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Has anyone else have the lining material of their Hokas disintegrate?

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#1
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
 

Attachments

Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2019)
#2
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
Hi Nidarosa,

Let me say at the outset that I am no expert when it comes to the various performances of different types of footwear but I do know a bit about the Law relating to purchases.

You apparently have bought footwear that the selling shop states is for running, not walking. Now, once again, I don't claim any expertise in this field but I would suggest that to run in a footwear would cause more stress in the footwear than if you were to walk.
Therefore, the response made by Cotswold is a Red Herring of the first magnitude, in other words 'ignorable'

Do not respond by sending a letter to the manufacturer. Although they 'made' the article, your argument in Law, has nothing to do with them (as far as you are concerned)

You have protection under the Consumer Act in the UK in that you purchased a product which was not fit for purpose, pure and simple.

As you have stated, the inferior part of your footwaer is nowhere near that part that was in contact with the ground surface.

This is what to do. Send a letter back to where you bought the shoes. Tell them that you do not accept their response. In the letter tell them that you have 'WALKED' in the shoe for two weeks. Tell them that in so doing, you must have caused LESS stress on the product than if you had ran. Ask them to explain their opposing hypothesis, if they can. Include a photo as you have done on here and sit back.

If they maintain that they are right then send them a 'Letter before Action' This is a necessary letter that you must send to a retailer or organisation that tells them that you will take them to the Small Claims Court. Don't worry about the formulation of such a letter. There is plenty of advice on Google. Do a search on Google and you will come up with a letter that can be adapted to suit your circs.

Do not accept any sum other than the price that you paid. Do not accept a discount because you have used the shoes.

How do I know all this. Because after a flight on BA they wrecked my luggage and then offered me £17 as compensation (even trying to ignore the £40 I paid for them to carry it. After doing exactly as I have outlined above, I got the cost of the case plus the carriage fee. They 'rolled over' after they received the 'Letter before Action'

PS. Ignore the 'warranty' offered by the manufacturer. This means very little. Your legal argument is with the retailer and, should they offer to take the shoes to the manufacturer, desist. THEY are responsible. If THEY wish to send the shoes they can do, AFTER you have got YOUR money.

PPS, Sugar!!! I've just reread that you bought the shoes in Spain. I'm sorry but the above info. only applies to UK. Maybe someone on here can advise as to what the deal is in Spain, Sorry .
 
Last edited:

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#3
@Derek Booth Thank you for your very informative reply! Since I posted here I have actually composed a reply to Cotswold Outdoors in the UK - I rang them from Spain while on the Camino, but bought the shoes in the UK before I left - questioning exactly that part of their conclusion and quoting the Hoka description of this 'trail' shoe, no mention of running! In fact their description, which is copied on the CO website too, claims these shoes are for a variety of terrain and 'wherever the trail takes you', no mention of a limit to how far that would be. I have also checked my other Hokas, which have all been on long distance walks, and none of them have the same wear on them, so it's not specific to how I walk - and yes, the holes appear where there is nothing touching them! I have also used some of the text to write a letter to Hoka to inform them that CO thinks their otherwise quality product should be expected to unravel in less than two weeks. I probably won't send it though.
I really appreciate your info and support, thank you for taking the time to reply so thoroughly.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
#4
Hi Nidarosa,

Let me say at the outset that I am no expert when it comes to the various performances of different types of footwear but I do know a bit about the Law relating to purchases.

You apparently have bought footwear that the selling shop states is for running, not walking. Now, once again, I don't claim any expertise in this field but I would suggest that to run in a footwear would cause more stress in the footwear than if you were to walk.
Therefore, the response made by Cotswold is a Red Herring of the first magnitude, in other words 'ignorable'

Do not respond by sending a letter to the manufacturer. Although they 'made' the article, your argument in Law, has nothing to do with them (as far as you are concerned)

You have protection under the Consumer Act in the UK in that you purchased a product which was not fit for purpose, pure and simple.

As you have stated, the inferior part of your footwaer is nowhere near that part that was in contact with the ground surface.

This is what to do. Send a letter back to where you bought the shoes. Tell them that you do not accept their response. In the letter tell them that you have 'WALKED' in the shoe for two weeks. Tell them that in so doing, you must have caused LESS stress on the product than if you had ran. Ask them to explain their opposing hypothesis, if they can. Include a photo as you have done on here and sit back.

If they maintain that they are right then send them a 'Letter before Action' This is a necessary letter that you must send to a retailer or organisation that tells them that you will take them to the Small Claims Court. Don't worry about the formulation of such a letter. There is plenty of advice on Google. Do a search on Google and you will come up with a letter that can be adapted to suit your circs.

Do not accept any sum other than the price that you paid. Do not accept a discount because you have used the shoes.

How do I know all this. Because after a flight on BA they wrecked my luggage and then offered me £17 as compensation (even trying to ignore the £40 I paid for them to carry it. After doing exactly as I have outlined above, I got the cost of the case plus the carriage fee. They 'rolled over' after they received the 'Letter before Action'

PS. Ignore the 'warranty' offered by the manufacturer. This means very little. Your legal argument is with the retailer and, should they offer to take the shoes to the manufacturer, desist. THEY are responsible. If THEY wish to send the shoes they can do, AFTER you have got YOUR money.

PPS, Sugar!!! I've just reread that you bought the shoes in Spain. I'm sorry but the above info. only applies to UK. Maybe someone on here can advise as to what the deal is in Spain, Sorry .
What a considerate informative response!
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
#5
@Derek Booth Thank you for your very informative reply! Since I posted here I have actually composed a reply to Cotswold Outdoors in the UK - I rang them from Spain while on the Camino, but bought the shoes in the UK before I left - questioning exactly that part of their conclusion and quoting the Hoka description of this 'trail' shoe, no mention of running! In fact their description, which is copied on the CO website too, claims these shoes are for a variety of terrain and 'wherever the trail takes you', no mention of a limit to how far that would be. I have also checked my other Hokas, which have all been on long distance walks, and none of them have the same wear on them, so it's not specific to how I walk - and yes, the holes appear where there is nothing touching them! I have also used some of the text to write a letter to Hoka to inform them that CO thinks their otherwise quality product should be expected to unravel in less than two weeks. I probably won't send it though.
I really appreciate your info and support, thank you for taking the time to reply so thoroughly.
Let us know how it all goes!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2019)
#6
Thank you for clarifying that the footwear was bought in the UK and therefore covered by the Consumer Act.
I must emphasis that your 'argument' is with the retailer and in trying to include the manufacturer in the process, all it will do is obfuscate the issue.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#7
I have worn Hoka's last June on the Le Puy route and never had this problem with them. That said, I have had the exact wear spots you are showing in your photos on two different brands of trail runners. I wondered what had caused that particular type of wear and came up with two possibilities.
1) My walking gait is almost like I am walking on a balance beam as my feet stay very close together one in front of the other. So depending on the exact height of the inside of the shoe top, my rather skinny ankle bones combined with the shoe top rubbed on each other as I walked and caused the wear and tear on the shoes.
2) Because of the gait of my walk, if the soles of the shoes extend out beyond the shoe itself (offering good stable support), then the lifting of my foot can scrape the top of the opposite shoe with the wide width of the soles against that same spot.
I have experienced both types, but they each wore out my shoes exactly as your pictures show. My opinion is that it is all just the 'luck of the draw' on whatever shoes you purchase because you are not even aware of this happening and cannot know for sure when trying them on in the store as it is the rubbing and friction between the two shoes.

This is all just my opinion based on my experiences with wearing of my trail runners in the exact same spots as yours. I don't believe it is the fault of the Hoka company, but rather your personal walking gait combined with where your ankle bone protudes in or just above the top of the shoe. Sorry for the long post as I had a hard time explaining myself on this particular issue.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#8
Like @Camino Chris, I wondered if your shoes are touching as you walk. Perhaps the very particular shape/position of the shoe created the contact that you've never had before, with other shoes. In fact, I cannot imagine how they would wear like that without friction. Even so, I wouldn't expect it to happen so fast.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#9
@C clearly, you explained basically the same thing as I was trying to say...only much less wordy, yet getting the same point across! :)
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
#10
@C clearly, you explained basically the same thing as I was trying to say...only much less wordy, yet getting the same point across! :)
Don't give me so much credit! As one of my colleagues used to say, you need to write the full version before you can write the simplified version. Your detailed description allowed me to come along and give a final wrap-up summary!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#11
If, ultimately you determine the likely or proximate cause of this fraying was contact abrasion from an 'odd' gait, you can apply a duck tape or KT tape patch over the area BEFORE starting a Camino.

While not especially stylish, it will reduce the rubbing. I have seen this done on mid-height boots, at the top - scree collar.

Hindsight is ALWAYS 20-20...;)

Hope this helps.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
#13
I'm on my third pair of Hokas and I have put close to 2,000 km on my second pair. I've never had any wear spots on the sides or backs of the shoes. Your picture does show an odd place where the shoe is breaking down, and only after a couple of weeks! Good luck with your refund!
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#14
Could you post a photo of what the soles of the shoes look like please?

I'm no @davebugg but perhaps you're overpronating? Is there a pattern of wear on the inside edge of the sole? In future you might be able to counter act this with padded insoles?

1542212324056.png

Is there any wear inside the shoe?
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#15
Jeff, in my case pronation problems were never the issue as I've had no wear spots in those areas, but is something the OP should check out.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" camino
Porto to SdC May 2019
#16
Thinking about it and looking at your photos your lacing looks fairly loose. This could contribute to the splitting. If the shoe is slightly loose it could allow the sides to flex and tearing at any small split making it worse.

You could try lock lacing to pull the sides in.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francis 2018
#17
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
The happens to all Hokas. Not sure there is anything you can do about it. I have worn this brand of running shoes (a variety of styles) for about seven years, and they break down quite quickly.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2015); Camino Norte/Primitivo (2016); Camino Frances (2017); Le Puy (June 2018)
#18
I wore my Hokas daily for a full month walking the Le Puy route and mine have absolutely no wearing spots anywhere except the bottoms of the soles. And mostly I was walking on many rocks and roots! In fact, I am still using them on the local trails near my home.
 

Geoff Shepherd

I’m the big fella on the left.
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sep-Oct 2018
#19
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
I walked for a while with a bloke from the US, Greg. He and his wife had walked from Le Puy and finished in SdC 18 Oct. His Hokas were showing the same wear patterns especially around his heels. He put it down to the dust and dirt abrading the lining. He did adequate running repairs with Duct tape.
 
Camino(s) past & future
August to September 2016
#20
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
Hello nidarosa
While I did not take the time to view all responses to your question, I do know that I also wore a pair of Hoka shoes on my Camino in 2016. I had the shoes less than one year ( about 5 months at the time of my return to the States). I had some minor wear, a small rip, in the mesh of one shoe. I emailed Hoka directly. They had, and I believe still have, a one year warranty. They had me mail them the shoes, and sent me a brand new pair. I hope this may help...
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#21
I wore my Hokas daily for a full month walking the Le Puy route and mine have absolutely no wearing spots anywhere except the bottoms of the soles. And mostly I was walking on many rocks and roots! In fact, I am still using them on the local trails near my home.
Which Hoka's do you have? I am considering trying them after my current Keen hiking sandals wear through the heel and sole. I use them for training, mostly on paved surfaces. I am thinking the improved cushioning might be a good idea.
 
#22
My Hokas wore out after training and then 2 weeks on the CP Coastal. But I still loved them, first time with no blisters and I didn’t feel the cobblestones my friends felt. The foam uppers don’t seem to be built for long days of walking. I was able to order a new pair online at a great price for next years Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2019), Portuguese (2019)
#23
I have run long distances over 12 months in both pairs of my Hoka One One Arahi shoes. I run on dirt & hard surface roads. Neither pair shows signs of wear like your shoes.
 

gml

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago, Sept/Oct 2012
Le Puy to Roncesvalles, Oct/Nov 2014
#25
A couple of years ago, I bought a pair of the previous season's Hoka Ones on sale. Within a couple of weeks, they became worn in exactly the place that yours did. I used them for running on gentle terrain every couple of days, so there was no reason for their quick disintegration. Shortly after that, the inner soles began sliding up the heel -- way up -- which made the shoes completely unwearable. I discovered complaints about this problem from many others online. I then looked at the newer models in the store and found that Hoka had come up with a better inner sole design, so I wrote to them, described the problem, and asked if they would send me a pair of the new soles. They refused. They said they don't have a "parts department." It was a frustrating experience, and I would never buy Hokas again, ever.
 

4 Eyes

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17
#26
It may be a gait problem. I have Hokas which I wear extensively but never had that problem, but I have worn holes in my Goretex rain pants at the exact same spots. I have also noticed that when it rains my pant legs always get very muddy at those exact same spots but not elsewhere. Judging from the wear on the soles of my shoes, I don't have a over pronation problem. I am sure there is some rubbing or friction that I do not feel and am not aware of that's occurring when I walk.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2019)
#27
I would contact Hoka and not the store where you purchased them.
Whilst there is fundamentally nothing wrong in contacting the manufacturer, should they wish to see the product, the OP is risking the possibility that the footwear 'disappears' (And don't think that doesn't happen)
If that occurs, the OP would not be able to produce the shoes should they wish to take the Retailer to the Small Claims Court.
It may seem contrarian to common sense, BUT, in English Law, the Retailer is responsible for ensuring that the product they sell is fit for purpose. It matters not a jot what the manufacturer thinks. The OP's argument is with the retailer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte (2019)
#28
A couple of years ago, I bought a pair of the previous season's Hoka Ones on sale. Within a couple of weeks, they became worn in exactly the place that yours did. I used them for running on gentle terrain every couple of days, so there was no reason for their quick disintegration. Shortly after that, the inner soles began sliding up the heel -- way up -- which made the shoes completely unwearable. I discovered complaints about this problem from many others online. I then looked at the newer models in the store and found that Hoka had come up with a better inner sole design, so I wrote to them, described the problem, and asked if they would send me a pair of the new soles. They refused. They said they don't have a "parts department." It was a frustrating experience, and I would never buy Hokas again, ever.
Respectfully may I direct you to the reply I gave to the OP. Your complaint should have been made to the Retailer.
 
Camino(s) past & future
St Frances segments in 2014 and 2016
Norte/Primitivo in 2018
#29
I walked the CF from Estella to Finisterre this Sept/Oct in brand new Hoka One One Mafate Speed II, with cushioned sole and Vibram for durability, and loved them. The only problem was that the rolled-over lining on the side of both shoes - where they meet, so to speak - started disintegrating after less than two weeks. I rang Cotswold Outdoors, where I bought them, from Spain to ask what to do about this and if this sort of damage was covered by the warranty. They advised me not to try to fix it, that would void the warranty, and send the shoes to them for inspection when I came home. So I did. I have now had them back saying they are not defective because they are a running shoe and not meant for 'long walks in desert terrain'. ?? The part of the shoe which is disintegrating never even touched anything, as I walked in tights most of the time. Nothing rubbed at this part of the shoe, it just developed large holes that eventually let sand in, because I was advised not to fix it with superglue or needle and thread. Has anyone else have this happen? I am not best pleased right now so I shall wait until tomorrow before I write a reply or send an email straight to Hoka One One to ask them if this is acceptable wear. The photos below were taken after 15 days of walking.
I expect you are simply kicking your own ankles, ever so slightly, as you walk. I do the same - you don't even realize you're doing this. Solution? Wear lightweight gaiters. Altra or Dirty Girl gaiters do the trick and keep your shoes intact. Another benefit of the gaiters - they keep dust and small rocks from getting into your shoes (which can also be worse for those of us who kick our shoes as we walk).
 

gml

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago, Sept/Oct 2012
Le Puy to Roncesvalles, Oct/Nov 2014
#30
Respectfully may I direct you to the reply I gave to the OP. Your complaint should have been made to the Retailer.
It would have been a long journey. I purchased the shoes in California and I live in Toronto.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#32
I think your shoes were faulty. Happened to me on my first Camino (Not Hokas but another good brand).
They just desintegrated...
I’d forget about it. I did!
No way did I consider bringing them back to the UK although that would have guaranteed my money back....
Life’s too short! :)
 

nidarosa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes please!
#33
@TMinAlaska Agree with the Dirty Girl gaiters, I have them and used them half the time I was walking (when I wore tights), which makes it even more unlikely that some kind of friction is the cause. Plus none of my other Hokas have the same wear in the same place, nor do my socks - good point @notion900. I did have a pair of Salomons where the lining disintegrated too, but that was just in one shoe and not in the same place - turns out there was a hard edge near the heal that wore through. I contacted the retailer and got a replacement sent out straight away. Right now I am tempted to just leave it, after all the shoes took me across Spain on a wonderful camino and really were worth their weight in gold, but the problem is I would like to buy the same model (Mafate Speed II) again and am worried the same thing will happen to a new pair. Thanks for all your input though.
DSC_0330.jpg
 

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