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Sudocrem vs Vaseline

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
Hi all,

I brought a small amount of Sudocrem in a little travel pot in my first aid kit on my last Camino but never thought of using it on my feet. After reading up on the forum here about Vaseline as a blister prevention method, I am wondering if Sudocrem might do as good a job as Vaseline as a foot lubricant?

The ingredients of both are as follows:

Vaseline = 100% petroleum jelly.

Sudocrem = % (w/w): Zinc Oxide, 15.25, Benzyl Alcohol 0.39, Benzyl Benzoate 1.01, Benzyl Cinnamate 0.15, Lanolin (Hypo-Allergenic) 4, Also contains: Purified Water, Liquid Paraffin, Paraffin Wax, Beeswax, Microcrystalline Wax, Sodium Benzoate, Linalyl Acetate, Propylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Butylated Hydroxyanisole, Sorbitan Sesquioleate, Lavender Fragrance

My logic here is that, while in gross amounts petroleum will glide over surfaces, both petroleum and paraffin act as moisture barriers for the skin and reduce friction. I only intend on using small amounts of either rubbed onto the skin because I don't want to spend hours every night trying to get the stuff out of my socks!

Does anyone have any experience of using Sudocrem on their feet over long distances or am I completely on the wrong track thinking that Sudocrem might be suitable?
 

Bradypus

Antediluvian
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
Very different products with different properties. Sudocrem is not a very useful lubricant in my experience and does not seem to be as effective as Vaseline to prevent chafing. However I find it more effective in treating chafed areas of skin and especially areas of fungal infection to which I am occasionally prone. I do not normally use either as a preventative on my feet and I rarely have trouble with blisters. I do occasionally use Sudocrem between my toes to relieve the itchy symptoms of athlete's foot if they occur or to apply to other chafed areas. I usually carry a small tub for that reason. Sometimes thinned a little with a few drops of tea tree oil which I also find useful as an anti-fungal agent.
 

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
Very different products with different properties. Sudocrem is not a very useful lubricant in my experience and does not seem to be as effective as Vaseline to prevent chafing. However I find it more effective in treating chafed areas of skin and especially areas of fungal infection to which I am occasionally prone. I do not normally use either as a preventative on my feet and I rarely have trouble with blisters. I do occasionally use Sudocrem between my toes to relieve the itchy symptoms of athlete's foot if they occur or to apply to other chafed areas. I usually carry a small tub for that reason. Sometimes thinned a little with a few drops of tea tree oil which I also find useful as an anti-fungal agent.
Thanks for your reply @Bradypus and agreed that they are very different products...I am just chancing my arm to see if I can extrapolate an extra few uses from a mini tub of Sudocrem to save me carrying a pot of Vasoline as well! It would be for blister prevention rather than chafing (thankfully that's never been an issue for me) I would be hoping to use it, so maybe it's not ideal for that purpose. I will be keeping it in my first aid kit for treating minor skin issues though.

What they do have in common is that they are both quite greasy to use and would be bothersome to wash out of socks if they built up so I do want to avoid that as well.

Cheers for the tip of adding some drops of tea tree oil, I might give that one a go.
 

Shazenalan

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2018
Hi - we used 100% aloe vera gel every night on our feet - cooling and moisturising. This along with Bridgedale Fusion socks, changed every lunchbreak, and ultralight boots meant zero blisters for us during Aug/September. I used old contact lense cases to carry small amounts of creams, pain killers etc, light weight and non leaking too.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Hi all,

I brought a small amount of Sudocrem in a little travel pot in my first aid kit on my last Camino but never thought of using it on my feet. After reading up on the forum here about Vaseline as a blister prevention method, I am wondering if Sudocrem might do as good a job as Vaseline as a foot lubricant?

The ingredients of both are as follows:

Vaseline = 100% petroleum jelly.

Sudocrem = % (w/w): Zinc Oxide, 15.25, Benzyl Alcohol 0.39, Benzyl Benzoate 1.01, Benzyl Cinnamate 0.15, Lanolin (Hypo-Allergenic) 4, Also contains: Purified Water, Liquid Paraffin, Paraffin Wax, Beeswax, Microcrystalline Wax, Sodium Benzoate, Linalyl Acetate, Propylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Butylated Hydroxyanisole, Sorbitan Sesquioleate, Lavender Fragrance

My logic here is that, while in gross amounts petroleum will glide over surfaces, both petroleum and paraffin act as moisture barriers for the skin and reduce friction. I only intend on using small amounts of either rubbed onto the skin because I don't want to spend hours every night trying to get the stuff out of my socks!

Does anyone have any experience of using Sudocrem on their feet over long distances or am I completely on the wrong track thinking that Sudocrem might be suitable?
Try one of the many antifriction products like Body Glide, that are not greasy like Vaseline.

https://www.bodyglide.com/
 

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
Try one of the many antifriction products like Body Glide, that are not greasy like Vaseline.

https://www.bodyglide.com/
Will probably end up going for BG alright. I just would prefer something more dual purpose because I have a rule that every item I carry has to have at least two uses! Edit: That said, a 30g stick of BG isn't too big of an investment weight-wise.
 

Lisanne

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning: camino Frances april/may 2019
As a doctor in a nursing home I prescribe both Vaseline and Sudocreme. Vaseline (or any other greasy thing): for dry skin. Sudocreme: for skinparts that are too moist. For example when there’s severe urine incontinence; or when someone has a moist wound ans surrounding (healthy) skin would become affected by the moist. It is the Zinc in Sudocreme that helps with the moist.
How to apply Sudocreme? A really really small amount padded on. Remover evere day, before applying new Sudocreme, by using oil.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hi all,

I brought a small amount of Sudocrem in a little travel pot in my first aid kit on my last Camino but never thought of using it on my feet. After reading up on the forum here about Vaseline as a blister prevention method, I am wondering if Sudocrem might do as good a job as Vaseline as a foot lubricant?

The ingredients of both are as follows:

Vaseline = 100% petroleum jelly.

Sudocrem = % (w/w): Zinc Oxide, 15.25, Benzyl Alcohol 0.39, Benzyl Benzoate 1.01, Benzyl Cinnamate 0.15, Lanolin (Hypo-Allergenic) 4, Also contains: Purified Water, Liquid Paraffin, Paraffin Wax, Beeswax, Microcrystalline Wax, Sodium Benzoate, Linalyl Acetate, Propylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Butylated Hydroxyanisole, Sorbitan Sesquioleate, Lavender Fragrance

My logic here is that, while in gross amounts petroleum will glide over surfaces, both petroleum and paraffin act as moisture barriers for the skin and reduce friction. I only intend on using small amounts of either rubbed onto the skin because I don't want to spend hours every night trying to get the stuff out of my socks!

Does anyone have any experience of using Sudocrem on their feet over long distances or am I completely on the wrong track thinking that Sudocrem might be suitable?

I have posted this before, and maybe it can be of help to you.

----------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

lt56ny

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2013-Frances SJP-Finisterre, 2015 Camino Le Puy-Santiago, 2017 Portugues Lisbon-Santiago 2018 Norte
I have posted this before, and maybe it can be of help to you.

----------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Davebugg, I have decided to do a semi-winter Camino. I will be doing the CF. I will start walking about October 28th. Wanted to do th VDLP but promised my wife I would be home for Christmas. I live in Puerto Vallarta so there aren't alot of choices for buying winter walking boots. But I will be in Ithaca, New York in July for my annual college reunion with the boys. This year marks our 47th year of friendship. Not as wild a gathering this year as say, 44 or 45 years ago. Anyway, do you think you could meet me in Ithaca about July 25 or so? Then we can pick out some light comfortable boots that I can wear. I am always tempted to wing it with my Brooks trail runners but I know that would probably be foolish. By some chance if you can't make it maybe you could recommend a few different brands. Remember light and really comfy. Please don't kill me on the price hahaha. But try to make it. We have fun.
 

daesdaemar

Camino-holic
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Ingles - twice
consider BodyGlide under Injinji liner sock then your walking/hiking socks.
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
I used on my Portugues Camino Vick voporub and my last one

Xenofit Deer Tallow Second Skin Sports Cream. Worked like a charm.
 

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
Thanks all. I am going to give rubbing a tiny amount of Sudocrem on at night a go because the stuff dries up completely by the morning. Starting out in the mornings, I might give BG a go (have decided against Vaseline) or else liners (I use them for day hikes but never on the Camino). For hot spots, I'm going to stick with zinc oxide tape which has worked for me in the past. Fingers crossed blisters will be minimal!
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Before you have full hot spots when it’s getting uncomfy I use paper tape and cover that spot.
 

Linda Fantillo

RiverWalker
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18
I swear by NOK. Lost it out of my pack on my way from Paris to Porto in September, couldn't find anything quite like it in Portugal and this Camino was the only time that I had an issue - a blister on my heel. In Canada, I get it at MEC, but probably could be bought on line.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Davebugg, I have decided to do a semi-winter Camino. I will be doing the CF. I will start walking about October 28th. Wanted to do th VDLP but promised my wife I would be home for Christmas. I live in Puerto Vallarta so there aren't alot of choices for buying winter walking boots. But I will be in Ithaca, New York in July for my annual college reunion with the boys. This year marks our 47th year of friendship. Not as wild a gathering this year as say, 44 or 45 years ago. Anyway, do you think you could meet me in Ithaca about July 25 or so? Then we can pick out some light comfortable boots that I can wear. I am always tempted to wing it with my Brooks trail runners but I know that would probably be foolish. By some chance if you can't make it maybe you could recommend a few different brands. Remember light and really comfy. Please don't kill me on the price hahaha. But try to make it. We have fun.
I really appreciate the invitation, but I live on the west coast side of the US in central Washington State, so it isn't in the cards to be able to join you :) .

I was on Camino Frances in the middle of November, and wore my Hoka Bondi 6 shoes with Smartwool Merino Phd light pad socks without any issues, if that helps give a comparison. Send me a PM and we can go over some options :)
 

marie Louise

New Member
Thanks for your reply @Bradypus and agreed that they are very different products...I am just chancing my arm to see if I can extrapolate an extra few uses from a mini tub of Sudocrem to save me carrying a pot of Vasoline as well! It would be for blister prevention rather than chafing (thankfully that's never been an issue for me) I would be hoping to use it, so maybe it's not ideal for that purpose. I will be keeping it in my first aid kit for treating minor skin issues though.

What they do have in common is that they are both quite greasy to use and would be bothersome to wash out of socks if they built up so I do want to avoid that as well.

Cheers for the tip of adding some drops of tea tree oil, I might give that one a go.
 

Carolethecatlover

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2018
I have posted this before, and maybe it can be of help to you.

----------------------------------------
Blisters are a product of friction.... often referred to as shear force friction. The skin of your foot, and the sock that is in contact with that area of skin, are sliding and rubbing together.

Strategies for the prevention of shear force friction and blisters have changed and matured over recent years.
  1. A properly fitting shoe. In brief, it needs to be long enough and wide enough to accommodate any insoles, orthotics, metatarsal pads, etc, PLUS the socks that you will be wearing, PLUS the increased pressure on the feet from wearing a loaded pack.
  2. Light padded Merino wool sock designed for walking or backpacking, or the same type of sock in a good synthetic blend. A heavy pad on a sock allows potentially more movement against the skin, takes longer to air out, and takes longer to dry when washed.
  3. A sock fit that is snug and form fitting to the foot, but not gangrene-inducing tight. You want the shear force to be between the sock and the interior of the shoe, not the sock and the skin. A snug fitting sock will help to make that happen.
  4. Allow the shoe to move over the sock a bit. By keeping the shoes a bit looser on the feet, the sock will take the brunt of the shear force. If a shoe is tied snug, then that forces the foot to move more in the sock, which means the sock and skin are absorbing the shear force. An exception occurs on long downhill grades; the shoes need to be tied tight enough to keep your toes from hitting the front of the shoe which can cause injury and trauma to the nail bed and toe joints.
  5. While there are foot lubricants, from Body Glide and Hiker's Goo to plain old vaseline, they have a fairly short viable working span as the material rubs off of the skin and is absorbed by the socks. For prophylactic protection from shear force friction to blister prone areas on the feet, a long lasting barrier is the better option. The placement of tapes, like Leukotape P, or moleskin-type products, if adhered correctly, will last the whole day.
  6. To apply tapes and moleskin type products,
    1. Clean off the area of application with a bit of alcohol to remove grease, dirt, and body oils. A bit of regular hand sanitizer works for this, in addition to hand cleansing.
    2. Cut a piece of your chosen barrier material to fit the area you want protected; be sure to cut rounded corners rather than square in order to help the material from rolling up away from the skin.
    3. Apply a thin smear of Tincture of Benzoin to the skin area where the adhesive will stick. This will increase the holding power of the tape or moleskin.
      1. If the tape or moleskin, etc. is going on top of a blistered area, avoid getting the Benzoin on the roof area of the blister, and add a thin coating of ointment/vaseline onto the blister roof, avoiding the surrounding skin area. This will allow removal of the product without hurting the blister wound.
    4. Place the barrier on the area, taking care to not handle the adhesive; spend a bit of time rubbing the material to create friction so that the adhesive will heat up and adhere more firmly.
    5. At the end of the day, remove the barrier and use some alcohol to wipe the area that was covered.
      1. Since fungus (athletes foot) and pathogens splash around in showers, shower shoes are not necessarily preventative to one's feet being exposed or infected. It is helpful to use an alcohol or astringent product applied to the feet after showering.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Are you a podiatrist too? This is just too detailed! But it is the BEST.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Are you a podiatrist too? This is just too detailed! But it is the BEST.
No. I have extensive backpacking experience and first aid care. I do have a background that includes studies and some clinical work around exercise physiology and performance. The blister prevention information, as well as my guideline on blister treatment, are also based on current literature and practice. This guide is not the only valid methodology, but what it includes is consistent with the much broader scope of care and prevention from other sources.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
The only issue that I have with adding lubricants to the bottoms of feet, like vaseline, Body Glide, etc, is that they can drastically interfere with adhering tapes and other hot-spot barriers to shear force friction. So if one wishes to use them, it is a good idea to use an alcohol based cleaner prior to putting on tape or moleskin, etc.

Since it is wise to carry a small bottle of hand sanitizer to use for toileting and before handling food, it can serve as a multitasker for cleaning skin in preparation for the application of blister prevention tapes as well.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
Thanks all. I am going to give rubbing a tiny amount of Sudocrem on at night a go because the stuff dries up completely by the morning. Starting out in the mornings, I might give BG a go (have decided against Vaseline) or else liners (I use them for day hikes but never on the Camino). For hot spots, I'm going to stick with zinc oxide tape which has worked for me in the past. Fingers crossed blisters will be minimal!
What will be the purpose of applying the Sudocreme?
 

tpmchugh

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2013)
Camino Frances (2015)
Hi all,

I brought a small amount of Sudocrem in a little travel pot in my first aid kit on my last Camino but never thought of using it on my feet. After reading up on the forum here about Vaseline as a blister prevention method, I am wondering if Sudocrem might do as good a job as Vaseline as a foot lubricant?

The ingredients of both are as follows:

Vaseline = 100% petroleum jelly.

Sudocrem = % (w/w): Zinc Oxide, 15.25, Benzyl Alcohol 0.39, Benzyl Benzoate 1.01, Benzyl Cinnamate 0.15, Lanolin (Hypo-Allergenic) 4, Also contains: Purified Water, Liquid Paraffin, Paraffin Wax, Beeswax, Microcrystalline Wax, Sodium Benzoate, Linalyl Acetate, Propylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Butylated Hydroxyanisole, Sorbitan Sesquioleate, Lavender Fragrance

My logic here is that, while in gross amounts petroleum will glide over surfaces, both petroleum and paraffin act as moisture barriers for the skin and reduce friction. I only intend on using small amounts of either rubbed onto the skin because I don't want to spend hours every night trying to get the stuff out of my socks!

Does anyone have any experience of using Sudocrem on their feet over long distances or am I completely on the wrong track thinking that Sudocrem might be suitable?
Never tried it but have used the pilgrim stuff sold along the camino, vaseline and vick. The pilgrim stuff while very good is expensive at €12 a jar. Vaseline believe it or not, I had problems sourcing it in places. Vick on the other hand is available in all farmacias and only half the price of the pilgrim ointment. Getting any of them out of your socks is no problem. Sudocrem on the other hand was not the easiest to wash out of towelling nappies. Yes I am old enough to remember those and changed many a dirty one. On the basis of my experiences with nappies, I would not recommend it. But anything is better than blisters. On the one occasion I got a blister I put compeed on it. Now there is a problem getting out of your socks if it comes off while walking
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
Davebugg, I have decided to do a semi-winter Camino. I will be doing the CF. I will start walking about October 28th. Wanted to do th VDLP but promised my wife I would be home for Christmas. I live in Puerto Vallarta so there aren't alot of choices for buying winter walking boots. But I will be in Ithaca, New York in July for my annual college reunion with the boys. This year marks our 47th year of friendship. Not as wild a gathering this year as say, 44 or 45 years ago. Anyway, do you think you could meet me in Ithaca about July 25 or so? Then we can pick out some light comfortable boots that I can wear. I am always tempted to wing it with my Brooks trail runners but I know that would probably be foolish. By some chance if you can't make it maybe you could recommend a few different brands. Remember light and really comfy. Please don't kill me on the price hahaha. But try to make it. We have fun.
Hi
I sent you a pm re brooks
 

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
What will be the purpose of applying the Sudocreme?
I use it as a general purpose skin ointment; it's great for cuts, sunburn, pimples and irritated skin. It's also an antiseptic, so helps prevent infection where there's minor breaks in the epithelium. From what people are suggesting here, it probably won't be a suitable replacement for a lubricant if I opt to use one. However, I might use it at night to promote healing.
 

CiaraC

Aspiring hikiatrist
Camino(s) past & future
Afife to SDC (June 2016)
SJPdP to Melide (May/June 2018)
SJPdP to SDC to Fisterra (May/June 2019)
Okay, but what specifically? Blisters?
Blisters possibly, but I usually leave them alone to heal (after draining using aseptic technique) and put a layer of zinc oxide tape on top to stop any more friction rubbing against them.
 

Lydia Gillen

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2007/8/9 2011 (C.F 2015)
I have no 'official qualifications' except my own personal experience. I have been walking the Camino every year with one exception since 2007. In the early years, in spite of following all sorts of advice I always got at least one blister. I then thought the whole thing through and decided; that on the Camino my feet got hot and sweaty, therefore my skin got damp and soft and then I got blisters. So could I prevent the sweat?? . I realised that I used underarm antiperspirant and it worked well under my arms, so I tried it on my feet and since then no more blisters. I use a stick antiperspirant like Mitchum and I rub it well in and between the toes. Maybe it could work for others too.
 

Flig

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Primitivo (2020)
I realised that I used underarm antiperspirant and it worked well under my arms, so I tried it on my feet and since then no more blisters
I do the same thing! Works well for me. I use a solid antiperspirant and it reduces friction as well, a bit like a body glide. Of course I have to toughen my feet up first, I always get blisters if I shoot off on a 20k jaunt with a backpack when I haven’t trained or done any strenuous walking for a few years.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
As an aside, re petroleum jelly. In the uk we have had some cases - all females - who have covered their whole bodies with it and then it has rubbed onto their nightgown - an accident with fire has set light to their nightgown and they have quickly gone up like torches and burnt to death - if using a skincare product over the whole body please do not use petroleum jelly.

There is a move now to have a safety warning on all such products.
 

Enzed

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago (2020)
I'm thinking of taking my favourite balm, it's a NZ locally made one containing just sweet almond oil, castor oil, beeswax and essential oils.
Applying it to my feet this summer kept any dry and cracked heels away. Also it's good for dry skin relief, lip balm, hair moisturiser and shaving balm.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2015
Sorry, I'm lacking time and I skipped almost everything above (but I noticed that Dave Bugg posted and he knows feet and shoes and lots of other stuff like no other.)

At a pilgrims meeting I was given a free sample of Chafex for blister prevention. I haven't tried it yet so I have review but see https://chafex.com/ if you are interested.

Edit: My apologies to @David. He is fearsome with feet too. I was thinking of Dave Bugg's near professional reviews elsewhere of backpacking equipment and methods. If those review guys only gave him money he would fit in with the professional group.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I have no 'official qualifications' except my own personal experience. I have been walking the Camino every year with one exception since 2007. In the early years, in spite of following all sorts of advice I always got at least one blister. I then thought the whole thing through and decided; that on the Camino my feet got hot and sweaty, therefore my skin got damp and soft and then I got blisters. So could I prevent the sweat?? . I realised that I used underarm antiperspirant and it worked well under my arms, so I tried it on my feet and since then no more blisters. I use a stick antiperspirant like Mitchum and I rub it well in and between the toes. Maybe it could work for others too.
I've been following the videos of Sara Dhooma, who does a lot of walking. You can find them on YouTube. She has chronicled her walks on a number of camino routes. In any case, this is what she touts as her secret weapon against blisters.
 

Glamgrrl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Travel318
I used the Leuko tape method. From reading this thread I’ll now cut the corners off. After carefully taping my heel and footpad, I’d add a bit of Vick’s vapor rub between my toes and elsewhere. I never blistered. At the end of each day after showering, I’d use the German foot creme Geh Wold (also available on Amazon), mentioned above. It was heaven and available along the Camino. My feet are usually tough and calloused but using this treatment they were soft and pliable. And blister free.
 

Etienne1964

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances in 2021
Someone mentioned using an antiperspirant on her feet. While I haven’t walked the Camino (yet), I did use the antiperspirant technique while walking the Chartres pilgrimage in 2017. For those who do not know, this is a three day, 70-75 mile hike. I would also use sock liners if I ever walk the Camino.

After walking to Chartres, we visited Santiago de Compostela. There I saw pilgrims completing the Camino. Some pilgrims looked fresh, while others looked tan and skinny, as if they had been out in the sun for a long time. Seeing them inspired me to one day walk the Camino.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Someone mentioned using an antiperspirant on her feet. While I haven’t walked the Camino (yet), I did use the antiperspirant technique while walking the Chartres pilgrimage in 2017. For those who do not know, this is a three day, 70-75 mile hike. I would also use sock liners if I ever walk the Camino.

After walking to Chartres, we visited Santiago de Compostela. There I saw pilgrims completing the Camino. Some pilgrims looked fresh, while others looked tan and skinny, as if they had been out in the sun for a long time. Seeing them inspired me to one day walk the Camino.
The 'fresh ones probably started at the 100 km distance from Santiago de Compostela at or near Sarria. That is the minimum walking distance to obtain the Compostela.

The more 'weathered' pilgrims likely started much earlier, like in St Jean Pied de Port which is 800 km distant.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I used the Leuko tape method. From reading this thread I’ll now cut the corners off. After carefully taping my heel and footpad, I’d add a bit of Vick’s vapor rub between my toes and elsewhere. I never blistered. At the end of each day after showering, I’d use the German foot creme Geh Wold (also available on Amazon), mentioned above. It was heaven and available along the Camino. My feet are usually tough and calloused but using this treatment they were soft and pliable. And blister free.
I am also a fan of both Leukotape P and Omnifix tapes. They create a durable shear friction barrier on the skin to prevent blistering. It is very useful for dealing with known blister prone areas by pre-taping, and for dealing with developing Hotspots during walking.

In my judgement, pre-taping (Leukotape, Omnifix, Moleskin, etc) is superior to applications of lubricants for this concern. Lubricants are a tool for prevention when there is no known concern about blister prone areas of one's feet. The downside of lubricants is that if hotspot treatment by taping is needed, the lubricant can interfere with the ability of the adhesive product to stay adhered to the skin.

I do not know if you already do this with the Leukotape P, but in addition to rounding the corners, use a bit of hand sanitizer or alcohol to wipe the area of taping. This will help remove residue of body oils or lubricant or dust which can interfere with adhesion.

If the tape has a problem of staying on while walking, that is a place I would use a bit of Tincture of Benzoin applied to the area to be taped (if on a blister is involved, do not put Benzoin on the roof of the blister). Apply a thin, moist coating and allow it to completely dry. This will tremendously increase the tape's holding power.

Once the tape is applied, with or without the Benzoin, rub the surface of the tape. This heat from the gentle friction will help activate the adhesive by warming it up.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
In my judgement, pre-taping (Leukotape, Omnifix, Moleskin, etc) is superior to applications of lubricants for this concern.
I think of applying tape to the balls of my feet (my particular hot spot prone area) as an insurance policy against blisters.
 

Janet Lauren

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés Aug-Sept 2019
I swear by NOK. Lost it out of my pack on my way from Paris to Porto in September, couldn't find anything quite like it in Portugal and this Camino was the only time that I had an issue - a blister on my heel. In Canada, I get it at MEC, but probably could be bought on line.
They have NOK at pharmacies in León!
 
Thread starter OLDER threads on this topic Forum Replies Date
Mr. Walker Medical issues on the pilgrimage 53
G Medical issues on the pilgrimage 38

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