedo. The forecast was giving wind but no rain, and they were accurate, as soon as we stepped above maybe the 1000m line we were in the wind zone with like lean into it to stay on the mountain wind. The wind made the long uphill slog a whole body affair every step and slow going. It's the first day I've worn my fleece vest, winter cap and light gloves while walking uphill (that's usually when I warm up and shed stuff). It was a beautiful view from the top and I'm happy to have lucked out weather wise. The descent was a bit steep in places with loose rocks, but you descend only about half the altitude you climb on this stage. A hot shower and cup of coffee were welcome when we arrived at Berducedo and the newly renovated municipal Albergue here.
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The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Day 23, February 21st. We left the municipal albergue in Borres hoping I had enough water for the trek to Berducedo via Hospitales(1.5L, and yes, it was enough). I also had an ample supply of snacks because there is essentially nothing until Berducedo. The forecast was giving wind but no rain, and they were accurate, as soon as we stepped above maybe the 1000m line we were in the wind zone with like lean into it to stay on the mountain wind. The wind made the long uphill slog a whole body affair every step and slow going. It's the first day I've worn my fleece vest, winter cap and light gloves while walking uphill (that's usually when I warm up and shed stuff). It was a beautiful view from the top and I'm happy to have lucked out weather wise. The descent was a bit steep in places with loose rocks, but you descend only about half the altitude you climb on this stage. A hot shower and cup of coffee were welcome when we arrived at Berducedo and the newly renovated municipal Albergue here.
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Thanks for your updates!
 
I'm amazed at your ability to post photos in the morning before you start walking. Thanks for all the information and great descriptions, I really like the news about shops, cooking and sleeping plans. Enjoy your final days walking.
 
Day 24, February 22nd. I didn't leave the Albergue until 10am after a breakfast, it was already raining and wasn't giving to let up and the wind was howling to boot so I suited up in my rain gear and headed out.The other peregrino in the albergue left a short while before me. I stopped for a coffee in La Mesa at the Albergue/bar there and continued on leaning into the pelting rain, I ran into the other peregrino heading back to La Mesa to wait out the worst of the weather. He never did show up in Grandes de Salime. I was committed and carried on down the 830m descent to the Grandas reservoir, after a couple hundred meters descent the wind abated a bit as I hoped it would. Gronze refers to this descent as Pyrenean, I don't know exactly what is meant by that(the scale of it? the slope? both?) but I was very happy with the shale path ensuring good footing even in the rain and the grade wasn't as bad as others I've come down recently. At some point I lost my pack cover, I have no idea where, when I took my pack off in Grandes it wasn't there, that's all I know man. The guy at the municipal Albergue in Grandes was kind enough to give me a couple trash bags as I'll need them for tomorrow's mountaintop 0° sleet festivities, good times, February decided to show up after all.
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Day 25, February 23rd. I heard from the other peregrino who had made retreat the day before. He had stayed in La Mesa for the evening, and noticing his Achilles was sore, got the bus to Grandes and visited the doctor there. He decided to stay in Grandes for the day and recouperate.
I left the albergue late(10am after a breakfast I cooked in the kitchen there) and headed out clad in rain gear because it was giving to rain/snow all day. I stopped for coffee in Malneira and continued. It was raining until Peñafuente, where the snow line began and snow was the order of the day. By the time I got to where the way heads, rather steeply upwards to Alto del Acevo the path was covered in 7ish cm of snow with big flakes coming down. The path was much easier to navigate than it looked, the wet snow packing down nicely with very little slippage, I knew I had to continue moving to keep my feet warm (they were soaked through an hour into my day) so I went up and over. I had hoped there would be less snow on the other side of the pass, there wasn't. I was delighted to find Mesón Catro Ventos restaurant open about 6km before A Fonsarada, my destination, and the municipal albergue there. I arrived caked in snow, very tired, and contemplating a rest day.
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Wow you've made the right choice having a coffee day! Hope the weather settles for you to be able to continue comfortably tomorrow.
 
There was lots of snow and the temp was rising and continuing to rain so taking a day off made sense to every part of me
Wow … so much snow on the Norte …
Certainly makes sense to take a rest day - take care of yourself. It looks like it’s well deserved.

Ps. In the pics the snow looks heavenly but that’s looking at it from afar (here in Oz).

Buen camino.
 
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Day 27, February 25th, I left A Fonsarada clad in rain gear again as it was supposed to rain all day. I was rested and felt good, even when my shoes soaked through before an hour was up (I signed up for this 😃). Almost all the snow had melted as I had hoped, so water was the order of the day today, buckets of it. Water came down and sideways, leaving A Fonsarada you go up again and over another "Alto" de something or other, there are ruins of a Hospital up there I took shelter from the pelting rain for a minute, all I had to do was stand next to a lee wall. Coming down the other side, the wind calmed as the altitude dropped. Maybe 2 or 3km before A Lastra there is a church with a gate that appeared locked but my velociraptor self had try the handle and I was able to take a dry snack break in the covered entrance. When I came out the gate again there were two other hikers/pilgrims? and their support vehicle. The driver of the support vehicle said it was impassable about a km ahead and offered to give me a lift to A Lastra, showing me a video he had taken of a torrent crossing the Way. I didn't think it looked impassable, declined the lift and went ahead, I was able to leap it, albeit getting one foot on the bank and one in the drink. After A Lastra the heavy rains/snowmelt had maxed out the drainage ditches and there was lots of overflow so it was climbing a bank here, jumping through the lesser of two puddles there for a few kms. The first coffee break/open café was O Cádavo, where I sat dripping, watching sideways rain, the gusts opening and closing the café door. I wrapped up again, mentally preparing myself and continued on my way to Castroverde, my destination at the municipal albergue there. As soon as I stepped out the rain stopped and except for scattered showers it was dry(nothing was dry😐), the sun even came out for a bit. The Way was full of puddles and near Castroverde, between two walls the path had standing water from wall to wall. Providence presented a farmer on a tractor at that moment and he gave me a lift on the back through the 50m pond(the Camino provides).
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The driver of the support vehicle said it was impassable about a km ahead and offered to give me a lift to A Lastra, showing me a video he had taken of a torrent crossing the Way.
Even in good weather, there are some who stay on the road (LU-530) and avoid the beautiful little dip down to O Couto and up to A Lastra. So you are a trooper! The last time I was through, the Xunta had done its best to put hormigón on the steep path up, but mother nature had already let the Xunta know what she thought of that! On the ascent to A Lastra, I met a toothless man coming down, who was somewhere in the 50-80 year range and tried to explain something to me that I just could not understand. In the bar in A Lastra, I learned that this guy walks up and down every day for exercise. But it sounds like today was not a day he would be out in.

Good food in the mesón in Castroverde!
 
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Day 28, February 26.
Even in good weather, there are some who stay on the road (LU-530) and avoid the beautiful little dip down to O Couto and up to A Lastra. So you are a trooper! The last time I was through, the Xunta had done its best to put hormigón on the steep path up, but mother nature had already let the Xunta know what she thought of that! On the ascent to A Lastra, I met a toothless man coming down, who was somewhere in the 50-80 year range and tried to explain something to me that I just could not understand. In the bar in A Lastra, I learned that this guy walks up and down every day for exercise. But it sounds like today was not a day he would be out in.

Good food in the mesón in Castroverde!
I passed the toothless guy with the cane, he was there on my way up, I tried to tell him "mucho agua", he laughed, said something I didn't understand and kept walking 😂.
 
Hey Dan, was fun to stumble across your journey and pictures. It's always amazing how fast and slow time can be on the Camino.
Buen Camino my friend.
Kathy Jo
from Mpls
 
Day 28, February 26th, I left the albergue in Castroverde early(for me) as I was planning on walking to the little municipal albergue in San Román da Retorta. I had a coffee before leaving town because I had read there was no place to stop between there and Lugo, that was correct with the exception of a sheltered vending spot I was happy to sit and snack and rest my legs and feet(the vending machines and microwave usually there were removed for the winter). I made it to Lugo had a coffee, replaced lost mittens, did some grocery shopping and headed on for San Román da Retorta. The sun came out on my way in to Lugo and the weather held except for a few brief showers until my destination but there was still quite a bit of water flowing on the Way. There was one more vending machine spot with a bathroom, picnic table, both a snack and coffee vending machine, and a stamp for my credential(a private converted garage excellently done). Shortly after(1to3km) after the vending spot I came upon two big dogs unleashed at the end of a driveway and one of them bit me pretty good on the hip(big german shepherd looking bastard), the negligent owner immediately started screaming at the dogs as I scuttled on looking to see if the bite broke through my pants (it didn't but I do have a wound and discovered the next morning my raincoat was ripped). I arrived very tired and still wet at the Wonderful little, cozy, warm albergue in San Román da Retorta and slept well. *While crossing the river in Lugo it became apparent this may be more than average rainfall.
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The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Day 29, February 27th. I left San Román da Retorta at 10am(the hostelero had said it was "todo tranquilo") and headed for Melide. After a few kilometers I came across a hotel bar that served breakfast in O Burgo that was happy to make me a tortilla con queso sin patatas(low carb, they also cater to vegans, low price, highly recommend). I had hoped to stop at at least one of a couple other cafés mentioned by pilgrims on Gronze but none were open until closer to Melide. There was a rest stop with a water spigot where I chugged the last of my water and discovered it was off (for the season?)😐, it was my fault for not refilling when I had the chance. It was in Irago de Arriba I found the next open café (bar Carburo) and rested my feet. It was a relatively flat walk into Melide where I feasted on plates of pulpo I had been anticipating🤤. The only open albergue was the municipal where there was probably 20 or so pilgrims. It didn't rain and I arrived with dry feet.
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Day 30th, February 28th. We left Melide(reunited with Christine who had come down to walk sections of the Frances) after breakfast at a local cafe heading for O Pedrouzo. I went ahead stopped for coffee and sat long enough to post a day's progress so we arrived at Arzua at the same time and stocked up on groceries, changing the destination to the Santa Irena municipal Albergue(cutting a couple kilometers off of our day). We arrived at the Santa Irena Albergue at dusk to find a note on the door saying that it was closed(just that day) and sorry for the inconvenience. So on to Pedrouzo we went with headlamps, it was only two and a half more kilometers to the municipal albergue there. We dined on microwave fare and slept well. It didn't rain and we were grateful.
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Day 31, February 29th.
*(I have never tried to attach files/pictures other than thumbnails, it happens when service gets interrupted while uploading)
We left Pedrouzo after coffee and breakfast at a local cafe for our final approach to Santiago. We stopped a few times, drawing out our relatively short day and arrived mid afternoon. There were scattered showers all day, a bright sun convinced me at one point to take my rain jacket off prematurely. We headed to the Cathedral and then to the Last Stamp Albergue because it has a kitchen and is in the old town. We feasted on steak and salad and walked around the beautiful city.
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Congratulations, on completing your Camino, thanks for taking the time to keep us updated. You walked some long days and documented that a Norte in Winter, using a good number of Albergues is possible.

Enjoy Santiago, a nice celebratory lunch in San Martin Pinario, in a lovely setting, at reasonable cost, is worth investigating...

Well done!
 
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Well done pilgrim, well done. Thank you for your updates and photos and stories. You survived the ups and downs, the wind the rain, the long and short of it. Even an unfortunate dog bite. Congratulations! 🥳
Say hello to Santiago for me.
Now, where to next? 😎👣🌻
 
Day 32, March 1st. It's not over yet! In February 2020, when I walked the Frances, I walked from SJPD P to Finistère and waded into the ocean sin ropa.
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This journey ends in Muxía, sitting wet in a cafe as I write this the cold north Atlantic dip is still up in the air. Day 32 was spent lounging in Santiago, Christine decided to go to Barcelona to see all things Gaudi and I will continue walking to Muxía. Thank you for all your congrats but I'm not done yet.
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Day 33, March 2nd. I ate up half the day eating breakfast and drinking coffee and tracing my Santiago footsteps of four years ago with Christine before heading to Alto da Peña. The Way to Finistère/Muxía is beautiful even before you leave city limits(I had forgotten that). I stopped for coffee a few kilometers(8?) out of Santiago and there really wasn't another opportunity until Negreira, where I stocked up on snacks/groceries and discovered my debit card had expired(woops) and had a couple coffees on hold with my Credit card company working out a cash advance(sorted). My late departure and delay in Negreira left me walking in darkness with a headlamp the last couple hours to Alto da Pena where I stayed at the privately run albergue there. It rained a little but one advantage of leaving Santiago late was I avoided most of the weather the other perigrinos were drying out from in Alto da Pena.
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Hello,

How far is Alto da Pena from Negreira?

I have always stayed at municipal albergue in Negreira. Years ago it was spotless.

But, seems to be otherwise now.

Really enjoying your camino posts.
 
Day 34, March 3rd. I left Alto da Pena with a sunny sky and a cool breeze heading for Dumbría, about 5km past the Finistère/Muxía split. It rained a little but the optimistic forecast convinced me to use my pack cover and rain coat but no rain pants(too hot and clamy). I got a little wet but dried out quickly after the showers. There was only one coffee option that I passed up because I hadn't walked far enough and then nothing until Olviera. I snacked in a bus stop because it was the only dry seat I came across, there were a handful of nice rest areas along the way but none sheltered. There was a nice restaurant in Olviera where I had a coffee and continued on. Shortly before the Finistère/Muxía split there is a restaurant with a sign that says there's no café or restaurant for 15km going to Finistère and they play that up to their best. I had a coffee and a tortilla sin patata and when I got the bill, memory of this establishment came flooding back, everything there costs a euro or two more than anywhere else in Spain. 5km more and I was in Dumbría with a cafe/supermercado with some of the most reasonable prices of the trip. The municipal albergue in Dumbría had blankets and a few pots and pans, exceeding the Galician municipal mould.
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Hello,

How far is Alto da Pena from Negreira?

I have always stayed at municipal albergue in Negreira. Years ago it was spotless.

But, seems to be otherwise now.

Really enjoying your camino posts.
Alto da Pena is 8.52km from Negreira
*I use the daily stage planner feature on Buen Camino app for distances between towns, you select your starting town and it gives a drop down list of the proceeding towns with distances to them. Very handy.
 
Day 35, March 4th. I left the municipal albergue in Dumbría with 22km to walk on the solemn last leg of my Camino. I stopped for coffee at the few cafés open trying to draw the day out, savoring every breath of eucalyptus forest after a rainfall and moss covered wall glittering bright green in the sun. There were brief showers but the sun held it's own in the tug o war. As I came up a hill, watching my footing on the path, I looked up to see that big, beautiful blue wonder. Neptune's lair. I existed for a moment in emotion only, a mélange of triumph and defeat, understanding Alexander's plight. I walked the last few kilometers to Santuario da Virxe da Barca and sat on a rock next to the lighthouse and watched the waves crash on the rocks until the wind had numbed my hands. I trudged to the Muxía Mare albergue a dutch pilgrim heading the other way had recommended the night before. There was another round of showers and I debated whether or not to take my baptismal dip. Viktor Frankl said that, when counseling patients facing a tough decision, he encouraged them to vision themselves as old, years down the line and imagine what they would advise. Things become rather clear and present fears and influences lessen. So I found a beach on the lee side of the point and did what I had to do to finish my Camino and then watched the sun set.
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There's still some things to be done in Santiago, some paperwork, ceremony, and investigation of San Martin Pinario, not to mention a stop by Casa Ivar to thank him for this opportunity and the correct spelling of albergue 😉. I'll follow up with some takeaways when I'm ready.
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Hi all, I walked the CF in February 2020 while covid was ravaging Italy and prodding Spain. I had time constraints and often did two "stages" a day, I got shin splints pretty bad and kept walking. I am not a fast walker, I was always the last to arrive at the albergue (which wasn't a problem that time of year). SJPDP to Finisterre in 26 days. I don't recommend that pace to anyone but have zero regrets. I'm planning my second Camino now, going to walk Del Norte starting on January 30 in Bayonne and finishing in Muxia this time having 36 days. I don't expect much to be open and don't care, you always find your way on the Camino, I have never heard anyone not finding their way, just people who never read Meditations complaining about the way that they found. One foot in front of the other and you'll cry in front a cathedral or the ocean.... whichever you hold sacred because it's over.
Walking the north Camino at the moment... . definitely someone needs to improve the yellow arrows 😔 and unlike Camino Frances or Portuguese or the English Camino there is a confusing choice of routes....easy to get on the wrong path . However the big issue is the lack of good yellow arrows.
Did I say that closed albergues is another really big problem too.. after a long walk, really tired...closed albergues that were supposed to be open....e.g.onton, Castro Ordiales.....can someone check this.
 

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