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Hiking Trailer for a dog, advice

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
A crazy question, but does anyone know of a hiking trailer suitable for a dog? Do you know anyone who has done that?
I would love to take my dog with me on long walks, but she is only capable of walking a couple of hours at best, plus the roads can get too hot for her feet. I'd love to take a trailer that I can just pop her into when she gets tired.
She is 35 kgs.
 
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Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
A crazy question, but does anyone know of a hiking trailer suitable for a dog? Do you know anyone who has done that?
I would love to take my dog with me on long walks, but she is only capable of walking a couple of hours at best, plus the roads can get too hot for her feet. I'd love to take a trailer that I can just pop her into when she gets tired.
She is 35 kgs.
The problem is most albergues will under no circumstances allow a dog inside. Many of the cafes also don't allow dogs. In the summer, not a problem because there are lots of outdoor seating places, but in the fall and spring when it rains a lot this is an issue. There is also the issue of raingear for the dog, a portable bed, and carrying food for the dog. With all the stuff you will have to bring you'll need a trailer. Plus since the albergues won't have you, you will have to carry a tent and sleeping bag and small cooking kit to camp out. I witnessed several people being turned away because of dogs.
 

Andres Cano

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
April 9 - May 3 2018 on regular bicycle.
The problem is most albergues will under no circumstances allow a dog inside. Many of the cafes also don't allow dogs. In the summer, not a problem because there are lots of outdoor seating places, but in the fall and spring when it rains a lot this is an issue. There is also the issue of raingear for the dog, a portable bed, and carrying food for the dog. With all the stuff you will have to bring you'll need a trailer. Plus since the albergues won't have you, you will have to carry a tent and sleeping bag and small cooking kit to camp out. I witnessed several people being turned away because of dogs.
oh yeah, and the churches will NOT allow dogs.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
The problem is most albergues will under no circumstances allow a dog inside. Many of the cafes also don't allow dogs. In the summer, not a problem because there are lots of outdoor seating places, but in the fall and spring when it rains a lot this is an issue. There is also the issue of raingear for the dog, a portable bed, and carrying food for the dog. With all the stuff you will have to bring you'll need a trailer. Plus since the albergues won't have you, you will have to carry a tent and sleeping bag and small cooking kit to camp out. I witnessed several people being turned away because of dogs.
My dream is to walk the length of NZ, but I would really love to take my dog with me. It would require a tent/bivvy (we dont have anything that eats you here other than mozzies or sandflies). Its too much to ask of a dog to walk that distance, but I would miss her too much, so a trailer option would be great. I think it would take 3 months or so.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Wow..35kgs is 77 pounds. A big dog! Also a big load😬
Yes she is heavy, (she is the smaller of the two dogs - the other is 60 kgs and definitely out of the question) but years ago (when I was much younger) my father, a mechanical engineer by training, designed and made me a small trailer to tow behind my dirt bike. It was superbly balanced, very light, and had a unique universal type tow connection that allowed it to follow over all types of terrain independently without impacting on the bike steering, and had some fold up sides. I could pop a calf in it, or hay, and it wouldn't fall out. Mostly I used it on the farm.
It was so well balanced that it wasn't heavy to push around by hand even loaded. I was hoping to achieve that same sort of balance. I planned to put my pack in it when she was walking, and carry it when she needed a ride.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
The problem is most albergues will under no circumstances allow a dog inside. Many of the cafes also don't allow dogs. In the summer, not a problem because there are lots of outdoor seating places, but in the fall and spring when it rains a lot this is an issue. There is also the issue of raingear for the dog, a portable bed, and carrying food for the dog. With all the stuff you will have to bring you'll need a trailer. Plus since the albergues won't have you, you will have to carry a tent and sleeping bag and small cooking kit to camp out. I witnessed several people being turned away because of dogs.
Yes even if I could, I wouldn't think of taking a dog on a Camino. We walked with a woman who had 2 dogs who eventually had to return to Germany as it was just too difficult.

I dont think Id worry about a rain jacket if we walked through our summer months, if it does rain its quite refreshing, if its too bad we'd stay put for a day or two. Although she does look very cute in her rain jacket. Shes quite fluffy so she looks much smaller when her fur is flattened. But I would have a waterproof mattress for her in the trailer.
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2022
My dream is to walk the length of NZ, but I would really love to take my dog with me. It would require a tent/bivvy (we dont have anything that eats you here other than mozzies or sandflies). Its too much to ask of a dog to walk that distance, but I would miss her too much, so a trailer option would be great. I think it would take 3 months or so.
This is doable in NZ. Some parts of the Te Araroa trail require wading/swimming and narrow mountain trails. Provided you are prepared to be flexible then you could do the 2,000 klm trail.

Also some parts of the trail cross private land and so your dog would need to be under control in these circumstances.

By happenstance, I travelled alongside a woman biking with her dog along the Frances. She seemed to be finding enough albergues that would take her inside and the dog outside/in a shelter that she could manage.

Her dog was very well socialised. I am very sensitive to dogs as I was maulled by two Alsatians when I was 4 and hospitalised. Her dog was generally fine. The only issue that I had with it was that she tended to leave late and so would pass me on the trail. The dog ran on ahead and so I would be walking along in my own world, deep in thought when this dog would wiz passed me. Scaring the willies out of me, not because it was aggressive, it wasn't but because I wasn't expecting it.

I mentioned this to her one afternoon and the next day when they passed me the dog wasn't as far in front of her and she rang her bell to warm me that they were approaching. That was nice of her but I didn't see them again after that so I never got to thank her.

To be fair to your dog, you should include it in your training walks so that it can build its fitness.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
This is doable in NZ. Some parts of the Te Araroa trail require wading/swimming and narrow mountain trails. Provided you are prepared to be flexible then you could do the 2,000 klm trail.

Also some parts of the trail cross private land and so your dog would need to be under control in these circumstances.

By happenstance, I travelled alongside a woman biking with her dog along the Frances. She seemed to be finding enough albergues that would take her inside and the dog outside/in a shelter that she could manage.

Her dog was very well socialised. I am very sensitive to dogs as I was maulled by two Alsatians when I was 4 and hospitalised. Her dog was generally fine. The only issue that I had with it was that she tended to leave late and so would pass me on the trail. The dog ran on ahead and so I would be walking along in my own world, deep in thought when this dog would wiz passed me. Scaring the willies out of me, not because it was aggressive, it wasn't but because I wasn't expecting it.

I mentioned this to her one afternoon and the next day when they passed me the dog wasn't as far in front of her and she rang her bell to warm me that they were approaching. That was nice of her but I didn't see them again after that so I never got to thank her.

To be fair to your dog, you should include it in your training walks so that it can build its fitness.
I dont plan on following Te Araroa trail, I've walked lots of it already and I'll probably do some of the trail and some road. I wouldn't do the bush tracks, as I like looking up and not watching my feet. My aunt run the length of NZ back in the 90's, I will loosely follow her run trail. My husband will join periodically in a camper with our other dog and she can travel with them then. He is Plan B as well, if she doesnt like it. I'd probably do it in three stages as well.
I walk her daily, and have taken her with me on training walks for the Camino and other walks before so I know her limitations, and she is 7, not a young dog anymore. (I'm not young any more either but that is different) She doesnt run on ahead, she sticks with me, and in some areas would even need to be on a lead. My routine would be very different from a Camino in order to work to her natural schedule. We walk early while its cool, then I hope to pop her in a trailer for the next few hours and tow her. Stop and let her sleep in the afternoon, then
walk again in the evening. She loves to walk with me but cant cope with long distances or the midday heat hence the need for a trailer.
Any ideas where to get one or have one made?
Obligatory pic of sleepy dog. Very friendly and social.
20161105_212139 (1).jpeg
 
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Year of past OR future Camino
2022
I dont plan on following Te Araroa trail, I've walked lots of it already and I'll probably do some of the trail and some road. I wouldn't do the bush tracks, as I like looking up and not watching my feet. My aunt run the length of NZ back in the 90's, I will loosely follow her run trail. My husband will join periodically in a camper with our other dog and she can travel with them then. He is Plan B as well, if she doesnt like it. I'd probably do it in three stages as well.
I walk her daily, and have taken her with me on training walks for the Camino and other walks before so I know her limitations, and she is 7, not a young dog anymore. (I'm not young any more either but that is different) She doesnt run on ahead, she sticks with me, and in some areas would even need to be on a lead. My routine would be very different from a Camino in order to work to her natural schedule. We walk early while its cool, then I hope to pop her in a trailer for the next few hours and tow her. Stop and let her sleep in the afternoon, then
walk again in the evening. She loves to walk with me but cant cope with long distances or the midday heat hence the need for a trailer.
Any ideas where to get one or have one made?
Obligatory pic of sleepy dog. Very friendly and social.
View attachment 89299
A quick Google failed to find anything in NZ but if you are handy with tools or know someone who is then you might be able to modify this bike trailer https://www.torpedo7.co.nz/products...sp3wuAttlgAVN7PPa2hoC2dIQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds
 
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Zordmot

First timer Spring 2019
Year of past OR future Camino
April-May 2019
A crazy question, but does anyone know of a hiking trailer suitable for a dog? Do you know anyone who has done that?
I would love to take my dog with me on long walks, but she is only capable of walking a couple of hours at best, plus the roads can get too hot for her feet. I'd love to take a trailer that I can just pop her into when she gets tired.
She is 35 kgs.
Hello Anamiri,
You ask a legitimate question. I’ve followed a couple of vlogs that might offer some insight. The first is of Efren Gonzalez who has documented his walking of several caminos. I pulled one at random here where he walked the Via Fracegena from Canterbury to Rome carrying all his gear in a trailer.

He alternates pushing it in front of him with attaching it to his hips and pulling it. I could imagine you having a pack in it: when the dog is walking the pack is in the trailer. When the dog is in it, the pack goes on your back.

The other is a guy that bicycle toured from LA all through Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras to Costa Rica with his Aussie cattle dog alternately walking beside or in the Bob Trailer he was towing. Maybe Bob makes a walking trailer? There are jogging trailers where I see Moms out for a run pushing a trailer with her kids inside. Check running sites and stores catering to runners.

My friend with the Aussie cattle dog had booties for the feet of his dog.

Keep in touch! Tell us how it goes! You can do this!!
 

Rick of Rick and Peg

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
Depending on where and when you walk you should consider having a collapsible wire kennel that fits on the trailer. With a waterproof cover this can serve as a nightly shelter and also as a place to keep your things pilfer-free.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
In The Netherlands we have special dog trailers that attach to the back of a bike. Some people just buy one for children (yeah, in Holland everyone bikes) and take out the belts to use for a dog. There are many of the latter around on the second hand market and so are much cheaper. The former or later could be adjusted to attach to a belt I bet but I sure would not want to be pulling such a heavy dog. I thought of something of the sort for mine to use on a bicycle but she is a mini Australian Labradoodle and only weighs 8 kilos. I walk with her day in, day out for 14-16 km. She is now 1,5 and has done 20+ without a problem but I personally would not take her for more than 1 or 2 weeks. This comes from experience walking the Norte with a previous dog who was about the same size. I found it too much of a hassle due the daily planning as NO ALBERGUE accepted a dog so we stayed in hostales. Most pilgrims I've met with dogs sleep in tents. But you want to walk in NZ so that another story.

There are special boots for dogs to protect the paws. I've never tried them as we walked part of the Norte in October and I haven't needed them for my current dog. Last February I was a hospitalera along the Via de la Plata and a Germany woman stayed with us. She walked the entire Plata with her miniature schnauzer. We kept in touch and she did fine with his little boots.

I don't know if any of this helps but I would think twice given your dogs size. Good luck!
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VFnS (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VdT (ToDo)
Depending on where and when you walk you should consider having a collapsible wire kennel that fits on the trailer. With a waterproof cover this can serve as a nightly shelter and also as a place to keep your things pilfer-free.

You've got e-Cars, e-Bikes and now e-Prams. Perhaps in a few years time there will be an e-Kennel.
Cybex-epriam-News-MAIN-960x480.jpg
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
In The Netherlands we have special dog trailers that attach to the back of a bike. Some people just buy one for children (yeah, in Holland everyone bikes) and take out the belts to use for a dog. There are many of the latter around on the second hand market and so are much cheaper. The former or later could be adjusted to attach to a belt I bet but I sure would not want to be pulling such a heavy dog. I thought of something of the sort for mine to use on a bicycle but she is a mini Australian Labradoodle and only weighs 8 kilos. I walk with her day in, day out for 14-16 km. She is now 1,5 and has done 20+ without a problem but I personally would not take her for more than 1 or 2 weeks. This comes from experience walking the Norte with a previous dog who was about the same size. I found it too much of a hassle due the daily planning as NO ALBERGUE accepted a dog so we stayed in hostales. Most pilgrims I've met with dogs sleep in tents. But you want to walk in NZ so that another story.

There are special boots for dogs to protect the paws. I've never tried them as we walked part of the Norte in October and I haven't needed them for my current dog. Last February I was a hospitalera along the Via de la Plata and a Germany woman stayed with us. She walked the entire Plata with her miniature schnauzer. We kept in touch and she did fine with his little boots.

I don't know if any of this helps but I would think twice given your dogs size. Good luck!
I have tried boots on her before and she didnt like them, she just stands there and wont move. Maybe I just have to persevere and bribe her with treats. It would be better for her feet.
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Hello Anamiri,
You ask a legitimate question. I’ve followed a couple of vlogs that might offer some insight. The first is of Efren Gonzalez who has documented his walking of several caminos. I pulled one at random here where he walked the Via Fracegena from Canterbury to Rome carrying all his gear in a trailer.

He alternates pushing it in front of him with attaching it to his hips and pulling it. I could imagine you having a pack in it: when the dog is walking the pack is in the trailer. When the dog is in it, the pack goes on your back.

The other is a guy that bicycle toured from LA all through Mexico, Belize, Guatemala, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Honduras to Costa Rica with his Aussie cattle dog alternately walking beside or in the Bob Trailer he was towing. Maybe Bob makes a walking trailer? There are jogging trailers where I see Moms out for a run pushing a trailer with her kids inside. Check running sites and stores catering to runners.

My friend with the Aussie cattle dog had booties for the feet of his dog.

Keep in touch! Tell us how it goes! You can do this!!
Do you have a link to the guys videos? The one that towed the dog.
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
A quick Google failed to find anything in NZ but if you are handy with tools or know someone who is then you might be able to modify this bike tr
@Doughnut NZ got there before me, @Anamiri. Just to say I know somebody who successfully did this to tow an elderly Border Collie. But a border collie, who was probably less then half the weight of your gorgeous girl. Like @LTfit, I'm not sure how much fun it would be to pull 35 kilos up a hill.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Lycra tribe.
CF (2017/8), VF (2018/9), Old Way (2020), VFnS (2020), CP (rebooked) (2021), VdT (ToDo)
I'm not sure how much fun it would be to pull 35 kilos up a hill.

It will be more like 50kg as its dog (35kg), trailer (5kg), personal luggage (10kg)

When I bike, the load is somewhere between 35kg and 40kg so it is possible and have tacked the Cisa pass (1041m) on the Via Francigena. But doing it daily will take a toll. And I can confirm it is not fun.

From a practical viewpoint, some form of assistance such as an e-bike with a trailer would be possible. I have explored doing this for my own 30kg mutt. Total would be 65kg - 70kg for that option but totally possible with the power assist.
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
Well, this wasn't what I was thinking I would find when I opened the thread. I thought I'd find trailers that a dog could pull, saving us the trouble. :)
Yes would be a great idea, sadly not possible. Maybe the next dog, I'll be older then and might need it!
 

MinaKamina

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Jacobspad 2017
1608384609725.png
This is the Innopet Hercules, a pet stroller that will carry up to 50 kgs.
Some of these pet strollers can be adapted for pulling instead of pushing.
I would try them out first and see how this works on longer distances before considering adaptation.

Hiking trailers are made to sit easily on the hips, and big dogs need a flat and comfortable place to sit or lie down. It will be a challenge to combine these conflicting demands. I think it can be done once you find the right person for that job.

Perhaps @David has some ideas?
 
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Dandabika

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Completed GR65 (2016)
A crazy question, but does anyone know of a hiking trailer suitable for a dog? Do you know anyone who has done that?
I would love to take my dog with me on long walks, but she is only capable of walking a couple of hours at best, plus the roads can get too hot for her feet. I'd love to take a trailer that I can just pop her into when she gets tired.
She is 35 kgs.
I've completed the GR65 Compostelle, the Norte and Primitivo Caminos and the GR70 Stevenson Route. I had to camp out when I had no other options but I did stay at well over 120 albergues and gites. Roughly 75% of the alberque or gite managers had adopted dogs that had to be abandoned by their owners because the dogs had been seen and diagnosed by local vets and had been declared unable to go on. Many albergues or gites do not allow dogs, so that will severely limit your lodging options unless you plan to camp out. Be aware there are sections of the Caminos where a cart will not pass easily or not at all, especially after a rainfall. Happy trails to you !
 

Anamiri

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016, 2017, 2019 Camino Frances
View attachment 89453
This is the Innopet Hercules, a pet stroller that will carry up to 50 kgs.
Some of these pet strollers can be adapted for pulling instead of pushing.
I would try them out first and see how this works on longer distances before considering adaptation.

Hiking trailers are made to sit easily on the hips, and big dogs need a flat and comfortable place to sit or lie down. It will be a challenge to combine these conflicting demands. I think it can be done once you find the right person for that job.

Perhaps @David has some ideas?
That looks great, I watched the video, I think she would like that stroller. The reason I was hoping or a trailer is to have my arms free, but maybe I need to get over that, and push it instead.
 
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Ted Stek

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF, SJPDP-SdC (5-16) VDLP, Sevilla-SdC (9-16), CM/CF Madrid-SdC (4-18), CP, Lisbon-SdC (9-19)
Hello Everyone,

I actually trekked from my home in Southern California to Canada, four Caminos (Plata, Francis, Madrid & Portugues), and the length of New Zealand (3/19 - 5/19) with the Wheelie, a two wheel hiking cart. I had up to 85 pounds of weight in it when I was in the desert and needed to carry water.

On my treks to Canada and New Zealand I averaged about 70 to 75 pounds of weight as I camped most of the way. Most of my trekking was on roads, but on some trails as it was more difficult on soft surfaces.

I have also done some local treks for extended periods, and one time took our dog, a big corgi about 40 pounds. Trekking with dogs can be difficult because they are really not meant to cover the distances we can walk. On one occasion my dog developed sores on her pads and I had to unload my gear and put her in the Wheelie and carry her out the rest of the way. The weight was not a problem but I am not sure you could put a larger dog in the Wheelie? The company, Radical Designs, does make a conversion kit so it can carry a small child, and that may work? Radical Designs is in the Netherlands. They have been great in supporting me when I’ve had small issues with the Wheelie.

I had planned to trek across the United States this last March, from my home here in California to the east coast, approximately 2,500 to 3,000 miles, with the Wheelie, but had to cancel because of COVID.

I have a blog site with all the treks I’ve done, so you can send me a personal messages and I can give you the site.
 

Ted Stek

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF, SJPDP-SdC (5-16) VDLP, Sevilla-SdC (9-16), CM/CF Madrid-SdC (4-18), CP, Lisbon-SdC (9-19)
Sorry about those multiple photos, wasn’t easy to post on the website with my iPad.
 

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