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Daily Distances v Risk of Injury for those who are not exactly Fit or Slim

Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#1
I had a flash of the blindingly obvious yesterday. :oops:

This might be something to think about if you are carrying an injury or a lot overweight....like me :eek:

Quick recap.
1st CF (from St Jean) I took 40 days. Started out with Achilles Tendonitis (training injury) and got shin splints towards the end.
My confortable daily distance I found was about 22-25 kms.
I tried 3 or 4 of over 30+ and it almost ended my Camino.
It was just too much on the existing injuries.
By the end, it took me 8 days to get from Sarria to Sdc.

2nd partial CF. (about 140 kms)
With my wife Pat.
She has Plantaar Faciitis.
So we walked shorter days.
We started to build up slowly to see how she coped.
7, 9, 11, etc up to 20 kms.
We both did fine.

3rd. CF from St Jean.
With my wife Pat.
Both still carrying the same injuries.
So we had to walk shorter days.
Our comfortable distance was a maximum of 20 kms.
We did fine.
Till I screwed up my knee coming down that hill from Alto do Riocabo to Montan.
(Minor tear to meniscus in my knee it turns out)

So Caminos 2 and 3 were a lot easier (for me at least) because the daily distances were shorter.

Something to think about if your health is not great or you're a bit 'chubby' :)

It's a clear message for me too. If I want to walk longer Caminos, with less injury risk, and longer daily distances (which I'll need to), I'd better
a) lose some significant weight and
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

P.S. We met some great people this year on the CF (3 couples at least), who had to give up by the time they got to Burgos, due to injury. Too far, too fast, too early, for their level of fitness and health.
 
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MeandIan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May2018
#2
I had a flash of the blindingly obvious yesterday. :oops:

This might be something to think about if you are carrying an injury or a lot overweight....like me :eek:

Quick recap.
1st CF (from St Jean) I took 40 days. Started out with Achilles Tendonitis (training injury) and got shin splints towards the end.
My confortable daily distance I found was about 22-25 kms.
I tried 3 or 4 of over 30+ and it almost ended my Camino.
It was just too much on the existing injuries.
It took me 8 days to get from Sarria to Sdc.

2nd partial CF. (about 140 kms)
With my wife Pat.
She has Plantaar Faciitis.
So we walked shorter days.
We started to build up slowly to see how she coped.
7, 9, 11, etc up to 20 kms.
We both did fine.

3rd. CF from St Jean.
With my wife Pat.
Both still carrying the same injuries.
So we had to walk shorter days.
Our comfortable distance was a maximum of 20 kms.
We did fine.
Till I screwed up my knee coming down that hill from Alto do Riocabo to Montan.
(Minor tear to meniscus in my knee it turns out)

So Caminos 2 and 3 were a lot easier (for me at least) because the daily distances were shorter.

Something to think about if your health is not great or you're a bit 'chubby' :)

It's a clear message for me too. If I want to walk longer Caminos, with less injury risk, and longer daily distances (which I'll need to), I'd better
a) lose some significant weight and
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

P.S. We met some great people this year on the CF (3 couples at least), who had to give up by the time they got to Burgos, due to injury. Too far, too fast, too early, for their level of fitness and health.
For 20-25km per day, how long did it take? And how many, if any, rest days? Thanks
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#3
For 20-25km per day, how long did it take? And how many, if any, rest days? Thanks
On my first CF I took 40 days.
2 Rest days. Burgos and Leon.
But the rest days should be taken 'when' you need them rather than anything else.

I actually like a 'slower' Camino, but it does mean it takes longer obviously.
And if you want to be part of a Camino family, they may pass you by.
40 days was fine.
45 days on #3 meant people were passing us by quite a bit. We might see them for a few days or a week max.

I'm not saying the Camino Family thing is the 'be all and end all' but it's a nice feature of the CF for many during the busier parts of the year.
 

FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
#4
"Slow but sure" is my motto.

Some stupid injuries from a couple of pavement accidents.

Average 20km but sometimes less sometimes more.

Walked CF in stages over the years, got older and wiser and finally reached Finisterra.
Have walked and still walking stages of the Voie de Tours.
 

TravelBandit

Independent traveller & blogger
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2018)
#5
My wife and I are in our mid-50's and aimed for between 15-20 km per day on our CF this year. We did a few "longer" days (longest was 24.1 km). We carried all our own gear. Enjoyed every day, no injuries, no blisters, no problems. Never left at the crack of dawn, never walked late, stopped often for coffee.
We met an Australian girl one evening after dinner - she was still walking and wanted to do another 3-5 km that evening. She had walked over 700 km in 3 weeks, averaging about 35 km a day. Also carrying all her own stuff. Brutal! She was probably about 40 but admitted that she had been an athlete, so was supremely fit. She must have finished the whole CF in about 23 days.
 

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Phil Smith

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
July/ Aug (2016): StJPdP to Viana
Apr (2017): Viana to Castrojeriz
Apr (2018): Castrojeriz to Leon
#6
"Slow but sure" is my motto.

Some stupid injuries from a couple of pavement accidents.

Average 20km but sometimes less sometimes more.

Walked CF in stages over the years, got older and wiser and finally reached Finisterra.
Have walked and still walking stages of the Voie de Tours.
Great to see this; I'm still part way through my first Camino as I just can't get away for the time to do it in one go. This gives me encouragement ... many thanks.
 

FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
#7
@Phil Smith
I began the CF in 2012 completed in 2016. Only started walking that one because I'd discovered that the Voie de Tours passes close to my second home in France.
Just keep on going, you'll get there. Each time you return you have a more experience to draw on.
Note to all, it's not a crime to get your pack carried at times especially if you've health issues or are temporarily injured.
 

Ianinam

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Hospitalera at Roncesvalles 2015/2016/2017/2018
Camino Portugues (Sept. 2018)
#8
I walked the CF from SJPdP to SdC 5 years ago in 40 days; three restdays in Burgos, Sahagun and León. I walked an average of 22 kms a day, sometimes 17 kms, sometimes 27 kms. I saw many, many younger people (I was 65 then) walking longer distances, swallowing huge amounts of Ibuprofen and then, after a week or so, having to take a few days rest or even having to give up because of serieus injuries. Walking my own pace I eventually walked into SdC without any problems, never had a blister, never took any medicine.......
I am planning to walk the CP in September; I am 70 now and my daily distances will be approx. 15 kms, maybe sometimes 20, but definitely not more than that!
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015)
Camino Portugues (2017)
Norte/Liebana (Planning)
#9
I am in my 30s and 25km is my daily maximum. I'm small, fit and healthy, but the few days I did 30kms broke me badly - legs, back, headaches. Lesson learned - I take my time, embrace my inner slug and walk my camino happy and healthy :) Santiago will be there, no matter how long I take.

I totally agree with Robo in terms of paying attention on what is good or bad for your body. And i also met a girl that was hating the camino on the 3rd day (she started in Astorga) because "those stages you have to make are too hard". She was following a guide book and believed she HAD to walk those stages. When I told her she did not have to, she was a bit shocked. I hope she went on, but she was already quite disappointed.
 

MeandIan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May2018
#10
On my first CF I took 40 days.
2 Rest days. Burgos and Leon.
But the rest days should be taken 'when' you need them rather than anything else.

I actually like a 'slower' Camino, but it does mean it takes longer obviously.
And if you want to be part of a Camino family, they may pass you by.
40 days was fine.
45 days on #3 meant people were passing us by quite a bit. We might see them for a few days or a week max.

I'm not saying the Camino Family thing is the 'be all and end all' but it's a nice feature of the CF for many during the busier parts of the year.
Thank you for your response. We’re also planning 40+ days
 
Camino(s) past & future
please see signature
#11
As we differ in our physiology, and our feet and susceptibility to bed bugs, so we differ in what we each think is normal.

I have to declare that @Robo and I have a recent history as to what is normal.

I think it is normal, when training/maintaining my stamina with all my gear to aim for close to 6km per hour for 15 km or so on public roads and paths.

I think it is normal, when I started training in 2012, to get my weight down from 92 kg to a BMI of around 25: a target weight of around 72 kg**

And these two aspects (increased stamina and reduced weight) gave me choices as what to aim for at the start of each day and to adjust my plan during the day as circumstances changed. And to ensure I took time to smell the roses on the way.

I still had problems that took time to resolve. I credit my fitness level with a good recovery and ensuring a return to finish the job.

Yes, we are all different.

And I repect the choices @Robo has made as evidenced by his several go outs.

** took three years with exercise from training coupled with reduction in food intake
 
#13
@Robo

Quote:
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

Doesn’t the Camino fulfill this criterion? ;)

Having lost a lot of weight recently, I’d recommend avoiding sugar, in most forms (fruit like berries excepted) and low fibre carbs.
It really does work .... provided the motivation is there!
And your energy levels rise ... hugely!

Good luck with it, Robo :)
 

JennyH94

Pilgrim in progress
Camino(s) past & future
Leon-SDC 2012, Hospitalera Rabanal 2014, First Aid 2015, Burgos-Rabanal 2017, Part VF 2017
#14
Great thread Robo - you make an excellent point about walking slow and steady and not being ridiculous about daily distances.

Please don’t be too concerned about losing a significant amount of weight - your doctor will naturally advise you there - however, please remember this: an old German expression, which was told to me by a lovely German pilgrim last Thursday:

A man without a belly is like the night sky without stars.”

Isn’t it wonderful?

Best regards from Leon to you and to Pat -

Jenny
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#15
I know nice it can be to develop a little community as one walks the Camino, but one has to balance the body’s physical needs versus one’s needs for emotional support.

We have had many pleasant one nighters with pilgrims including Korean students, Doctor from N. Ireland, Tucker from the Carolinas, Sandra from Hamburg, Helga from Stuttgart, Claire from Ausralia...and many, many, many more wonderful people. No doubt we were the slowest two winter walkers so we did not have expectations that we would see these folks again. Our limit was usually between 15 -20 km per day. Once in a while we met someone again...but rarely. We saw each encounter as a gift for that time and then let go. It also leaves one free and open to new encounters along the way.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#16
As we differ in our physiology, and our feet and susceptibility to bed bugs, so we differ in what we each think is normal.

I have to declare that @Robo and I have a recent history as to what is normal.

I think it is normal, when training/maintaining my stamina with all my gear to aim for close to 6km per hour for 15 km or so on public roads and paths.

I think it is normal, when I started training in 2012, to get my weight down from 92 kg to a BMI of around 25: a target weight of around 72 kg**

And these two aspects (increased stamina and reduced weight) gave me choices as what to aim for at the start of each day and to adjust my plan during the day as circumstances changed. And to ensure I took time to smell the roses on the way.

I still had problems that took time to resolve. I credit my fitness level with a good recovery and ensuring a return to finish the job.

Yes, we are all different.

And I repect the choices @Robo has made as evidenced by his several go outs.

** took three years with exercise from training coupled with reduction in food intake
I think we are on the same page.
Improved fitness and reduced weight will allow me to walk longer distances ;)

My point is, if you are not fit, and you are
Overweight,
Shorten your distances....
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata.
#17
It works for me. My last Camino I was definitely training for the Camino while on the Camino... Having worked so hard on the VdlP, I’m really trying hard now I’m at home to maintain muscle and keep the weight down. It would be soooo nice next time to be fit.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#20
@Robo
If you are planning to walk the VdlP next, you may find that a lot of planning is needed, as villages are fewer than on the CF and the distances between them are quite variable. I did a massive amount of planning for my VdlP last fall, just to be confident to have a place to sleep each night. To illustrate, I decided that I needed to average twenty km a day to get to Santiago in fifty days, then added on a rest day on the way and three days in Santiago. But with distances between villages varying from fourteen to thirty (approximately) I had to plan for days of varying length. It worked for me because I kept a running total of twenty km days. I found that I arrived at the half-way point in Salamanca having walked in twenty-five days five hundred of the one thousand km. You might choose to be much more flexible in your planning, but if you have a return flight booked you may want to have some idea of how you will get your chosen distance walked before your plane leaves.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#21
Thanks @Albertagirl . Very good advice. I'm lucky that I am not too restricted by time.
I tend to book a return flight that gives me an extra 7+ days anyway, as contingency.
Then if I finish 'on time' I just pull the flight forward.

Caminos are hard things to plan exactly :rolleyes: Who knows what can happen along the way.........

THis year with Pat on the CF I had roughly planned out a 20 km a day schedule. But of course in reality that did not survive long, due to a dozen different reasons.

I just always kept in mind that a short day, (we had a few <15 kms) needed to be balanced by a longer day, or an extra day..... :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Caminos Frances (x4), Finisterre, Aragon, Via de la Plata, Portuguese 2011 -2015. Hospitalero 2015
#22
To fully enjoy the camino, one should be fit and healthy. I trained for 6 months for my first camino from St Jean to Finisterre, at first short walks and building up to the last couple of weeks to four 25km walks with pack and two hour hilly walks all the other other days. I was 79 and honestly found the camino easy (39 days) and no feet problems at all and made many wonderful friends. Next year went back and walked Aragones and Frances (about 900kms) and included a couple of 30km days. Again easy and no problems and carried pack again. When 82 I attempted Via de la Plata but after 300kms found it too hard so walked the Frances again for a holiday and finished with the Camino Portuguese ( about 1200kms)
So please do not listen to those who say get fit on the Camino. Get fit and lose any excess weight before you go and then you will enjoy it. Please!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#23
Wise advice @camino-david .

But if someone found themselves walking the Camino, for whatever reason, unfit and overweight.......
It can still be fully enjoyed! Just don't walk long distances. That was my whole point.

On my first Camino I was both. (unfit, overweight........and injured)
I ate and drank my way along the CF and ended at my starting weight, but the journey was everything I had hoped for and more! :):)

Would I prefer to walk my next one fit, healthy and much lighter in weight. You betcha! :):)

That's a work in progress..........
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
#24
To fully enjoy the camino, one should be fit and healthy. I trained for 6 months for my first camino from St Jean to Finisterre, at first short walks and building up to the last couple of weeks to four 25km walks with pack and two hour hilly walks all the other other days. I was 79 and honestly found the camino easy (39 days) and no feet problems at all and made many wonderful friends. Next year went back and walked Aragones and Frances (about 900kms) and included a couple of 30km days. Again easy and no problems and carried pack again. When 82 I attempted Via de la Plata but after 300kms found it too hard so walked the Frances again for a holiday and finished with the Camino Portuguese ( about 1200kms)
So please do not listen to those who say get fit on the Camino. Get fit and lose any excess weight before you go and then you will enjoy it. Please!
@

I do think most folks walking the Camino prepare...perhaps not as much as you...your training is, indeed, impressive!

We prepare enough to handle 20km if need be daily. However, we have no desire to walk more than 20km per day! I have heard others say that walking only 20km would leave most of the afternoon free for them so they keep walking. I, too, understand that others have time limits and they want to walk as much as they can. Great! For us, having most of the day free is wonderful! We take a good amount of time to talk to pilgrims, owners, locals, and to explore the towns and even rest and read! We have the flexibility of time in our schedules so we enjoy it.
We stop frequently. Sometimes, we even take out a miniature deck of cards and
play rummy for half an hour before moving again. We stop to take pictures, cease walking when we drink and eat a snack we are carrying, and are mindful of what we are doing!
Please do not misunderstand, I think it’s wonderful if one’s goal is to walk 30+km per day. Each pilgrim has there own journey! And yes, one should be prepared for whatever distance one sets. We prepare enough to meander along for 15-20km happily...and know that most folks will wiz by us! God bless them and you! “Walk in a Relaxed Manner”..whatever that is for you..(and you will be less likely to get shin splints).
 
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FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
#25
Definitely need the stops for water, refreshments and of course breakfast x 3! at different intervals. Don't forget those Kodak moments either
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#26
I found that walking my first camino, the Frances, taught me what my own walking rhythm on camino would be. I have been a mountain walker since many years, but the feeling of a camino is totally different. I scheduled quite a few rest days/short days for my first camino, and did not want them. I took three days retreat in Santo Domingo de Silos and three rest days/see the city days in Leon. But I didn't feel like resting. I started slowly in SJpdP and when I found my rhythm I wanted to walk. I arrived in Santiago with too many days left over, given that my flight home was not going for almost two weeks - so extra time in Santiago, Muxia, and Finesterre. Now I know how to plan, for me: twenty km days average, thirty km days maximum, and a few shorter days, but no days off except for retreat, etc. I don't regret giving myself extra time for my first camino. I just didn't know yet. Find your own rhythm.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Planning to walk May 2017
#27
My wife and I are in our mid-50's and aimed for between 15-20 km per day on our CF this year. We did a few "longer" days (longest was 24.1 km). We carried all our own gear. Enjoyed every day, no injuries, no blisters, no problems. Never left at the crack of dawn, never walked late, stopped often for coffee.
We met an Australian girl one evening after dinner - she was still walking and wanted to do another 3-5 km that evening. She had walked over 700 km in 3 weeks, averaging about 35 km a day. Also carrying all her own stuff. Brutal! She was probably about 40 but admitted that she had been an athlete, so was supremely fit. She must have finished the whole CF in about 23 days.
Was that girl NZ not Australian? Only I met a similar sounding lady.
 

Sharon B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk Portuguese interior Camino route in July. Start point? Do I need maps?
#28
I had a flash of the blindingly obvious yesterday. :oops:

This might be something to think about if you are carrying an injury or a lot overweight....like me :eek:

Quick recap.
1st CF (from St Jean) I took 40 days. Started out with Achilles Tendonitis (training injury) and got shin splints towards the end.
My confortable daily distance I found was about 22-25 kms.
I tried 3 or 4 of over 30+ and it almost ended my Camino.
It was just too much on the existing injuries.
By the end, it took me 8 days to get from Sarria to Sdc.

2nd partial CF. (about 140 kms)
With my wife Pat.
She has Plantaar Faciitis.
So we walked shorter days.
We started to build up slowly to see how she coped.
7, 9, 11, etc up to 20 kms.
We both did fine.

3rd. CF from St Jean.
With my wife Pat.
Both still carrying the same injuries.
So we had to walk shorter days.
Our comfortable distance was a maximum of 20 kms.
We did fine.
Till I screwed up my knee coming down that hill from Alto do Riocabo to Montan.
(Minor tear to meniscus in my knee it turns out)

So Caminos 2 and 3 were a lot easier (for me at least) because the daily distances were shorter.

Something to think about if your health is not great or you're a bit 'chubby' :)

It's a clear message for me too. If I want to walk longer Caminos, with less injury risk, and longer daily distances (which I'll need to), I'd better
a) lose some significant weight and
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

P.S. We met some great people this year on the CF (3 couples at least), who had to give up by the time they got to Burgos, due to injury. Too far, too fast, too early, for their level of fitness and health.

Thanks for the good advice. I am doing the Portuguese Camino and decided to do a maximum of 20 kms a day, interspersed with 15-km days to try to avoid injuries but also to savor the beauty of the walk and the great gift of time to enjoy it
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés 2013
Camino Fisterra/Muxía 2013
Camino Inglés 2013
Camino del Salvador 2014
Camino Primitivo 2014
Caminho Portugues 2015
Camino del Norte 2016
#29
My wife and I are in our mid-50's and aimed for between 15-20 km per day on our CF this year. We did a few "longer" days (longest was 24.1 km). We carried all our own gear. Enjoyed every day, no injuries, no blisters, no problems. Never left at the crack of dawn, never walked late, stopped often for coffee.
We met an Australian girl one evening after dinner - she was still walking and wanted to do another 3-5 km that evening. She had walked over 700 km in 3 weeks, averaging about 35 km a day. Also carrying all her own stuff. Brutal! She was probably about 40 but admitted that she had been an athlete, so was supremely fit. She must have finished the whole CF in about 23 days.
Like me then but I’m not an athlete. We are all different some of us has a large stamina and fast legs :) I would say that all people should get to know their own bodies and limitations. Not listen to how others have done it and think that is the only way. As the original poster did, he found his comfort limit. But it might be a good idea to find out before heading off to Spain To be able to plan how long it will take and and a couple of extra days. Or take it as it comes on the Camino, either you do like I did on CF suddenly find your self in SdC 10 days “to early” or you might have to catch a train here and there to fit your schedule or come back later. Not planning every stop is my method. I walk as long as I like, stop when the body says stop, sometimes it is before and sometimes it is after the “planned stop”. Don’t press your self or force your self to stop in a place you don’t want to be at. Said so many times before, let your Camino be your Camino.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan on walking the Camino Frances May 2019, God willing
#30
I walked the CF from SJPdP to SdC 5 years ago in 40 days; three restdays in Burgos, Sahagun and León. I walked an average of 22 kms a day, sometimes 17 kms, sometimes 27 kms. I saw many, many younger people (I was 65 then) walking longer distances, swallowing huge amounts of Ibuprofen and then, after a week or so, having to take a few days rest or even having to give up because of serieus injuries. Walking my own pace I eventually walked into SdC without any problems, never had a blister, never took any medicine.......
I am planning to walk the CP in September; I am 70 now and my daily distances will be approx. 15 kms, maybe sometimes 20, but definitely not more than that!
This is SO encouraging! My husband and I are planning on walking the CF Sept 2019 and I hope we do as well (@ 66 and 72 ) Thsnk you
 

Cheryl M

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
none
#31
I know nice it can be to develop a little community as one walks the Camino, but one has to balance the body’s physical needs versus one’s needs for emotional support.

We have had many pleasant one nighters with pilgrims including Korean students, Doctor from N. Ireland, Tucker from the Carolinas, Sandra from Hamburg, Helga from Stuttgart, Claire from Ausralia...and many, many, many more wonderful people. No doubt we were the slowest two winter walkers so we did not have expectations that we would see these folks again. Our limit was usually between 15 -20 km per day. Once in a while we met someone again...but rarely. We saw each encounter as a gift for that time and then let go. It also leaves one free and open to new encounters along the way.
Thanks you for this. We expect to be very slow walkers on our first Camino and will adopt your attitude and look at each encounter as a gift.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2018)
We start in SJPDP on May 21, 3018
#32
Hello
May 20-June 30/ 18
My friend and I just walked the Camino Francis from St Jean to Santiago in 41 days. We are both overweight, 58 and live in a very flat area. We had an amazing trip as we sauntered across Spain. We saw so much and took in EVERYTHING!! No blisters or injuries to be had as we did a maximum of 20 km and listened to our bodies.We did however get food poisoning and climbed the Pyrenees with head colds. We lost days from the food poisoning so jumped a bus to catch up. We met all kinds of people in all shapes and sizes and abilities. What I took away from this experience is that if it is something you really want to do don't let anyone discourage you It's an amazing experience.
 
#34
I have not been on the Camino, but done several thousand miles on other trails in the US, UK and France, the accepted wisdom to do big miles a day is not to walk fast but walk long i.e early starts and late finishes; not easy to do on the Camino with the accommodation. I do 24 k or so a day.
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#36
I have not been on the Camino, but done several thousand miles on other trails in the US, UK and France, the accepted wisdom to do big miles a day is not to walk fast but walk long i.e early starts and late finishes; not easy to do on the Camino with the accommodation. I do 24 k or so a day.
I get that. If I have a longer day I just walk more hours.
Why do you suggest that is not possible on the Camino?
With so many villages and accommodation options?

Finishing late might not work for 'non bookable' Albergues at busy times of the year, but there are plenty of other options surely?
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Santiago (2018)
We start in SJPDP on May 21, 3018
#37
There are no STAGES on the Camino - walk what you can and/or want. So often met people that were missing so much of the camino by pushing on the meet some arbitrary stage set by an author. Just walk til you're hungry, tried or just see a stop that appeals to you ! ENJOY
Well said
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October (2015)
#38
I had a flash of the blindingly obvious yesterday. :oops:

This might be something to think about if you are carrying an injury or a lot overweight....like me :eek:

Quick recap.
1st CF (from St Jean) I took 40 days. Started out with Achilles Tendonitis (training injury) and got shin splints towards the end.
My confortable daily distance I found was about 22-25 kms.
I tried 3 or 4 of over 30+ and it almost ended my Camino.
It was just too much on the existing injuries.
By the end, it took me 8 days to get from Sarria to Sdc.

2nd partial CF. (about 140 kms)
With my wife Pat.
She has Plantaar Faciitis.
So we walked shorter days.
We started to build up slowly to see how she coped.
7, 9, 11, etc up to 20 kms.
We both did fine.

3rd. CF from St Jean.
With my wife Pat.
Both still carrying the same injuries.
So we had to walk shorter days.
Our comfortable distance was a maximum of 20 kms.
We did fine.
Till I screwed up my knee coming down that hill from Alto do Riocabo to Montan.
(Minor tear to meniscus in my knee it turns out)

So Caminos 2 and 3 were a lot easier (for me at least) because the daily distances were shorter.

Something to think about if your health is not great or you're a bit 'chubby' :)

It's a clear message for me too. If I want to walk longer Caminos, with less injury risk, and longer daily distances (which I'll need to), I'd better
a) lose some significant weight and
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

P.S. We met some great people this year on the CF (3 couples at least), who had to give up by the time they got to Burgos, due to injury. Too far, too fast, too early, for their level of fitness and health.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October (2015)
#39
Thank you so much for this post. I am 69, overweight, with a knee problem (cortisone helps), but will be walking the Camino on September 3rd. I spent this evening watching all the posts of your latest Camino with your wife, and have decided to take things slowly and use your 45 days as a guide to do my own Camino. I've taken lots of notes. I think your mileage each day was reasonable and something I feel I could comfortably do as well. Thank you for your pictures, your videos, and your comments on each days journey. I know it's going to help me immensely.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2018
#40
Hello
May 20-June 30/ 18
My friend and I just walked the Camino Francis from St Jean to Santiago in 41 days. We are both overweight, 58 and live in a very flat area. We had an amazing trip as we sauntered across Spain. We saw so much and took in EVERYTHING!! No blisters or injuries to be had as we did a maximum of 20 km and listened to our bodies.We did however get food poisoning and climbed the Pyrenees with head colds. We lost days from the food poisoning so jumped a bus to catch up. We met all kinds of people in all shapes and sizes and abilities. What I took away from this experience is that if it is something you really want to do don't let anyone discourage you It's an amazing experience.
Thanks for your commentary. This is so encouraging. I've just 6 weeks to go and I'm getting a bit concerned I haven't practiced enough. I have 40 days. It looks like it's doable at 73. Thanks!
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
Alone.
------------------------------
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
with my wife Pat.
------------------------------
CF SJPDP-SdC
(Apr/May 2018)
together again :-)
#41
Thank you so much for this post. I am 69, overweight, with a knee problem (cortisone helps), but will be walking the Camino on September 3rd. I spent this evening watching all the posts of your latest Camino with your wife, and have decided to take things slowly and use your 45 days as a guide to do my own Camino. I've taken lots of notes. I think your mileage each day was reasonable and something I feel I could comfortably do as well. Thank you for your pictures, your videos, and your comments on each days journey. I know it's going to help me immensely.
I'm glad you found the blog of interest.
Just one tip though.
You don't really need to eat two Pilgrims Menus a day like we did on many days :oops:
 

AbbyDee

Court Jester
Camino(s) past & future
In celebration of the 35th anniversary of my 25th year, I will begin my Camino in September 2017
#42
I had a flash of the blindingly obvious yesterday. :oops:

This might be something to think about if you are carrying an injury or a lot overweight....like me :eek:

Quick recap.
1st CF (from St Jean) I took 40 days. Started out with Achilles Tendonitis (training injury) and got shin splints towards the end.
My confortable daily distance I found was about 22-25 kms.
I tried 3 or 4 of over 30+ and it almost ended my Camino.
It was just too much on the existing injuries.
By the end, it took me 8 days to get from Sarria to Sdc.

<<<<<snipage>>>>>
It's a clear message for me too. If I want to walk longer Caminos, with less injury risk, and longer daily distances (which I'll need to), I'd better
a) lose some significant weight and
b) undertake some kind of exercise regime to build up my legs and joints.

P.S. We met some great people this year on the CF (3 couples at least), who had to give up by the time they got to Burgos, due to injury. Too far, too fast, too early, for their level of fitness and health.

Last September I walked the Camino from St. Jean through to Santiago. It took me 6 weeks, I averaged about 20 km per day, sometimes more, sometimes less with the occasional day off in Burgos, Leon, and on or two other places There were a few days when I took a bus to avoid " mule killer" ravine or some some such obstacle. As you can see, I fall into the category known "the stylishly stout" While I was not the fasted walker around, I managed and the first few days through the mountains were challenging to say the least. I sustained no injuries (which I can largely attribute to extensive training and trekking poles,) I had two blisters neither in critical locations (thank you merino wool socks. Take at least 4 pair and good comfy boots) This put me in a position to be generous with my compeed with fellow pilgrims. I stocked up before I left home and I was glad to be able to help out several others along the way. I remember gifting a package of them to a young woman who was just beginning her Camino with the words "May you never need them yourself but be generous to others along the way".

Also, I admit that I also recognized the option (about half the way along) of sending my pack pack on ahead, via one of the many transport services. A young man about half my age, and much more trim than I was, recommended it because "then, I could really enjoy the walk." I saw the wisdom in that about half way along my Camino.

Take your time, set your own pace and remember, no one can define the camino for another. It's a personal journey, not a race for either speed or endurance.

Happy Trails!
 
Camino(s) past & future
First Camino Mar-April 2018
#43
For me, walking the Camino has been a dream for several decades. I am a half marathon runner but a meniscus tear ended that as well as my plan to walk Camino in 2017. So 2018 was my year in March following brierley’s book for daily distances, given I still work and only had 5 weeks. Yes, I met my Camino family and as we encountered brutal weather and consequently difficult walking conditions, the emotional support was welcome. However at day 6 I hit a wall in Torres de rio with acciles tendinitis that forced me home, couldn’t walk for 3 weeks and emotionally, financially and physically spent!! The blame most likely is the boots as I trained on the prairies, too long daily distances (averaged 27km per day) and likely too much weight in my backpack. I have had no positive feedback from any posts or from my local Camino group leaving me to feel that if you don’t complete Camino, you are dismissed!!! Not sure I will go back / will stick to my social work profession and help others claim the lessons in life’s disappointments!!
Nancy from Winnipeg
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015); Ch. d'Arles: Oloron Ste Marie to Aragones; Frances (2016); V.d.l.P.; Sanabres (2017)
#44
For me, walking the Camino has been a dream for several decades. I am a half marathon runner but a meniscus tear ended that as well as my plan to walk Camino in 2017. So 2018 was my year in March following brierley’s book for daily distances, given I still work and only had 5 weeks. Yes, I met my Camino family and as we encountered brutal weather and consequently difficult walking conditions, the emotional support was welcome. However at day 6 I hit a wall in Torres de rio with acciles tendinitis that forced me home, couldn’t walk for 3 weeks and emotionally, financially and physically spent!! The blame most likely is the boots as I trained on the prairies, too long daily distances (averaged 27km per day) and likely too much weight in my backpack. I have had no positive feedback from any posts or from my local Camino group leaving me to feel that if you don’t complete Camino, you are dismissed!!! Not sure I will go back / will stick to my social work profession and help others claim the lessons in life’s disappointments!!
Nancy from Winnipeg
@NancyLee
I am so sorry that your planned camino did not go as you hoped for. I am convinced that you did the best you could, in gear, in training and in walking. And this was something important to you, that you had planned for for a long time. It may be hard for those in your camino group in Winnipeg to understand the depth of feeling of someone who was unable to complete her long-planned walk. I think that you have expressed what you feel very well in this posting. You have also included an extraordinary photo, which shows a woman, strong and capable, standing with a long dark tunnel behind her and a vivid circle of light at the far end of the tunnel. I hope that this photo illustrates your hope for light in the distance. My last camino did not go well and has left me wondering if I shall want to walk another. If you wish for a further listening ear, you are welcome to send me a personal message. Just click on my photo and click on Start a conversation. I am an Albertagirl, from Calgary.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#45
I have had no positive feedback from any posts or from my local Camino group leaving me to feel that if you don’t complete Camino, you are dismissed!!!
It is too bad that your camino was cut short and that you have had to deal with this injury. Perhaps you haven't seen them, but you did receive a couple of sympathetic replies to your post to this forum after your short camino. :). If you asked for detailed advice on your backpack weight and your boot type, you would be overwhelmed with responses :p. It is hard (maybe impossible) for online acquaintances to play the same emotional support role as family or friends might. We have very limited information to engage with you to help figure out what strategies you could use, or even if you want such advice. Maybe your local group was similarly in the dark.

It is still only a few months since your injury. It is a great idea to continue walking at home as a regular exercise anyway, and then you can at least keep the option open of doing a Camino in the future whenever (or if) you feel like it. If you don't do the Camino again, you will still enjoy the benefits of the regular walking.
 

FLEUR

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2012 - 2016
#46
Walking the Camino is a bit like childbirth! You have to work / walk through the pain to achieve the goals. Just like childbirth the memory of that pain is quickly forgotten and you find yourself being tempted to repeat and relive the experience.
 

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