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Camino Aragones in Spring

Past OR future Camino
Planning Camino Frances 2024
Planning Camino Frances in 2024.
I live in Western Australia, a very sparsely populated area. I am used to walking on my own, enjoying the 'private' landscape.
Camino Aragones interests me due to the views, and the higher chance at solitude, as I become more accustomed to meeting more 'people'.
Starting in April, would it be it be too cold?
As an overweight 50yo, would it be too risky on my knees?

ps. I have developed a new addiction.... researching the Camino
Ligia.
 
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J Willhaus

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
2016, 2022
Planning Camino Frances in 2024.
I live in Western Australia, a very sparsely populated area. I am used to walking on my own, enjoying the 'private' landscape.
Camino Aragones interests me due to the views, and the higher chance at solitude, as I become more accustomed to meeting more 'people'.
Starting in April, would it be it be too cold?
As an overweight 50yo, would it be too risky on my knees?

ps. I have developed a new addiction.... researching the Camino
Ligia.
We will walk the Aragones starting later this month and will post here. Havent seen many other reports this year on that route.. We use hiking poles which transfers some of the weight off your knees.
 

Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
Planning Camino Frances in 2024.
I live in Western Australia, a very sparsely populated area. I am used to walking on my own, enjoying the 'private' landscape.
Camino Aragones interests me due to the views, and the higher chance at solitude, as I become more accustomed to meeting more 'people'.
Starting in April, would it be it be too cold?
As an overweight 50yo, would it be too risky on my knees?

ps. I have developed a new addiction.... researching the Camino
Ligia.
You'll be fine. We found wind to be an issue when we walked in autumn 2018. Weather was good, comfortable and one day if rain. We started in Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume (not official start I don't think but Mary Magdalene always fascinated me) from there we walked to Pau. There was a nice place albergue in Yesa. Fascinating ruins there and Jaca...
You'll enjoy the solitude.

Good luck and enjoy.
Oh to be 50 again.
 
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Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
You'll be fine. We found wind to be an issue when we walked in autumn 2018. Weather was good, comfortable and one day of rain. We started in Saint-Maximin-la-Sainte-Baume (not official start I don't think but Mary Magdalene always fascinated me) from there we walked to Pau. There was a nice place to stay in Yesa.
You'll enjoy the solitude.

Good luck and enjoy.
Oh to be 50 again.
When we tied up with CF we walked backwards to SJPDP, completely different Camino. This was the year I discover I couldn't cross the Pyrenees mountains twice in one journey.
 
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Frances but starting iin Somport
Planning Camino Frances in 2024.
I live in Western Australia, a very sparsely populated area. I am used to walking on my own, enjoying the 'private' landscape.
Camino Aragones interests me due to the views, and the higher chance at solitude, as I become more accustomed to meeting more 'people'.
Starting in April, would it be it be too cold?
As an overweight 50yo, would it be too risky on my knees?

ps. I have developed a new addiction.... researching the Camino
Ligia.
I walked the Aragonés in April. I’m an overweight 71 year old carrying a 9kg pack and I managed it. The trick is to do it in small bites if possible. For the first stage stay in Jaca and takes the bus to Somport and walk to Canfranc Station. This is a rough bit. Only a day pack and poles are required. Take the bus back to Jaca and next day go back up and start down to where you are comfortable stopping.

Same from Jaca. Don’t try to get to Arrés but stop in at the albergue in Santa Cilia. There isn’t any option to stop from Arrés to Artieda which is 19km. Then it’s Ruesda (short but a lot in woods which is really nice), a huge climb to get over the top to Undués de Lerda and then downhill into Sanguesa.

We elected to go to Lumbier and then to Monreal from there. That’s a long haul of 21km and the first half is uphill. The municipal albergue in Monreal is horrible, avoid it if possible. There is a Casa Rural there. Tiebas, on the other hand, is a delight. From Tiebas you have 17km into Puenta la Reinha and then you are on the main Camino.

Unfortunately there aren’t any pack transfer services that we could find on the Aragonés. My friend developed feet problems so we used taxis to transport our main packs from Lumbier to PlE and used day packs on those legs. There is a Casa Rural in Abinzano which looked OK.

Also, those medieval villages of Arrés, Artieda and Undués are all on the top of steep hills. Just what you need after many kms on the road. Enjoy.
 

Jeff Mayor

Member
Past OR future Camino
French route (04,05,06,18) Portugues (07) VDLP (09,10,11) Aragon (4,13) Levante (16) Ebro (19)
Planning Camino Frances in 2024.
I live in Western Australia, a very sparsely populated area. I am used to walking on my own, enjoying the 'private' landscape.
Camino Aragones interests me due to the views, and the higher chance at solitude, as I become more accustomed to meeting more 'people'.
Starting in April, would it be it be too cold?
As an overweight 50yo, would it be too risky on my knees?

ps. I have developed a new addiction.... researching the Camino
Ligia.
Check out the Levante for solitude.
 
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Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
Early April on the Aragones means cold temperatures including the chance of snow at the Somport Pass. You can definitely plan for shorter days on some stages, but realize that April is still early and there is no guarantee that all of the accommodations will be open.

My wife and I will be working at the new albergue in Canfranc Pueblo, so I encourage you to choose that as the end point of your first stage from Somport - it’s all downhill and not overly difficult if the weather cooperates. Day 2, Jaca, then Santa Cilia, Arres, Ruesta, Lumbier, Monreal, Tiebas, and then Puente Le Reina to finish the route!

You have time to train and get into shape - go seize the day!
 
Past OR future Camino
Planning Camino Frances 2024
I walked the Aragonés in April. I’m an overweight 71 year old carrying a 9kg pack and I managed it. The trick is to do it in small bites if possible. For the first stage stay in Jaca and takes the bus to Somport and walk to Canfranc Station. This is a rough bit. Only a day pack and poles are required. Take the bus back to Jaca and next day go back up and start down to where you are comfortable stopping.

Same from Jaca. Don’t try to get to Arrés but stop in at the albergue in Santa Cilia. There isn’t any option to stop from Arrés to Artieda which is 19km. Then it’s Ruesda (short but a lot in woods which is really nice), a huge climb to get over the top to Undués de Lerda and then downhill into Sanguesa.

We elected to go to Lumbier and then to Monreal from there. That’s a long haul of 21km and the first half is uphill. The municipal albergue in Monreal is horrible, avoid it if possible. There is a Casa Rural there. Tiebas, on the other hand, is a delight. From Tiebas you have 17km into Puenta la Reinha and then you are on the main Camino.

Unfortunately there aren’t any pack transfer services that we could find on the Aragonés. My friend developed feet problems so we used taxis to transport our main packs from Lumbier to PlE and used day packs on those legs. There is a Casa Rural in Abinzano which looked OK.

Also, those medieval villages of Arrés, Artieda and Undués are all on the top of steep hills. Just what you need after many kms on the road. Enjoy.
Thank you so much for the info... I am now even more inspired!
Now i Just need to remember all those names!

22 months and counting!!!
 
Past OR future Camino
Planning Camino Frances 2024
Early April on the Aragones means cold temperatures including the chance of snow at the Somport Pass. You can definitely plan for shorter days on some stages, but realize that April is still early and there is no guarantee that all of the accommodations will be open.

My wife and I will be working at the new albergue in Canfranc Pueblo, so I encourage you to choose that as the end point of your first stage from Somport - it’s all downhill and not overly difficult if the weather cooperates. Day 2, Jaca, then Santa Cilia, Arres, Ruesta, Lumbier, Monreal, Tiebas, and then Puente Le Reina to finish the route!

You have time to train and get into shape - go seize the day!
Thank you!
I am in for the journey, rather than the destination... so taking my time is exactly what i would do...
There is no SNOW in Western Australia... so it would be a different kind of cold for me.... Layers and layers!
Will remember to post again closer to the date...
tic toc tic toc....
 
Past OR future Camino
Planning Camino Frances 2024
Use Gronze.com to plan. It's in Spanish but for each stage you have the distances, profiles, villages, albuergues.Also caminosperegrinos.com
That's exactly what i did after reading the posts... Gronze...
My mother tongue is spanish, so i have that to my advantage...

now to continue with my new addiction...
 
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Past OR future Camino
Lourdes, Aragonese May-June 2018 incomplete
I walked the Aragonés in April. I’m an overweight 71 year old carrying a 9kg pack and I managed it. The trick is to do it in small bites if possible. For the first stage stay in Jaca and takes the bus to Somport and walk to Canfranc Station. This is a rough bit. Only a day pack and poles are required. Take the bus back to Jaca and next day go back up and start down to where you are comfortable stopping.

Same from Jaca. Don’t try to get to Arrés but stop in at the albergue in Santa Cilia. There isn’t any option to stop from Arrés to Artieda which is 19km. Then it’s Ruesda (short but a lot in woods which is really nice), a huge climb to get over the top to Undués de Lerda and then downhill into Sanguesa.

We elected to go to Lumbier and then to Monreal from there. That’s a long haul of 21km and the first half is uphill. The municipal albergue in Monreal is horrible, avoid it if possible. There is a Casa Rural there. Tiebas, on the other hand, is a delight. From Tiebas you have 17km into Puenta la Reinha and then you are on the main Camino.

Unfortunately there aren’t any pack transfer services that we could find on the Aragonés. My friend developed feet problems so we used taxis to transport our main packs from Lumbier to PlE and used day packs on those legs. There is a Casa Rural in Abinzano which looked OK.

Also, those medieval villages of Arrés, Artieda and Undués are all on the top of steep hills. Just what you need after many kms on the road. Enjoy.
I have just booked and paid for baggage transfer with paqmochila@correos.com on this route. Note that they do not do transfers on the weekends
 

Suzanne H

Camino Junkie
Past OR future Camino
CF'17; LePuy'18; Porto/Coastal'19; Portugal? '22
Thank you for the details on this route. I'm considering walking in springtime 2023 (after the Arles) and am wondering about the weather in early vs late May. How concerned should I be with regard to bad weather and snow? Is it closed during parts of the season as the SJPdP/Roncesvalles crossing? Any specifics re crossing the Pyrenees at this location is much appreciated~
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Past OR future Camino
2019
There is always a chance of a late season snowstorm, but generally May is sunny and clear. While snow might still cover parts of the trail, you can always bypass those areas by taking the road. Additionally, the Spanish side after Somport has been reconfigured lower down the mountainside, so the new trail between Somport and Canfranc should be easier with no snow and much less mud (I still prefer the old, upper route!)
 

Scott Sweeney

Veteran Member
We will walk the Aragones starting later this month and will post here. Havent seen many other reports this year on that route.. We use hiking poles which transfers some of the weight off your knees.
Use caution on some parts of the mountain hikes, in several place the path was wide enough for you to walk but weeds prohibited use of walking poles. Fall to your left if you trip.
:)
 
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