Search 57,387 Camino Questions

A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it


Advertisement
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

LIVE from the Camino We’re finally on our way!!!!!

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Edit: I’ll keep this as a rolling post while I’m here but wrote the first post before we reached SJPP!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
 
Last edited:
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.

DanielH

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
September 2015 (SJPP to Burgos)
September 2016 (Burgos to Villafranca del Bierzo)
May 2017 (Villafranca del Bierzo to Santiago de Compostela)
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
Congrats and Buen Camino. I did the Camino Frances in three stages in a span of 18 months. Burgos was the stopping point for the first leg and I loved every bit of it. The Cathedral, El Cid, the plazas, the river...
 
Past OR future Camino
2013.2014..SJ/SDC ....2015.PORTO/SDC..2017.18.19.20.BURGOS/P.FERRADA
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
So envious.God Speed.Buen Camino
 
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

ukjohn99

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2009 St Jean to Santiago
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
I hope that all goes well and that you have a great time. Buen Camino!
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery

Patricia43

New Member
Past OR future Camino
October 2017
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
Don't forget - if your feet are bothering you, no shame in sending your pack w one of the services. Buen Camino!
 

bergmannfamily

New Member
Past OR future Camino
none
We are excited for you Lhollo! We also are covid delayed for our first Camino. We will start Sept 10 in SJPDP. Like you we also have health issues that make the trip a bit tougher (arthritis and Parkinson's). We are doing a bag delivery service for the whole thing. Buen Camino!
 
Past OR future Camino
Camino Francés, Oct 2020
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
Have a fantastic adventure. Buen Camino
 
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.

thistleamy

Camino Portuguese - 2019; CF - 2021
Past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese (2019); Camino Frances (2021)
Buen Camino from the Ingles! Be well and like someone else wrote you can always use a baggage transfer service. I'm using one on my Camino since I didn't have enough time train the way I wanted after have had Covid. I'm fully recovered now but it took a lot out of me for a few months.
Bill
So sorry you contracted COVID and that it hit so hard... but so glad you are on the mend and able to walk the Camino. Are you on the Ingles now? Buen Camino and hope to hear more about your travels!

Cheers
 
Past OR future Camino
Inglese 2021
Bill
So sorry you contracted COVID and that it hit so hard... but so glad you are on the mend and able to walk the Camino. Are you on the Ingles now? Buen Camino and hope to hear more about your travels!

Cheers
Thank you Thistleamy, yes I'm on the Ingles now, I just arrived in Neda. I'll post some updates on the Ingles subforum.
 
Camino Magnets
A collection of Camino Fridge Magnets
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

sfdithomas

Member
Past OR future Camino
2015
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Almost!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
Buen Camino! 💜
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Buen Camino from the Ingles! Be well and like someone else wrote you can always use a baggage transfer service. I'm using one on my Camino since I didn't have enough time train the way I wanted after have had Covid. I'm fully recovered now but it took a lot out of me for a few months.
I’m glad to hear you recovered fully but even so, very sorry to hear you had it at all and that your recovery wasn’t straightforward. I hope you’re loving the Ingles! I’m now in SJPP so sending Buen Camino from here!
 
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
We’re now in SJPP and just about ready to leave early in the morning. We’ll use a transfer for a small bag of heavier, non-essential items. I’ve found SJPP slightly strange after Spain. I’d expected lots of smiles and excitement from mostly pilgrims so the amount of ordinary tourism was a surprise. It’s also been a bit confusing in terms of which language to use (my French is pretty dreadful so I’ve opted for Spanish despite being English). I’m also wondering whether this place has soaked up some of the pre-Camino nerves/uncertainty, feeling that are not necessarily bad but still powerful, which must have flooded the place over the years. I wondered what others here think about this. Is it just me?
 
Last edited:

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Well, we’re heading out from SJPP early, while it’s still dark. Had a pleasant night at the Gite Compostela but wanted to get out before their breakfast. We’ve packed a small bag of heavy/unnecessary things we won’t need today and will send that ahead. Weather seems mild so far.

(I’m wondering whether this thread could be shifted to the Live section? I didn’t know how to do that, nor whether to start a new thread, etc… will follow advice).
 

Zazz

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Well, we’re heading out from SJPP early, while it’s still dark. Had a pleasant night at the Gite Compostela but wanted to get out before their breakfast. We’ve packed a small bag of heavy/unnecessary things we won’t need today and will send that ahead. Weather seems mild so far.

(I’m wondering whether this thread could be shifted to the Live section? I didn’t know how to do that, nor whether to start a new thread, etc… will follow advice).
Hey thanks for posting updates! I will most likely run into along the way!

Did you by chance take a bus into SJ from Spain? Were you checked for vaccination papers at all? Did you have the French QR code and we’re you required to show it at the gite or pilgrims office? Sorry for all the questions, I’m taking a bus into SJ today and wanted to know what I am walking into. Don’t have a QR code and am prepared to have to start in Roncesvalles but am really hoping I can walk the Pyrenees!
 

CWBuff

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2022
Well,

(I’m wondering whether this thread could be shifted to the Live section? I didn’t know how to do that, nor whether to start a new thread, etc… will follow advice).
I would suggest to ask the moderators to close this thread and then start a new one in Live
Buen Camino
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Hey thanks for posting updates! I will most likely run into along the way!

Did you by chance take a bus into SJ from Spain? Were you checked for vaccination papers at all? Did you have the French QR code and we’re you required to show it at the gite or pilgrims office? Sorry for all the questions, I’m taking a bus into SJ today and wanted to know what I am walking into. Don’t have a QR code and am prepared to have to start in Roncesvalles but am really hoping I can walk the Pyrenees!
We took the bus from Pamplona and it didn’t stop at all, except to take on more passengers at Roncesvalles. I read elsewhere that some people did experience a French presence but their papers weren’t checked either. I did have mine to hand just in case. I didn’t need a French QR code because my U.K. NHS one is accepted in France, but every restaurant and cafe asked to see it and scanned it before they even took the order. There is a Lidl supermarket in SJPP and places where you could get nice takeaway food so I think you’d manage that way if necessary. I hope you’re able to do it!
 
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Got to Orisson around 9am and had cafe con leche. About to move on. Clouds maybe beginning to clear…?! 893B925F-764B-44D9-848F-C975DBD306F1.jpeg
 

Attachments

  • 51CD1C80-2E50-40E6-9D88-41AAE12A2E2E.jpeg
    51CD1C80-2E50-40E6-9D88-41AAE12A2E2E.jpeg
    3.9 MB · Views: 111
  • AD732D0D-0F5D-4B41-87ED-FC4C33967F85.jpeg
    AD732D0D-0F5D-4B41-87ED-FC4C33967F85.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 89
  • C56BF86B-03D0-462C-BE1D-A36F9C0C0A68.jpeg
    C56BF86B-03D0-462C-BE1D-A36F9C0C0A68.jpeg
    1.6 MB · Views: 76
  • 543FA5AB-EE67-4D56-AE2C-33A23D83E70B.jpeg
    543FA5AB-EE67-4D56-AE2C-33A23D83E70B.jpeg
    3.1 MB · Views: 75

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
I would suggest to ask the moderators to close this thread and then start a new one in Live
Buen Camino
I can’t find how to do that (am currently sitting outside Orisson) so hoping someone can shift this over, then I’ll change the title 🤞
 
Learn Spanish for the Camino
Enhance your Camino experience by learning about the Spanish language and culture.
Camino Way Markers
Original Camino Way markers made in bronze. Two models, one from Castilla & Leon and the other from Galicia.

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I can’t find how to do that (am currently sitting outside Orisson) so hoping someone can shift this over, then I’ll change the title 🤞
I’ve added the “live from the Camino” prefix to your thread. I am not sure if you can still change the title, but if you can’t, I can do it for you, just let me know.

Hoping the clouds clear for you so you can get at least a glimpse!
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
I’ve added the “live from the Camino” prefix to your thread. I am not sure if you can still change the title, but if you can’t, I can do it for you, just let me know.

Hoping the clouds clear for you so you can get at least a glimpse!
Thank you for this 🙏. The clouds didn’t really clear until we were nearing Roncesvalles but it was very atmospheric!
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Loved the walk over from SJPP to Roncesvalles yesterday! I’d been concerned I’d develop a fresh injury but we found it surprisingly straightforward, albeit it’s not a stretch to take lightly. We stopped for around an hour and a half in total: forty minutes for two cups of coffee in Orisson, a stop at the food van (what a wonderful thing!) and just below the summit for some bread, cheese and sausage that we’d bought in SJPP. I think my weekends of training in the Welsh mountains helped a lot, both for the physical aspects, and for the fog! We barely saw the woods around us for much of the way but it’s was so eerie as to be beautiful and I’ll never forget it. Coming down into Roncesvalles, the clouds cleared and we entered a sunny village. We’re now just about to leave (early again, more fog) the Casa Sabina where we spent a peaceful afternoon, yesterday, and night. I really recommend this place, for its lovely rooms, terrace at the front, and the food too.
 

Attachments

  • 7A6FE7DE-CD7E-4811-8C0E-17A9CDBAC705.jpeg
    7A6FE7DE-CD7E-4811-8C0E-17A9CDBAC705.jpeg
    4.6 MB · Views: 62
  • 9991FA33-A137-4C79-AD56-3EF5779223E0.jpeg
    9991FA33-A137-4C79-AD56-3EF5779223E0.jpeg
    4.9 MB · Views: 56
  • 69F5D0F3-AC88-40E0-B16F-3C725746BB98.jpeg
    69F5D0F3-AC88-40E0-B16F-3C725746BB98.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 50
  • D064B125-02DD-48EB-9A0E-5FFEBF3D2E73.jpeg
    D064B125-02DD-48EB-9A0E-5FFEBF3D2E73.jpeg
    4.4 MB · Views: 48
  • 8C0E0F69-AD7C-40C7-9F8A-53738D159187.jpeg
    8C0E0F69-AD7C-40C7-9F8A-53738D159187.jpeg
    3 MB · Views: 46
  • 6B490AD4-90F6-4993-9ED2-2A8B35121889.jpeg
    6B490AD4-90F6-4993-9ED2-2A8B35121889.jpeg
    4.1 MB · Views: 63
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
Loved the walk over from SJPP to Roncesvalles yesterday! I’d been concerned I’d develop a fresh injury but we found it surprisingly straightforward, albeit it’s not a stretch to take lightly. We stopped for around an hour and a half in total: forty minutes for two cups of coffee in Orisson, a stop at the food van (what a wonderful thing!) and just below the summit for some bread, cheese and sausage that we’d bought in SJPP. I think my weekends of training in the Welsh mountains helped a lot, both for the physical aspects, and for the fog! We barely saw the woods around us for much of the way but it’s was so eerie as to be beautiful and I’ll never forget it. Coming down into Roncesvalles, the clouds cleared and we entered a sunny village. We’re now just about to leave (early again, more fog) the Casa Sabina where we spent a peaceful afternoon, yesterday, and night. I really recommend this place, for its lovely rooms, terrace at the front, and the food too.
Hi, how long did it take you on the SJPP to Roscenvalles walk? I am starting in 2 weeks and thinking I would need to allow myself around 8 hours to complete this stage. Does that sound ok. I’m a regular Walker and usually make a decent pace, but I recognise this will be a challenge. Also was it cool on the walk? I’m guessing it won’t be too warm over the Pyrenees?
 
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Hi, how long did it take you on the SJPP to Roscenvalles walk? I am starting in 2 weeks and thinking I would need to allow myself around 8 hours to complete this stage. Does that sound ok. I’m a regular Walker and usually make a decent pace, but I recognise this will be a challenge. Also was it cool on the walk? I’m guessing it won’t be too warm over the Pyrenees?
I don’t want to misguide you and am mindful that, from what I’ve read, people experience the SJPP to Roncesvalles walk very differently. With that understood, my own experience was that it was actually easier than I’d feared. Your 8 hours sounds very reasonable.
We left early, just before 7am. We reached Orisson after two hours then stopped there for forty minutes and two coffees. Further up, in the section just before the cross, the food and drinks stall was there (I know it isn’t always), and we stopped again there for about twenty minutes, a banana each and more coffee. Below the summit we had another short lunch break, about 20 mins, for cheese, bread, etc, which we’d bought in SJPP. We also stopped for breathers along the way as necessary, particularly on the uphill to Orisson and periodically on the section to the cross, and then between the French/Spanish border and the summit. We reached Roncesvalles at 2:30pm. I do have medical issues but when they’re under control, I’m apparently quite a fast walker, but slowed by a need to take photos all the time! My partner goes slower on the uphills but we’re both quick going down. We’re not spring chickens and neither of us are fitness freaks but we do walk regularly at weekends, in Wales for mountains and in our local part of England for the flat. I presume you’re from Harrogate so may understand what I mean by saying that if you can handle a Welsh mountain, or the Yorkshire peaks, you’ll have no problem. It’s further and a higher ascent that many of those in the U.K., but because it isn’t as severe an incline, it’s not as exhausting. I’d been thinking ‘That’s Ben Nevis with a backpack!’, and for me it was nothing like that, but even so I was glad I’d shipped some of my items ahead that day.

So… for my partner and I, 7.5 hours with breaks. No problem if you’re used to walking hills.
It’s a fantastic walk! I hope you love it. Buen camino.
Edit… just to answer your other question about the heat. For us, it was foggy most of the way and cool. That said, I took a lightweight fleece and disposable poncho and needed neither. Very refreshing. A typical day on a hill/mountain in Wales 😃 (I spent much the day commenting on this!). I do know that usually people have amazing views so it’s presumably hotter at times. I can well imagine that in two weeks time there might be rain and even less visibility.
 
Last edited:

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
A lovely walk over to Zubiri from Roncesvalles today. We left in the semi-dark and fog, stopped for coffee at a wonderfully quirky place in Espina where the owner has a penchant for Santana (6x the same song 😂 although he then switched to jazz). We were surprised by how many uphill sections there are to this stage; I’d read a lot about the severe downhill but if I’d known about the initial uphills I’d have carried less water then filled up in one of the towns. The downhill into Zubiri was a lot of fun, but then I love downhills! A gorgeous section. Red kites flying overhead. Church bells. Locals sitting outside their houses peeling fruit. Good chat with fellow pilgrims. French cheese and bread in a clearing in the woods. Absolutely wonderful.
We’re now at the Palo Avellano in one of their private rooms (we’ve booked rooms for all of the way to Burgos because of my health issues). It’s a lovely albergue. The lady here is not only friendly and helpful but impressed me by remembering how long ago I first made the booking (Feb 2020!), the many emails and what we’d talked about.
 

Attachments

  • D2F18FA8-BE90-4F84-B592-EE30AF21797D.jpeg
    D2F18FA8-BE90-4F84-B592-EE30AF21797D.jpeg
    4.8 MB · Views: 52
  • 4DB4344F-D007-4332-A517-0794F9F6D63E.jpeg
    4DB4344F-D007-4332-A517-0794F9F6D63E.jpeg
    4.2 MB · Views: 48
  • 4D678E62-8DAB-41C6-956A-AE5F84EC3D06.jpeg
    4D678E62-8DAB-41C6-956A-AE5F84EC3D06.jpeg
    5.6 MB · Views: 44
  • 85034D8A-D71B-4772-8D20-96F79036BF8B.jpeg
    85034D8A-D71B-4772-8D20-96F79036BF8B.jpeg
    5.4 MB · Views: 43
  • 6D0BF91F-BB34-41C7-A372-D86E2770DBFC.jpeg
    6D0BF91F-BB34-41C7-A372-D86E2770DBFC.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 47
Last edited:

SkyDancer

Camino dreaming
Past OR future Camino
2021
A lovely walk over to Zubiri from Roncesvalles today. We left in the semi-dark and fog, stopped for coffee at a wonderfully quirky place in Espina where the owner has a penchant for Santana (6x the same song 😂 although he then switched to jazz). We were surprised by how many uphill sections there are to this stage; I’d read a lot about the severe downhill but if I’d known about the initial uphills I’d have carried less water then filled up in one of the towns. The downhill into Zubiri was a lot of fun, but then I love downhills! A gorgeous section. Red kites flying overhead. Church bells. Locals sitting outside their houses peeling fruit. Good chat with fellow pilgrims. French cheese and bread in a clearing in the woods. Absolutely wonderful.
we’re now at the Palo Avellano in one of their private rooms (we’ve booked rooms for all of the way to Burgos because of my health issues). It’s a lovely albergue. The lady here is not only friendly and helpful but impressed me by remembering how long ago I first made the booking (Feb 2020!), the many emails and what we’d talked about.
Wonderful descriptions, feel like I’m there! 🙏😄🌈
 
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
I don’t want to misguide you and am mindful that, from what I’ve read, people experience the SJPP to Roncesvalles walk very differently. With that understood, my own experience was that it was actually easier than I’d feared. Your 8 hours sounds very reasonable.
We left early, just before 7am. We reached Orisson after two hours then stopped there for forty minutes and two coffees. Further up, in the section just before the cross, the food and drinks stall was there (I know it isn’t always), and we stopped again there for about twenty minutes, a banana each and more coffee. Below the summit we had another short lunch break, about 20 mins, for cheese, bread, etc, which we’d bought in SJPP. We also stopped for breathers along the way as necessary, particularly on the uphill to Orisson and periodically on the section to the cross, and then between the French/Spanish border and the summit. We reached Roncesvalles at 2:30pm. I do have medical issues but when they’re under control, I’m apparently quite a fast walker, but slowed by a need to take photos all the time! My partner goes slower on the uphills but we’re both quick going down. We’re not spring chickens and neither of us are fitness freaks but we do walk regularly at weekends, in Wales for mountains and in our local part of England for the flat. I presume you’re from Harrogate so may understand what I mean by saying that if you can handle a Welsh mountain, or the Yorkshire peaks, you’ll have no problem. It’s further and a higher ascent that many of those in the U.K., but because it isn’t as severe an incline, it’s not as exhausting. I’d been thinking ‘That’s Ben Nevis with a backpack!’, and for me it was nothing like that, but even so I was glad I’d shipped some of my items ahead that day.

So… for my partner and I, 7.5 hours with breaks. No problem if you’re used to walking hills.
It’s a fantastic walk! I hope you love it. Buen camino.
Edit… just to answer your other question about the heat. For us, it was foggy most of the way and cool. That said, I took a lightweight fleece and disposable poncho and needed neither. Very refreshing. A typical day on a hill/mountain in Wales 😃 (I spent much the day commenting on this!). I do know that usually people have amazing views so it’s presumably hotter at times. I can well imagine that in two weeks time there might be rain and even less visibility.
thankyou that’s a great response, super helpful
 
Published on Amazon
Guide to the 16 main caminos with maps, pictures, hyperlinks and other information.
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
We had a deliberately slower today, heading out of Zubiri in daylight after a good breakfast at El Palo Avellano. Spent much of the first section chatting with another peregrina whilst following the meanders of the river. Everything was closed on the route, which I gather is normal for a Tuesday, but we stopped for bread, cheese and chorizo by the Irtugaiz Bridge. I enjoyed watching the minnows dart in the clear, shallow waters there. We took the higher, harder path from there, rather than the easier bicycle route, and almost immediately passed a fruit seller. The next section will now anchored in my memory to the taste of ripe peach! At the top of the hill before Valleva, we stopped briefly for more water and wonderful fresh orange juice: a man who squeezes the oranges in the back of his van. Entering Pamplona, I was more than excited to see an Egyptian Vulture overhead. I read on a notice board nearer to Zubiri that they’re seen in the area. It’s great that they’re here because they’re critically endangered. It’s late in August to see them though, Ive read they should be heading to Africa for the winter by mid August. I’ll post a photo of it from the back of my main camera. I do get excited about wildlife :D Now in Pamplona, we’ve stopped for coffee in the main square and had a long chat with the super-helpful and knowledgeable owner of Caminoteca: a shop I’m sure most of you already know, which is down the street from the Cathedral and which has everything a pilgrim could want or need, from souvenirs to blister advice, backpacks and ponchos to injinji toe socks.
 

Attachments

  • 91FEA0E7-7ACC-4030-AE52-3E34BEDE5B2A.jpeg
    91FEA0E7-7ACC-4030-AE52-3E34BEDE5B2A.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 42
  • 469F649A-E4AF-412D-BFE2-4514C6DA38C2.jpeg
    469F649A-E4AF-412D-BFE2-4514C6DA38C2.jpeg
    6.3 MB · Views: 38
  • 7CEC0F35-978E-4409-A8B2-6D13819D308D.jpeg
    7CEC0F35-978E-4409-A8B2-6D13819D308D.jpeg
    4.3 MB · Views: 38
  • 909DA4C3-A86E-4FB2-93C7-B2853CFA599A.jpeg
    909DA4C3-A86E-4FB2-93C7-B2853CFA599A.jpeg
    6.4 MB · Views: 38
  • 0B444970-5703-434F-B517-BED68DB44259.jpeg
    0B444970-5703-434F-B517-BED68DB44259.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 41
  • 4B1CF61C-9A2A-4FC4-9A63-29532576C1E9.jpeg
    4B1CF61C-9A2A-4FC4-9A63-29532576C1E9.jpeg
    3.5 MB · Views: 42
  • E4B7EDED-0BDD-4D88-A40C-A5CCB2C5298C.jpeg
    E4B7EDED-0BDD-4D88-A40C-A5CCB2C5298C.jpeg
    4.7 MB · Views: 41
  • 416AB912-8659-49B2-AD82-0DB05AD42A9E.jpeg
    416AB912-8659-49B2-AD82-0DB05AD42A9E.jpeg
    3.2 MB · Views: 46

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
We left Pamplona in the dim early daylight making good progress out of the city and up to the pilgrim statues. We were lucky in that the sky was slightly overcast so the climb up to the ridge wasn’t as hard as I’d feared; I’d wondered about sending a bag forward again but am glad we didn’t. The statues were busier than I’d expected—I hadn’t imagined the wide area and the sense of its being a meeting point, which was really lovely. I was moved by the stone circle monument to victims of local villages during the civil war. After that the skies gave way to a strong sun. We had a fun downhill, loving the edge walk into Muruzábal, then stopped in Uterga for coffee and a snack. We took the detour to visit the octagonal church of Santa Maria of Eunate. We were the only pilgrims on the route, and inside the church, until suddenly a huge group appeared. The contrast from silent contemplation and to so much energy was atmospheric. We made it to Albergue Jakue with enough time to refresh then explore Puente la Reine. We were charmed by the narrow streets with high buildings, deep reds and ochres, iron balconies and supermarkets leading out onto the spread of the old yellow bridge. A lovely town. I’d recommend Vinoteca Ganbara, on the street leading straight down to the bridge, it’s the restaurant with bamboo shades around the outdoor tables. Small dishes that are perfect for sharing. Very attentive service. Artisan foods, many local. Combinations of flavours I’ve never before encountered (no spoilers but try the pâté!).
 

Attachments

  • AF6FDED6-D3F3-404F-908F-F89A12F7EB21.jpeg
    AF6FDED6-D3F3-404F-908F-F89A12F7EB21.jpeg
    4.2 MB · Views: 30
  • 3761B589-DA54-4BBD-B3C3-D8A11E3B4C2A.jpeg
    3761B589-DA54-4BBD-B3C3-D8A11E3B4C2A.jpeg
    3.9 MB · Views: 29
  • CD69DD69-165D-4238-ACFB-F5710F16B6A4.jpeg
    CD69DD69-165D-4238-ACFB-F5710F16B6A4.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 28
  • 3E0200DB-017D-40C4-B837-EF81BFDC0A7A.jpeg
    3E0200DB-017D-40C4-B837-EF81BFDC0A7A.jpeg
    4.2 MB · Views: 26
  • 93566807-5434-468C-B9E2-B112DDDE6799.jpeg
    93566807-5434-468C-B9E2-B112DDDE6799.jpeg
    4.3 MB · Views: 26
  • CF5124B6-BD2D-441F-BD77-D2014704A061.jpeg
    CF5124B6-BD2D-441F-BD77-D2014704A061.jpeg
    3.6 MB · Views: 27
  • DF5812A9-931F-4178-9072-6EFF01D734CE.jpeg
    DF5812A9-931F-4178-9072-6EFF01D734CE.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 25
  • C670CC06-E183-4274-A673-DACE05190260.jpeg
    C670CC06-E183-4274-A673-DACE05190260.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 26
  • 19C68D5E-39D4-4793-845D-A9FDCA6E70DB.jpeg
    19C68D5E-39D4-4793-845D-A9FDCA6E70DB.jpeg
    2.2 MB · Views: 26
  • FCF3DB8D-0BE2-411A-A7F6-23157C2133AA.jpeg
    FCF3DB8D-0BE2-411A-A7F6-23157C2133AA.jpeg
    3.3 MB · Views: 30
Last edited:

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
We left Puente la Reina again in early daylight, aware that the walk to Estella would be a shorter, less demanding day, but also that the weather was forecast to be hot. Somehow the full impact of that forecast didn’t hit us until it was around 11am but felt like 1pm! It’s a beautiful section throughout, but I couldn’t stop taking photos as we passed vineyards, the red soil almost seeming to bake itself, and villages such as Cirauqui appearing like cairns, marking the way. We were intrigued to find a sign ‘Paradise loading… 27%’ and then further signs for the Gard Zen. What a magical oasis this place is, with its incense and watermelons, fruit and coffee, book and clothes exchanges, hearts and flags hanging from olive trees. I talked a little with the owner of the stall, Ivan, who hopes this December to press his olives as an organic olive oil, rather than mixing it with olives from other fields. He’s trying to raise enough money to fully buy the land, for animals, organic farming, camping for volunteers, and some sort of music spot. Very intriguing! A lovely man. The heat took hold in the section from there to Estella, where we arrived, at the Hosteria Cortidores, by 1pm. The next day would be a rest day so we settled in, did washing, then explored the town.
 

Attachments

  • 19D3D5EF-28E8-4A13-8373-874D85C568D4.jpeg
    19D3D5EF-28E8-4A13-8373-874D85C568D4.jpeg
    3.6 MB · Views: 29
  • A449E533-2826-423D-A8A9-2727F2D9CA01.jpeg
    A449E533-2826-423D-A8A9-2727F2D9CA01.jpeg
    2.7 MB · Views: 24
  • 8D6873AC-B8A3-4E81-A55A-75C5F5A0B4EA.jpeg
    8D6873AC-B8A3-4E81-A55A-75C5F5A0B4EA.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 24
  • BCC03CB1-9536-4AF1-A187-AA6DC2D15AB5.jpeg
    BCC03CB1-9536-4AF1-A187-AA6DC2D15AB5.jpeg
    1.2 MB · Views: 23
  • 7FB3052B-C09E-4EA5-A188-F671972E1DF5.jpeg
    7FB3052B-C09E-4EA5-A188-F671972E1DF5.jpeg
    4.8 MB · Views: 23
  • B18AA738-021E-4D05-99DA-901A7C51DEEA.jpeg
    B18AA738-021E-4D05-99DA-901A7C51DEEA.jpeg
    2.7 MB · Views: 24
  • 367E9FF7-1AC2-473A-B686-622198398DF3.jpeg
    367E9FF7-1AC2-473A-B686-622198398DF3.jpeg
    4.3 MB · Views: 23
  • 46AD78F4-4FD7-4ED2-9C93-FBA77E6D3391.jpeg
    46AD78F4-4FD7-4ED2-9C93-FBA77E6D3391.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 26
  • 53263E01-281A-4663-B7B0-8DA3C54893E2.jpeg
    53263E01-281A-4663-B7B0-8DA3C54893E2.jpeg
    3.4 MB · Views: 30
Last edited:

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
When I first booked our Camino as a shorter break, before the pandemic, I arranged a rest day here Estella, and became so attached to the idea that we stuck with it. Now we’re here, we felt sad to become separated from our group of fellow pilgrims, even though we rarely say more than ‘Buen Camino’: there’s something so wonderful about the accumulative mutual experience, the faces that become familiar through repetition, friendlier to one another each time. Because we’re only able to go as far as Burgos this year, I imagine we won’t see many of these faces again. Even so, the rest day has been lovely. I’m typing this from one of the Hosteria Cortidores’ wonderful rooms overlooking the river and weir. Children are diving into the water from the derelict buildings opposite, as they were yesterday afternoon too. Some very skilful somersaults. I can’t help but fear for them as they climb onto the roofs then walk along the walls! So intrepid! Their laughter and chatter carries. Last night and this morning we explored Estella: the church of Saint Miguel de Estella, with its particularly gory gargoyles watching over the doorway, wonderful views over the steps across the town, then a particularly fine smoothie and cafe con leche at the cafe Namaste. We also spent a long time sitting on the stones below the bridge, watching a heron fishing just a few yards from us. I’ve never seen one so close, nor for so long. They’re more graceful than I’d realised.
 

Attachments

  • B40FE7E5-5A0E-45BB-BE50-2E46144A0D51.jpeg
    B40FE7E5-5A0E-45BB-BE50-2E46144A0D51.jpeg
    3.4 MB · Views: 30
  • E4959F4E-0D60-444F-8188-CF67A13CC138.jpeg
    E4959F4E-0D60-444F-8188-CF67A13CC138.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 28
  • 691D5758-9945-4E92-985B-6B12D85643CC.jpeg
    691D5758-9945-4E92-985B-6B12D85643CC.jpeg
    3.6 MB · Views: 27
  • F5926ECD-3DAC-46B5-BAFC-C9C4F81FCDC8.jpeg
    F5926ECD-3DAC-46B5-BAFC-C9C4F81FCDC8.jpeg
    3.9 MB · Views: 26
  • 80062A03-326A-4E8A-9370-52C47E94DA5A.jpeg
    80062A03-326A-4E8A-9370-52C47E94DA5A.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 25
  • 49297730-60F2-4D64-9D15-969C2DCF8C01.jpeg
    49297730-60F2-4D64-9D15-969C2DCF8C01.jpeg
    5.4 MB · Views: 30
  • 87530427-6E43-4B02-9A4A-354048C2A60B.jpeg
    87530427-6E43-4B02-9A4A-354048C2A60B.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 27
  • DDA664A4-036E-4DE1-8AB1-A247982327D7.jpeg
    DDA664A4-036E-4DE1-8AB1-A247982327D7.jpeg
    2.2 MB · Views: 36
Last edited:
Camino Maps
A collection of Camino Maps from the Camino Forum Store
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
we felt sad to become separated from our group of fellow pilgrims, even though we rarely say more than ‘Buen Camino’: there’s something so wonderful about the accumulative mutual experience, the faces that become familiar through repetition, friendlier to one another each time.
This is a great description of what happens, and the camaraderie that develops even among those people who do not (for whatever reason) get embedded in a "camino family."

I am happy to read how much you are enjoying the Camino. How is your footwear working out?
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Edit: I’ll keep this as a rolling post while I’m here but wrote the first post before we reached SJPP!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
Buen Camino have a safe, healthy and positive trip. Enjoy the Pyrenees
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
This is a great description of what happens, and the camaraderie that develops even among those people who do not (for whatever reason) get embedded in a "camino family."

I am happy to read how much you are enjoying the Camino. How is your footwear working out?
My footwear was quite the saga, wasn’t it? 😃 I’m wearing Nike Invincible flyknit in a size/size and a half more than my old shoes size. I say ‘old shoe size’ because since I started wearing wider shoes, my feet have also widened, so I’m not sure what my actual size is any more.

in terms of how I’m getting on with them, they’re mostly brilliant. They’re superbly cushioned, but then I’ve added a small layer of extra poron foam as well. They’re also bouncy; they’re designed for marathons, but also for long distance walking, and to propel energy forward. I find they do help. The only downside—and this is mortifying given how much research, testing and practice in shoes I did—is that I got two small blisters, on the outsides of my big toes. I handled them straight away and they’ve now healed—they were never very sore—but I’m keeping the toes padded to prevent a recurrence. I’m also dealing with a heat rash in various places: ankles, feet, but also my legs after buying a last minute pair of super light running shorts made by a very good brand but that seem to hold in moisture. Gah! Overall though, I’m amazed, touch wood, that I seem to be able to bounce along remarkably well given the problems I sometimes have.

Thanks for asking, @C clearly
 
Last edited:

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
What a lovely walk the section from Estella to Los Arcos is! We left around 7:30am. The morning was cool but for me, pleasant enough in just a tank top and shorts. We stopped for a chat with the iron forger at Ayegui, then collected a little wine at the Iraxte wine fountain: the amount is less than a small glass but it’s still in a Smart Water bottle in my bag! I couldn’t face wine at 8:30am. Must taste it later. The smell of it was heady. We gathered with many pilgrims at the cafe in Azqueta; I imagine we’ll see their faces again in the coming days. We exchanged a few greetings. The high point at Villamayor came sooner than expected (we feared that uphill on the graph but in fact the whole day until then seemed to involve some uphills, mostly quite gradual), then we were off across that gorgeous landscape: mountains in the distance, blue and almost lilac, pale stubble fields nudging against red soil, vineyards versus haystacks. At one point, a shepherd whistled to his sheepdogs as they herded a flock of sheep almost across our path. Further on, I was excited by the haystacks (I’ve been looking forward to them!) and by the butterflies, lizards and vultures. I was surprised by the cool breeze all day, which offset the strong sun and cloudless sky. We’re now in Los Arcos, in a room at La Casa de la Abuela. I’m expecting the next two days (Los Arcos > Logroño, then Logroño > Nájera) to be pretty tough!
 

Attachments

  • 0EC5E081-A194-4939-94BA-D3E8D32CEAD7.jpeg
    0EC5E081-A194-4939-94BA-D3E8D32CEAD7.jpeg
    3.9 MB · Views: 28
  • B7A9F27A-BF5A-4757-BC2C-22EEF3BE9F10.jpeg
    B7A9F27A-BF5A-4757-BC2C-22EEF3BE9F10.jpeg
    4.6 MB · Views: 28
  • B3BC4A67-C881-4BD7-9E66-06D91B22D6A0.jpeg
    B3BC4A67-C881-4BD7-9E66-06D91B22D6A0.jpeg
    3.5 MB · Views: 27
  • 3EDC5D3E-0B4A-42B3-A8F6-B0A1ADBD81E6.jpeg
    3EDC5D3E-0B4A-42B3-A8F6-B0A1ADBD81E6.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 27
  • 52E4E62A-5AEC-4175-94AA-02C583BEF33A.jpeg
    52E4E62A-5AEC-4175-94AA-02C583BEF33A.jpeg
    2.3 MB · Views: 26
  • 107E231E-D398-4286-9AC6-56D8B3D87E52.jpeg
    107E231E-D398-4286-9AC6-56D8B3D87E52.jpeg
    5.9 MB · Views: 25
  • 8325AB69-84E3-4964-AA31-804FC3268E8B.jpeg
    8325AB69-84E3-4964-AA31-804FC3268E8B.jpeg
    735.2 KB · Views: 24
  • 86730AF6-BCEE-4EC5-A5F3-AAC75154A687.jpeg
    86730AF6-BCEE-4EC5-A5F3-AAC75154A687.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 23
  • 1DCC117B-0742-4B4A-AB56-92EEB5F242EB.jpeg
    1DCC117B-0742-4B4A-AB56-92EEB5F242EB.jpeg
    4.5 MB · Views: 23
  • 5D9AEC48-80F8-4CDC-80C9-C7B38A8D63B7.jpeg
    5D9AEC48-80F8-4CDC-80C9-C7B38A8D63B7.jpeg
    2.8 MB · Views: 39

A Kerryman

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
What a lovely walk the section from Estella to Los Arcos is! We left around 7:30am. The morning was cool but for me, pleasant enough in just a tank top and shorts. We stopped for a chat with the iron forger at Ayegui, then collected a little wine at the Iraxte wine fountain: the amount is less than a small glass but it’s still in a Smart Water bottle in my bag! I couldn’t face wine at 8:30am. Must taste it later. The smell of it was heady. We gathered with many pilgrims at the cafe in Azqueta; I imagine we’ll see their faces again in the coming days. We exchanged a few greetings. The high point at Villamayor came sooner than expected (we feared that uphill on the graph but in fact the whole day until then seemed to involve some uphills, mostly quite gradual), then we were off across that gorgeous landscape: mountains in the distance, blue and almost lilac, pale stubble fields nudging against red soil, vineyards versus haystacks. At one point, a shepherd whistled to his sheepdogs as they herded a flock of sheep almost across our path. Further on, I was excited by the haystacks (I’ve been looking forward to them!) and by the butterflies, lizards and vultures. I was surprised by the cool breeze all day, which offset the strong sun and cloudless sky. We’re now in Los Arcos, in a room at La Casa de la Abuela. I’m expecting the next two days (Los Arcos > Logroño, then Logroño > Nájera) to be pretty tough!
What is the current state of cafes and bars and getting a meal in the evenings ??? , thanks in advance and I am enjoying your posts.
 
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Camino Socks
Browse the Camino Socks collection on the forum shop

donalomahony

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
"Camino from 2013 to 2019" paused for now...
What a lovely walk the section from Estella to Los Arcos is! We left around 7:30am. The morning was cool but for me, pleasant enough in just a tank top and shorts. We stopped for a chat with the iron forger at Ayegui, then collected a little wine at the Iraxte wine fountain: the amount is less than a small glass but it’s still in a Smart Water bottle in my bag! I couldn’t face wine at 8:30am. Must taste it later. The smell of it was heady. We gathered with many pilgrims at the cafe in Azqueta; I imagine we’ll see their faces again in the coming days. We exchanged a few greetings. The high point at Villamayor came sooner than expected (we feared that uphill on the graph but in fact the whole day until then seemed to involve some uphills, mostly quite gradual), then we were off across that gorgeous landscape: mountains in the distance, blue and almost lilac, pale stubble fields nudging against red soil, vineyards versus haystacks. At one point, a shepherd whistled to his sheepdogs as they herded a flock of sheep almost across our path. Further on, I was excited by the haystacks (I’ve been looking forward to them!) and by the butterflies, lizards and vultures. I was surprised by the cool breeze all day, which offset the strong sun and cloudless sky. We’re now in Los Arcos, in a room at La Casa de la Abuela. I’m expecting the next two days (Los Arcos > Logroño, then Logroño > Nájera) to be pretty tough!
Thank you so much for these updates and pictures Donal
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
What is the current state of cafes and bars and getting a meal in the evenings ??? , thanks in advance and I am enjoying your posts.
Cafes are open through the day from 9am to late, although this varies depending on the size of the town or village. We’ve passed through small villages with shut cafés, albeit mostly on a Tuesday when, I read elsewhere here, most places close.

We are finding one of the hardest things here to be sorting out breakfast and evening meals. It is mostly fine but requires some resourcefulness. The reasons for this are: we sometimes want to leave earlier than breakfasts begin at hotels/Albergue’s or before many panaderías or shops are open; we are avoiding eating inside. The latter issue doesn’t seem to bother anyone else here; most people are eating together indoors. Our reasons for not doing so are complicated but in summary, we decided from the outset that Spain would probably be even safer than the U.K. right now because there’s so much mask wearing, but that for our own part we’d eat outside, which we thought would in any case be the norm, and always wear good masks when indoors. I’ve been surprised that outdoor eating isn’t commonplace; there are almost always restaurants with outdoor seats but they’re not always the open ones when you need one, and I haven’t yet had a room in an albergue that had an outdoor eating area. The other issue is with evening meals, in that many places only open at 7:30pm or 8pm, and we want to eat around 6pm so as to get to bed early. We’re usually able to find something, though, and waiting until 7:30pm isn’t the worst thing ever. There are always places open then. Even here in Los Arcos, where I’d read there’s only one restaurant, there are in fact several and they’re all open albeit after 7:30pm. Supermarkets are of course always present and a good fallback plan. We buy bread, cheese and usually a cured sausage from a supermarket every one to two days and eat that for lunch. Another trick we’ve come up with for breakfasts is buying coffee and a pain au chocolate each the night before, then having them cold in our room the next morning. It works well for us! We usually find no need to stop a couple of hours in, and pass people who’ve done so.
Hope this helps! Thanks for reading 🙂
 
Last edited:

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
@Lhollo when on camino I find it easiest to follow the Spanish custom, a late breakfast after I've walked for a few hours, and my main meal between 2 and 3pm. By then I am usually finished walking for the day. Then I have just a few tapas in a bar at night, which avoids having to stay out late.
 
Donation to the Forum
A donation to this forum helps it continue to exists and also removes all ads for you.
Original artwork based on your pilgrimage or other travel photos.

A Kerryman

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Cafes are open through the day from 9am to late, although this varies depending on the size of the town or village. We’ve passed through small villages with shut cafés, albeit mostly on a Tuesday when, I read elsewhere here, most places close.

We are finding one of the hardest things here to be sorting out breakfast and evening meals. It is mostly fine but requires some resourcefulness. The reasons for this are: we sometimes want to leave earlier than breakfasts begin at hotels/Albergue’s or before many panaderías or shops are open; we are avoiding eating inside. The latter issue doesn’t seem to bother anyone else here; most people are eating together indoors. Our reasons for not doing so are complicated but in summary, we decided from the outset that Spain would probably be even safer than the U.K. right now because there’s so much mask wearing, but that for our own part we’d eat outside, which we thought would in any case be the norm, and always wear good masks when indoors. I’ve been surprised that outdoor eating isn’t commonplace; there are almost always restaurants with outdoor seats but they’re not always the open ones when you need one, and I haven’t yet had a room in an albergue that had an outdoor eating area. The other issue is with evening meals, in that many places only open at 7:30pm or 8pm, and we want to eat around 6pm so as to get to bed early. We’re usually able to find something, though, and waiting until 7:30pm isn’t the worst thing ever. There are always places open then. Even here in Los Arcos, where I’d read there’s only one restaurant, there are in fact several and they’re all open albeit after 7:30pm. Supermarkets are of course always present and a good fallback plan. We buy bread, cheese and usually a cured sausage from a supermarket every one to two days and eat that for lunch. Another trick we’ve come up with for breakfasts is buying coffee and a pain au chocolate each the night before, then having them cold in our room the next morning. It works well for us! We usually find no need to stop a couple of hours in, and pass people who’ve done so.
Hope this helps! Thanks for reading 🙂
Thanks so much , I am off on Thursday and was wondering what changes would I meet . Enjoy the rest off your walk and safe journey to you . P
 
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
@Lhollo, you are really offering super reports of your camino thus far. I want to just add in a note to recommend something you may have missed, between Zubiri and Pamplona. Zabaldika. Although the albergue will not be open at all this year, to the best of my knowledge, the little effort it takes to climb the hill and view the church, with perhaps a visit if you ring the bell at the community door, where you can also ask to use the bathroom, is worth it. From there, you can continue onward, skirting the mountain, and arriving at the iconic bridge that leads to the wonderful albergue in Trinidad de Arre.
I am really enjoying your posts, thank you for the very careful and useful content.
 
Past OR future Camino
2014, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19
Various routes...
I want to just add in a note to recommend something you may have missed, between Zubiri and Pamplona. Zabaldika. Although the albergue will not be open at all this year, to the best of my knowledge, the little effort it takes to climb the hill and view the church, with perhaps a visit if you ring the bell at the community door
Absolutely.
Not to be missed.
💖
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Wow what a day. We left Los Arcos later than we’d hoped, around 7:15am, but somehow made good progress and were in Torres del Río by 8:45am. We’re probably unhealthily observant of the time it’s taking us to reach each point; this is partly because of a sense that we’re racing against the sun—we both find it so much harder after around 1:30pm—and partly because I’m gradually proving to myself that I’m not slow. The thing is that at home, on paper—or rather, in my walking app—my partner and I often walk at around 2-2.5 miles an hour, allowing for short stops, a dog, and my photo obsession. I know this isn’t unusual but because of it, for the 17 mile days, we were concerned we’d stand no chance of reaching our pre-booked rooms and would either have to walk through the heat or take a taxi. It seems we were wrong! We’ve been making very good progress… possibly too good. We stopped for coffee at La Pata del Oca in Torres del Río, then headed on into the lovely section between there and Viana: twisting valleys filled with vineyards and olive groves, the bleached path, a flock of sheep nervously racing across a field by a road, pilgrims gathering to sip water in the shade of trees at the valley bottoms. At one point, we got a little carried away and jogged down one of the hills; all very fun, until a few hundred metres further on and up a hill, I realised my phone had fallen from my hip pocket. This turned out to be a good thing. Fellow pilgrims gathered to help, and we’ve been chatting with them on and off since then. One kind pilgrim found my phone and reunited it with me after ten or so minutes. I do know that I shouldn’t really be running; the thing is, it feels incredibly good to be feeling strong enough to do so, and we only live once! I am going to try to restrain myself from now on, though. Some of the other pilgrims did actually warn us to slow down, albeit they presumed we were trying to reach Santiago. Even so, I take their advice as fateful. We stopped for coffee and refreshments in Viana—what a lovely town, with a strong pilgrim spirit, particularly by the church, where restaurant tables line the street. After Viana, we continued to be transfixed by the distant mountains, their jagged blue and lilac shapes, and the ever present green lines of vineyards. Toward La Rioja, a man passed us leading a beautiful brown and cream dappled horse, a sheep dog also in tow. After that it was down into Logroño, and I was very glad to arrive at 2pm at the apartment we’ve booked here (the ‘Logroño centro, a orillas del Ebro’, booked via Booking.com: I can’t recommend it enough; it’s the best place we’ve had so far, by a long way, with absolutely everything provided including breakfast, and a really lovely owner who met us and explained everything). It’s a long stage from Los Arcos to Logroño, of course, albeit undulating rather than a single steady climb. We were feeling it by the time we arrived. My knee started partially dislocating in the last few minutes, and my sciatica/foot pain friend was joining the party. A powerful shower, food and ibuprofen seems to have fixed this. I have my fingers crossed that tomorrow’s long walk to Nájera doesn’t finish me off. We’ll try to take it steadily.
 

Attachments

  • 22545151-5E95-4FFD-BB50-55A3E2F11108.jpeg
    22545151-5E95-4FFD-BB50-55A3E2F11108.jpeg
    4.3 MB · Views: 26
  • CE20D981-22C1-44F1-88B9-581F4BC21626.jpeg
    CE20D981-22C1-44F1-88B9-581F4BC21626.jpeg
    4.6 MB · Views: 24
  • 6CC04EAD-3F55-446C-A85D-476DEFB957DD.jpeg
    6CC04EAD-3F55-446C-A85D-476DEFB957DD.jpeg
    3.6 MB · Views: 24
  • D88FF046-09D1-40FE-872F-8069989DD9C5.jpeg
    D88FF046-09D1-40FE-872F-8069989DD9C5.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 24
  • EB4F2707-1828-4BEB-912B-35C7296E25E0.jpeg
    EB4F2707-1828-4BEB-912B-35C7296E25E0.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 23
  • D6938165-8F36-4D88-BE2F-8C3CC5548932.jpeg
    D6938165-8F36-4D88-BE2F-8C3CC5548932.jpeg
    4.1 MB · Views: 22
  • 89F9DAC2-A893-42D3-A3BC-271553FB4F4E.jpeg
    89F9DAC2-A893-42D3-A3BC-271553FB4F4E.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 26
  • 1ED58CA4-135E-4361-9916-B198A8EE1AED.jpeg
    1ED58CA4-135E-4361-9916-B198A8EE1AED.jpeg
    3 MB · Views: 26
  • 484E7535-640D-4856-AFF8-3B79A7D33580.jpeg
    484E7535-640D-4856-AFF8-3B79A7D33580.jpeg
    3.3 MB · Views: 23
  • C643B8E3-69AA-4B5E-933B-162D8DFA44CA.jpeg
    C643B8E3-69AA-4B5E-933B-162D8DFA44CA.jpeg
    4.9 MB · Views: 31
Last edited:
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.
Published on Amazon
Guide to the 16 main caminos with maps, pictures, hyperlinks and other information.

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
@Lhollo when on camino I find it easiest to follow the Spanish custom, a late breakfast after I've walked for a few hours, and my main meal between 2 and 3pm. By then I am usually finished walking for the day. Then I have just a few tapas in a bar at night, which avoids having to stay out late.
Not to put it too plainly but we intended to try that, and find that the lack of coffee first thing plays a little havoc with the usual bathroom routine. Cold coffee seems the best solution so far. We’d both like to become Spanish, seems far easier!
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
@Lhollo, you are really offering super reports of your camino thus far. I want to just add in a note to recommend something you may have missed, between Zubiri and Pamplona. Zabaldika. Although the albergue will not be open at all this year, to the best of my knowledge, the little effort it takes to climb the hill and view the church, with perhaps a visit if you ring the bell at the community door, where you can also ask to use the bathroom, is worth it. From there, you can continue onward, skirting the mountain, and arriving at the iconic bridge that leads to the wonderful albergue in Trinidad de Arre.
I am really enjoying your posts, thank you for the very careful and useful content.
I’m really glad you’re enjoying the posts; I’m not entirely used to posting like this but thought I’d just take the plunge and see what happened!

you’re right in that we missed Zabaldika. I wish we’d seen it. That day was unusual for us in that we spent several hours walking and chatting with a fascinating pilgrim from Madrid, and as a result passed through a few of the spots that are marked in the Buen Camino app. Thanks for adding it here 🙏
 

thistleamy

Camino Portuguese - 2019; CF - 2021
Past OR future Camino
Camino Portuguese (2019); Camino Frances (2021)
Excellent photos and writing... I feel as if I were there. Thank you so much for taking the time to share with us. I will be walking in October - Burgos to Santiago and hope to be as thorough and fun as your posts have been. Buen Camino!!
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Excellent photos and writing... I feel as if I were there. Thank you so much for taking the time to share with us. I will be walking in October - Burgos to Santiago and hope to be as thorough and fun as your posts have been. Buen Camino!!
Thank you for your lovely comments 🙏. Burgos to Santiago! I’ll look forward to reading your posts about that section. You’ll be picking up where we leave off, and we’re already talking about how to return and do the remaining Burgos to Santiago portion; can’t leave it unfinished! Buen Camino in advance! It’s such an exciting thing to have on the horizon isn’t it?
 
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Past OR future Camino
Inglese 2021
@Lhollo when on camino I find it easiest to follow the Spanish custom, a late breakfast after I've walked for a few hours, and my main meal between 2 and 3pm. By then I am usually finished walking for the day. Then I have just a few tapas in a bar at night, which avoids having to stay out late.
A great idea. I stumbled upon this on on my Camino and found it really worked for me.
 
Past OR future Camino
Inglese 2021
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Edit: I’ll keep this as a rolling post while I’m here but wrote the first post before we reached SJPP!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
I'm really enjoying your posts and photos. Thank you for sharing your story! Buen Camino!
 
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
We’re finally off on our Camino! (Edit: I’ll keep this as a rolling post while I’m here but wrote the first post before we reached SJPP!)

It’s been postponed a few times. I first booked it in January/February 2020, as a surprise for my partner (that worked out well! 😃) and we were supposed to do a small section of the Frances in September 2020. We postponed that to May 2021, lengthening the section to Burgos. We postponed it from May again, to now.

We’re flying to Barcelona today from the U.K., and after two nights there and then a night in Pamplona, we’ll go on to SJPDP. Our flight was altered which is why we have an extra night in Barcelona!

We’ll start walking from SJPDP on 22nd August, going straight over to Roncesvalles (fingers crossed).
Some of you may have seen my earlier posts about equipment—shoes in particular—because of my health issues. We’ll stay in private rooms all the way, and I’ve booked them in advance. On the one hand this is great, on the other, I’m feeling some pressure to make it to each destination each day! I’m generally pretty healthy but I’ve had a few recent issues (foot pain/sciatica stuff) related to my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome so am packing light but with a massage ball and extra foam insoles. I’m also putting faith in myself, the powers that be, my backpack and my shoes: (none of those in my thread on Hokas, Altras, Brooks etc; I’ve ended up with a pair of Nike Zoomx invincible, with extra poron foam!).

I hope those of you who are also leaving soon have a safe trip to the starting point. And those of you who aren’t, that you’re safe and able to plan your own caminos when you want to.
hi thankyou for your posts which are really helpful as I’m starting in a weeks time. Like you I am reserving ahead mainly as I wish to reserve private rooms due to (Covid) concerns over sharing rooms with lots of people. But I have only booked the first week so far and I may decide to take my chances for second week onwards. How busy are you now finding it where you are, and do you think I will find plenty of availability if I do not pre book?
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
hi thankyou for your posts which are really helpful as I’m starting in a weeks time. Like you I am reserving ahead mainly as I wish to reserve private rooms due to (Covid) concerns over sharing rooms with lots of people. But I have only booked the first week so far and I may decide to take my chances for second week onwards. How busy are you now finding it where you are, and do you think I will find plenty of availability if I do not pre book?
Does your first week take you to Logroño? I’m not sure what best to advise because I haven’t needed to check availability of private rooms. It’s certainly been a relief for us not to need to spend time when we’re tired trying to find good private rooms with private bathrooms in good locations. That said, I’ve just looked on Booking.com for my next two nights—Santo Domingo de la Calzado and Belorado—and can see that there is one place available in each. That would still pin me down to reaching those places, of course, which is what I intended to do before I arrived. I think it’s possible you might find some places have no availability, but you’d need to look to nearby locations or find accommodation that isn’t listed in the obvious apps/websites. There are quite a few groups here—Spanish and American—who have prebooked everything and are using courier services. Many of the Spanish groups doing this are only walking the first week, though, or, I’ve heard, the last 100km, so it may be easier for you to just book as you go for the middle section. We haven’t yet met another British person, by the way. Our presence here has been remarked upon by quite a few people, some of whom have seen no English people all year (Caminotech in Pamplona, for example). It’s weird. It’s also a great time to be here in some ways, albeit less social then usual, I suspect. I hope this helps. I’m pretty sure you’ll enjoy whatever you end up doing! I’ll look forward to updates come the time, if you post some.
 

A Kerryman

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Thanks so much , I am off on Thursday and was wondering what changes would I meet . Enjoy the rest off your walk and safe journey to you . P
Sorry for annoying you but I am packing my rucksack 🎒 and need to ask you what are the nights like weather wise , is it sleeping bag or Sleeping bag liner that you find you are using . Thanks
 
Camino Jewellery
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Come September and beyond, I'd say you will have some warm days and some chilly nights eventually before you are finished. My opinion is that you would benefit by packing a lightweight sleeping bag. I personally dislike sleeping cold and I do not have much extra "padding" on my body.
 
Last edited:

A Kerryman

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Come September and beyond, I'd say you will have some warm days and some chilly nights eventually before you are finished. My opinion is that should pack a lightweight sleeping bag, but I dislike sleeping cold and I do not have much extra "padding" on my body.
Thanks Camino Chrissy , but I am only going for 8 days walking this time and doing the same sections as LHollo and as she is on there at the moment I was hoping she would have up to date current information . P
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
Sorry for annoying you but I am packing my rucksack 🎒 and need to ask you what are the nights like weather wise , is it sleeping bag or Sleeping bag liner that you find you are using . Thanks
Argh, I’m not using either because we have bedding provided in most of the private rooms we’ve booked. That being said… most nights I’ve been happy with just the cotton sheet, but there have been some nights when I needed more, particularly in the Pyrenees and a little beyond. On one of those occasions, I put on my lightweight fleece when I woke in the wee hours, and I’ve covered my legs with a blanket when necessary. You basically occasionally need a thin thermal layer and always a cotton layer or equivalent. A sleeping bag might be overkill—sometimes too hot—but allowing for the nights getting cooler into September and October it could be wise. Sorry to be sitting on the fence! Hope this helps.
 

A Kerryman

Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Argh, I’m not using either because we have bedding provided in most of the private rooms we’ve booked. That being said… most nights I’ve been happy with just the cotton sheet, but there have been some nights when I needed more, particularly in the Pyrenees and a little beyond. On one of those occasions, I put on my lightweight fleece when I woke in the wee hours, and covered my legs with a blanket if necessary. You basically occasionally need a thin thermal layer and always a cotton layer or equivalent. A sleeping bag might be overkill—sometimes too hot—but allowing for the nights getting cooler into September and October it could be wise. Sorry to be sitting on the fence! Hope this helps.
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
Learn how to Get "Camino Ready " 2nd Edition. In English, Spanish, German and Korean
Past OR future Camino
I plan to walk this year 2020 in September
Does your first week take you to Logroño? I’m not sure what best to advise because I haven’t needed to check availability of private rooms. It’s certainly been a relief for us not to need to spend time when we’re tired trying to find good private rooms with private bathrooms in good locations. That said, I’ve just looked on Booking.com for my next two nights—Santo Domingo de la Calzado and Belorado—and can see that there is one place available in each. That would still pin me down to reaching those places, of course, which is what I intended to do before I arrived. I think it’s possible you might find some places have no availability, but you’d need to look to nearby locations or find accommodation that isn’t listed in the obvious apps/websites. There are quite a few groups here—Spanish and American—who have prebooked everything and are using courier services. Many of the Spanish groups doing this are only walking the first week, though, or, I’ve heard, the last 100km, so it may be easier for you to just book as you go for the middle section. We haven’t yet met another British person, by the way. Our presence here has been remarked upon by quite a few people, some of whom have seen no English people all year (Caminotech in Pamplona, for example). It’s weird. It’s also a great time to be here in some ways, albeit less social then usual, I suspect. I hope this helps. I’m pretty sure you’ll enjoy whatever you end up doing! I’ll look forward to updates come the time, if you post some.
Thanks that’s helpful. Will of course post as I go. I have already identified 3 other Brits on the same flight out as me, heading to the Camino, so the Brits are coming!
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
This is an update about yesterday, which was my Logroño to Nájera stage. For my partner and I, it was the hardest stage yet. We’re used to hill walking, mountains, etc, so unexpectedly, the SJPP to Roncesvalles section wasn’t too hard for us, particularly given that we had trained but also had fresh legs. Yesterday’s 17+ miles to Nájera was a different matter. One of the problems with my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome is that even if I’m not having dislocations, my muscles have to work hard to keep everything in place and can go into spasm. I had some mild pain, mostly stiffness, during the walk through the city. How great a contrast from the previous day’s charm of Los Arcos, and the old city of Logroño, to suddenly be surrounded by corporate buildings and wide business district streets. We reached the Parque de la Grajera at around 8:40am. What a wonderful surprise, to find red squirrels running not away but right up to us, hoping for food. And then the reservoir with its ducks, swans, pink footed geese and, further round, carp beneath the footbridge, sucking at the air. There was a detour in place around the park, leading up the hill, before we reached the fence where pilgrims have woven crosses. Further down the hill there were roadworks, and another detour. By this point, the pain behind my left knee had been joined by a stabbing pain in my lower right calf. I was taking it steadily but occasionally the pain took my breath away and I’d stop. I think it’s easy to put pressure on oneself: to not let a walking partner down, to not let oneself down, somehow to not let the experience itself down. I ended up crouched on the floor, sobbing, then in my partners’ arms. We were in the middle of the roadworks section, next to a digger. A workman in a high viz vest looked on from afar. This is not what I’d expected my low point of our Camino to be! Surely I’m not the only pilgrim to have a massive wobble on the way, am I? I stumbled from there to Navarrete, where a great hunger hit me and I ate sandwiches, battered chicken, and coffee outside a cafe then bought mini pain au chocolate from a panadería and ate four of those too. The break and food helped more than I thought possible; the pain was still there but more bearable. I should have known that vineyards in La Rioja would be so extensive as to seem like an infinite city, row after row, block after block. It was overwhelming, and beautiful. The path in places looked as though an earthquake had torn it apart. We were blessed by a largely overcast day, and as we neared Nájera and the beehive-shaped oven on a hill, we chatted with fellow pilgrims: a lady from Belgium, a Spanish man with no English, from Alicante and determined to reach at least León, ideally Finisterre, after two years of having to delay. His muscles were strong but he had blisters. I told him I had the opposite trouble. The knot in my leg was back. At times my foot scraped the floor because I’d fail to fully lift it. Entering Nájera at around 3pm, I was again impressed by the way the residential area unfolded into first the beautiful vegetation around the river, and then into the old town. We didn’t bother checking in straight away. I did something I never usually do: went to the first open restaurant and ordered an afternoon beer, with patatas bravas. I was again almost in tears, with pain, with the effort of determination, with the amount that I don’t understand about any of these things, and with relief. We checked into a room at the absolutely wonderful Hostal Ciudad de Nájera and rested. Somehow, after a shower and massage, I recovered enough not only to walk through Nájera but also to climb the hill by the old castle and take in the view over to the red rocks and caves. I’ve been fascinated by these since reading about Nájera, and was desperate not to miss them! What an enchanting place Nájera is. We were sorry to leave it this morning, even though we’d seen much of the town.
 

Attachments

  • 0322CC77-0FB3-4BE6-833D-A6955F0CDE5C.jpeg
    0322CC77-0FB3-4BE6-833D-A6955F0CDE5C.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 15
  • 5DAD8A69-F375-47C6-AFED-4AFDBD46EBB6.jpeg
    5DAD8A69-F375-47C6-AFED-4AFDBD46EBB6.jpeg
    1.6 MB · Views: 15
  • 6BB872C1-5454-4BC1-B7F4-AB6007F3B6F5.jpeg
    6BB872C1-5454-4BC1-B7F4-AB6007F3B6F5.jpeg
    5.2 MB · Views: 16
  • 8FF2254A-26C7-43D2-98B9-4A552882A794.jpeg
    8FF2254A-26C7-43D2-98B9-4A552882A794.jpeg
    1.5 MB · Views: 15
  • DDFABD23-D164-4DFE-84B7-FCB1D504DD26.jpeg
    DDFABD23-D164-4DFE-84B7-FCB1D504DD26.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 15
  • E4DA2A5E-3534-4AD9-A53F-77B19930A125.jpeg
    E4DA2A5E-3534-4AD9-A53F-77B19930A125.jpeg
    3.1 MB · Views: 17
  • 894493DC-D433-4285-820F-9808EE79B9AF.jpeg
    894493DC-D433-4285-820F-9808EE79B9AF.jpeg
    2.1 MB · Views: 19
  • 73F6244F-528C-45EE-8133-626F0C548F22.jpeg
    73F6244F-528C-45EE-8133-626F0C548F22.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 23
  • FD3C7333-77A9-4A00-996E-655AAFF54730.jpeg
    FD3C7333-77A9-4A00-996E-655AAFF54730.jpeg
    2 MB · Views: 20
  • 2F03B85F-A4AA-4F2B-B9F6-82B253A423E8.jpeg
    2F03B85F-A4AA-4F2B-B9F6-82B253A423E8.jpeg
    2.6 MB · Views: 30
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
2019
This is an update about yesterday, which was my Logroño to Nájera stage. For my partner and I, it was the hardest stage yet. We’re used to hill walking, mountains, etc, so unexpectedly, the SJPP to Roncesvalles section wasn’t too hard for us, particularly given that we had trained but also had fresh legs. Yesterday’s 17+ miles to Nájera was a different matter. One of the problems with my Ehlers Danlos Syndrome is that even if I’m not having dislocations, my muscles have to work hard to keep everything in place and can go into spasm. I had some mild pain, mostly stiffness, during the walk through the city. How great a contrast from the previous day’s charm of Los Arcos, and the old city of Logroño, to suddenly be surrounded by corporate buildings and wide business district streets. We reached the Parque de la Grajera at around 8:40am. What a wonderful surprise, to find red squirrels running not away but right up to us, hoping for food. And then the reservoir with its ducks, swans, pink footed geese and, further round, carp beneath the footbridge, sucking at the air. There was a detour in place around the park, leading up the hill, before we reached the fence where pilgrims have woven crosses. Further down the hill there were roadworks, and another detour. By this point, the pain behind my left knee had been joined by a stabbing pain in my lower right calf. I was taking it steadily but occasionally the pain took my breath away and I’d stop. I think it’s easy to put pressure on oneself: to not let a walking partner down, to not let oneself down, somehow to not let the experience itself down. I ended up crouched on the floor, sobbing, then in my partners’ arms. We were in the middle of the roadworks section, next to a digger. A workman in a high viz vest looked on from afar. This is not what I’d expected my low point of our Camino to be! Surely I’m not the only pilgrim to have a massive wobble on the way, am I? I stumbled from there to Navarrete, where a great hunger hit me and I ate sandwiches, battered chicken, and coffee outside a cafe then bought mini pain au chocolate from a panadería and ate four of those too. The break and food helped more than I thought possible; the pain was still there but more bearable. I should have known that vineyards in La Rioja would be so extensive as to seem like an infinite city, row after row, block after block. It was overwhelming, and beautiful. The path in places looked as though an earthquake had torn it apart. We were blessed by a largely overcast day, and as we neared Nájera and the beehive-shaped oven on a hill, we chatted with fellow pilgrims: a lady from Belgium, a Spanish man with no English, from Alicante and determined to reach at least León, ideally Finisterre, after two years of having to delay. His muscles were strong but he had blisters. I told him I had the opposite trouble. The knot in my leg was back. At times my foot scraped the floor because I’d fail to fully lift it. Entering Nájera at around 3pm, I was again impressed by the way the residential area unfolded into first the beautiful vegetation around the river, and then into the old town. We didn’t bother checking in straight away. I did something I never usually do: went to the first open restaurant and ordered an afternoon beer, with patatas bravas. I was again almost in tears, with pain, with the effort of determination, with the amount that I don’t understand about any of these things, and with relief. We checked into a room at the absolutely wonderful Hostal Ciudad de Nájera and rested. Somehow, after a shower and massage, I recovered enough not only to walk through Nájera but also to climb the hill by the old castle and take in the view over to the red rocks and caves. I’ve been fascinated by these since reading about Nájera, and was desperate not to miss them! What an enchanting place Nájera is. We were sorry to leave it this morning, even though we’d seen much of the town.
Many thanks Lhollo for the vicarious journey
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
The stage from Nájera to Santo Domingo de la Calzada was for me one of the easiest so far. I’d hoped to catch the eastern sun hitting the red rocks of Nájera but the sun seemed to have risen and the rocks were a subdued dusky colour similar to the previous dusk. ‘It must be overcast in the east’, I reasoned. We left fairly late, at around 7:45 and were beyond the village when the sun actually rose and turned everything fire red. I was tempted to run back down to a viewpoint, and might have done so if we’d covered less ground. Lesson (re)learnt far too late in life: the light from the sun fills the sky before the disc of the sun itself appears! Despite missing the glowing town, we passed red rocks in the shallow dips and hills higher up. In Azofra we passed two notice boards, both advertising cafes. We stopped at the farther of the two in the village, mostly because it was actually the first of the adverts we’d seen, and we felt a loyalty to it; it had sounded so perfect. As we ate neopolitanas and drank café con leche and fresh orange juice, familiar pilgrims strode by or stopped at the tables further down the street. Moving on, the last of the vineyards passed without our knowing it was a goodbye. I stopped to photograph graffiti, which I’ve been doing on occasions each day. This time it was scrawled on a metal door: ‘Where are you?’. Soon the fields turned from red to yellow, mostly wheat stubble. A pilgrim came up behind us and I noticed he had two flags, on wooden poles, sticking from his backpack. A pilgrim had previously told us about ‘Flagman’, who moves at speed, is like us from the U.K.—the only other Brit whom that pilgrim had met—and that he’s walking the Camino for charity. I started a conversation with him and found that he’s raising money for asthma and Parkinson’s charities. He’s suffered from asthma himself for over 40 years but for the past six months, hasn’t needed inhalers. He doesn’t know why this is, but puts some of it down to Covid restrictions and a new lifestyle with more walking. He’s the fastest pilgrim I’ve met, except for the Occasionally-Running-Man-from-Mexico. I wish I knew these pilgrim’s names, and have collected as many as I could. The flag-bearing pilgrim said he’d see us later in Santo Domingo, and give us details of the charities, but as yet we haven’t seen him to get that information. Maybe someone here already knows of him? If I speak to him today, I’ll post an update here. I followed in his fast steps up the yellow hillside before Cirueña. Shortly before entering the village, at the summit of that hill, I had a difficult encounter with the people who own a fruit and drinks stall, the proceeds from which they say go to a charity. It’s the only unpleasant experience I’ve had here, everything and everyone else has been so lovely. I won’t go into the details of what happened but I was shocked and troubled. Entering Santo Domingo de la Calzada at 12:30pm, I was again surprised by the industrial and residential area on the outskirts of the old town. We stopped for drinks and a salad in a plaza near the cathedral: cool lettuce, bardenera olives (bright green, a hint of juicy cloves), tuna, onion, egg, white wine vinegar and olive oil). We’d treated ourselves to a night at the Parador—not as over the top as it would be now, because it was booked some time ago, when prices were low during early Covid. We were given a room overlooking the main square, with a balcony that was fluttered by the flags above the hotel entrance. The bell tower, cathedral and chapel blazed yellow in the early afternoon sun. How clean everything is here, despite its crumbling age. After I had a bath—a bath! What muscle joy!—we explored the town. I can’t believe we’ll soon leave Spain. It’s a blessing to be here, even for a while.
 

Attachments

  • F90A1695-3C5C-4B6D-A202-5AAEF8178332.jpeg
    F90A1695-3C5C-4B6D-A202-5AAEF8178332.jpeg
    2.9 MB · Views: 16
  • F0A2D485-C94F-4A8E-BAC8-D3A4812A3839.jpeg
    F0A2D485-C94F-4A8E-BAC8-D3A4812A3839.jpeg
    2.4 MB · Views: 16
  • CD03C02F-E703-49E3-80BC-D8A9B0BFB1D7.jpeg
    CD03C02F-E703-49E3-80BC-D8A9B0BFB1D7.jpeg
    1.1 MB · Views: 17
  • 22691CE3-8AB5-4C6E-845A-F67BF969413D.jpeg
    22691CE3-8AB5-4C6E-845A-F67BF969413D.jpeg
    4.1 MB · Views: 20
  • 6ED3A222-55BF-4B95-899C-E0E4097E44B8.jpeg
    6ED3A222-55BF-4B95-899C-E0E4097E44B8.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 18
  • 447D7F44-95E7-4575-ABDB-0254AB1C2102.jpeg
    447D7F44-95E7-4575-ABDB-0254AB1C2102.jpeg
    1.7 MB · Views: 18
  • 4DF00FFD-F619-4CAE-9FE5-E1E786407DA1.jpeg
    4DF00FFD-F619-4CAE-9FE5-E1E786407DA1.jpeg
    4.3 MB · Views: 20
  • 5B9E2DCD-95A5-4F7E-8704-295170DF1B5D.jpeg
    5B9E2DCD-95A5-4F7E-8704-295170DF1B5D.jpeg
    2 MB · Views: 19
  • C51FFE8D-99D0-413B-A645-C0BD8160002B.jpeg
    C51FFE8D-99D0-413B-A645-C0BD8160002B.jpeg
    1.8 MB · Views: 19
  • 22E805FA-7874-404D-93F7-9D0B75669758.jpeg
    22E805FA-7874-404D-93F7-9D0B75669758.jpeg
    1.9 MB · Views: 23
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
The stage from Nájera to Santo Domingo de la Calzada was for me one of the easiest so far. I’d hoped to catch the eastern sun hitting the red rocks of Nájera but the sun seemed to have risen and the rocks were a subdued dusky colour similar to the previous dusk. ‘It must be overcast in the east’, I reasoned. We left fairly late, at around 7:45 and were beyond the village when the sun actually rose and turned everything fire red. I was tempted to run back down to a viewpoint, and might have done so if we’d covered less ground. Lesson (re)learnt far too late in life: the light from the sun fills the sky before the disc of the sun itself appears! Despite missing the glowing town, we passed red rocks in the shallow dips and hills higher up. In Azofra we passed two notice boards, both advertising cafes. We stopped at the farther of the two in the village, mostly because it was actually the first of the adverts we’d seen, and we felt a loyalty to it; it had sounded so perfect. As we ate neopolitanas and drank café con leche and fresh orange juice, familiar pilgrims strode by or stopped at the tables further down the street. Moving on, the last of the vineyards passed without our knowing it was a goodbye. I stopped to photograph graffiti, which I’ve been doing on occasions each day. This time it was scrawled on a metal door: ‘Where are you?’. Soon the fields turned from red to yellow, mostly wheat stubble. A pilgrim came up behind us and I noticed he had two flags, on wooden poles, sticking from his backpack. A pilgrim had previously told us about ‘Flagman’, who moves at speed, is like us from the U.K.—the only other Brit whom that pilgrim had met—and that he’s walking the Camino for charity. I started a conversation with him and found that he’s raising money for asthma and Parkinson’s charities. He’s suffered from asthma himself for over 40 years but for the past six months, hasn’t needed inhalers. He doesn’t know why this is, but puts some of it down to Covid restrictions and a new lifestyle with more walking. He’s the fastest pilgrim I’ve met, except for the Occasionally-Running-Man-from-Mexico. I wish I knew these pilgrim’s names, and have collected as many as I could. The flag-bearing pilgrim said he’d see us later in Santo Domingo, and give us details of the charities, but as yet we haven’t seen him to get that information. Maybe someone here already knows of him? If I speak to him today, I’ll post an update here. I followed in his fast steps up the yellow hillside before Cirueña. Shortly before entering the village, at the summit of that hill, I had a difficult encounter with the people who own a fruit and drinks stall, the proceeds from which they say go to a charity. It’s the only unpleasant experience I’ve had here, everything and everyone else has been so lovely. I won’t go into the details of what happened but I was shocked and troubled. Entering Santo Domingo de la Calzada at 12:30pm, I was again surprised by the industrial and residential area on the outskirts of the old town. We stopped for drinks and a salad in a plaza near the cathedral: cool lettuce, bardenera olives (bright green, a hint of juicy cloves), tuna, onion, egg, white wine vinegar and olive oil). We’d treated ourselves to a night at the Parador—not as over the top as it would be now, because it was booked some time ago, when prices were low during early Covid. We were given a room overlooking the main square, with a balcony that was fluttered by the flags above the hotel entrance. The bell tower, cathedral and chapel blazed yellow in the early afternoon sun. How clean everything is here, despite its crumbling age. After I had a bath—a bath! What muscle joy!—we explored the town. I can’t believe we’ll soon leave Spain. It’s a blessing to be here, even for a while.
How sensitively put, that you hadn't known it was goodbye to the vineyards... and more so, with the uncomfortable incident. I hope you can let that go, sink into the ground. I am really enjoying your posts, thank you.
 
Peaceable Projects Inc.
Peaceable Projects Inc. is a U.S.-based non-profit group that brings the vast resources of the wide world together with the ongoing needs of the people who live, work, and travel on the Camino de Santiago pilgrim trail network in Spain.
A Quest of St. James, Tommy Ray, Book Cover, Image
Come follow the vivid imagery of this life-changing adventure.

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
First, I’m sorry that my final update is so delayed…

I’ve never known a storm like the one that hit Santo Domingo de la Calzada the night before our last day of walking. I’ve seen some intense storms in various countries, but never a lightning storm that lingered in one place for nine hours. As I mentioned in my last post, we’d got lucky with a booking at the main Parador on the Plaza España by the cathedral. It was originally a little luxury which I’d found for a surprisingly cheap rate during one of the lockdowns. That booking was at the Parador’s recently opened hotel in the town, the Fresneda. They then closed that hotel during Covid, and moved all bookings to their other one on the plaza. Somehow we ended up with a balcony overlooking the square, directly opposite the bell tower. The bell tower is fascinating for many reasons but one of these is that it’s the highest point in the town, with commanding views that are well worth the climb (note from experience: it’s best not to lean back to take photos when the bells are about to chime 😃). By around 10:30pm, I heard a light patter of rain, which surprised me given that the day and evening had been glorious. I went out onto the balcony and brought in my socks. I then drifted toward sleep. At around 11pm, I shot upright when there was an almighty crash. It shook the room, accompanied by a brilliant flash. Lightning had struck the bell tower. Of course it had. The storm then passed over a little but the lightning continued until long after we were awake and packing for the day. I delayed for a while, reading posts here and on other sites about walking during lightning storms. There is a difficulty in not knowing personally the land ahead: whether there will be flat plains in which a walker will be the sole high point, where lighting is most likely to strike; whether there will be many bare hilltops. I read about the lightning crouch, and theories about when and whether it’s a good idea to lie flat on the ground. Over the hour, we watched three pilgrims cross the plaza, each of them in sturdy ponchos. By 8am, the lightning seemed to be less frequent. I’d had a chat with the concierge, who told me that the storm was coming from the west, which was of course where we were heading. This meant that we should be walking away from it rather than into it. We shook out our disposable ponchos and left the hotel in a persistent but undemanding rain. We saw no more lightning. Walking down the main road, we avoided a flooded section of the Camino. We couldn’t see the surrounding hills because of fog. Reaching the cross that marks the historical duel through which a standoff between Grañón and Santo Domingo was resolved—for years, there had been disagreement about the ownership of a pasture field—the clouds lifted. Entering Grañón, we followed the sound of piano music: Einaudi, one of my favourites. What a haven is the cafe van Barbackana! We ordered two of the breakfasts, which comprised what we usually order anyway: cafe con leche, a warm neopolitana and fresh orange juice. I chatted with the owner in Spanish; a really kind, friendly man. Gradually, more pilgrims appeared. We talked with a lady from Indiana who is still on the Camino. Four American friends also joined the group; they’d split their stages differently from us so it was lovely to catch up with them. The air was suddenly fresh. We sat beneath bright-leafed trees, piano drifting among us, taking group photos. We left Grañón with our new friend, the lady from Indiana, with whom we’d walk the rest of the day to Belorado. Vultures appeared above us in squadrons, released from the storm. We stopped in Viloria, having been greeted by a car that pulled over: two locals who handed us cool bottles of water because ‘it’s the four year anniversary’ of St James. What a lovely gesture! The village is also the birthplace of Santo Domingo. We went into the Church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, where there is a 10th century font. Inside, I talked with a volunteer and inhabitant of the village. It was a meeting that will stay with me. All her life, she’s watched pilgrims walk through the village and not stop, perhaps not knowing that it is the birthplace of Santo Domingo. The ruins of his house are still there, with a sign explaining that they are ‘more than ruins’. There are hotels in the town and restaurants that are usually open but had to close because of Covid. There is an application to open a museum in the village, and the Ayuntamiento is in talks with higher political powers about developing the village so that its significance can be better understood. The lady I spoke with was passionate, ‘Muy triste’, she kept saying, and I found myself agreeing that is was sad. I wanted to hug her. Moving on, we stopped at a somewhat peculiar but pleasant restaurant in Villamayor Del Río: peculiar because of the combination of warning signs, not to wear backpacks, not to remove shoes, that the wifi was overloaded so they’d turned it off, to maintain distance, etc, all in a narrow entrance next to a 19th century style pram full of frilly dolls. Pleasant because the outside area was airy and bright, and the waiter helped me to load a tray full of food and drinks so it was balanced well. The food consisted mostly of egg products because they have their own hens, but with some sandwiches, which we ordered. More pilgrims arrived and we chatted with a man from Barcelona who’d become a very familiar face. Now a group of four, we walked the remaining stretch into Belorado under a deep sun, vultures still gliding overhead, the conversation carrying us forward so that we were in Belorado, and at the end of our Camino, before we could feel saddened.

Afterward, we explored Belorado. The foot and hand prints of famous people embedded into the pavement, including Emilio Estévez and Martin Sheen. The leafy central square. The views from the castle to places we wouldn’t this year reach. The abandoned stork nests.

Somehow, somewhere in Belorado between Hostal B and the bus stop, I lost my ring. It’s silver, with a gold plated circular disk and a round lapis lazuli set into it. I bought it in Crete and loved it. If anyone sees it, I’d love to be reunited with it. I’m also oddly accepting of its loss to me, though. I thought I’d removed all my rings before we left for Spain, and was surprised to see it still on my hand in the airport, like a stowaway. I felt it was destined for something. It makes sense that it’s meant to be with someone else now.

The following day, we took a bus part way to Burgos, got off in the middle of nowhere and walked two hours to Paleolítico Vivo (https://www.paleoliticovivo.org), to do one of their jeep safaris. Very odd, after the Camino, but somehow also coherent: how humans lived alongside nature for so many millennia. I strongly recommend visiting this place if you have time.

After that, we explored Burgos, and the following day drove to Barcelona. We then had a full day and a half day in the city before flying home.

It is a shock to be back here. I’m not enjoying the need to be static. We wish our work lives were such that we could complete the Camino in one go.

What next? We plan to return next May/June and pick up where we left off. I’m currently looking into flights to Madrid, a train to Burgos, bus to Belorado, then… as many sections as we can manage. I will prebook rooms again. There are few flights from northern Spain to northern England so we’re looking at trains back to Madrid from as far west as our time will allow. My plan is also to improve my Spanish further before then.

I wonder where any of this leads. The Camino strikes me as natural, organic, our bodies doing what they are designed to do but also fighting to become that strong, our minds finding equilibrium. And yet it is miles from reality, for most of us. How do we balance these competing demands? I don’t know. Maybe more Camino will teach me. Maybe not!

I’d love to know your own experiences: of doing only a chunk of etapes, of the adjustment afterwards, of doing the full Camino and how that felt after, or of anything I’ve touched on here.

Thanks for reading 🙏
 

Attachments

  • 5F8F9E0C-8F00-4F47-9D18-7BF64DAB7B3D.jpeg
    5F8F9E0C-8F00-4F47-9D18-7BF64DAB7B3D.jpeg
    4.5 MB · Views: 6
  • F11CD5ED-D8F9-4C9A-B358-3CEFB7E77812.jpeg
    F11CD5ED-D8F9-4C9A-B358-3CEFB7E77812.jpeg
    3.8 MB · Views: 6
  • 43764C6C-EAC7-45B5-9271-FFDB8B91B38A.jpeg
    43764C6C-EAC7-45B5-9271-FFDB8B91B38A.jpeg
    4.5 MB · Views: 6
  • 2D8D0224-CC5B-4ADA-BD9D-B885080A742F.jpeg
    2D8D0224-CC5B-4ADA-BD9D-B885080A742F.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 6
  • 44E98506-7293-4263-B7E0-40020D2A5699.jpeg
    44E98506-7293-4263-B7E0-40020D2A5699.jpeg
    3.5 MB · Views: 6
  • 714AF2C9-920D-4165-91B5-9F51DB12D148.jpeg
    714AF2C9-920D-4165-91B5-9F51DB12D148.jpeg
    1.9 MB · Views: 6
  • 70E74157-0E4D-41C8-B3BA-CBFB28EC94B1.jpeg
    70E74157-0E4D-41C8-B3BA-CBFB28EC94B1.jpeg
    4.1 MB · Views: 6
  • 69D2D261-1D38-4783-B724-3954D5FCD110.jpeg
    69D2D261-1D38-4783-B724-3954D5FCD110.jpeg
    2.1 MB · Views: 6
  • 38DE2C0E-BC17-4FAF-9823-D344A7132D6A.jpeg
    38DE2C0E-BC17-4FAF-9823-D344A7132D6A.jpeg
    1.8 MB · Views: 6
  • 1F47AD59-4593-42E0-A008-64EDD6F8F714.jpeg
    1F47AD59-4593-42E0-A008-64EDD6F8F714.jpeg
    4 MB · Views: 7
Last edited:
Past OR future Camino
06,CF;13,CP;17,SSal;19,Ingles
First, I’m sorry that my final update is so delayed…

I’ve never known a storm like the one that hit Santo Domingo de la Calzada the night before our last day of walking. I’ve seen some intense storms in various countries, but never a lightning storm that lingered in one place for nine hours. As I mentioned in my last post, we’d got lucky with a booking at the main Parador on the Plaza España by the cathedral. It was originally a little luxury which I’d found for a surprisingly cheap rate during one of the lockdowns. That booking was at the Parador’s recently opened hotel in the town, the Fresneda. They then closed that hotel during Covid, and moved all bookings to their other one on the plaza. Somehow we ended up with a balcony overlooking the square, directly opposite the bell tower. The bell tower is fascinating for many reasons but one of these is that it’s the highest point in the town, with commanding views that are well worth the climb (note from experience: it’s best not to lean back to take photos when the bells are about to chime 😃). By around 10:30pm, I heard a light patter of rain, which surprised me given that the day and evening had been glorious. I went out onto the balcony and brought in my socks. I then drifted toward sleep. At around 11pm, I shot upright when there was an almighty crash. It shook the room, accompanied by a brilliant flash. Lightning had struck the bell tower. Of course it had. The storm then passed over a little but the lightning continued until long after we were awake and packing for the day. I delayed for a while, reading posts here and on other sites about walking during lightning storms. There is a difficulty in not knowing personally the land ahead: whether there will be flat plains in which a walker will be the sole high point, where lighting is most likely to strike; whether there will be many bare hilltops. I read about the lightning crouch, and theories about when and whether it’s a good idea to lie flat on the ground. Over the hour, we watched three pilgrims cross the plaza, each of them in sturdy ponchos. By 8am, the lightning seemed to be less frequent. I’d had a chat with the concierge, who told me that the storm was coming from the west, which was of course where we were heading. This meant that we should be walking away from it rather than into it. We shook out our disposable ponchos and left the hotel in a persistent but undemanding rain. We saw no more lightning. Walking down the main road, we avoided a flooded section of the Camino. We couldn’t see the surrounding hills because of fog. Reaching the cross that marks the historical duel through which a standoff between Grañón and Santo Domingo was resolved—for years, there had been disagreement about the ownership of a pasture field—the clouds lifted. Entering Grañón, we followed the sound of piano music: Einaudi, one of my favourites. What a haven is the cafe van Barbackana! We ordered two of the breakfasts, which comprised what we usually order anyway: cafe con leche, a warm neopolitana and fresh orange juice. I chatted with the owner in Spanish; a really kind, friendly man. Gradually, more pilgrims appeared. We talked with a lady from Indiana who is still on the Camino. Four American friends also joined the group; they’d split their stages differently from us so it was lovely to catch up with them. The air was suddenly fresh. We sat beneath bright-leafed trees, piano drifting among us, taking group photos. We left Grañón with our new friend, the lady from Indiana, with whom we’d walk the rest of the day to Belorado. Vultures appeared above us in squadrons, released from the storm. We stopped in Viloria, having been greeted by a car that pulled over: two locals who handed us cool bottles of water because ‘it’s the four year anniversary’ of St James. What a lovely gesture! The village is also the birthplace of Santo Domingo. We went into the Church of Nuestra Señora de la Asunción, where there is a 10th century font. Inside, I talked with a volunteer and inhabitant of the village. It was a meeting that will stay with me. All her life, she’s watched pilgrims walk through the village and not stop, perhaps not knowing that it is the birthplace of Santo Domingo. The ruins of his house are still there, with a sign explaining that they are ‘more than ruins’. There are hotels in the town and restaurants that are usually open but had to close because of Covid. There is an application to open a museum in the village, and the Ayuntamiento is in talks with higher political powers about developing the village so that its significance can be better understood. The lady I spoke with was passionate, ‘Muy triste’, she kept saying, and I found myself agreeing that is was sad. I wanted to hug her. Moving on, we stopped at a somewhat peculiar but pleasant restaurant in Villamayor Del Río: peculiar because of the combination of warning signs, not to wear backpacks, not to remove shoes, that the wifi was overloaded so they’d turned it off, to maintain distance, etc, all in a narrow entrance next to a 19th century style pram full of frilly dolls. Pleasant because the outside area was airy and bright, and the waiter helped me to load a tray full of food and drinks so it was balanced well. The food consisted mostly of egg products because they have their own hens, but with some sandwiches, which we ordered. More pilgrims arrived and we chatted with a man from Barcelona who’d become a very familiar face. Now a group of four, we walked the remaining stretch into Belorado under a deep sun, vultures still gliding overhead, the conversation carrying us forward so that we were in Belorado, and at the end of our Camino, before we could feel saddened.

Afterward, we explored Belorado. The foot and hand prints of famous people embedded into the pavement, including Emilio Estévez and Martin Sheen. The leafy central square. The views from the castle to places we wouldn’t this year reach. The abandoned stork nests.

Somehow, somewhere in Belorado between Hostal B and the bus stop, I lost my ring. It’s silver, with a gold plated circular disk and a round lapis lazuli set into it. I bought it in Crete and loved it. If anyone sees it, I’d love to be reunited with it. I’m also oddly accepting of its loss to me, though. I thought I’d removed all my rings before we left for Spain, and was surprised to see it still on my hand in the airport, like a stowaway. I felt it was destined for something. It makes sense that it’s meant to be with someone else now.

The following day, we took a bus part way to Burgos, got off in the middle of nowhere and walked two hours to Paleolítico Vivo (https://www.paleoliticovivo.org), to do one of their jeep safaris. Very odd, after the Camino, but somehow also coherent: how humans lived alongside nature for so many millennia. I strongly recommend visiting this place if you have time.

After that, we explored Burgos, and the following day drove to Barcelona. We then had a full day and a half day in the city before flying home.

It is a shock to be back here. I’m not enjoying the need to be static. We wish our work lives were such that we could complete the Camino in one go.

What next? We plan to return next May/June and pick up where we left off. I’m currently looking into flights to Madrid, a train to Burgos, bus to Belorado, then… as many sections as we can manage. I will prebook rooms again. There are few flights from northern Spain to northern England so we’re looking at trains back to Madrid from as far west as our time will allow. My plan is also to improve my Spanish further before then.

I wonder where any of this leads. The Camino strikes me as natural, organic, our bodies doing what they are designed to do but also fighting to become that strong, our minds finding equilibrium. And yet it is miles from reality, for most of us. How do we balance these competing demands? I don’t know. Maybe more Camino will teach me. Maybe not!

I’d love to know your own experiences: of doing only a chunk of etapes, of the adjustment afterwards, of doing the full Camino and how that felt after, or of anything I’ve touched on here.

Thanks for reading 🙏
I love your attitude, shown in your detachment and resignation to the fate of your treasured ring. You certainly gained a lot of information along the way, and met some friendly people. It will not be long till you are starting off again! Thanks for update, I was wondering how it had been going for you.
 

Jesnat

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2017
I have so enjoyed reading your posts. I have felt I am walking alongside you. I’m sure you will be back to complete one or more stretches. I re-commence my own walk from Belorado this Friday so I will be sure to scan the path for your ring. I’m just planning to walk for a week or so aiming for Leon.

Just some info for others, there is a great direct coach service from Madrid to Pamplona via Belorado and other key towns along that part of the Camino and vice versa for those who want to get back to Madrid.

Here’s the link: https://jimenezmovilidad.es/pamplona-logrono-madrid/

"Pamplona Madrid route service. PLM Autocares makes the journey between Pamplona and Madrid making stops in the following towns: Puente la Reina, Estella, Los Arcos, Viana, Logroño, Nájera, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, Belorado, Ibeas de Juarros and Madrid with an estimated duration of 5 : 45 hours."
 

Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
I have so enjoyed reading your posts. I have felt I am walking alongside you. I’m sure you will be back to complete one or more stretches. I re-commence my own walk from Belorado this Friday so I will be sure to scan the path for your ring. I’m just planning to walk for a week or so aiming for Leon.

Just some info for others, there is a great direct coach service from Madrid to Pamplona via Belorado and other key towns along that part of the Camino and vice versa for those who want to get back to Madrid.

Here’s the link: https://jimenezmovilidad.es/pamplona-logrono-madrid/

"Pamplona Madrid route service. PLM Autocares makes the journey between Pamplona and Madrid making stops in the following towns: Puente la Reina, Estella, Los Arcos, Viana, Logroño, Nájera, Santo Domingo de la Calzada, Belorado, Ibeas de Juarros and Madrid with an estimated duration of 5 : 45 hours."
Buen Camino for your return to Belorado and onwards! Very exciting. I’d been thinking of walking for maybe two weeks next time, and in an abstract way, presumed that this would take us to roughly Leon. We clearly need to do much more research! 😃
 

Did not find what you were looking for? Search here

Popular Resources

“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf ivar
  • Featured
“All” Albergues on the Camino Frances in one pdf
4.95 star(s) 101 ratings
Downloads
15,185
Updated
A selection of favorite albergues on the Camino Francés Ton van Tilburg
Favorite Albergues along the Camino Frances
4.83 star(s) 35 ratings
Downloads
7,863
Updated
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances ivar
Profile maps of all 34 stages of the Camino Frances
4.88 star(s) 24 ratings
Downloads
7,669
Updated

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

Top