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How can i take bus?

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#1
How can i take bus? I feel so tired and uncomfortable,want take a rest to the next stop. Want to know how to take bus? I am in Boadilla de camino now
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#2
How can i take bus? I feel so tired and uncomfortable,want take a rest to the next stop. Want to know how to take bus? I am in Boadilla de camino now
Boadilla is not the easiest place to take a bus.

If possible walk to Fromista from where there are more options of travelling further by train or bus.
From what I just saw in the internet, there are more buses back to Burgos then forward to Fromista and Leon.
 

domigee

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(x4), Fisterra/Muxía(x2), VdlP, Jerusalem, VF, Walsingham,
C inglés. 2019? Who knows! ;-)
#4
Hi! Why don’t you ask the hospitalero where you are staying? Maybe - maybe - they know someone from the village who is driving to the town tomorrow and could give you a lift? Just a thought.
Good luck.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#6
How can i take bus? I feel so tired and uncomfortable,want take a rest to the next stop. Want to know how to take bus? I am in Boadilla de camino now
Then rest -- stay put and don't move 'til you feel better.

I have no idea why so many people seem to think that fatigue=bus, rather than fatigue=stop, rest, and sleep 'til the fatigue goes away.
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#7
Then rest -- stay put and don't move 'til you feel better.

I have no idea why so many people seem to think that fatigue=bus, rather than fatigue=stop, rest, and sleep 'til the fatigue goes away.
I understand your thought @JabbaPapa . This would be my first choice too. But I also understand those who fly from far away to Spain to walk a Camino and have limited time.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte April (2019) possible Primitivo
#8
Then rest -- stay put and don't move 'til you feel better.

I have no idea why so many people seem to think that fatigue=bus, rather than fatigue=stop, rest, and sleep 'til the fatigue goes away.
I agree with you whole heartedly on the idea of rest days. I was just about to suggest the same by updating my last post until I read yours. I wonder if the OP intends to bus to a larger city then take a few days of rest as stated in the original post “want take a rest to the next stop.” I don’t rember that village and I am not sure how small it is and what services, amenities or facilities are available. In either case we hope the OP is able to continue. After a well deserved rest.
 

JabbaPapa

"True Pilgrim"
Camino(s) past & future
100 characters or fewer : see signature details
#9
I understand your thought @JabbaPapa . This would be my first choice too. But I also understand those who fly from far away to Spain to walk a Camino and have limited time.
Well, then if they have limited time, why try and start at SJPP ? That's something else I'll never understand ...

Start from as far away from Compostela as you can actually walk in the time that you have, including rest days and time for yourself at the end, there's nothing "magical" about Saint-Jean Pied de Port.

This also helps avoid turning your Camino into a torture instrument.
 
Camino(s) past & future
----
#10
Perhaps not the ideal thread to discuss fundamental questions and concentrate instead on offering practical help if possible. As you can see from messages and profile info, @Lito Wen is a first time pilgrim from South China who started a few days ago in Burgos and seems to have allowed for plenty of time.

It's November, there are not many pilgrims on the road and many albergues etc are closed.

Quite different from being on the Camino Frances in May or September or when you are on your umpteenth camino.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
#11
How can i take bus? I feel so tired and uncomfortable,want take a rest to the next stop. Want to know how to take bus? I am in Boadilla de camino now
Lito Wen: if you are staying at En El Camino in Boadilla, then you hospitalero Edoardo will surely help you. He is one of the most friendly hospitaleros on the Camino Francés.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues (April 2019)
#13
Well, then if they have limited time, why try and start at SJPP ? That's something else I'll never understand ...

Start from as far away from Compostela as you can actually walk in the time that you have, including rest days and time for yourself at the end, there's nothing "magical" about Saint-Jean Pied de Port.

This also helps avoid turning your Camino into a torture instrument.
it's ok to not understand, don't take it to heart
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April (2018)
Camino Del Norte April (2019) possible Primitivo
#14
It is tiny, there is a (lovely) church, the albergue and now the hotel run by the same family. That is it :)
Sounds charming thank you for the description, maybe I will make a point to look for it next time I walk the Frances again
 
Last edited:

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#16
Boadilla is not the easiest place to take a bus.

If possible walk to Fromista from where there are more options of travelling further by train or bus.
From what I just saw in the internet, there are more buses back to Burgos then forward to Fromista and Leon.
Thanks! i will go to Fromista first and see what should i do next
 

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#19
Then rest -- stay put and don't move 'til you feel better.

I have no idea why so many people seem to think that fatigue=bus, rather than fatigue=stop, rest, and sleep 'til the fatigue goes away.

Yes, just want get some rest now…but in boadilla de.camini i csn not get enough rest, the food is not good and sleeping bad. I will go to Fromista first and see the next move
 

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#21
Perhaps not the ideal thread to discuss fundamental questions and concentrate instead on offering practical help if possible. As you can see from messages and profile info, @Lito Wen is a first time pilgrim from South China who started a few days ago in Burgos and seems to have allowed for plenty of time.

It's November, there are not many pilgrims on the road and many albergues etc are closed.

Quite different from being on the Camino Frances in May or September or when you are on your umpteenth camino.

Thanks for understanding. It is my first to walk camino, and i didn't ready for many thing and my body say its tired now, maybe take few day rest will be good, but i will go to Fromista first.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2, El Norte incompleto
#23
Thank you for all of advices, i wll go to fromista first, take a day rest, and keep walking camino!
There is a fantastic albergue just 4 km after Fromista where you can have some privacy to get a really good rest - Albergue La Finca. Each bunk is like a tiny room! It's only 10 Euro, and the restaurant there is excellent! http://www.alberguelafinca.es/
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
#24
There is a fantastic albergue just 4 km after Fromista where you can have some privacy to get a really good rest - Albergue La Finca. Each bunk is like a tiny room! It's only 10 Euro, and the restaurant there is excellent! http://www.alberguelafinca.es/

Yes because the municipal in Fromista is adequate enough but not the best place to take a rest . And I hear some horrid stories about a very unfriendly owner of a private albergue in Fromista.
So @Lito Wen do follow up the advice from @trecile .
 
Camino(s) past & future
----
#28
It is my first to walk camino, and i didn't ready for many thing and my body say its tired now, maybe take few day rest will be good, but i will go to Fromista first.
Good to hear from you, @Lito Wen. I have very good memories of Fromista although some places may be closed now that it is November. There is a tourist information office right before you cross the canal. I didn't visit it but they may have good information for a rest day. There's a lovely church - San Martin - to visit, if you want to you can buy a small guide book in the church to learn about the meaning of the many tiny sculptures inside and outside. It is an excellent example of the medieval Romanesque style. There is an exhibition on the Camino in another church, I think, and a small museum in or close to a third church.

As already said, Fromista is a good place to take a train to a destination further along the Camino Frances if that is what you decide.

What do you do to find accommodation? Do you use the winter albergue list http://www.aprinca.com/alberguesinvierno/? I am not surprised that you stayed in the albergue Titas in Boadilla as it is the only one on the list. The albergue En el camino is closed in November, only their hotel is open. Surprisingly, La Finca in Poblacion del Campos is not on the winter albergue list but they are supposed to be open during the whole year.

It seems that you walked from Burgos to Boadillo in 3 days, as some guidebooks suggest. I chose to walk this distance in 4 days. You don't have to stop where the guidebooks suggest it. Walk shorter daily distances or walk short days before and after a long walking day. Don't hesitate to call a taxi if you feel it will benefit you greatly. Write down taxi numbers for the next day, they are often displayed on the wall in albergues and bars.

Ask local people and in particular those where you stay. They are usually helpful and knowledgeable. Of course, if they don't know much English and you don't know much Spanish, it can get a little difficult.

Buen camino!!!
 

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#29
Good to hear from you, @Lito Wen. I have very good memories of Fromista although some places may be closed now that it is November. There is a tourist information office right before you cross the canal. I didn't visit it but they may have good information for a rest day. There's a lovely church - San Martin - to visit, if you want to you can buy a small guide book in the church to learn about the meaning of the many tiny sculptures inside and outside. It is an excellent example of the medieval Romanesque style. There is an exhibition on the Camino in another church, I think, and a small museum in or close to a third church.

As already said, Fromista is a good place to take a train to a destination further along the Camino Frances if that is what you decide.

What do you do to find accommodation? Do you use the winter albergue list http://www.aprinca.com/alberguesinvierno/? I am not surprised that you stayed in the albergue Titas in Boadilla as it is the only one on the list. The albergue En el camino is closed in November, only their hotel is open. Surprisingly, La Finca in Poblacion del Campos is not on the winter albergue list but they are supposed to be open during the whole year.

It seems that you walked from Burgos to Boadillo in 3 days, as some guidebooks suggest. I chose to walk this distance in 4 days. You don't have to stop where the guidebooks suggest it. Walk shorter daily distances or walk short days before and after a long walking day. Don't hesitate to call a taxi if you feel it will benefit you greatly. Write down taxi numbers for the next day, they are often displayed on the wall in albergues and bars.

Ask local people and in particular those where you stay. They are usually helpful and knowledgeable. Of course, if they don't know much English and you don't know much Spanish, it can get a little difficult.

Buen camino!!!

Thank you very much!
I am in Fromista now, and live in very nice Albergue called Lux de Fromista, and enjoy the rest day
Hopefully i can have full energy and keep my Camino.
Gracia!
 

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#30
Too late now for @Lito Wen but perhaps a reader of this thread will make a note of it for next year. I had totally forgotten about it what with all the commemorations yesterday of the centenary of the Armistice, ie the end of the First World War on 11 Nov 1918, but the 11th of November is also the feast day of Saint Martin which used to be an important religious holiday and also an important day in the rural calendar; a mess was held in San Martín de Fromista yesterday which doesn't happen often as the church is more of an artistic treasure than a working church.

I don't know about local traditions but perhaps they still serve a Saint Martin's goose or Saint Martin's roast pork in the local restaurants? :)

No ideal😂just very tired and lie on my bed now
 
Camino(s) past & future
2014 Camino Frances
#32
Then rest -- stay put and don't move 'til you feel better.

I have no idea why so many people seem to think that fatigue=bus, rather than fatigue=stop, rest, and sleep 'til the fatigue goes away.
Hello,
Yes! You can ask the Hospitalero, also the Taxis are not bad, and the idea about Fromista is excellent! When we did Camino 4 years ago we only had 45 days, and where going by a book that promotes a 33 day Camino! By the way everyone is different! What takes someone 33 days may take someone else 50! Injuries come, sickness, weather, etc., etc., Don’t let anyone tell you how to walk your Camino, and what rules apply! Your Camino is your own, and you do it as you please! It is you journey and no one else! We had one day of heavy rain through one of the roughest mountain area, and decided to take a bus to the next city and avoid an injury! Well when we got to the bus station, there was about 20 peregrinos doing the same! All tha said! REST, Do what you must, enjoy your pilgrimage and “BUEN CAMINO!”
 

Lito Wen

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
08/11/2018-08/12/2018
#33
Hello,
Yes! You can ask the Hospitalero, also the Taxis are not bad, and the idea about Fromista is excellent! When we did Camino 4 years ago we only had 45 days, and where going by a book that promotes a 33 day Camino! By the way everyone is different! What takes someone 33 days may take someone else 50! Injuries come, sickness, weather, etc., etc., Don’t let anyone tell you how to walk your Camino, and what rules apply! Your Camino is your own, and you do it as you please! It is you journey and no one else! We had one day of heavy rain through one of the roughest mountain area, and decided to take a bus to the next city and avoid an injury! Well when we got to the bus station, there was about 20 peregrinos doing the same! All tha said! REST, Do what you must, enjoy your pilgrimage and “BUEN CAMINO!”
Thank u for ur encourage!
 

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