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Suggested route for late Oct-early Nov.

Celi Anatrella

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
2018, 2019, 2021 and planning… God willing.
Unexpectedly, I might be able to go on my fourth camino, God willing, the last week in October to the first week in November of this year. Needless to say, my training will be the camino itself. At first I thought I will do the Salvador and come home but my hubby said go for 2 weeks. I need to be obedient! 😆 He will not need to repeat it! 😉

Leon to Santiago was my first Camino followed by SJPP to Leon followed by the Primitivo for my second Camino and last year I did the Portugues (central with the Variante Espiritual). I’d rather not repeat a route this year and try something new. Which route should I walk? I hope to stay in albergues but I heard some close in November? And I would love a route that I can find the map in an app so if I’m lost I can easily load the app and find my way. Yes, I’m the worst with directions and I always relied in those apps to avoid getting lost. Thank you for your suggestions.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
If you are keen on the Salvador, go for it and take a few days to explore the Oviedo region, with all the caves and historical region of Covadonga. :)

You could also do the Portuguese Coastal route, which seems beautiful, Or maybe the Ingles followed by Finisterre?

What a lovely problem to have!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
If you are keen on the Salvador, go for it and take a few days to explore the Oviedo region, with all the caves and historical region of Covadonga. :)

maybe the Ingles followed by Finisterre?
Great ideas, both of these.

The 2nd one - Inglés to Santiago and claim your Compostela there then Sdc to muxia and over to Finisterra…. Would fit in well with getting there and back to X? (Not sure how much travel time you need).

Buen camino.
 
Great ideas, both of these.

The 2nd one - Inglés to Santiago and claim your Compostela there then Sdc to muxia and over to Finisterra…. Would fit in well with getting there and back to X? (Not sure how much travel time you need).

Buen camino.
Thank you kindly! Two days travel each way. So I could count with 12-13 days to walk.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I don't think that I'd do the Salvador or a mountainous Camino in October/November.

How about the Invierno, part of the Norte or part of the Via de la Plata?
The Camino del Norte really appeals to me too but somehow I think I would love to do that one complete in one trip maybe with my daughter in the future. The feeling of reaching Santiago after a loong pilgrimage it’s indescribable compared to the feeling after a shorter challenge. That being said… isn’t the Camino del Norte montanious as well?

I heard you have to walk very long days in Via de la Plata and I might not be ready for that.

The Camino de Invierno is intriguing! I don’t know much about it.

Would most albergues be closed in November, do you know? And how lonely will it be?

Thank you kindly for your suggestions!
 
If you are keen on the Salvador, go for it and take a few days to explore the Oviedo region, with all the caves and historical region of Covadonga. :)

You could also do the Portuguese Coastal route, which seems beautiful, Or maybe the Ingles followed by Finisterre?

What a lovely problem to have!
I wanted to walk the Portuguese Coastal when I first started planning the Portuguese but then my hubby wanted to go along so I researched the Central instead so he could have a more Camino ‘feeling’. That one seems really nice. However, I met a couple of pilgrims when walking the Central that switched to the Central and said the Coastal was very touristy? Maybe it was the time of the year?

I don’t know much about the Camino Ingles but the combo you suggested sounds interesting. Thank you kindly!
 
Consider the Aragonese and a slight detour to the old monastery of San Juan de la Peña. I walked it from Santa Cilia in early November 2019. The temperature was okay. There was a lot of rain but that was the case all over northern Spain then. I had no problems finding open albergues (except Santa Cilia). I only saw two other pilgrims on it though. We walked separately at different speeds but shared the albergue at night.

I connected to it from the Camino Catalan so I did miss the mountanous part from Somport down to Jaca. You'll have to ask further about that section.

It connects to the CF near the old church at Eunate (five stars, like San Juan de la Peña) and you can keep on it in either direction until you run out of time
 
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The Camino del Norte really appeals to me too but somehow I think I would love to do that one complete in one trip maybe with my daughter in the future. The feeling of reaching Santiago after a loong pilgrimage it’s indescribable compared to the feeling after a shorter challenge.
I totally agree with you about the feeling of reaching Santiago after walking for over a month.
isn’t the Camino del Norte montanious as well?
The Norte has a lot of ups and downs, but it's not mountainous in the same way that the Salvador is. Plus I think that being near the coast it doesn't get as much snow as the interior mountain regions.
 
I totally agree with you about the feeling of reaching Santiago after walking for over a month.

The Norte has a lot of ups and downs, but it's not mountainous in the same way that the Salvador is. Plus I think that being near the coast it doesn't get as much snow as the interior mountain regions.
Thank you kindly! I appreciate your input.
 
Consider the Aragonese and a slight detour to the old monastery of San Juan de la Peña. I walked it from Santa Cilia in early November 2019. The temperature was okay. There was a lot of rain but that was the case all over northern Spain then. I had no problems finding open albergues (except Santa Cilia). I only saw two other pilgrims on it though. We walked separately at different speeds but shared the albergue at night.

I connected to it from the Camino Catalan so I did miss the mountanous part from Somport down to Jaca. You'll have to ask further about that section.

It connects to the CF near the old church at Eunate (five stars, like San Juan de la Peña) and you can keep on it in either direction until you run out of time
I did not know about this onee. Thank you kindly! Now I’m more confused than before! 🙈 I love the possibilities …
 
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I wanted to walk the Portuguese Coastal when I first started planning the Portuguese but then my hubby wanted to go along so I researched the Central instead so he could have a more Camino ‘feeling’. That one seems really nice. However, I met a couple of pilgrims when walking the Central that switched to the Central and said the Coastal was very touristy? Maybe it was the time of the year?

I don’t know much about the Camino Ingles but the combo you suggested sounds interesting. Thank you kindly!
Interesting, i have the same question and
Relative time frame.. im thinking doing the frances again cause i am a bit injured so, will be doing it to stregthen my body.. but im over there for 90 days.. starting idk..mid october
 
I met a couple of pilgrims when walking the Central that switched to the Central and said the Coastal was very touristy? Maybe it was the time of the year?
I've only done the Central route (with the exception of Porto to Vila do Conde on the Litoral), but I can pass on what a friend who has done both told me. He said that many of the coastal towns could be beach towns just about anywhere, so he really liked the Central route more for that reason.
 
I've only done the Central route (with the exception of Porto to Vila do Conde on the Litoral), but I can pass on what a friend who has done both told me. He said that many of the coastal towns could be beach towns just about anywhere, so he really liked the Central route more for that reason.
The beach towns have their own unique Portuguese flavour I felt, as someone coming from a place with lots of coastline. In October-November (which is also when I walked) the beach towns have a lovely sleepy deserted feel. Wild winds and a spectacular wild Atlantic coast. The little fishing villages are gorgeous, and interesting, with tractors pulling the boats up the sand, and fish for sale out the back of the sheds.

I walked the Central route from Porto this year and enjoyed it. But it did feel like an almost continuous string of towns, with some eucalyptus forests in between.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Consider the Aragonese and a slight detour to the old monastery of San Juan de la Peña. I walked it from Santa Cilia in early November 2019. The temperature was okay. There was a lot of rain but that was the case all over northern Spain then. I had no problems finding open albergues (except Santa Cilia). I only saw two other pilgrims on it though. We walked separately at different speeds but shared the albergue at night.

I connected to it from the Camino Catalan so I did miss the mountanous part from Somport down to Jaca. You'll have to ask further about that section.

It connects to the CF near the old church at Eunate (five stars, like San Juan de la Peña) and you can keep on it in either direction until you run out of time
I was going to suggest the Aragones too but wondered about the Somport pass in Winter… (I walked it in August).
Starting from Santa Cilla is an excellent idea 😎

That may help, also the gronze site. https://www.mundicamino.com/rutas-camino-de-santiago/
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hi, thought I'd jump in on this thread with a sort of related question of my own....
I'm thinking of walking the Invierno in the last two weeks of November. Can anyone who had completed it in late Nov early Dec advise if it's difficult to find Albergues open? I've looked on Gronze and it seems to show more private small pensions etc - which cost-wise soon starts to add up. It seems there are some Albergues in-between the main recommended stage points, which I'd be happy to adjust my schedule to - but not sure if they remain open in winter...? Any advice gratefully received.
 
Hi, thought I'd jump in on this thread with a sort of related question of my own....
I'm thinking of walking the Invierno in the last two weeks of November. Can anyone who had completed it in late Nov early Dec advise if it's difficult to find Albergues open? I've looked on Gronze and it seems to show more private small pensions etc - which cost-wise soon starts to add up. It seems there are some Albergues in-between the main recommended stage points, which I'd be happy to adjust my schedule to - but not sure if they remain open in winter...? Any advice gratefully received.
I have been thinking of doing the same. Would appreciate feedback from others who have journeyed on the Invierno at that time of year. Thank you!
 
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No I haven’t done either one although i had planned to so Invierno this month. Check with Peregrina2000 i think is her forum name. She knows everything
 
Hi,

Is your goal to finish in Santiago? Or do you want to walk a camino? If it's the latter you could think about the Mozarabe. I did that in november a few years ago. It was cold and the first days it rained a lot, but it was beautiful too and very interesting, with tiny old villages and some bigger towns.

Buen camino!
 
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Forgive my ignorance... it's the first week of Nov in Spain considered the winter season already?
Ok, I should have said Autumn. My mistake.
But still, it’s a mountain area. Who knows what the weather will be? Not me…😉
And I didn’t want to give the wrong message, like ‘yeah, it’ll be ok!’
I’ve just come back from a few weeks in Alicante and the weather was all over the place, some days 26 deg and the following days 12 deg and raining heavily 😳 In all the years I have come here (since I was 11 !) I have never experienced this before.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Ok, I should have said Autumn. My mistake.
But still, it’s a mountain area. Who knows what the weather will be? Not me…😉
And I didn’t want to give the wrong message, like ‘yeah, it’ll be ok!’
I’ve just come back from a few weeks in Alicante and the weather was all over the place, some days 26 deg and the following days 12 deg and raining heavily 😳 In all the years I have come here (since I was 11 !) I have never experienced this before.
Thank you kindly for your answer!
 

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