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2019 Camino Guides

Yellow arrows in Paris? Why?

M

Mike Trebert

Guest
#1
I've been in Paris for a couple of weeks will be here for 2 more weeks. I just finished a Camino Frances so have seen A LOT of yellow arrows recently. Didn't expect to see any here in Paris. I've noticed a few, which look recently painted, on the right bank across from Ile de la Cité but pointing away from Notre Dame. They're smallish and a bit more discreet than most of the ones I saw along the Camino Frances. I've noticed a series of 3 or 4 over a kilometre or so, will go back and follow if I have time. The last one I saw pointed across the frantic intersection leading onto Blvd de Sabastopal.

Can't find anything on Google. Any thoughts, anyone?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#3
I've been in Paris for a couple of weeks will be here for 2 more weeks. I just finished a Camino Frances so have seen A LOT of yellow arrows recently. Didn't expect to see any here in Paris. I've noticed a few, which look recently painted, on the right bank across from Ile de la Cité but pointing away from Notre Dame. They're smallish and a bit more discreet than most of the ones I saw along the Camino Frances. I've noticed a series of 3 or 4 over a kilometre or so, will go back and follow if I have time. The last one I saw pointed across the frantic intersection leading onto Blvd de Sabastopal.

Can't find anything on Google. Any thoughts, anyone?
Have no answer as why the arrows may be near Blvd Sebastopol but
Click here for more on pilgrims in Paris (with further links).

Or come visit our farmhouse b&b/pilgrim albergue in Champagne scenically located on a walking route from Reims to Paris.

Bon chemin and Buen camino!
 
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Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#6
I wrote this post earlier to help some Paris pilgrims but the info is still valid.

"Since you are beginning a pilgrimage here are two Parisian accommodations sponsored by religious groups; the Freres Aveniat and the basilica of Sacre Coeur.

For secular accommodation in Paris have you tried CouchSurfing, AirBnB or searched Hostelworld for individual rooms?

Check out these earlier Forum threads for more about pilgrim sites in Paris and the camino in Paris.

When on the parvis or place facing the Notre Dame cathedral below you underground lie Roman ruins and visible to your right across the Seine begins the medieval rue Saint Jacques which pilgrims followed to leave the city; walk it a bit and ponder history.

Take a deep breath, relax and just enjoy it! As an American who has lived 35+ years in France both in Paris and Champagne even after all those years for me as Thomas Jefferson wrote 'a walk about Paris will provide lessons in history, beauty, and in the point of life.' "

Bon Chemin and Buen Camino!

Margaret Meredith
 
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M

Mike Trebert

Guest
#7
Thanks everyone. The last arrow I saw was pointing right at Tour Saint Jaques, I now realise (sorry, it was raining). I'll go back and have another look and follow the arrows if I can. The few that I saw were leading me east along the Right Bank, then away from Notre Dame, turning North towards the tower.

Thanks for the Compostelle 2000 link. I found a map there and some directions re the GR 655, although my French is not the best. The GR 655 goes south - starts from the tower, along Sabastopol for a bit, wiggles over towards Notre Dame then South along Rue Saint Jacques.

I'll just give Dan Brown a call...
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#8
IMG_1437-b.jpg
I have found Camino markings accross Europe, in the most unexpected places. This was in Hall, in the very picturesque Tyrol, near Innsbruck, Austria.
When the Camino calls you, it calls you.
I have seen other markings in Hamburg and Bremen, Germany.
 
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M

Mike Trebert

Guest
#9
There was a man who for decades wrote the word "Eternity" in white chalk on the footpaths (=sidewalks) of Sydney, where I've lived for many years. He remained completely anonymous for about twenty years from the mid 1930's. He continued writing the word "Eternity" for a total of 35 years. The word was written beautifully in an elegant, flowing script, like an engraving. He could hardly write his own name but the word "Eternity" became a legend. Some speculate that he wrote it about 500,000 times. His name was Arthur Stace. He died in 1967 at the age of 82.

Just Google " 'Eternity', Sydney" to see some images
 
M

Mike Trebert

Guest
#10
Here is something that I did not know about and I regret that I missed it when I walked down the rue Saint Jacques. It will be put on the ever growing list of things I want to see or revisit: there is a sundial on the building at 27 rue Saint Jacques, created by Salvador Dali in 1966, and it is a reference to the scallop symbol of the pilgrimage to Santiago de Compostela.
Thanks Katharina. I'll go and find that. - Mike
 

Cayou

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Villafranca to Santiago
2016 St Jean to Los Arcos
2018 24-Sept Leon to Finnisterre
#11
Way cool. Wife & I are flying into Paris 14 June for 6 days and staying across Saine from Notre Dame! We will search for The Way and get a few K in, then St Jean in August .... who knew?
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#12
In May 2014 I went to Paris for the first time. It was an amazing trip. I finally got to meet a Camino friend I'd met online after we both walked our first Camino in 2010 (a week apart), in person! We were both excited to spot a few yellow arrows in the city, but it was even more exciting to make our way to Rue Saint Jacques and find the Camino church. We'd been told this was where Camino pilgrims traditionally came to begin their pilgrimage to Santiago in Spain. It was a thrill to see it, and its big red doors, even though it had just closed for the day about 20 minutes before we arrived.

Paris Camino 1 (480 x 400).jpg

We went back the next day and it was open. The church was gorgeous, especially with the sunlight filtering through the windows. One stone sculpture there is labeled "Saint Jacques en pélerin" (Saint James, pilgrim) and is from the 14th century. I also noticed while in the church that a woodcut pilgrim was carrying the traditional water gourd (I've seen them on the Camino in Spain, though these days they're more for decoration), but it wasn't until I zoomed in on the photo of him after my trip that I realised his cloak is covered in pilgrim scallop shells!

My friend's husband who is French was with us, and he helped us to talk with the man working at the church and ask if it would be possible to get an official Camino stamp. Mine is in my Camino guide book. But he had an even greater surprise for us, totally unexpected. The original door that pilgrims walked through at the start of their Camino still exists, and he took us to it. Not only that, he unlocked it and let us walk through. I wondered how many other pilgrims had crossed this threshold before me, in ages past. It was quite moving to be there and be gifted with that opportunity.

Paris Camino4.jpg

After the Camino church we went looking for the Tour-Saint-Jacques, or Saint Jacques Tower, which has already been mentioned. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint-Jacques_Tower

It was beautiful too, but my friend and I agreed that the church was the highlight of our mini Paris Camino. :)

Bon Chemin!

Rachel
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#13
View attachment 26306
I have found Camino markings accross Europe, in the most unexpected places. This was in Hall, in the very picturesque Tyrol, near Innsbruck, Austria.
When the Camino calls you, it calls you.
I have seen other markings in Hamburg and Bremen, Germany.
I've found them in Hungary and Czech Republic! :)
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#14
Everything is focused on Santiago de Compostela these days. In the Middle Ages, however, the cult of Saint James was widespread.
Shared with the cult of Saint Roch, another patron saint of pilgrims. There are many chapels dedicated to this saint, especially in south France and Bavaria (Germany).
Interestingly, he is also the patron of dogs, and by a kind of reversion, against mean dogs. There is a popular prayer, "San Roque, San Roque, que este perro no me mire ni me toque" ("San Roque, San Roque, this dog will not see me or touch me") Try it...you never know.
.
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#15
Everything is focused on Santiago de Compostela these days. In the Middle Ages, however, the cult of Saint James was widespread. Not everything that has Saint James written on it is directly related to the pilgrimage to Santiago. If you read the French Wikipedia articles on the Tour Saint-Jacques and the church Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie to which it belonged, or recent research such as papers published by the Fondation David Perou, in particular by Denise Péricard-Méa, you get a different view, for example that the church Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie was an important pilgrimage site in itself as it had relics of Saint James. Many pilgrims who went there never went to Santiago.
Well, I'd say that's likely true, Katharina. I'd guess that many pilgrims who attended the church in Paris didn't go to Santiago. I'm not saying that what my friend and I were told should be taken as gospel. ;) However, if I'd known more French and been able to follow more of what the man working at the church said to my friend's husband, I'm sure I'd have more of the story. What I do know is how reverent he was in relaying the story of the door he unlocked for us (and the way it had been preserved). For two pilgrims who were finally getting the chance to meet and spend time together, it was a beautiful experience. Perhaps take the details of it with a grain of salt. For us it was enough. :) (But I agree it's important not to speak of things as definite without being certain of their accuracy.)

Thanks for asking!

Rachel
 

Felipe

Veteran Member
#16
I did not even know that Saint Roch was a patron saint of pilgrims and I will remember San Roque, San Roque, que este perro no me mire ni me toque . I'm usually terrified of them and it will certainly help to calm my nerves, as it will help me to remember a couple of Spanish verbs. :) I know only one of these prayers/saying, from South Germany/Austria, referring to Saint Florian, the patron saint of firefighters and who was called for help when a fire had broken out: O heiliger Sankt Florian, verschon' mein Haus, zünd' and're an", which means "O Holy Saint Florian, please spare my house, set fire to another one".
Yes, my mother taught me this prayer, because, having been bitten a couple of times, I was afraid of mean dogs when I was a child (and I still am, really). Actually this saying may work, in a way. I remember a pannel in Bruges, France (that is deep sheep country) explaining what to do in case the walker meets a barking shepherd dog: don’t react, look uninterested, avoid watching him in the eyes, yawn, and sing a tune. So, there could be a rationale behind this curious saying.
Now, for the prayer to Saint Florian, I don’t know...I will remember it, just in case.
 
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Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#17
View attachment 26306
I have found Camino markings across Europe, in the most unexpected places. ...Austria...Germany.
That's because the Way of St James is not confined to Spain, or even to France. There are routes starting as far east as Warsaw and Bratislava, and a route from Talinn is under development. These are thoroughly waymarked, well guide-booked, routes with quite adequate infrastructure. It's beautiful walking, lovely people, fantastic scenery, and no competition for beds.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-18
#18
...an important pilgrimage site in itself as it had relics of Saint James. Many pilgrims who went there never went to Santiago.
This is true all across Europe: there are important sites that were themselves destinations of pilgrimage. Some that I know are Cologne, Einsiedeln (Switzerland), Le Puy and Conques. Einsiedeln is one of the sites with a black Madonna. Austria has its Maria Himmelfahrt pilgrimage still.
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#19
It's wonderful to read that this visit was such a highlight for you. But just to make sure - I don't think I noticed it in particular, my all-time favourites are Romanesque and Gothic churches - this church was Saint Jacques du Haut Pas which was built in 1630?
I wasn't sure of the date, I had to look it up. But yes, it's the one. I didn't realise there's a Wikipedia article about it! I appreciate the new information. Thanks again! :)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Église_Saint-Jacques-du-Haut-Pas

Rachel
 

Cayou

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Villafranca to Santiago
2016 St Jean to Los Arcos
2018 24-Sept Leon to Finnisterre
#20
CAMINO2010: Rachael - thx so much for your info, even copied your comments. Will be there mid-June to follow your footsteps!!
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#21
CAMINO2010: Rachael - thx so much for your info, even copied your comments. Will be there mid-June to follow your footsteps!!
I'm happy for you for that, and I hope you have a wonderful time in Paris! Here is one more thing you might like to look for while you're there. I spotted this on the way out of Notre-Dame Cathedral and of course it caught my attention. There were many references to the Camino on this trip, and this was the second (after seeing my first yellow arrow earlier). The English translation given for these words, on one of the other four sides, is "I am the way which seeks travelers."

Paris Camino 6.jpg

Joyful!

Rachel :)
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
#23
I noticed the yellow arrows pointing in interesting directions in a number of places on the right bank, including over in the area near the Moulin Rouge. Having walked the trail from the cathedral in Saint Denis to the Notre Dame, I knew they weren't from that.

I speculated that someone blaised the trail to all the significant churches, but maybe not.
 

Labyrinth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Paris to Chartres-Rocamadour (2016)
#24
When you come from the North of France and want to go to Santiago de Compostela you can cross Paris by following the long distance path GR 655, which is regarded as some kind of "official" St James' Way. The GR 655 starts in Brussels. Near Paris, it goes from the Basilica St Denis to Notre Dame and then further south, passing the Tour St Jacques. It follows the Boulevard Sébastopol.

I personally don't think that Paris needs any yellow arrows. Compostelle 2000 is campaigning for a uniform marking of the Chemin de Compostelle - the road to Santiago - throughout Paris; not yellow arrows but bronze markers with a shell design, similar to other cities.

View attachment 26245
I am desperately seeking a detailed route from Versailles (Igny) to Chartres and beyond -- on what I have been told is GR655 -- I need information on pilgrim places to stay along that route for 2-3 nights --- anyone who has any info please contact me. I understand that walking from Paris to Versailles is very tedious and it would be better to take the train ... comments? I will be arriving in Paris on Sept. 8
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#25
I am desperately seeking a detailed route from Versailles (Igny) to Chartres and beyond -- on what I have been told is GR655 -- I need information on pilgrim places to stay along that route for 2-3 nights --- anyone who has any info please contact me. I understand that walking from Paris to Versailles is very tedious and it would be better to take the train ... comments? I will be arriving in Paris on Sept. 8
To begin your research see this Topo guide in French to the GR6551 listed on the web of the FFRp, Fédération Française de la Randonnée pédestre. Their guide includes maps, trail description and accommodations.

Also check out this map and further links for the GR65 ouest.

Good luck and Bon chemin!
 
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Labyrinth

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Paris to Chartres-Rocamadour (2016)
#27
Thank you so much, but unfortunately I do not read or speak French with any fluency -- is there any reference to accommodation on the GR655 route in English? Or even Spanish? I have accomodations in Paris, Versailles, Chartres and Saint Foy la Grande -- but I need help with pilgrim accomodations from Versailles to Chartres -- any ideas?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#28
You might try Googling the three terms Chemin de Saint Jacques Versailles Chartres to see if anyone has a blog about this section of the route. Have you found pilgrim accommodation in Versailles? If so where and how?

You will definitely need some type of guidebook or at least a map for your trip.
These can usually be found in Paris at the camping shop Au Vieux Campeur near the Sorbonne. http://www.auvieuxcampeur.fr/boutiques/Paris

I suggest that in the shop you browse the Guide cited in my earlier post for the relevant pilgrim accommodation info between Versailles and Chartres.

If you find English info on line please mention it here!

Have you seen this ad for a very up-market tour in 2017 following the route you want to follow in September? What a coincidence!

Good luck and Bon chemin!
 
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newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#29
Me at Tower Saint Jacques Paris. Got à stamp at Notre Dame. Took à métro to Port Orléans Start walking from there on 13 May 2012. Follow the GR route with a French Guide book. Took me 39 days to SJPP.
Ahh.....the correct answer to the often asked question "what is the best way to get from Paris to SJPP?"
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#30
Labyrinth,

The Monastery of the Orantes in Bonneuil, 23 km from Igny on the route to Chartres provides pilgrim accommodation. Here is their web with contact info for an email. http://www.spiritualite2000.com/monasteres/monastere-des-orantes-de-lassomption/
You can write them in English for a reservation and provide a Google translation.

Also see the English editions of sketch maps of the relevant sections of the GR655 from the local FFrp.

31 km further at Epernon the Priory Saint Thomas offers accommodation for pilgrims. See their email contact on this web
www.guidestchristophe.com/hebergements/centre/prieure-saint-thomas.

From Epernon it is 26 km to Chartres. For more French info on this section of the walk in the Eure et Loir department see
www.compostelle28.org/index.php?version=computer

Happy planning!
 
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Cayou

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 Villafranca to Santiago
2016 St Jean to Los Arcos
2018 24-Sept Leon to Finnisterre
#31
I'm happy for you for that, and I hope you have a wonderful time in Paris! Here is one more thing you might like to look for while you're there. I spotted this on the way out of Notre-Dame Cathedral and of course it caught my attention. There were many references to the Camino on this trip, and this was the second (after seeing my first yellow arrow earlier). The English translation given for these words, on one of the other four sides, is "I am the way which seeks travelers."

View attachment 26628

Joyful!

Rachel :)
IMG_1104.JPG FOUND IT! But, they were closing up. Saw 2 other great churches while looking for this one, and we were even invited into a wonderful piano/violin concert at one. Had a great time - Camino magic!
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
#32
View attachment 27361 FOUND IT! But, they were closing up. Saw 2 other great churches while looking for this one, and we were even invited into a wonderful piano/violin concert at one. Had a great time - Camino magic!
I'm so glad! I wondered how things would turn out for you. I love seeing the red doorknocker. Camino magic is a beautiful thing! Thanks for reporting back. :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
I live next to the Grand Châtenet section
#33
Spray painted temporary arrows are used here(charente-maritime) for one off organised walks/cycle events, the roads and tracks around here have many from past events.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances [08 ]Portuguese [09 ]Le Puy[10] Norte[ 11] Madrid [12] Figeac - Pamplona [13] Mont Saint Michel - Bordeaux / St Palais - Pamplona [14] Moissac -Burgos [15] , Norte to Oviedo and then Primitivo [16]
Le Puy to Moissac and Dax to Santo Domingo
#34
Everything is focused on Santiago de Compostela these days. In the Middle Ages, however, the cult of Saint James was widespread. Not everything that has Saint James written on it is directly related to the pilgrimage to Santiago. If you read the French Wikipedia articles on the Tour Saint-Jacques and the church Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie to which it belonged, or recent research such as papers published by the Fondation David Perou, in particular by Denise Péricard-Méa, you get a different view, for example that the church Saint-Jacques-de-la-Boucherie was an important pilgrimage site in itself as it had relics of Saint James. Many pilgrims who went there never went to Santiago.
In the old days Padron was completion when commencing in Portugal
 
Camino(s) past & future
N/A
#35
There was a man who for decades wrote the word "Eternity" in white chalk on the footpaths (=sidewalks) of Sydney, where I've lived for many years. He remained completely anonymous for about twenty years from the mid 1930's. He continued writing the word "Eternity" for a total of 35 years. The word was written beautifully in an elegant, flowing script, like an engraving. He could hardly write his own name but the word "Eternity" became a legend. Some speculate that he wrote it about 500,000 times. His name was Arthur Stace. He died in 1967 at the age of 82.

Just Google " 'Eternity', Sydney" to see some images
Wow, I can't believe you wrote about that. I saw the movie about him and that some years ago, and it's never left my mind, and I've never heard abouthim from anyone until here and now where I read your message. I too now am infatuated with the word and meaning of Eternity and write it in various places myself when I remember. I also made a 3-d window that I decorated and added the word, "Eternity". Thanks so much for bringing back that memory and reminding me of some forgotten details. The story is incredible to me!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#36
I saw yellow arrows painted on the ground (on pavement) in Calgary a few days ago. I concluded that they indicated directions in a public maintenance or construction project. But they reminded me of the camino, where I have been unable to go this year.
 

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