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Hiking skirts ... For men

mickcope

Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino - Sarria
Reading a blog recently - one of the hikers was talking about his use of mens hiking skirts. When he listed the advantages they seemed really interesting.

I wonder if any men on the forum have used these (and I am conscious that a Kilt may fall into the category)

With a SJPP start next week and the talk of 35 degrees heatwave - the idea seems attractive and somewhat cooler when walking...

Cheers

Mick

 
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I’ve seen men wearing utilikilts (“utility kilts”) on the Camino, but I’ve never worn one myself. Given the variety of cultures, personalities, and hiking gear seen on the Camino, I doubt you’d be given a second look.
 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I wonder if any men on the forum have used [hiking skirts] (and I am conscious that a Kilt may fall into the category)

Yes, I have. I've only hiked in it once so far but it's not going to be the last time. I liked it. I'm going to get used to it in the mountains before wearing it on the more public local hikes.

I got tired of chafing and looked online for something. On a trip to the South last month I was passing within a few miles of the factory that made my #1 pick. I stopped, tried it out and it suited me fine. The belt loops, front fly and cargo pockets give it a somewhat masculine look. Since I never got instruction when young on the proper way to sit in the things I went with the optional snaps to effectively turn the skirt into something that looks like a baggy pair of shorts. The pockets are huge, my smartphone with a heavy case can fit sideways in four of the six pockets with plenty of room for a ton of other things.

Here's the webpage for the Lightheart Gear skirt I picked (the gray one). There is a video there geared to women but it shows a guy hiking in one as well. Of the nine reviews four are by guys and they all rate the skirt as 5/5.

 
I would, but it would definitely have to be a kilt type, with the kilt type pattern and useful pockets. As far as going commando? Hmmm, too many really good brands of breathable hiking skivvies out there, and I'd feel a bit vulnerable :D
 
I would, but it would definitely have to be a kilt type, with the kilt type pattern and useful pockets. As far as going commando? Hmmm, too many really good brands of breathable hiking skivvies out there, and I'd feel a bit vulnerable :D
That's another reason for not wearing a kilt, because you don't wear anything underneath. When I walk I wear running shorts and mine are basically leggings with football shorts over the top. If I spend time nude (which I do sometimes) I chafe, and I can't imagine walking 15 miles or more with my legs apart. Probably more than most people want to visualise :)
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
I have my kilt here in Spain (I'm part Scottish) but it's like wearing a heavy woollen overcoat around your waist so I won't be wearing it to walk in anything over 20º. Which isn't going to happen often.
I have both wool and polyester kilts. For hiking I use the polyester light weight and quick drying. My other kilts are for regular wear.
 
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That's another reason for not wearing a kilt, because you don't wear anything underneath. When I walk I wear running shorts and mine are basically leggings with football shorts over the top. If I spend time nude (which I do sometimes) I chafe, and I can't imagine walking 15 miles or more with my legs apart. Probably more than most people want to visualise :)
Canada's bracing weather has long made this an optional practice. I have friends in kilted regiments who assure me that spandex has saved them from frostbite many a time and oft; avoiding chafing would to me sound like a reasonable excuse to modify traditional practice.
 
I have often worn kilts and skirts (more often skirts because they are lighter to carry) hiking in various places across the world for about 15 years with little comment or problem. Once I overcame the mental barrier to wearing them (which took about 6 months) and embraced them not as women’s clothes but my clothes, it was easy. Skirts are comfortable and light, easier to wash, and last longer than pants. And I have traveled without a pair of pants in my pack. On pilgrimage I also like that a skirt makes a small statement that I’m different.

Wearing a kilt will not create any problems, particularly in Galicia. That said, in my experience society regards skirts as different than kilts. In today’s divided culture a man wearing a skirt can seem like a political statement to some and I have been confronted unpleasantly more often in the past year or two than in the past when I was rarely confronted except by the politely curious. Because of this wearing a skirt on the Frances during the summer rush of peregrinos will likely cause no problem. In contrast, a man wearing a skirt on less traveled routes ”off-season” may encounter some unpleasant (but probably not threatening) responses. As a result you may want to carry a pair of pants as a backup. I have always traveled the Camino as a pilgrimage and as such the goodwill and help of others is always essential and focusing on my inner life not outer conflicts is a part of that.
 
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Reading a blog recently - one of the hikers was talking about his use of mens hiking skirts. When he listed the advantages they seemed really interesting.

I wonder if any men on the forum have used these (and I am conscious that a Kilt may fall into the category)

With a SJPP start next week and the talk of 35 degrees heatwave - the idea seems attractive and somewhat cooler when walking...

Cheers

Mick

We are walking Le Puys now, 32-33 temps crazy!

My wife has been trying to stay cool and cover her legs, sun relentless out here.

She developed heat rash as did many hikers..
Today we discussed skirts, kilts, saris whatever and thought the idea was brilliant

When she gets home my wife is going to make one or buy one but either way we’re going to be getting them

Right now as we melt, to hell with convention and on the Camino you see it all…oh and we walk with sun umbrellas and we are the talk of the trail ! People take our pics

All this to say - get a skirt!
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
There is a Czech currently walking the Frances in a kilt. He wears 6-8” Lycra underwear underneath it. He seems very happy with the combination.
 
Reading a blog recently - one of the hikers was talking about his use of mens hiking skirts. When he listed the advantages they seemed really interesting.

I wonder if any men on the forum have used these (and I am conscious that a Kilt may fall into the category)

With a SJPP start next week and the talk of 35 degrees heatwave - the idea seems attractive and somewhat cooler when walking...

Cheers

Mick

I wore rain hiking skirt instead of rain pants once and almost got hyperthermia. I won't try that again.
 
I have often worn kilts and skirts (more often skirts because they are lighter to carry) hiking in various places across the world for about 15 years with little comment or problem. Once I overcame the mental barrier to wearing them (which took about 6 months) and embraced them not as women’s clothes but my clothes, it was easy. Skirts are comfortable and light, easier to wash, and last longer than pants. And I have traveled without a pair of pants in my pack. On pilgrimage I also like a skirt makes a small statement that I’m different.

Wearing a kilt will not create any problems, particularly in Galicia. That said, in my experience society regards skirts as different than kilts. In today’s divided culture a man wearing a skirt can seem like a political statement to some and I have been confronted unpleasantly more often in the past year or two than in the past when I was rarely confronted except by the politely curious. Because of this wearing a skirt on the Frances during the summer rush of peregrinos will likely cause no problem. In contrast, a man wearing a skirt on less traveled routes ”off-season” may encounter some unpleasant (but probably not threatening) responses. As a result you may want to carry a pair of pants as a backup. I have always traveled the Camino as a pilgrimage and as such the goodwill and help of others is always essential and focusing on my inner life not outer conflicts is a part of that.
thanks a lot for that. mick
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Macabi Skirt
This might be what you're looking for. In September I walked from Irún to Llanes cut through the the Picos on the Lebaniego to León and then to Santiago. 90% of my walk was in this Macabi Skirt. Hopefully when I go back to walk the Camino Primitivo I might bring a pair of shorts. This thing takes the place of all for me, even plane trip to and from.
C3C9251E-B3AB-4C6F-A0FF-394B20CBF0ED.jpeg
 
Macabi Skirt
This might be what you're looking for. In September I walked from Irún to Llanes cut through the the Picos on the Lebaniego to León and then to Santiago. 90% of my walk was in this Macabi Skirt. Hopefully when I go back to walk the Camino Primitivo I might bring a pair of shorts. This thing takes the place of all for me, even plane trip to and from.
View attachment 125902
Yes - I love Macabi skirts
 
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...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
The wonderful Mandy at Purple Rain Adventure Skirts also makes kilts for guys and girls, with a wide yoga waist band and very handy pockets. I have a few of the skirts and *love* them for camino walking, so practical and cool!
I love Purple Rain! I bought one of their skirts earlier this year and am eagerly awaiting the arrival of one of their dresses. Super comfy, incredibly lightweight and POCKETS!!! I can't wait to wear them on the trail next year!
 
I won't be wearing it to walk in anything over 20º

Tongue in cheek: the chances of getting over 20º in York would be quite low?

More seriously.

I have real kilts. In my view they are not suitable for walking. The maintenance after a days walk is not to be complicated. Dry cleaning is the only method I can think of.

On the other hand, I have worn a "sports" kilt for all my training and real walks since 2015. The advantages include:
  • relatively light - just over 500 grams
  • washing machine or hand wash
  • polyester wool, so dries over night
  • hook and loop (velcro) fasteners - so no issues at check in security
  • good sized pocket on each side
  • conversation starter
  • calls of Ecosse (or similar) to be properly acknowledged
What's not to like

Kia kaha (take care, be strong)
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I've worn a rain skirt (kilt) for a number of years, I can't stand waterproof trousers. The beauty of a rain skirt is that I can put it on, or take it off in about 20 seconds. I bought mine from Amazon, for less than £10. In order for it to work well, you need your preferred waterproof jacket, your rain skirt and waterproof gaiters, the rain falls to the ground like tiles on a roof. In my case my wife's friend sewed a 6" extension to the hem, it now works even better.
 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
We are walking Le Puys now, 32-33 temps crazy!

My wife has been trying to stay cool and cover her legs, sun relentless out here.

She developed heat rash as did many hikers..
Today we discussed skirts, kilts, saris whatever and thought the idea was brilliant

When she gets home my wife is going to make one or buy one but either way we’re going to be getting them

Right now as we melt, to hell with convention and on the Camino you see it all…oh and we walk with sun umbrellas and we are the talk of the trail ! People take our pics

All this to say - get a skirt!
Can I start by saying, I just love this particular thread! I cannot remember seeing any men wearing kilts or skirts on my 2 (so far) pilgrimages, but it would have made me happy if I had.
Now, for the specific, I have never walked (pilgrimage) in anything other than a skirt. You can see most of my first one in my profile photo there on the left. I bought that one from a hiking shop here in Adelaide in 2018 and liked it so much, I ordered a second one from the US makers before starting on my Arles pilgrimage last year. Tell your wife to look for the Running Skirts website, if I were more alert I'd attach a link, but she'll find it (if not, pm me and I will find the info). Comfortable, good pockets, easy to wash, quick to dry. *EDIT* I acknowledge that I am responding as a woman, to a man's query, so I will just add that I am supportive of skirt-wearing by pilgrims, regardless of gender! If I can find the link, I will edit again to add the Running Skirts info. Who knows, perhaps they also make men's gear!
** https://runningskirts.com/ **
 
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I've worn a rain skirt (kilt) for a number of years, I can't stand waterproof trousers. The beauty of a rain skirt is that I can put it on, or take it off in about 20 seconds. I bought mine from Amazon, for less than £10. In order for it to work well, you need your preferred waterproof jacket, your rain skirt and waterproof gaiters, the rain falls to the ground like tiles on a roof. In my case my wife's friend sewed a 6" extension to the hem, it now works even better.
I brought my first of Amazon out of curiosity now have a ULA rain kilt from the states which for me is even easier than the original to use.
From March to November i wear my Columbia shorts which has 7 pockets (i don't wear the same pair for 9 months 🤣 ) or until temp drops below about 10C. The kilt fits in the leg pocket when not in use here.

When raining i wear it into shops or supermarkets and as yet no comments from anybody.
I think my only concern with a REAL kilt would be it's ability to match the pockets i already have!

Regarding the kilt effect on how your viewed as a male in a skirt/kilt!

With my size twelve Hoka Stinsons in bright blue with thick yellow soles ,my bright yellow Haglof rain jacket, rain kilt and a silver umbrella walking through town looking like Ronald McDonald on steroids.🤣
I cant see it would make much difference in how i was perceived if i wore a kilt!!
Buen Camino
Woody
 
These are a very good option for those who are interested

Thanks @Paul Wilson.

I note they have the "normal" look.

By which I mean they have the usual fasteners, including metal buckles.

In my experience, those side buckles usually get me unwanted (and unwarranted) particular extra attention at airport security checks.

Kia kaha (take care, be strong)
 
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I think my only concern with a REAL kilt would be it's ability to match the pockets i already have!

I have two kilts.

1) Real kilt from the tailors in Buchanan Street, Glasgow with metal buckles and no pockets. Real wool. With all the pleats quite heavy. But warm on cold days and inbuilt air conditioning with higher temperatures. This is for high days and holy days and everyday wear from time to time. See post #33 above for the attention metal buckles bring.

2) Active kilt from an US website. This has hook and loop (Velcro) fasteners and a pocket in the usual place on each hip. Easy maintenance: machine wash and dries quite quickly. The pleats are permanent - a very occasional warm iron. W

But no, my active kilt wont match your seven pockets.

Kia kaha
 
but it would have made me happy if I had.

I can't give any specific dates, but ....

I am actively planning to return to my Via Francigena in mid September and hope to be striding around Lac Leman later that month.

Can I suggest you make camp at Parc de Vernex just before Montreux for as long as it takes!!

Kia kaha, kia māia, kia mana'wa'nui (take care, be strong, patient and confident)
 
I can't give any specific dates, but ....

I am actively planning to return to my Via Francigena in mid September and hope to be striding around Lac Leman later that month.

Can I suggest you make camp at Parc de Vernex just before Montreux for as long as it takes!!

Kia kaha, kia māia, kia mana'wa'nui (take care, be strong, patient and confident)
Oh, such temptation! Man in kilt in Swiss setting....
But, I will have to be patient and wait for another opportunity, at another time, perhaps my longed-for return visit to NZ....
But, also, just in case, I am actively planning my own return, to resume the Chemin d'Arles, possibly April 2024. I will keep an eye out 👀
Ka kite wawe koe (with apologies if I got that wrong).
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Can I start by saying, I just love this particular thread! I cannot remember seeing any men wearing kilts or skirts on my 2 (so far) pilgrimages, but it would have made me happy if I had.
Will this count? Today Ivar posted a video that included a walk to the new Casa Ivar. Here it is, set for 3m30s in.

 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
I would happily hike with a kilt, but not a wool kilt (allergic to wool). I think going commando is a requirement. I do in shorts. Learnt that lesson on my first camino. Had rashes in places you don't want rashes after 3 days of walking with underwear, in 30C temps. Got rid of said underwear and the rashes disappeared.

Off to research, non-wool kilts (again). :)
 
I use a woollen shawl. 90x180 cms. Usually a bright obvious tartan, to create the appearance of the kilt, to the unknowing. Stylish and versatile.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Off to research, non-wool kilts (again). :)
The American kilt makers USAkilts use a teflon treated polyviscose fabric for their two most inexpensive kilts (they also make 5 and 8 yard wool kilts). Polyviscose is a blend of polyester and viscose (a.k.a. rayon in the US). They say it is terrific for wearing in pubs because of its stain resistance and machine washability. They also say that it is good for hiking, especially in summer, due to its lightness. They've mentioned that their casual kilt with velcro closure, if made to hang at the hips, is best for hiking because you won't have the extra fabric holding in heat like with their high waisted traditional kilt in the PV fabric.

To find similar kilts near you search the internet for polyviscose tartan fabric kilts.

USAkilts imports the PV fabric from the UK, I think from Marton Mills. Besides using it in their own products they resell the PV to the American market.


BTW, the guys at USAkilts have low regard for 100% acrylic kilts.

In this video they show differences between PV and wool, the feel, sheen, weight, how it affects sett size, how the weave looks and probably a few more things I've forgotten.

YouTube video id: tOjjICppXow
 
After a chat with my mother it seems our family can use Stewart (mothers side) or Black Watch (fathers side) tartan. So I had a look for PV kilts in those patterns and there are a few places that stock them over here. One for the future. :)
 
After a chat with my mother it seems our family can use Stewart (mothers side) or Black Watch (fathers side) tartan. So I had a look for PV kilts in those patterns and there are a few places that stock them over here. One for the future. :)
Stewart of Appin is lovely but I don't believe it is available in PV.

Black Watch was a Campbell tartan but when BW was formed about half were Campbells so the unit took it as theirs. The Duke of Argyll, head of the Campbell clan says the official clan tartan is Ancient Campbell though I really like Campbell Weathered (Black Watch Weathered). These three use the same pattern but with variant colors. These are available in PV.

Stewart of Appin:


 
...and ship it to Santiago for storage. You pick it up once in Santiago. Service offered by Casa Ivar (we use DHL for transportation).
I think my choices are pretty much these. But I probably won't go Black Watch.

One shop I looked at carries many different tartan designs, but none seem to exactly match the official designs. But I guess it's the difference between a £1000 kilt and a £60 kilt. My mother paid a crazy amount for hers, about 40 years ago. In modern money it would come to over £1000.

I also expect even within clan's there might be derivations of designs. So maybe some of these designs are actually authentic. But something for a different day. :)
 
I would happily hike with a kilt, but not a wool kilt (allergic to wool). I think going commando is a requirement. I do in shorts. Learnt that lesson on my first camino. Had rashes in places you don't want rashes after 3 days of walking with underwear, in 30C temps. Got rid of said underwear and the rashes disappeared.

Off to research, non-wool kilts (again). :)

As a single woman I must stop reading this thread here and now.

Happy skirts and shorts to you.
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
but not a wool kilt (allergic to wool)

My "real" kilt from Glasgow is real wool.

My walking kilt is polyester wool and does not pretend to be a real kilt either. For example:
  • has two side pockets (for handkerchiefs or mobile phone or ... )
  • uses hook and loop (Velcro or similar) fasteners (so no metal problem at check-in)
  • has nothing like the usual number of pleats
It is relatively light weight and does wash and dry easily.
It has not caused itches for me.
My father's family tartan (but not his mother's) is available as standard.

Mine is from SportKilt.com, was first used in 2015 and has walked over 8,000 km since then.

Bi làidir - Kia kaha - Be strong, take care
 
Reading a blog recently - one of the hikers was talking about his use of mens hiking skirts. When he listed the advantages they seemed really interesting.

I wonder if any men on the forum have used these (and I am conscious that a Kilt may fall into the category)

With a SJPP start next week and the talk of 35 degrees heatwave - the idea seems attractive and somewhat cooler when walking...

Cheers

Mick

I hiked the CDT last year 2022, and a lot of guys wore them and i asked them how good they were, THey all gave me the thumbs up, Never tried myself as i just hike in shorts
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Never tried [hiking skirts] myself as i just hike in shorts
One advantage that the skirt has over shorts is that to get more ventilation you can pull up the middle of the front hem and tuck it under the waist band. A quick tug restores modesty. Best used in deserts, forests and mountains; this is not recommended for caminos.
 

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I stopped in the pilgrim store Armería Castro.Deportes y Tienda del peregrino today, and they carry bags of wool to use on your feet. https://maps.app.goo.gl/Zb8fM4AK2qyCuGYt6?g_st=ac

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