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Connecting the Camino Portuguese to Finisterre, bypassing Santiago

gvmelissa

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP - Santiago April - May 2014
Porto - Santiago October 2016
Hello all,
I'm wondering if there is a way to walk the Portuguese route and then head towards Finisterre from around Padron,skipping Santiago. We would go to Santiago afterwards, but I'd love to save it for after Finisterre this time. Are there any trails? Accommodations? Thank you!
 

Albertinho

ninguém disse que era fácil !
Camino(s) past & future
2013 Lisboa - Sant.
2014 Ferrol -Sant.
2015 Porto -Sant.
2018 Porto -Valença
2019 Valença -Sant.
In june this year I have been in the area,camping, and stayed in Ribeira in the west part of Galicia.. The first bigger place from Padrón to Fisterre is Noia.
From there you can follow the coast all away to Fisterre. We drove it by car. It is about 90 kms from there to Fisterre but it is a long but beautiful way.
We only saw some cyclists.no walkers.you walk alongside the road.I have not seen any yellow waymarkers, not earlier than the village of Fisterre to cabo de Fisterre.
Maybe there is a link to Negreira where is the common path but I haven't been there.
Bom caminho
 

Tincatinker

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
A Google Maps search shows a route from Padron to Negreira on the Camino Fisterra. Approximately 24k.

From Padron take the AC-299 to Os Dices; then DP - 3302 and CP-7401 to Urdilde; then DP-1302 to Negreira. This route is mainly on minor roads but probably merits further research and consideration. Streetview shows much of it to be very rural.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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The entire historical and religious point / purpose behind the Camino de Santiago from the very beginning, around 850 AD, is to make pilgrimage to the crypt under the main altar at the Cathedral in Santiago to venerate the remains / relics of the Apostle Saint James the Greater, also the Patron Saint of Spain. Yes, the Camino de Santiago originated as a primarily Christian activity.

Remember that, pre-reformation in the early 1500's, there was only one Christian church. And that Church was and continues to be ruled by the Pope, in Rome. Everything else we know as Camino-related evolved from that Papal-pronounced premise.

Thus, all formal Camino de Santiago routes terminate at Santiago. This is also why it is not called Camino de Finisterre or Camino de Muxia, etc. I am not trying to be sarcastic, just historically accurate.

I am ONLY stating this as a basis for stating that any other walk, with a destination other than Santiago is not, strictly speaking, a route of the Camino de Santiago. Of course, a person who is walking anywhere for any other reason can do whatever they please. But, it is a hike, not a Camino.

However, and all this said, you can only qualify for a Compostela or Certificate of Distance if your pilgrimage ends at Santiago and you have walked the final 100 km on foot, or have ridden the last 200 km on bicycle.

Also, and in case you wondered, a Compostela is a logical prerequisite for obtaining the Certificate of Distance. The distance certificate attests to the pilgrim having travelled a specific distance (in km) having started at "A" and arrived at Santiago. As one is not a "pilgrim" until certified as such by receiving a Compostela, the mileage certificate is a secondary document. You must first have received a Compostela before being able to obtain the distance certificate. The Compostela remains free. There is a nominal "donation" for the distance certificate...three Euros if I recall correctly.

So, while it is possible to cobble segments of various routes together into a marvelous hike across Spain, it is NOT a Camino unless it terminates at Santiago. it would be more properly construed as a long-distance hike following parts of various Camino routes.

Finally, and this is the important bit, it IS POSSIBLE to combine parts of other Camino routes and arrive at Santiago by a non-traditional route, but still qualify for the Compostela by meeting the final 100 / 20o km (foot / bike) proviso.

For example, we regularly had folks arriving at the Pilgrim Office who combined portions of the Camino del Norte, the Primitivo, or the Invierno, feeding into the Frances, to arrive at Santiago. Others started at southern points and combined portions of other Caminos in a similar fashion. But, they all walked the final 100 km, or rode the final 2200 km on bicycle, to arrive at Santiago, satisfying the requirement for the Compostela. In addition, the new, "spiritual variant" on the Camino Portuguese is another recent innovation in this context.

Also, this year, we had a number of pilgrims, arriving at Santiago from Muxia, via Finisterre. They walked the Muxia / Finisterre / Santiago route in reverse. Alone, neither the Muxia - Santiago; nor, the Finisterre - Santiago route meet the minimum distance requirement. However, in combination, they are just over 100 km. I understand this was accepted as being valid for obtaining a Compostela.

I hope this helps the dialog.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
...
I am ONLY stating this as a basis for stating that any other walk, with a destination other than Santiago is not, strictly speaking, a route of the Camino de Santiago. Of course, a person who is walking anywhere for any other reason can do whatever they please. But, it is a hike, not a Camino.
....
So, while it is possible to cobble segments of various routes together into a marvelous hike across Spain, it is NOT a Camino unless it terminates at Santiago. it would be more properly construed as a long-distance hike following parts of various Camino routes.
...
I hope this helps the dialog.
@t2andreo
I happened upon this thread while having lunch in Póvoa do Vazim along the Caminho Portugês da Costa

Sorry for quoting only a piece of your post but the rest is not relevant for the point I would like to make which is:
there are several Caminos de Santiago which never reach Santiago (San Salvador, Aragonés, Camí Sant Jaume to name a few) but are nevertheless considered a Camino de Santiago.

Not everyone who walks a Camino reaches Santiago but they are still on a 'Camino de Santiago'.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
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You are, of course, correct. One could walk nearly forever and never actually arrive at Santiago.

However, my comments are offered in the standard context of pilgrims making a conventional pilgrimage to the Cathedral at Santiago.
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Remember that, pre-reformation in the early 1500's, there was only one Christian church. And that Church was and continues to be ruled by the Pope, in Rome.
I think that there may be a few Eastern Orthodox, Coptic, Armenian and Syriac believers who would disagree with you on that, who do not recognise papal primacy and yet would still describe themselves as Christian.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
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I will not split hairs. You are likely correct, chronologically. But, even the Eastern Sects remain Christian, and highly vested in the veneration of saints, regardless of which patriarch they follow. My comment was NOT meant to exclude. My bad, if I misspoke.
 

MichaelSG

Retired member
Camino(s) past & future
Not enough
......
I am ONLY stating this as a basis for stating that any other walk, with a destination other than Santiago is not, strictly speaking, a route of the Camino de Santiago. Of course, a person who is walking anywhere for any other reason can do whatever they please. But, it is a hike, not a Camino.
......
So, while it is possible to cobble segments of various routes together into a marvelous hike across Spain, it is NOT a Camino unless it terminates at Santiago. it would be more properly construed as a long-distance hike following parts of various Camino routes
......
In the spirit of being persnickety, I'm pretty sure I walked the Camino Ignaciano from Azpeitia in the Basque Country to Manresa outside of Barcelona two years ago. I even have a certificate to prove it in my "put these in my coffin for the bonfire" file. I may be committing heresy on this forum but "Camino" is just a Spanish word for "walk", "path" or "way".
 
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t2andreo

Veteran Member
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You are of course totally correct. The root word for walking, the verb, is caminar. The term 'el Camino' means 'The Way.'

In my post, I was only reflecting the Cathedral rules that state that Compostelas are only issued for pilgrimages that terminate at the Cathedral in Santiago. Then again, many pilgrims, an increasing number actually, eschew the Compostela all together.

That is reflective of Camino Rule One, everyone does their own Camino and no other person is positioned to pass judgment. I do not.

I hope this clarifies.
 
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Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I'm jut tying to figure out why the OP couldn't walk the Portugues, divert via Finisterre and then walk back to Santiago and still qualify for a Compostella. She would still be finishing in Santiago and still have done over 100k. As this isn't her first Camino ( she says 'this time') she is probably aware of the 100k rule and perhaps the Compostela doesn't matter to her this time but I don't see why she couldn't do it that way round if she wanted to ?
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
For better or for worse, that is not the criteria. It is the last 100km to the tomb of St. James, and Fisterra does not qualify as a starting point.
Yes - I get that ! Am I being stupid (probably knowing me ! :) But if you walk non stop from say Porto to Santiago but do a loop via Finisterre on the way, does that not count ? I'm not trying to be awkward - just not quite getting why ?
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
You are of course totally correct. The root word for walking, the verb, is caminar. The term 'el Camino' means 'The Way.'

In my post, I was only reflecting the Cathedral rules that state that Compostelas are only issued for pilgrimages that terminate at the Cathedral in Santiago. Then again, many pilgrims, an increasing number actually, eschew the Compostela all together.

That is reflective of Camino Rule One, everyone does their own Camino and no other person is positioned to pass judgment. I do not.

I hope this clarifies.
I can't find any mention of Compostela (as a document) in the OP that's why I'm reading this thread and wondering why it got so diverted from the OP...
Did I misread something or somebody else did? ;)
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
It would also work if you go from Fisterra via Muxia to SdC (or vice versa).
Well I'm heading out to my 3rd Camino on Monday and I'll be happy just to arrive in SdC in one piece.... ...and this time I'm looking forward to my first walk to Muxia and Fisterra - after a day of recovery.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Well I'm heading out to my 3rd Camino on Monday and I'll be happy just to arrive in SdC in one piece.... ...and this time I'm looking forward to my first walk to Muxia and Fisterra - after a day of recovery.
Bom Caminho!
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
The Pilgrim Office website states that to qualify for the Compostela:
"It is understood that the pilgrimage starts at one point and from there you come to visit the Tomb of St. James." i.e. you don't do 'loops' or backtracking, you start and you head to Santiago. So the point at which you plan to turn to head to Santiago, be it Fisterra or Muxia, isn't a valid start point because the distance is too short.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
The Pilgrim Office website states that to qualify for the Compostela:
"It is understood that the pilgrimage starts at one point and from there you come to visit the Tomb of St. James." i.e. you don't do 'loops' or backtracking, you start and you head to Santiago. So the point at which you plan to turn to head to Santiago, be it Fisterra or Muxia, isn't a valid start point because the distance is too short.
Not true. The distance from Fisterra (let's say you came by boat to this point) via Muxia to Santiago is recognized as suitable for Compostela. Same if you start in Muxia and walk through Fisterra to Santiago. So this "one point" would be either Fisterra or Muxia in this case. Simple.
What distance one walked before and on which Camino just isn't anything the PO would go into. Might be interesting for volunteers but it's the LAST 100km that counts and that's it. With two sellos per day of course :)
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
Fisterra to Santiago is 88km, Muxia to Santiago is 82km, and Fisterra to Muxia is 29km (according to Gronze). The distances add up, but the issue is that Fisterra isn't on the way to Santiago from Muxia, nor vice versa. Wouldn't as many people start on the coast as in Sarria if it were allowed?
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
If you start in either Finisterre or Muxia and then walk to Finisterre or Muxia and the walk on back to Santiago, you will have met the 100 km rule and the Pilgrims' Office has given people compostelas for this route. Unless something that has changed that I haven't heard about.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Fisterra to Santiago is 88km, Muxia to Santiago is 82km, and Fisterra to Muxia is 29km (according to Gronze). The distances add up, but the issue is that Fisterra isn't on the way to Santiago from Muxia, nor vice versa. Wouldn't as many people start on the coast as in Sarria if it were allowed?
Fisterra doesn't have to be on the way to Santiago at all (as Lugo, Sarria, Ourense, Monforte de Lemos, Tui,... aren't if you are walking from beyond them), it may/can be just a starting point if you walk to Santiago through Muxia!!!
And again - vice versa...

@peregrina2000 also explained it very clearly. No rocket science here. It's over 100km ;)

I'm not a religious person but I do know that much that it doesn't matter from which direction you come to a certain pilgrimage site as long as you come there. Same with Rome or Jerusalem or Fatima or Lourdes of which aren't any close to the sea. In case of Santiago not all the routes to it are from the west. What about Ingles, Portugues and Sanabres routes???
 
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Tincatinker

Moderator
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Camino(s) past & future
Lots ;0)
Probably because the vast majority are utterly unaware of any of the alternative routes. Be they parish or school groups from Spain or starry-eyed aficionados of The Way - there is only one way and its starts in Sarria where the coach drops you off. No Spaniard is going to walk the English Way for obvious reasons ;)
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
Except all the lovely ones I walked with last week! Spanish people are aware of their alternative routes. They tell me about ones I don't know about.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
So if this is allowed, why don't more of the 100km pilgrims do it?
Some of the more obvious reasons might be:
  1. the relatively longer distances between albergues or other low cost accommodation
  2. overall, fewer beds seem to be available - although that might be because there are fewer pilgrims anyhow
  3. it is not the traditional direction that this route is walked
  4. etc etc.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
Or could it be that people who want a Compostela actually read the Pilgrim Office rules and realise that loops and diversions aren't in the spirit of the pilgrimage?
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
Or could it be that people who want a Compostela actually read the Pilgrim Office rules and realise that loops and diversions aren't in the spirit of the pilgrimage?
I'm not entirely sure why you see doing this route as a problem. It might not comply to your particular and unique interpretation of the Pilgrim Office guidance, but seems to be generally accepted as a legitimate way of meeting the 100 km requirement.

Do you have a problem with the route of the Camino Ingles? The route to the albergue at Neda is far from the most direct walking route from Ferrol to Santiago.
 
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notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
I just occasionally read posts on here that share plans that verge on taking advantage of the public albergue system, that's all. Like 'I am going to have a lovely walk around and about, hither and thither, and then pop into Santiago'. The vast majority of pilgrims and the Pilgrim Office do not see it that way. They get that you start and you go to Santiago, no messing.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
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I just occasionally read posts on here that share plans that verge on taking advantage of the public albergue system, that's all. Like 'I am going to have a lovely walk around and about, hither and thither, and then pop into Santiago'. The vast majority of pilgrims and the Pilgrim Office do not see it that way. They get that you start and you go to Santiago, no messing.
Really. I don't pretend to know how any other pilgrim might see this, leave aside 'the vast majority of pilgrims', and I have no insight into whether the Pilgrim Office has this view either. I know that it seems a rather odd objection to me.
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
For me the wording of the Pilgrim Office website and the actions of tens of thousands of people are quite adequate evidence.

This year I walked the Salvador (separate camino to visit relics in Oviedo with its own credential and certificate), Ingles from Ferrol (normal camino, qualifies for Compostela) and Verde - unofficial camino on which I helped to refresh the way marks with its creator and I stayed in private accomodation - I would not have dreamed to stay in the Xunta albergue in Lugo or the monastery in Sobrado because I had no intention to continue to Santiago.
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
For me the wording of the Pilgrim Office website and the actions of tens of thousands of people are quite adequate evidence.
The Pilgrim Office guidance is clearly not inconsistent with walking from either Muxia or Finisterre to the other town and then to Santiago. It is your interpretation that it should be a direct route, not theirs. As for suggesting that the fact that few people might use this route is evidence that the majority agree with your proposition, well that is just nonsense, and you probably know that this is clutching at straws.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hey guys, no need for such strident comments. I do agree with Doug that the idea of direct route is not to be found in the "rules and regulations." If the most direct route were required, the Camino Madrid would not qualify for a compostela, nor would the Salvador/Primitivo combo starting in Leon.
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
Notion900 I think you are both wrong and correct in what you are saying. I think you are wrong in saying taking diversions and loops isn't in the spirit of the pilgrimage. It is VERY much in the spirit traditionally. Medieval pilgrims were making a once in a lifetime journey. They would have wanted to see and visit everything they could.
But I fear you may be correct in saying that presenting a Credencial at the Pilgrims' Office with the last set of stamps being from Finisterre to Santiago may present a problem. The Pilgrims' Office only address the stamps for the last 100 kms - that would usually be achieved by walking from Muxia - Finisterre - Santiago or Finisterre - Muxia - Santiago. I'm not sure they would readily understand or necessarily accept a loop which did not include that complete section.
 

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