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the Albergue at Granon

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#1
The sleeping area of the albergue consists of mattresses on the floor of the attic in the village church. The attic leads via a door to the roof space of the church where you can wash and dry clothes. Below, there is a comfortable sitting area and kitchen.

The night I stayed here Arturo, the hospitalero, and a couple of helpers prepared a wonderful communal meal for us all. After the meal there were prayers in the church for those who wanted to attend.

The setting itself is relaxing and evocative of a past era of pilgrimage.

However, the reason I mention this albergue is because of the kindness and sense of vocation shown by Arturo and his helpers.

“Remember us in Santiago”, said Arturo as I thanked him when I left in the morning. Many days later I did so, kneeling in the great Cathedral, in the midst of hundreds of fellow pilgrims, washed in the music of the noon Mass.

Regards

Bob M
 

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Minkey

Active Member
#2
On my first pilgrimage I was told this place was one of the Camino's gems. Seems very popular, although I have yet to stay there.
 

BobM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPDP - Santiago); Via Podensis (Le Puy en Velay - SJPDP); Via Francigena (Canterbury - Rome); Via Portugues (Tui - Santiago); Via Francigena del Sud (Rome - Bari).
To Do Via Egnatia (Durres - Thessaloniki); INT & Jerusalem Trail (Tel Aviv - Jerusalem)
#3
Gems of the Camino Frances

There are a few other albergues that I will always remember, as well as Granon. I still intend to write a few words on each of them.

They are memorable partly for the settings, but more so for the hospitaleros and hospitaleras I met.

Given the demands on them over every Camino season, I am amazed that the few special folk I will remember maintain a sense of vocation and service to pilgrims.

Regards

Bob M
 

Minkey

Active Member
#4
I felt very much the same way towards a few other hospitaleros... Firstly the kind gentleman in Cizur Menor who sang songs and made everyone feel so relaxed after a day's walk. Then there was the lovely man in Tardajos who gave me some stuff to clean my clothes (I had very little after not getting my kit flown with me on the plane)... Then there was the lovely, lovely, lovely guy in Foncebadon who had only anticipated on staying for 2 weeks and was still there 18 months later. I forget his name, but will never forget his welcome!
 

Minkey

Active Member
#5
Oh... and the pulling together to keep the refugio in Castrojeriz open, after the hospitalero was hit by a train (so I understood at the time). Fellow pilgrims kept it up and running.
 

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