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Jacob Sheep & Jacob Apple & Jacob Butterfly

#1
Pilgrimage is of all people, faiths, sferes and ages - for hunters, gatherers and smorgasbordians:

The Jacob Sheep got its name from the bibel story about Jacob who was payed for his work in Labans herd with all the spotted sheep. * At work in Denmark making a 850 Km cycle route when dusk was already falling I suddenly said to my collegue that I saw a sheep with four horns. He said: 'Yess; you're right: it's getting late and we should stop. But we drove back and there she was in all her glory with two standing horns and two drooping and hanging rather loosely ones. Much later I saw a small herd in a recreational area in our province.

The Jacob Apple is also called Yellow Transparent or even Blanke (Blanche) Madeleine; now isn't that a beautiful coïncidence? It's an old race from Russia and it was grown in the 19th century in France. They are on sale again.

http://www.jacobsheep.freeserve.co.uk ; http://www.jacobschaap-rackaschaap.nl : The Jacobsheep was named after the biblical story of Jacob who earned the spotted sheep in Laban's herd. * Het Jacobschaap ontleent zijn naam aan het bijbelse verhaal over Jacob, die als loon voor zijn werken alle gevlekte schapen uit Labans kudde mocht afzonderen en behouden.
http://www.jabikspaad.nl/nl/actueel/schaap.html : http://photo.zootrotters.nl/thumbnails. ... up&cat=-15 : Jacobsschaap - Vierhoornschaap ( Ovis aries aries jacobs_four_horned ) Jacob's four-horned sheep

http://www.jabikspaad.nl/nl/actueel/appel.html ; http://www.skries.nl/Jabikspaad/Wandelt ... tappe1.htm ; http://www.adopteereenappelboom.nl/nieu ... uliV1.html : De meeste appels zijn pas in september rijp, maar Yellow is er altijd heel vroeg bij: hij wordt al in juli geoogst. Onze teler William Pouw in Schalkwijk teelt deze appels. Het is een enigszins doorschijnende bleekgroene of lichtgele appel met wit, sappig vruchtvlees. Hij is een oud ras, waarschijnlijk afkomstig uit Rusland, en werd in de 19e eeuw al in Frankrijk geteeld. Hij wordt ook wel St. Jacobsappel of Blanke Madeleine genoemd.
http://library.wur.nl/speccol/fruithof/ ... kst024.htm : many more beautiful names and countries mentioned!

http://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sint-jacobsvlinder : nice picture of a Sint-jacob's butterfly; I saw them in Portugal near the giant statue of Christ at Lisboa bridge. This Cinnabar moth (Tyria jacobaeae) and its worms live on the very, very poisonous ragwort (Senecio or Dutch Jacobskruiskruid). Cinnabar after vermilion, the colour of common ore of mercury. In Latin it was known as minium, meaning also "red lead" - a word probably borrowed from Iberian (cf. Basque armineá "cinnabar").
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnabar ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cinnabar_moth ; http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Senecio_jacobaea ; http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Tyria_jacobaeae

Later I found: http://seeds.eldoc.ub.rug.nl/root/Asteraceae/Jacobaea ; http://plants.usda.gov/java/profile?symbol=SEJA : stinking willy ; http://www.plantenvinder.net/plantenzoe ... /44850.htm : Polemonium jacobaea ´Richardsonii´
http://www.ideboda.nl/herbarium/composi ... kruid.html : Jacobaea vulgaris ssp. dunensis wonderful picture full of beautiful butterflies: These plants on the island of Texel (Holland) don't need ray-florets do draw the attention of insects, that's clear. A great many black-and-red 6-spot Burnets (Zygaena filipendulae) moved around on the flowers, but also other moths, butterflies and beetles. At first I thought above-mentioned were Cinnabar moths (Tyria jacobaeae), which was a logical idea because these have the same colours and their striped caterpillars feed on Common ragwort (Jacobaea vulgaris ssp. vulgaris) and other ragworts, e.g. Groundsel (Senecio vulgaris) but those of the 6-spot Burnet live on clover varieties, quite a different type of hostplant. This moth is very common in coastal areas with dunes, like on the island of Texel.
http://www.ideboda.nl/herbarium/composi ... kruid.html : The new classification of the plant genera at the end of 2005 has resulted in two instead of one genus in the Ragwort family, the old Senecio and the new Jacobaea, which used to be the species name of only Common Ragwort. Now Silver Ragwort also belongs to the genus Jacobaea because of its close genetic relationship with Common ragwort.
http://www.ideboda.nl/herbarium/composi ... uiden.html : Dutch Kruiskruid = Grijskruid = grijsaard = grey-haired old man > grey wort = Senecio = Senes = Senate = grey-haired old men.

http://www.jacobsapplepie.com/index.php?lang=eng
http://www.recipezaar.com/Jacobs-Pie-A- ... Pie-275755
* http://www.geocities.com/teflonivan/1Yakovproj.htm - white, brown and spotted sheep - From the chart above, it appears that in the long term, Ya'aqeiv would have received more sheep than Lovon. Though the sheep would not be white, if the esoteric goal then was for Lovon (white) to receive literally white gifts and payments. Similarly, according to any esoteric hidden meanings of the striped sticks, it stands to reason that Ya'aqeiv had to have the brown sheep.
 

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#3
Peter wrote: "afraid a lot of that doesn't work in English, Geert, as the Old Testament name Jacob is different from the New Testament James." Now there’s an interesting point, Peter, as you say in your site on wort that St James has given his name to many things.

Two of my King reviewers made a contribution on the subject under the title: “Ja’akov en Jacobus: is de naam een voorteken?” or in English referring to Nomen est Omen: "Is the name an omen?” If you like I could have it translated for you and perhaps some other pilgrims who might be interested.

My friends said in their introduction: “Een denkoefening over een mogelijk betekenisvolle toevalligheid (synchroniciteit) met betrekking tot de naamgeving van aartsvader Ja’akov (Jacob) en de apostel Jacobus (Major). (…) Binnen de joodse traditie is de naamgeving van een mens een belangrijke gebeurtenis.”

In my poor translation: “A mental exercise on a possibly significant coincidence (synchronism) concerning the naming of the patriarch Ja’akov (Jacob) and the apostle Jacobus (Major). (…) In jewish tradition the naming of a human being is an important occasion.”

For now I’ll leave it like this and ask my friends if they would like to take over and then I’ll let you know by PM.
 
#4
See the promised post on naming on miscellaneous-about-santiago/topic3794.html in Re: The Santiago Enigma-Ja’akov and Jacobus–is the name a sign? by PILGRIMSPLAZA on March 31st, 2008, 5:25 pm.

For this instance it proved too difficult for us to translate the old names to James wherever that is needed to make it proper now-adays English. We simply do not understand the system if there is any. See the picture of King James = IACOBUS REX in The Santiago Enigma by PILGRIMSPLAZA on March 21st, 2008, 6:00 pm. That brought some confusion overhere.

When and why did Jacob and/or Jacobus change into James and whodunnit? Cromwell? We hope the experts will lead us to a better understanding in this very fascinating matter. A next post on all different Jacobuses by my good pilgrim friend Henk Flinterman is being translated into English now and will follow asap.

25-09-08: Also see: 5a. How jewish Ja'akov became roman Jacobus and catholic James in The Santiago Enigma by PILGRIMSPLAZA on March 21st, 2008, 6:00 pm on post20649.html#p20649.
 

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#6
Yes, I found them all on the internet and more like Gemmez in Normandy and Jakkez in our region. Then I tried the digital Authorized King James Version but after these 3 characters jac... the green search window turned red, meaning that Jacob of Jacobus do not occur there. For some reason that came as a surprise and I started wondering 'why' which I seem to be doing a lot lately... :wink:
 
#7
& St.Jago flower & Narcissus Jacobeus & St.Jacob's Knight

St. Jago flower ~ Passiflora ~ Flor de las cinco ilagas
Red Lilies ~ Narcissus Jacobeus ~ sword/cross emblem of the St. Jacob Knights

http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/197 ... ummary.htm

Vallet 1608 (picture will follow -gb)
Because of the period and the channel through which many New World plants were carried to Europe, even the most unabashedly pagan flowers became associated with religious symbolism. The Red Lilies were thought to be reminiscent of the sword/cross emblem of the St. Jacob Knights, as was the very different Sprekelia formosissima, which Clusius also called Narcissus Jacobeus.
The garden of Cardinal Odoardo Farnese in Rome contained many exotic plants. These were illustrated by Pietro Castelli and described by Tobia Aldinus in Hortus Farnesianus of 1625. Several of the plants originated in the New World, including a Canadian Yucca, Mexican Agave, Morning Glory, Passiflora, Acacia and the Lilionarcissus rubeus indicus or Narcissus Jacobeus. Aldinus wrote:

Hort. Farn. (picture will follow -gb)
Lilionarcissus or Narcissolirion more appropriately designates this plant than the Tulip: its flowers are truly lily-shaped, and the root & leaf are those of a Narcissus. This is the bulb named "Narcissus Jacobeus" for its resemblance to the cross of the St. Jacob's Knight, but its flowers have a different appearance than the Narcissus Jacobeus of Clusius, which was beautifully depicted by Rubino in that book. The majestic appearance (of the cross) is not presented until the leaves and cylindrical scape have extended to a length of two palms, at which height the thin, membranaceous tunic opens and the quartet (of buds) becomes disposed in the form of a cross attached to a thick peduncle. The flowers bend downwards: the flowers themselves are divided into six striped petals, & red, but with the aspect of white lilies. Inside there are six long, whitish stamens with yellow anthers, in the middle is one stamen otherwise oblong, red and without appendage. Flowers remain on the plant more than 20 days. Usually two or three flowers emerge from leaves like those of the Sea Daffodil (Pancratium), or similar to the Daylily, but wider, greener and brighter, not very long, that persist until winter: in fact, the plants are not truly productive unless the foliage survives into the middle of the following winter. In the Brightest & Finest garden of Lord Tranquillus of Romaulis where the rarest of flowers receive the very best care, it produced a fifth bloom which was upright in the middle of the other four, giving a most pleasing appearance, deepest scarlet, which I have to mention.

http://www.geocities.com/RainForest/197 ... rnesia.htm

H o r t u s - F a r n e s i a n u s - D E L I L I O - N A R C I S S O - R V B E O - I N D I C O
By Tobia Aldinus — Lilionarcissus or Narcissolirion more appropriately designates this plant than the Tulip: its flowers are truly lily-shaped, and the root & leaf are those of a Narcissus. This is the bulb named "Narcissus Jacobeus" for its resemblance to the cross of the St. Jacob's Knight, but its flowers have a different appearance than the Narcissus Jacobeus of Clusius, which was beautifully depicted by Rubino in his book [Vallet's Le Jardin du trés Chrestien Henry IV]. The majestic appearance (of the cross) is not presented until the leaves and cylindrical scape have extended to a length of two palms, at which height the thin, membranaceous tunic opens and the quartet (of buds) becomes disposed in the form of a cross attached to a thick peduncle. The flowers bend downwards: the flowers themselves are divided into six furrowed petals, & red, but with the aspect of white lilies. Inside there are six long, whitish stamens with yellow anthers, in the middle is one stamen otherwtic appearance (of the cross) is not presented until the leaves and cylindrical scape have extended to a length of two palms, at which height the thin, membranaceous tunic opens and the quartet (of buds) becomes disposed in the form of a cross attached to a thick peduncle. The flowers bend downwards: the flowers themselves are divided into six furrowed petals, & red, but with the aspect of white lilies. Inside there are six long, whitish stamens with yellow anthers, in the middle is one stamen otherwise oblong, red and without appendage. Flowers remain on the plant more than 20 days. Usually two or three flowers emerge from leaves like those of the Sea Daffodil (Pancratium), or similar to the Daylily, but wider, greener and brighter, not very long, that persist until winter: in fact, the plants are not truly productive unless the foliage survives into the middle of the following winter. In the Brightest & Finest garden of Lord Tranquillus of Romaulis where the rarest of flowers receive the very best care, it produced a fifth bloom which was upright in the middle of the other four, giving a most pleasing appearance, deepest scarlet, which I have to mention. (picture will follow -gb)

A dictionary is a useful tool, but rarely adequate for translations. Any Latin expert who would like to correct the above translation will be most welcome. - The Hortus Farnesianus (1625), written by Tobia Aldinus and illustrated by Pietro Castelli, contains descriptions of rare plants growing in the garden of Cardinal Odoardo Farnese. Several of these plants are American in origin; the author mentions Canada, Mexico, Virgin Islands, Guatemala, Venezuela and Peru. Among the American rarities are the Jerusalem Artichoke, Morning Glory, Castor Bean, Acacia, Amaryllis and Passiflora. The last plant, he informs us, was known to the Spanish as "Flor de las cinco ilagas" (flower of the five wounds). Richard Ligon later knew it as the St. Jago flower. (picture will follow -gb)

I'm still searching for the almost forgotten connection between the sword/cross emblem of the St. Jacob Knights and the Galician lizard. I remember having read about it a long time ago. Anyone?

25-09-08: Also see: 5a. How jewish Ja'akov became roman Jacobus and catholic James in The Santiago Enigma by PILGRIMSPLAZA on March 21st, 2008, 6:00 pm on post20649.html#p20649.
 

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