A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Le Chemin d'Arles

lynbru

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2007), Le Puy to St Jean-Pied-de-Port (2011),Voie d'Arles/ Aragonese (2013)
Via Francengina (Italy, 2015)
#1
Could anyone tell me where I can find a profile of the route between Arles & Somport? ie heights of the various stages. We found this information very useful last year on the Le Puy route but I can't find anything on this one.
Thanks,
Bruce & Lynne
 

Advertisment

Camino(s) past & future
Frances, autumn/winter; 2004, 2005-2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015
#2
lynbru said:
Could anyone tell me where I can find a profile of the route between Arles & Somport? ie heights of the various stages. We found this information very useful last year on the Le Puy route but I can't find anything on this one.
Thanks,
Bruce & Lynne
Bruce and Lynne,

Here is one--http://www.chemins-compostelle.com/Images/Altitudes-VA.gif.

Taken from http://www.chemins-compostelle.com/Leschemins/leschemins.html.

Although in French the heights and profiles are self-explanatory.

Bon Chemin and Buen Camino!

Margaret
 

lynbru

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2007), Le Puy to St Jean-Pied-de-Port (2011),Voie d'Arles/ Aragonese (2013)
Via Francengina (Italy, 2015)
#3
Thanks Margaret,
It doesn't look too bad until the Col de Somport!
Regards,
Bruce & lynne
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#5
The Haute Languedoc is highly genereralized in that profile. It has some really hard sections, much tougher than crossing the Pyrenees from SJPP. The section crossing the Haute Languedoc is as tough a trail as I've seen on any chemin. West Virginia on steroids. Look it over in Google Earth. The Somport goes to a higher altitude but is just one long gradual climb.
 

Attachments


Advertisment

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#7
You can see the whole thing by going here:

http://pilgrim.peterrobins.co.uk/routes ... louse.html

scroll to the bottom, and click the middle view (view all) next to the base map you want. The IGN topo is quite nice.

Peter got them here I believe.

http://viatolosana.free.fr/vt_cartes.php

I'm not sure how to extract a .kmz or .gpx file out of those, but I suspect it can be done.

When we went we found them from another source, since vanished. I have the file but I think the files above are more up to date.

If you have trouble putting together the maps or GPS files you want send me a PM and we'll get it worked out.
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#8

Davroos

Active Member
#9
Hi

Yes, I found the same, but would like to convert them to a gpx format so I can place them onto a gps. Have tried a few converters, but when you unzip each file, it is saved as a kml file but the converters do not recognise them !!!

Thanks
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
#10
Try this (works for me)

----------Save the 36 .kml files

---------go to http://www.gpsvisualizer.com/convert_input

--------in output format click GPX

------upload the files (you can do several at one time)

Convert!

From here you'll get a .gpx file. I go straight into Garmin mapsource. I use copy;paste to put them all on one map, then use the track join tool to make one long track, then load that to the GPS. The GPS handles long tracks just fine, even Nice to Rome or the Great Divide Mountain bike route from Canada to Mexico.

That is a lot of info---let me know if you get stuck.

newf
 

Davroos

Active Member
#11
Yes I managed to convert but if you look at the file on a map, it shows some faults around Toulouse and above Pau, so it does look good, but it doesn't really show how far the distance is. Are you seeing a similar thing?
 
#13
Ride mapping sites like mapmyride and bikeroute toaster will let you input your route and will then produce a nice interactive profile, but only for roads, I don't think it works with trails. I have got a beauty, going from Saint Jean Pied de Port to Roncevalles - 25.5 kilometres rising from 170 metres to 1042 kilometres. I would attach it,but I don't know how.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#14
Old thread, but I’m tentatively planning this one starting around Sept 10. Break the news to me gently - how tough is this one? (Ice already walked from Oloron-Ste Marie to Jaca.
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
#15
I found the part between St Guilhem and Salvetat quite difficult. If you see a profile map you will know that you must walk close to 30 k every day and will be climbing and escending 700-100 k/day. The trail is sometimes very rocky, steep and slippery when wet. It is really beautiful and quiet.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#16
I kinda wish you hadn't told me that :) Oh well - it looks like that's about five stages/days. My German Rother Wanderfuehrer breaks a few of the stages down to shorter ones (not all though), and yep, it does say it can be slippery when wet. Hmmm. Are there bail out places (maybe to a road, or any gites or auberges) in a pinch along this five day stretch? Also, how's the rest of the Chemin? (Last year I joined the Chemin d'Arles in Oloron-Ste. Marie and found the stretch to Jaca via Col de Somport not bad at all (but the weather was perfect)....
 

frida1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances April 11-May 11 2014
#17
You can bail by either walking the road or finding a local or taxi to drive you. You need to carry food for the day. We met only 6-8 people before getting to Toulouse. Three were Americans who Ended up road walking and taxiing much of the route. All 5 is us are in our mid 60s and I’m sure for younger people it can be a bit easier. We had one very wet and foggy day where visibility was hampered. You need to have some experience, gps and/or good map for this.
The stretch from Oloron to Jaca is more even, less bad surface and better waymarked. All in all much less of a challenge.
 

lunna

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
frances; portugues, lisboa-muxia; norte + to bayonne; vdlp; chemin du puy to jaca via col de somport
#18
thanks for this!
 

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Pilgrims here right now

Advertisement

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 32 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 106 15.2%
  • May

    Votes: 172 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 51 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 14 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 201 28.8%
  • October

    Votes: 85 12.2%
  • November

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top