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Jacobs Way (Jokobswege), Germany

stevelm1

Recovering Perigrino
Past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CP 2019, Jakobswege Germany 2022 or 23.
I am planning on walking a section or two of the many Camino's (Jakobswege) in Germany. Specifically trails along the Rhine and Mosel rivers. While I am doing a lot of research on my own I was wondering if anyone in this web community has some experience with these routes that they would like to share? I lived in Germany as a child (8-10, in Frankfurt, 1962-4) and fell in love with all the castles along the rivers. Having walked the CF (2015) and CP (2019) I would now would like to revisit some of those castles on foot and on a German Camino. Some of the castles have been turned into hotels and I hope to stay in one or two. I am curious if there are any hostels available on these routes? So far I have found only one guidebook for trails in this area and it is not Camino related (Walking the River Rhine Trail). Anyone know if there are others? With the state of things right now I suspect I will not be going until 2022-3. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. I wonder how you say Buen Camino alf Deutsch?
 
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Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
Hello fellow pilgrim!

For the Mosel-Camino there are several books available. Personally I would avoid that region because the devastating floods they had there lately. Not all infrastructure is repaired.

I plan to walk the CP (if flying is possible) or the Rhine-Trail (Rheinsteig) as alternative in Spring 2022.

Take it as it is meant: Guten Weg!

PS: if you want more Info: PM me.
 

kelleymac

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
March/April 2015, Late April 2016, Sept/Oct 2017, April 2019.
You might take a look at SYates posts on waking the Via Regia. They are from 2016 and so are pre-Covid, but I found them very detailed and interesting. I'm not sure how to link this but take a look at

Live Updates - Via Regia/Ecumenical Pilgrims Way (Germany).

 

stevelm1

Recovering Perigrino
Past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CP 2019, Jakobswege Germany 2022 or 23.
Hello fellow pilgrim!

For the Mosel-Camino there are several books available. Personally I would avoid that region because the devastating floods they had there lately. Not all infrastructure is repaired.

I plan to walk the CP (if flying is possible) or the Rhine-Trail (Rheinsteig) as alternative in Spring 2022.

Take it as it is meant: Guten Weg!

PS: if you want more Info: PM me.
Thanks for the advice. I will look for the books you mention and hope that by next year (or the next) that the Mosel river area will be recovered. However that is good advice to be aware of that I will certainly look more closely at before I go. Guten Weg!
 

stevelm1

Recovering Perigrino
Past OR future Camino
CF 2015, CP 2019, Jakobswege Germany 2022 or 23.
You might take a look at SYates posts on waking the Via Regia. They are from 2016 and so are pre-Covid, but I found them very detailed and interesting. I'm not sure how to link this but take a look at

Live Updates - Via Regia/Ecumenical Pilgrims Way (Germany).

I got right to her posts. I will certainly be reading them soon. Thanks.
 
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Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)

Marc S.

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
Since I discovered the Jakobswege in Germany, a whole new world has opened up for me as there are just so many possibilities. Do you know this website - it gives you an idea.

Some knowledge of German is probably necessary though for planning. (btw - there are many guidebooks on many different German ways, but they are all in German).

As far as pilgrim infrastructure goes, the Via Regia is your best choice. Many hostels along the way. If you have any questions about this route, I am happy to be of assistance.

In addition I also walked the Elisabethpfad (Eisenach - Marburg) - it is in fact the same route as the Jakobsweg. I am happy to say I slept in several castles. :) Wrote a little report on it - it is here: https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/elisabethpfad-eisenach-–-marburg.55924/

Guten Weg !
 
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I am planning on walking a section or two of the many Camino's (Jakobswege) in Germany. Specifically trails along the Rhine and Mosel rivers. While I am doing a lot of research on my own I was wondering if anyone in this web community has some experience with these routes that they would like to share? I lived in Germany as a child (8-10, in Frankfurt, 1962-4) and fell in love with all the castles along the rivers. Having walked the CF (2015) and CP (2019) I would now would like to revisit some of those castles on foot and on a German Camino. Some of the castles have been turned into hotels and I hope to stay in one or two. I am curious if there are any hostels available on these routes? So far I have found only one guidebook for trails in this area and it is not Camino related (Walking the River Rhine Trail). Anyone know if there are others? With the state of things right now I suspect I will not be going until 2022-3. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. I wonder how you say Buen Camino alf Deutsch?
I have just come back from Germany walking Jakobswege from Hof to Bayreuth and Erfurt via Coburg, Bamberg, Rothenburg Schwaebisch Hall to Murrhart. It was extremely solitary and very little pilgrim infrastructure or awareness. I got lost many times in the forest and really could have done with a phone app like map.me. It was also expensive. A lot of small hotels closed, difficult to get rooms at times. Some villages no longer had anywhere to have a meal or a beer. You really noticed the impact of covid. On several occasions my meal was bought at a butcher shop and consumed in a dismal room with a can of beer. I met another pilgrim on 4 occasions over 23 days, which was a highlight every time.
I have walked the Via Regia in 2014 snd it was fun, quite a few pilgrims, but seems to be a lot more solitary now and some of the cool places, like the Georgenboerse in Erfurt have closed.
I understand there is more pilgrim infrastructure on the Via Baltica from Swinemuende to Luebeck and the route south from Rostock.
I had planned the Mosel Camino, but the floods got in the way. There is route called the Lahnwanderweg which is meant to be amazing. Not sure if it was flooded. I plan to check this out for the future. Also looked into the Rheinsteig, but accommodation costs were huge. Germany has become expensive.
Have a look at the Jskobswege in Germany map. I'm not sure what to suggest, if you love castles.
 

mla1

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF (2000); St. Giles (2013); Le Puy-SJPP (2015); VDLP (2016); Mozárabe, Almeria to Granada (2018)
Thanks Gittiharre for your post. I had been planning on walking from Wurzburg or Bamberg to Strasbourg in Spring of 2020 and had been wondering if that would be an option for next spring. Hmmmm.

I wonder if some of the regional trails - promoted to tourists - would have better post-covid infrastructure than the jakobswegs?

In another thread someone posted very positively about this trail:

And here is an earlier thread about german routes:
 
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This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
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Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I wonder if some of the regional trails - promoted to tourists - would have better post-covid infrastructure than the jakobswegs?
If you want to cut the cost of accomodation, try the traditional route of the Rennsteig in the beautiful Thüringer Wald.
It's 160-170km long, the more rural accomodation is 15-25€ per night, dinner is cheap (most of the time under 10€), also. You will find many possibilities.
It runs from Hörschel (near Eisenach with the Wartburg) to Blankenstein near the Czech border.
You will see many castles. As far as I remember each odd year the main traffic runs from Hörschel to Blankenstein and in even years it's vice-versa.
You can do it in 6 more challenging stages or in up to 12 stages with some detours to scenic views or historic sites.
If you want, you can walk further on to Prague. It's well maintained and marked.

Good Info , but available only in German:

BC
Roland
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Thanks Gittiharre for your post. I had been planning on walking from Wurzburg or Bamberg to Strasbourg in Spring of 2020 and had been wondering if that would be an option for next spring. Hmmmm.

I wonder if some of the regional trails - promoted to tourists - would have better post-covid infrastructure than the jakobswegs?

In another thread someone posted very positively about this trail:

And here is an earlier thread about german routes:
Definitely. Also likely less concrete walking.
I read the Lahnwanderweg achieved prize as most neautiful trail in Germany. I wished, I had come across this before I set off.
Don't know any routes in the south.
I did walk the Malerweg which was spectacular, quite busy and accommodation books out months in advance.
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
@stevelm1 I haven't walked the Rhine and Mosel Camino yet, but am planning to do so next year and have already done a bit of research and planning. There are guide books available for both from "outdoor Verlag / Conrad Stein Verlag", the Rhine one is called "linksrheinischer Jakobsweg" and the Mosel one "Moselcamino". The guide books should be good, I've used the same publisher for other Caminos, like the via coloniensis and the way from Trier to Cluny before and was happy with them.

On both ways you will walk on top of the hills next to the river most of the time instead of down in the valley, so it will be a lot of up and down, but with very beautiful views down into the river valley, and castles and historic villages to explore :)

The path will be signed with yellow shells on blue ground, same everywhere in germany.

The Mosel valley is very touristic, so accomodation shouldn't be a problem. It is listed in the guide book also. Some dedicated pilgrim hostels ("pilgerherberge") do exist, but not many and they are not cheap, so you'll have to stay in pensions and hotels most of the time, unless you carry a tent (which I will - many good campsites along the way and much cheaper). This is the case for most German Caminos.

You can get a credential in Cologne and in Trier next to the cathedrals in the info centres.

If you need any help translating information from the guide books, feel free to pm me :)

Happy planning and Buen Camino!

Edit I: forgot to add, "Buen Camino" in German would be "guten Weg!"

Edit II: After a look into the guide book, it seems there are three pilgrim hostels on the Mosel Camino - in Alken (donation based), Traben-Trarbach (30 Euros for the bed), and in Klausen (18-33 for the bed). Prices seem to be between 25-35 Euros including breakfast in hostels and pensions, around 50-70 in hotels. Just to give a rough idea.
 
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good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
@gittiharre A bit off topic, but which time of year did you walk the Malerweg? I did not book at all. It was very busy, but only once we had to walk a few kms off track to have a bed, and it wasn't that much trouble, just a bit asking around and some phone calls. Met others who complained how difficult it was to find a bed, while we just showed up wherever and got along fine. Maybe we were just lucky? We walked in autumn. Bad weather and it was still very busy! Beautiful even in rain and fog! It's a spectacular route for sure.
 
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
@gittiharre A bit off topic, but which time of year did you walk the Malerweg? I did not book at all. It was very busy, but only once we had to walk a few kms off track to have a bed, and it wasn't that much trouble, just a bit asking around and some phone calls. Met others who complained how difficult it was to find a bed, while we just showed up wherever and got along fine. Maybe we were just lucky? We walked in autumn. Bad weather and it was still very busy! Beautiful even in rain and fog! It's a spectacular route for sure.
End of August/early September. It was busy!
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
If you want to cut the cost of accomodation, try the traditional route of the Rennsteig in the beautiful Thüringer Wald.
It's 160-170km long, the more rural accomodation is 15-25€ per night, dinner is cheap (most of the time under 10€), also. You will find many possibilities.
It runs from Hörschel (near Eisenach with the Wartburg) to Blankenstein near the Czech border.
You will see many castles. As far as I remember each odd year the main traffic runs from Hörschel to Blankenstein and in even years it's vice-versa.
You can do it in 6 more challenging stages or in up to 12 stages with some detours to scenic views or historic sites.
If you want, you can walk further on to Prague. It's well maintained and marked.

Good Info , but available only in German:

BC
Roland
I just walked from Erfurt south and for a couple of days the Jakobsweg coincided with the Rennsteig. It is no longer cheap in that part of Germany. Covid has changed things. Many accommodations have closed or are rented on a long term basis to migrant workers. In some places, it was a struggle to find a room. On one occasion, I had booked a room a few days earlier and when I arrived the Hotel was shut and noone answered the phone. I paid 40 to 45 Euros for basic rooms with bfast, sometimes without. Some accommodations were quite depressing.
I am still pleased I walked.
I looked at the Heidschnuckenweg and Rheinsteig, but accommodation costs were huge. Nothing under 80 to 120 Euros, single occupancy in July.
 

Old Bamboo

Member
Past OR future Camino
CF, Francigena, KumanoKodo,Benedetto, Iseji, Assisi, Kunisaki, Shikoku 88 (1~24), Kohechi,Dajia Mazu
I have just come back from Germany walking Jakobswege from Hof to Bayreuth and Erfurt via Coburg, Bamberg, Rothenburg Schwaebisch Hall to Murrhart. It was extremely solitary and very little pilgrim infrastructure or awareness. I got lost many times in the forest and really could have done with a phone app like map.me. It was also expensive. A lot of small hotels closed, difficult to get rooms at times. Some villages no longer had anywhere to have a meal or a beer. You really noticed the impact of covid. On several occasions my meal was bought at a butcher shop and consumed in a dismal room with a can of beer. I met another pilgrim on 4 occasions over 23 days, which was a highlight every time.
I have walked the Via Regia in 2014 snd it was fun, quite a few pilgrims, but seems to be a lot more solitary now and some of the cool places, like the Georgenboerse in Erfurt have closed.
I understand there is more pilgrim infrastructure on the Via Baltica from Swinemuende to Luebeck and the route south from Rostock.
I had planned the Mosel Camino, but the floods got in the way. There is route called the Lahnwanderweg which is meant to be amazing. Not sure if it was flooded. I plan to check this out for the future. Also looked into the Rheinsteig, but accommodation costs were huge. Germany has become expensive.
Have a look at the Jskobswege in Germany map. I'm not sure what to suggest, if you love castles.
I have longed to hike the Jakobsweg from Erfurt to Nuernberg on to Rothenburg for years, esp the area between Coburg and Rothenburg. I was a GI stationed in Nuernberg in the 1970's and travelled extensively in the northern Franconia area then. Do you have anything to share further on this route?
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
I have longed to hike the Jakobsweg from Erfurt to Nuernberg on to Rothenburg for years, esp the area between Coburg and Rothenburg. I was a GI stationed in Nuernberg in the 1970's and travelled extensively in the northern Franconia area then. Do you have anything to share further on

I have longed to hike the Jakobsweg from Erfurt to Nuernberg on to Rothenburg for years, esp the area between Coburg and Rothenburg. I was a GI stationed in Nuernberg in the 1970's and travelled extensively in the northern Franconia area then. Do you have anything to share further on this route?

This is a link to some pics. Not sure if it works.
There are a couple of guidebooks available, but I do suggest, you download map.me or komoot as signage is patchy and often no wifi or phone reception.
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
When you walk the Camino, and suddenly a pandemic appears
Create your own ad
€1,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
For someone looking for a not so expensive Jakobsweg during pandemic times, the via imperii section from Berlin to Leipzig might be interesting.

Not the most impressive landscape and mostly tiny villages you walk through, but still beautiful (if you liked the meseta, you'll probably like this, too). It is mostly flat and easy to walk, plus you get to see Lutherstadt Wittenberg. I slept in the tent most nights, but there were also inexpensive (for german standard) options along the way, and also some "Pilgerherbergen". Not everything was open in 2020 but enough. Others I met had no tent and it was apparently possible that way. Prices for a bed between 15-25 in the Pilgerherberge, some donativos also. Pensions/rooms 25-35. Hotels, especially in the cities, will of course be more expensive.

There's a good map of the route available that includes a guide book. Also, on the website of the st. James society for that region, there's a list with accomodation (updated 2021) that is easy to understand for non-german-speakers too, since it works with symbols. You can also download and print your own credential! And access to that route is easy, since Berlin and Leipzig both have good train and long distance bus connections. If you still have time, you can continue on the famous via regia from Leipzig on (I only walked to Naumburg, ran out of time).

It was a lovely pandemic Camino for me last year, even met other pilgrims, which isn't always the case in Germany!

https://www.brandenburger-jakobswege.de/rund-ums-pilgern/pilgerherbergen (scroll down and click on "Übersicht der Pilgerherbergen" for the accomodation list).
 
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Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
I just walked from Erfurt south and for a couple of days the Jakobsweg coincided with the Rennsteig. It is no longer cheap in that part of Germany. Covid has changed things. Many accommodations have closed or are rented on a long term basis to migrant workers.
Can't take that for true. My wive is born and raised in the Thüringer Wald and many places I've visited this year hadn't raised their prices. Some were closed forever, that's true.

In some places, it was a struggle to find a room. On one occasion, I had booked a room a few days earlier and when I arrived the Hotel was shut and noone answered the phone. I paid 40 to 45 Euros for basic rooms with bfast, sometimes without. Some accommodations were quite depressing.
That's true for allmost all of East-Germany. The less booked accomodations have difficulties generating enough profit to be renovated. Not far away I've booked a Hotel in a castle in northern Thuringia 5 years ago for 270€ per week, that's now 650€! But it was very good, top rooms, very cosy beds, super overwhelming breakfast, very friendly personel.
The Thuringian Forest is not as vacation-friendly as it could be. Most tourists just make day-trips to walk a stage or two of the Rennsteig.

I am still pleased I walked.
I looked at the Heidschnuckenweg and Rheinsteig, but accommodation costs were huge. Nothing under 80 to 120 Euros, single occupancy in July.
Yip that's true, too. For the Rheinsteig I planned with accomodation-prices around 50€ per night.
So I will walk in only 6 or 7 days, if possible at all.
 
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gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Can't take that for true. My wive is born and raised in the Thüringer Wald and many places I'v visited this year hadn't raised their prices. Some were closed forever, that's true.


That's true for allmost all of East-Germany. The less booked accomodations have difficulties generating enough profit to be renovated. Not far away I've booked a Hotel in a castle in northern Thuringia 5 years ago for 270€ per week, that's now 650€! But it was very good, top rooms, very cosy beds, super overwhelming breakfast, very friendly personel.
The Thuringian Forest is not as vacation-friendly as it could be. Most tourists just make days-trips to walk a stage or two of the Rennsteig.


Yip that's true, too. For the Rheinsteig I planned with accomodation-prices around 50€ per night.
So I will walk in only 6 or 7 days, if possible at all.
It is true. On the Via Regia a couple of years ago, my budget was about 35 Euros a day all up. There was a good splattering of pilgrim lodgings. A private room was 35 Euros, pilgrim accommodation 10 to 15 Euros.
This year, I paid 45 to 50 sometimes 70 or 80 Euros for rooms.
 

Marc S.

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Since 2012: CF, CdN, CP, Salvador, Aragones, Via Regia, Elisabethpfad, Jakobsweg NRW, Jakibspaad.
Perhaps I am going slightly off topic, but - as the topic of this thread was rather general anyway - I think it is worth adding the following.

For anyone considering walking the Via Regia, it is worth stressing that there is still a wide range of pilgrim lodgings available. The list of Herbergen is regularly kept up to date (see: https://www.oekumenischer-pilgerweg.de) As far as I can see, about 5 Herbergen are currently closed, which means that the majority is open. (some may have a lower capacity though)

As for the question: Have accomodation prices in Germany dramatically increased in general ? I did check on booking.com to check the prices of several hotels and pensions in various parts of Germany (where I stayed in 2017, 2018 and 2019). As far as I can see, prices are rather similar, at least I do not see a huge increase. It is worth mentioning that I walked off-season though (and will again this autumn) - maybe things are different during the summer.
 
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Roland49

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2019
As for the question: Have accomodation prices in Germany dramatically increased in general ? I did check on booking.com to check the prices of several hotels and pensions in various parts of Germany (where I stayed in 2017, 2018 and 2019). As far as I can see, prices are rather similar, at least I do not see a huge increase. It is worth mentioning that I walked off-season though (and will again this autumn) - maybe things are different during the summer.
As you see here:

You can manage to get a stay for 20€ per night on the Rennsteig in Hotels or Pensions. Yes, you have to book in advance. Yes, sometimes you have to walk a bit further or off trail. Almost all hotels welcome guests, especially Rennsteig-hikers, all year round.

In major cities or in massively touristical developed locations there was a rise in prices, b/c the hotels aren't allowed to rent out all rooms due to C19-regulations.

I have stayed in 2 different hotels before and after my walk over the Alps in the Allgäu this year, one was 55€ for a single-room, the other was 50€. Both in very touristical regions.
 
how to successfully prepare for your Camino
This book's focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared.
Rent a house in Santiago (1 month minimum)
300m from the cathedral and around the corner from the fresh food market in Santiago. Perfect place to tele commute from (1GB symmetrical connection).

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
Perhaps I am going slightly off topic, but - as the topic of this thread was rather general anyway - I think it is worth adding the following.

For anyone considering walking the Via Regia, it is worth stressing that there is still a wide range of pilgrim lodgings available. The list of Herbergen is regularly kept up to date (see: https://www.oekumenischer-pilgerweg.de) As far as I can see, about 5 Herbergen are currently closed, which means that the majority is open. (some may have a lower capacity though)

As for the question: Have accomodation prices in Germany dramatically increased in general ? I did check on booking.com to check the prices of several hotels and pensions in various parts of Germany (where I stayed in 2017, 2018 and 2019). As far as I can see, prices are rather similar, at least I do not see a huge increase. It is worth mentioning that I walked off-season though (and will again this autumn) - maybe things are different during the summer.
They are different during the summer holiday season and I previously only walked the Via Baltica and Via Regia, where pilgrim lodgings were plentiful, so my last route was a shock. Coburg for example was very pricey. I opted to walk through and not stay there.
It will be France/Spain for me again next time. Infinitely better value for money and a spirit of pilgrimage.
 

good_old_shoes

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Francés ('15, '19)
Via Coloniensis ('16)
Trier-Nancy + Le Puy-Fisterra ('17)
Aragonés ('18)
The problem is probably that there are not many pilgrims here in general, and even less that walk long tours. Official pilgrim hostels like in Spain make no sense on most routes, because there are not enough pilgrims. It's a loooong way to Santiago from here...

Most Germans walk Caminos in Germany only for a few days, or short ones (200-300km) for vacation, so many don't mind the higher cost of hotels and also seem to prefer a bit more luxury. A bit like the French hikers walking sections of the GR 65.

An explanation for the high cost, lack of pilgrim lodging and little pilgrim spirit on some routes compared to others, could also be that it really depends on the organisation of the region and the amount of effort that is done locally by individuals to create a Camino. In some regions/towns they promote it a lot, so there are places that offer pilgrim discount in hotels, have created stamps, many friends of the Camino who offer a place to stay (even if it's just a couch or a floor in the village's multi purpose room)... There you'll also find some pilgrim spirit and camino magic.

BUT, in some regions/places they probably just put the waymarking on and that's it. Nothing else. It's just another hiking path nobody knows about (sometimes apparently not even the local priest, but that's another story to tell at another time!).
 

gittiharre

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
CF Austria Czech Le Puy Geneva RLS V. Jacobi V. Regia V. Baltica/Scandinavica Porto Muxia
The problem is probably that there are not many pilgrims here in general, and even less that walk long tours. Official pilgrim hostels like in Spain make no sense on most routes, because there are not enough pilgrims. It's a loooong way to Santiago from here...

Most Germans walk Caminos in Germany only for a few days, or short ones (200-300km) for vacation, so many don't mind the higher cost of hotels and also seem to prefer a bit more luxury. A bit like the French hikers walking sections of the GR 65.

An explanation for the high cost, lack of pilgrim lodging and little pilgrim spirit on some routes compared to others, could also be that it really depends on the organisation of the region and the amount of effort that is done locally by individuals to create a Camino. In some regions/towns they promote it a lot, so there are places that offer pilgrim discount in hotels, have created stamps, many friends of the Camino who offer a place to stay (even if it's just a couch or a floor in the village's multi purpose room)... There you'll also find some pilgrim spirit and camino magic.

BUT, in some regions/places they probably just put the waymarking on and that's it. Nothing else. It's just another hiking path nobody knows about (sometimes apparently not even the local priest, but that's another story to tell at another time!).
Yes! There is a case for cooperation on a route between providers to offer a pilgrim oriented infrastructure, like on the Via Regia. I am sure people would then come. Rostock pilgrim albergue is overrun, as in that area, there is a cluster of pilgrim friendly accommodation, sense of welcome and way marking.
 

SusanH

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Walked 2014
I am planning on walking a section or two of the many Camino's (Jakobswege) in Germany. Specifically trails along the Rhine and Mosel rivers. While I am doing a lot of research on my own I was wondering if anyone in this web community has some experience with these routes that they would like to share? I lived in Germany as a child (8-10, in Frankfurt, 1962-4) and fell in love with all the castles along the rivers. Having walked the CF (2015) and CP (2019) I would now would like to revisit some of those castles on foot and on a German Camino. Some of the castles have been turned into hotels and I hope to stay in one or two. I am curious if there are any hostels available on these routes? So far I have found only one guidebook for trails in this area and it is not Camino related (Walking the River Rhine Trail). Anyone know if there are others? With the state of things right now I suspect I will not be going until 2022-3. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. I wonder how you say Buen Camino alf Deutsch?
 

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