• For 2024 Pilgrims: €50,- donation = 1 year with no ads on the forum + 90% off any 2024 Guide. More here.
    (Discount code sent to you by Private Message after your donation)

Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Crossing Pyrenees by wheelchair

Wheelchairpilgrim

Wheelchair pilgrim, in annual stages to Santiago.
Time of past OR future Camino
NL to Rocamadour. Hope to arrive 2025 in Santiago
Hi,

I don't do my pilgrimage by bicycle but by wheelchair but I mainly follow the cycling routes that is why I post it here.
2016 I started my pilgrimage in the Netherlands. 2016 haarlem-den Bosch, 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht, 2018 Maastricht-Reims, 2019 Reims-Vezelay, 2020 Vezelay-Taizé, 2021 Taizé- Le-Puy-en-Velay, 2022 Le-Puy-en-Velay - Rocamadour (2023 i had surgery and could not go).
Spring 2024 I hope to roll from Rocamadour to Lourdes and after that to Spain (I am not sure year how far I get, I have 6 weeks and I expect to do the last part 2026).

Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees? I see a few options but it is difficult to find out how steep and busy the roads are and how long the distances are between places I can sleep.
I rolled already a few mountains (like Massive Central in France) but I do not know well what to expect from the bike routes in the pyrenees.

Thanks for your replies.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hi,

I don't do my pilgrimage by bicycle but by wheelchair but I mainly follow the cycling routes that is why I post it here.
2016 I started my pilgrimage in the Netherlands. 2016 haarlem-den Bosch, 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht, 2018 Maastricht-Reims, 2019 Reims-Vezelay, 2020 Vezelay-Taizé, 2021 Taizé- Le-Puy-en-Velay, 2022 Le-Puy-en-Velay - Rocamadour (2023 i had surgery and could not go).
Spring 2024 I hope to roll from Rocamadour to Lourdes and after that to Spain (I am not sure year how far I get, I have 6 weeks and I expect to do the last part 2026).

Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees? I see a few options but it is difficult to find out how steep and busy the roads are and how long the distances are between places I can sleep.
I rolled already a few mountains (like Massive Central in France) but I do not know well what to expect from the bike routes in the pyrenees.

Thanks for your replies.
Unable to help but admire your spirit intensely. At 85 I thought I was finished. Had another serious fall a few days ago which as we say in Ireland now "has me off the legs". I promptly bought a 4 wheel walker to keep me mobile and as I live two floors up with no lift, its a major problem getting out of the block never mind anything else :) I have now invented a new system of wearing a rucksack, putting some carabiners near the shoulders and looping some carry straps from wheeler to ruck! And carrying wheeler down stairs! Its trial day tomorrow morning so wish me luck. Do you roll independently or get aided? I am quite intrigued by it all and once I win the lottery will buy the very lightest and strongest titanium version with good rough track tyres and see what happens. All the best and Buen Camino. Keep on truckin !

Samarkand.
 
Unable to help but admire your spirit intensely. At 85 I thought I was finished. Had another serious fall a few days ago which as we say in Ireland now "has me off the legs". I promptly bought a 4 wheel walker to keep me mobile and as I live two floors up with no lift, its a major problem getting out of the block never mind anything else :) I have now invented a new system of wearing a rucksack, putting some carabiners near the shoulders and looping some carry straps from wheeler to ruck! And carrying wheeler down stairs! Its trial day tomorrow morning so wish me luck. Do you roll independently or get aided? I am quite intrigued by it all and once I win the lottery will buy the very lightest and strongest titanium version with good rough track tyres and see what happens. All the best and Buen Camino. Keep on truckin !

Samarkand.
Thanks,
I do it on my own. Just me, my wheelchair and last but not least, with God. and on the way I prefer to camp in my little tent of at peoples homes. I can walk a few meter (even stairs when I really have to) and that helps a lot.

Amazing you still find ways to go walking with a walker And other inventions. I also made a lot of personal adaptations of my stuff during my pilgrimage.
I imagine it is hard to live in a house with stairs when you need a walker.
Just keep going!
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Hi,

I don't do my pilgrimage by bicycle but by wheelchair but I mainly follow the cycling routes that is why I post it here.
2016 I started my pilgrimage in the Netherlands. 2016 haarlem-den Bosch, 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht, 2018 Maastricht-Reims, 2019 Reims-Vezelay, 2020 Vezelay-Taizé, 2021 Taizé- Le-Puy-en-Velay, 2022 Le-Puy-en-Velay - Rocamadour (2023 i had surgery and could not go).
Spring 2024 I hope to roll from Rocamadour to Lourdes and after that to Spain (I am not sure year how far I get, I have 6 weeks and I expect to do the last part 2026).

Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees? I see a few options but it is difficult to find out how steep and busy the roads are and how long the distances are between places I can sleep.
I rolled already a few mountains (like Massive Central in France) but I do not know well what to expect from the bike routes in the pyrenees.

Thanks for your replies.
There is a real-life movie and book of the same title which is all about doing the Camino in a wheelchair. They started in St. Jean Pied de Port and have a good account of how they crossed the Pyrenees. If haven't checked it out yet, I recommend you do. Buen Camino!
 
Last edited:
There is a real-life movie and book of the same title which is all about doing the Camino in a wheelchair. They started in St. Jean Pied de Port and have a good account of how they crossed the Pyrenees. If haven't yet checked it out yet, I recommend you do. Buen Camino!
I loved that movie and also heard the two friends talk about their special friendship on a Ted Talk episode...very uplifting!
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
There is a real-life movie and book of the same title which is all about doing the Camino in a wheelchair. They started in St. Jean Pied de Port and have a good account of how they crossed the Pyrenees. If haven't yet checked it out yet, I recommend you do. Buen Camino!
Brain now fizzing with plots and plans! Gracias y Vaya con dios.

Samarkand.
 
Without a support team or companions to pick you up when you need it, I recommend you start your Camino in Roncesvalles or Pamplona. The first day out of St; Jean Pied de Port is not for the feint of heart. The gradient is continuous for 10 km and is fairly steep.

You can travel to SJPdP, get your credencial and even a first stamp, signifying that you started in SJPdP. Then, arrange to be driven over the first days segment to Roncesvalles. Check with Express Bourricot, just next to the SJPdP Pilgrim Office. They run shuttle services all over the passes into Spain.

While some of it is paved, after a fashion, much of it is just farm trails, with mud and grass. IMHO, it would be hazardous for you to attempt solo, in a wheelchair.

Also, in areas where there are know to be difficult ascents or descents, use guide books and online maps to find adjacent paved roads. They DO exist.

Sometimes, discretion is the better part of valor.

Hope this helps. Good luck and Buen Camino.

Tom
 
Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees? I see a few options but it is difficult to find out how steep and busy the roads are and how long the distances are between places I can sleep.
If you can get GPS tracks you can use https://www.gpsvisualizer.com/profile_input to get an elevation profile of the tracks. A bit complicated to get it to do exactly what you want but easy enough to compute steepness. I used it to produce this chart for SJPdP to Roncevalles.

 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
2016 I started my pilgrimage in the Netherlands. 2016 haarlem-den Bosch, 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht, 2018 Maastricht-Reims, 2019 Reims-Vezelay, 2020 Vezelay-Taizé, 2021 Taizé- Le-Puy-en-Velay, 2022 Le-Puy-en-Velay - Rocamadour (2023 i had surgery and could not go).
Spring 2024 I hope to roll from Rocamadour to Lourdes and after that to Spain (I am not sure year how far I get, I have 6 weeks and I expect to do the last part 2026).

Dictionaries should replace the definition of Ultreia , with a picture of you!
Beau Camino
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Wheelchairpilgrim, first, Buen Camino!!! I walked over both the Col de Somport and the Napoleon passes last month. I was not aware of paralleling bicycle paths. The foot paths in some places were difficult with good boots -- totally unsuitable for a wheelchair. There is a busy highway near the Napoleon Pass. I agree with t2andreo above. My youngest son has MS, can walk a little with a cane and has a "regular" wheelchair which he only uses occasionally. On gravel I find it difficult to push him. He would love to walk another Camino, but with just me, not a support team. He walked the Camino Portuguese in 2015 with great difficulty but one leg is now much worse. Please share what brand and model of wheelchair works for you. I am aware of some off-road models. Again, Buen Camino
 
Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees?
The four best crossing points with your limitations would be, East to West :

1) Cerbère to Portbou ; but that's very, very far from your intended route.

2) The Perthus crossing ; this one is lovely and easy, but again, just way too far from your intended route.

3) The valley route between SJPP and Roncesvalles. You would need to take the tarmac all the way, though there is a place to sleep halfway through (can't describe it, as I went through there on 1st January and one of the rare days it's closed).

4) Hendaye > Irun. Then down from there on the Vasco Interior to Burgos then etc. This is theoretically the best way for you, except that if you could make it to Roncesvalles, it's much better for you from there than from Irun.

Though I have to say -- if you could get someone to help and wheel you over the Napoleon Route ? Well that would be amazing !! On the steep sections you'd have to make sure that person kept you properly balanced and so on, so you'd definitely need to trust him, and yeah I guess it would need to be a man, just for reasons of brute strength. Or maybe an energetic peregrina ?

The valley route in a wheelchair is on a main road though -- and you'd need to go up along ways with few other pilgrims and quite a few motor vehicles.

Hendaye > Irun is not bad, and from what I have seen, the route down from there to Burgos might be doable. Nevertheless, if you can find some means to get to Roncesvalles, go for it !!

---

And yes, I have made all of those crossings personally.
 
Last edited:
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
The four best crossing points with your limitations would be, East to West :

1) Cerbère to Portbou ; but that's very, very far from your intended route.

2) The Perthus crossing ; this one is lovely and easy, but again, just way too far from your intended route.

3) The valley route between SJPP and Roncesvalles. You would need to take the tarmac all the way, though there is a place to sleep halfway through (can't describe it, as I went through there on 1st January and one of the rare days it's closed).

4) Hendaye > Irun. Then down from there on the Vasco Interior to Burgos then etc. This is theoretically the best way for you, except that if you could make it to Roncesvalles, it's much better for you from there than from Irun.

Though I have to say -- if you could get someone to help and wheel you over the Napoleon Route ? Well that would be amazing !! On the steep sections you'd have to make sure that person kept you properly balanced and so on, so you'd definitely need to trust him, and yeah I guess it would need to be a man, just for reasons of brute strength. Or maybe an energetic peregrina ?

The valley route in a wheelchair is on a main road though -- and you'd need to go up along ways with few other pilgrims and quite a few motor vehicles.

Hendaye > Irun is not bad, and from what I have seen, the route down from there to Burgos might be doable. Nevertheless, if you can find some means to get to Roncesvalles, go for it !!

---

And yes, I have made all of those crossings personally.
This is very useful. Thanks.
 
Wheelchairpilgrim, first, Buen Camino!!! I walked over both the Col de Somport and the Napoleon passes last month. I was not aware of paralleling bicycle paths. The foot paths in some places were difficult with good boots -- totally unsuitable for a wheelchair. There is a busy highway near the Napoleon Pass. I agree with t2andreo above. My youngest son has MS, can walk a little with a cane and has a "regular" wheelchair which he only uses occasionally. On gravel I find it difficult to push him. He would love to walk another Camino, but with just me, not a support team. He walked the Camino Portuguese in 2015 with great difficulty but one leg is now much worse. Please share what brand and model of wheelchair works for you. I am aware of some off-road models. Again, Buen Camino
I hope i find a way to do it on my own, but i need paved (or at least not muddy/sandy roads), inexpect to roll the same road as the cars.

amazing that you walked it with your son. Hopefully you find a way to do it together again.

I have a Ti-lite wheelchair (titanium wheelchair in exactly my size), e-motion wheels (electric motor in the wheels like the electric bikes) and as a front wheel I use the Pro Activ freeway.
I wrote a lot more information about all the stuff I use on my website. It is in Dutch but most browsers can translate it.

https://rolstoelpelgrim.nl/reviews/
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I hope i find a way to do it on my own, but i need paved (or at least not muddy/sandy roads), inexpect to roll the same road as the cars.

amazing that you walked it with your son. Hopefully you find a way to do it together again.

I have a Ti-lite wheelchair (titanium wheelchair in exactly my size), e-motion wheels (electric motor in the wheels like the electric bikes) and as a front wheel I use the Pro Activ freeway.
I wrote a lot more information about all the stuff I use on my website. It is in Dutch but most browsers can translate it.

https://rolstoelpelgrim.nl/reviews/
Thanks for your website. It’s very educational. I don’t use a wheelchair but we recently completed our first Camino and for what it’s worth here’s my two cents from the eyes of a first-time pilgrim (which may or may not be helpful).
With your current wheelchair set up, it will be better if you stick to paved roads instead of going through the mountain paths that walking pilgrims and mountain-biking pilgrims use. As suggested by @JabbaPapa and @t2andreo, there are alternate road routes around the Pyrenees. It may take you longer but based on my experience, if there’s anything the Camino demands, it’s time. (We met pilgrims who got injured, sick, or had to give up their Caminos basically because they were rushing. Almost happened to us too)
The reason I say this is because I’ve seen how difficult it is for many of these mountain bikers to negotiate these paths, especially in wet, rainy conditions (it’s difficult enough in dry conditions). Also, many of these paths are either too steep, narrow, and rocky for a wheelchair or any 4-wheel contraption.
Even the paved roads can be dangerous, especially after seeing how the Spanish drivers speed through them.
We actually met an Italian couple who were (the husband was) pushing an empty wheelchair to honor his mother who was terminally ill and too sick to join them on the Camino. Climbing up to O Cebreiro, they would fold the wheelchair and the husband would carry it on his back through the forest paths. Otherwise, the wheelchair will break on the rough terrain. Then he would unfold it again and push it on the paved roads. But mostly they would stick to the bike paths.
Anyway, we’re praying for your success. Buen Camino and God bless!
 
Last edited:
Thanks for your website. It’s very educational. I don’t use a wheelchair but we recently completed our first Camino and for what it’s worth here’s my two cents from the eyes of a first-time pilgrim (which may or may not be helpful).
With your current wheelchair set up, it will be better if you stick to paved roads instead of going through the mountain paths that walking pilgrims and mountain-biking pilgrims use. As suggested by @JabbaPapa and @t2andreo, there are alternate road routes around the Pyrenees. It may take you longer but based on my experience, if there’s anything the Camino demands, it’s time. (We met pilgrims who got injured, sick, or had to give up their Caminos basically because they were rushing. Almost happened to us too)
The reason I say this is because I’ve seen how difficult it is for many of these mountain bikers to negotiate these paths, especially in wet, rainy conditions (it’s difficult enough in dry conditions). Also, many of these paths are either too steep, narrow, and rocky for a wheelchair or any 4-wheel contraption.
Even the paved roads can be dangerous, especially after seeing how the Spanish drivers speed through them.
We actually met an Italian couple who were (the husband was) pushing an empty wheelchair to honor his mother who was terminally ill and too sick to join them on the Camino. Climbing up to O Cebreiro, they would fold the wheelchair and the husband would carry it on his back through the forest paths. Otherwise, the wheelchair will break on the rough terrain. Then he would unfold it again and push it on the paved roads. But mostly they would stick to the bike paths.
Anyway, we’re praying for your success. Buen Camino and God bless!
The guy must have been Oscar! He had walked all the way from Italy, pushing that chair…he has an Instagram account, recording his journey…if only I could track it down…
 
The guy must have been Oscar! He had walked all the way from Italy, pushing that chair…he has an Instagram account, recording his journey…if only I could track it down…
Yes, after reviewing my photo file, it is Oscar and Claudia. When we first met them and learned the story behind the wheelchair, we were struck by how much they love his mother. Buen Camino @Simperegrina
 
Last edited:
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Thanks for your website. It’s very educational. I don’t use a wheelchair but we recently completed our first Camino and for what it’s worth here’s my two cents from the eyes of a first-time pilgrim (which may or may not be helpful).
With your current wheelchair set up, it will be better if you stick to paved roads instead of going through the mountain paths that walking pilgrims and mountain-biking pilgrims use. As suggested by @JabbaPapa and @t2andreo, there are alternate road routes around the Pyrenees. It may take you longer but based on my experience, if there’s anything the Camino demands, it’s time. (We met pilgrims who got injured, sick, or had to give up their Caminos basically because they were rushing. Almost happened to us too)
The reason I say this is because I’ve seen how difficult it is for many of these mountain bikers to negotiate these paths, especially in wet, rainy conditions (it’s difficult enough in dry conditions). Also, many of these paths are either too steep, narrow, and rocky for a wheelchair or any 4-wheel contraption.
Even the paved roads can be dangerous, especially after seeing how the Spanish drivers speed through them.
We actually met an Italian couple who were (the husband was) pushing an empty wheelchair to honor his mother who was terminally ill and too sick to join them on the Camino. Climbing up to O Cebreiro, they would fold the wheelchair and the husband would carry it on his back through the forest paths. Otherwise, the wheelchair will break on the rough terrain. Then he would unfold it again and push it on the paved roads. But mostly they would stick to the bike paths.
Anyway, we’re praying for your success. Buen Camino and God bless!
Thanks for the reply.
I will take paved roads, now I just have to find out the best paved road.
 
Thanks for your website. It’s very educational. I don’t use a wheelchair but we recently completed our first Camino and for what it’s worth here’s my two cents from the eyes of a first-time pilgrim (which may or may not be helpful).
With your current wheelchair set up, it will be better if you stick to paved roads instead of going through the mountain paths that walking pilgrims and mountain-biking pilgrims use. As suggested by @JabbaPapa and @t2andreo, there are alternate road routes around the Pyrenees. It may take you longer but based on my experience, if there’s anything the Camino demands, it’s time. (We met pilgrims who got injured, sick, or had to give up their Caminos basically because they were rushing. Almost happened to us too)
The reason I say this is because I’ve seen how difficult it is for many of these mountain bikers to negotiate these paths, especially in wet, rainy conditions (it’s difficult enough in dry conditions). Also, many of these paths are either too steep, narrow, and rocky for a wheelchair or any 4-wheel contraption.
Even the paved roads can be dangerous, especially after seeing how the Spanish drivers speed through them.
We actually met an Italian couple who were (the husband was) pushing an empty wheelchair to honor his mother who was terminally ill and too sick to join them on the Camino. Climbing up to O Cebreiro, they would fold the wheelchair and the husband would carry it on his back through the forest paths. Otherwise, the wheelchair will break on the rough terrain. Then he would unfold it again and push it on the paved roads. But mostly they would stick to the bike paths.
Anyway, we’re praying for your success. Buen Camino and God bless!
Now that's determination!

Buen Camino

Samarkand.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Hi,

I don't do my pilgrimage by bicycle but by wheelchair but I mainly follow the cycling routes that is why I post it here.
2016 I started my pilgrimage in the Netherlands. 2016 haarlem-den Bosch, 2017 Den Bosch-Maastricht, 2018 Maastricht-Reims, 2019 Reims-Vezelay, 2020 Vezelay-Taizé, 2021 Taizé- Le-Puy-en-Velay, 2022 Le-Puy-en-Velay - Rocamadour (2023 i had surgery and could not go).
Spring 2024 I hope to roll from Rocamadour to Lourdes and after that to Spain (I am not sure year how far I get, I have 6 weeks and I expect to do the last part 2026).

Is there anyone who know what will be the best point to cross the pyrenees? I see a few options but it is difficult to find out how steep and busy the roads are and how long the distances are between places I can sleep.
I rolled already a few mountains (like Massive Central in France) but I do not know well what to expect from the bike routes in the pyrenees.

Thanks for your replies.
I did cycle from SJPP to SDC and only used the nearest paved roads to the walkers paths.
The Pyrenees are the most famous and most feared hills, but there are three other ranges over 1000m.
They are just before Burgos, the Cruz de Ferro, and O"Cebreiro.
This you tube link gives a motorcycle view of the Volcanos route over the Pyrenees
It will give you an idea on gradients and road conditions,
You could also search for The Danish Viking Pilgrim for more info .

Good Loock
 
I did cycle from SJPP to SDC and only used the nearest paved roads to the walkers paths.
The Pyrenees are the most famous and most feared hills, but there are three other ranges over 1000m.
They are just before Burgos, the Cruz de Ferro, and O"Cebreiro.
This you tube link gives a motorcycle view of the Volcanos route over the Pyrenees
It will give you an idea on gradients and road conditions,
You could also search for The Danish Viking Pilgrim for more info .

Good Loock
Thanks, this YouTube film give a good view. I think that this road is doable (it look beter than some roads I took in the massive central (1400m high). I just have to take care that I wear high visible clothing (I always have that with me).
 
Hi, I'm from the Netherlands as well. last year I cycled the 'Langs Oude Wegen' route. Crossed the Pyrenees over the Somport pass from Oloron-Sainte-Marie towards Jaca. Up to Bedous it's a quite and not steep road. From Bedous you have to follow the main road (as the walkers do). Not steep but bussier with cars and some (mainly local) lorries. Along the road are "be careful pelgrims' warning sings. Cars and lorries give way. The tunnel is forbidden for cyclist and walkers, there you have to take the old road. And yes that one is at some points steep (up to 12% in my remembrance). Alternatively you can at some point before the tunnel, take the bus. But the you miss the beauty of the Somportpass. I was a bit scared for traffic, but I planned my ride on a Sunday and it was without problems or scary moments. veel plezier!
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Hi, I'm from the Netherlands as well. last year I cycled the 'Langs Oude Wegen' route. Crossed the Pyrenees over the Somport pass from Oloron-Sainte-Marie towards Jaca. Up to Bedous it's a quite and not steep road. From Bedous you have to follow the main road (as the walkers do). Not steep but bussier with cars and some (mainly local) lorries. Along the road are "be careful pelgrims' warning sings. Cars and lorries give way. The tunnel is forbidden for cyclist and walkers, there you have to take the old road. And yes that one is at some points steep (up to 12% in my remembrance). Alternatively you can at some point before the tunnel, take the bus. But the you miss the beauty of the Somportpass. I was a bit scared for traffic, but I planned my ride on a Sunday and it was without problems or scary moments. veel plezier!
Dank je!
This is great information. I will take "langs oude wegen". I consider the Somportpass too. 12% I did before and is doable (I even did 25, that is not nice and I had to do it backwards, but I managed).
 
I will take paved roads, now I just have to find out the best paved road.

I normally only write from my own direct experiences. However ...

For many years I supported my wife when she was confined to a wheel chair. At home she had a battery powered chair. Away from home, as she had no upper body strength, I was the "pusher". And I am in awe with your achievements.

On camino I encountered a trio on bicycles: this was at San Juan de Ortega and they had come via the N120. One had a low slung reclining bike with a hand operated "pedals". The other two were his support team on normal bikes.

I mention the N120: this road starts about Logrono and ends at the approach to Astorga - there are "gaps" from to time, especially in the approach to Leon. After Astorga is the N-VI. A 'look' suggests this might be OK to Ponferrada.

As you have got to Rocamadour (and "rolled" the Massif Centrale) I suspect you have a very well attuned sense as to what the "best paved road" looks like for you.

All of my training walks here (and a lot of my camino walks also) are on roads. So I have, for me, a well developed sense of what roads I will walk on and those I wont.

I walk (of course) facing the oncoming traffic, except at bends where (crossing over if needs be) I walk on the outside of the curve.

I walk only where there is either a shoulder, or room to step aside from the road, to avoid oncoming traffic.

And I find street level imagery (such as Google maps street view) almost indispensable.

So, here is my tuppence worth for Spain, based on my observations as a road walker.

Pyrenees: my recommendation - do not start from Saint-Jean.

D428: (France) very steep and has bends / sight lines that are challenging. The clay section after leaving the road can be very deeply rutted. The NA-2033 from Col de Lepoeder has sight lines that may be challenging and a steep drop to the left and a steep bank to the right.

D933 (France) and N135 (Spain) no shoulders - lost of bends - pilgrims path leaves road.

After Roncesvalles - N135 often has side barriers and not shoulder

After Pamplona I've read of cyclists taking a semi-circular route south-east before turning west towards Obanos to avoid hills and motorways.


@Wheelchairpilgrim, kia kaha, kia māia, kia man'wa'nui (take care, be strong, patient and confident)
 
I normally only write from my own direct experiences. However ...

For many years I supported my wife when she was confined to a wheel chair. At home she had a battery powered chair. Away from home, as she had no upper body strength, I was the "pusher". And I am in awe with your achievements.

On camino I encountered a trio on bicycles: this was at San Juan de Ortega and they had come via the N120. One had a low slung reclining bike with a hand operated "pedals". The other two were his support team on normal bikes.

I mention the N120: this road starts about Logrono and ends at the approach to Astorga - there are "gaps" from to time, especially in the approach to Leon. After Astorga is the N-VI. A 'look' suggests this might be OK to Ponferrada.

As you have got to Rocamadour (and "rolled" the Massif Centrale) I suspect you have a very well attuned sense as to what the "best paved road" looks like for you.

All of my training walks here (and a lot of my camino walks also) are on roads. So I have, for me, a well developed sense of what roads I will walk on and those I wont.

I walk (of course) facing the oncoming traffic, except at bends where (crossing over if needs be) I walk on the outside of the curve.

I walk only where there is either a shoulder, or room to step aside from the road, to avoid oncoming traffic.

And I find street level imagery (such as Google maps street view) almost indispensable.

So, here is my tuppence worth for Spain, based on my observations as a road walker.

Pyrenees: my recommendation - do not start from Saint-Jean.

D428: (France) very steep and has bends / sight lines that are challenging. The clay section after leaving the road can be very deeply rutted. The NA-2033 from Col de Lepoeder has sight lines that may be challenging and a steep drop to the left and a steep bank to the right.

D933 (France) and N135 (Spain) no shoulders - lost of bends - pilgrims path leaves road.

After Roncesvalles - N135 often has side barriers and not shoulder

After Pamplona I've read of cyclists taking a semi-circular route south-east before turning west towards Obanos to avoid hills and motorways.


@Wheelchairpilgrim, kia kaha, kia māia, kia man'wa'nui (take care, be strong, patient and confident)
Thanks. This information about the roads is exactly what I need to know.
Specialy knowing about shoulders is very important.
My wheelchair looks a bit like a bike (I use a connected steering attachement) and that is one of the reasons why I decided to drive on the right side of the road but I need to have an escape (shoulder or other grassy/sandy side of the road ( I do not know how to call that in English) where I can go to when it is busy or when cars/trucs want to pass by.
I do a lot of things to be as visible from behind as posible like red light, yellow/silver reflecting back, an almost 2 meter high pole with high visible yellow flag.
 
Prepare for your next Camino on Santa Catalina Island, March 17-20
Dank je!
This is great information. I will take "langs oude wegen". I consider the Somportpass too. 12% I did before and is doable (I even did 25, that is not nice and I had to do it backwards, but I managed).
I would also suggest to do the Somportpass, did it in 2022, before the tunnel its not steep but a 4 lane way. Tunnel is forbidden for cyclist but there is not much traffic.
Certainly if you visit Lourdes, you are following Langs Oude Wegen, and next St Jacobs route #3 (spain part). I can get you the gpx but there are also some booklets in Dutch as you might already now.
Greeting Jos
 

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top