• For 2024 Pilgrims: €50,- donation = 1 year with no ads on the forum + 90% off any 2024 Guide. More here.
    (Discount code sent to you by Private Message after your donation)

Search 69,459 Camino Questions

Type 2 Diabetic on the Camino

MoniRose

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
(5/28-7/4, 2012) Camino Frances - SJPP to Santiago
(7/22-8/2, 2013) Camino Finesterra
(?) Camino Le Puy
Hi All- I’d like to hear from someone who walked the Camino who had similar health issues.
Of course I’m feeling itchy about walking the Camino again, only this time I’ll be 12 years older (65) and a Type 2 Diabetic. I’m a little nervous about my feet. So far, I’ve had no issues at all but remember the blisters, etc I got in 2012.
Should I skip the Pyrenees and begin in, say, Pamploma or even Burgos? (I did some damage on that first day in 2012 that took a good week to recover). I walked down thru the Beech tree forest and my feet killed by the time I arrived in Roncevalles. Would there be an easier way around?
Any advise or ideas would be appreciated!
Monica
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Hi Monica,
I am also a T2. Pay careful attention to your shoes and socks. I have not had any blisters since that first Camino with better fitting socks and shoes.

Begin where you want, but just pay attention to your feet. Careful of too much good bread! Otherwise, enjoy!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during & after your Camino. Each weighs only 1.4 oz (40g)!
I agree that getting the right shoes, socks, and footcare routine is the most important preparation. To figure that out, you probably need a good training routine (i.e. walking a lot) and 2 or 3 consecutive 20 km days to test your footwear.
 
I also am type2
You do not have to begin in SJPdP.
Well before leaving, tell your podiatrist/chiropodist your plan, and take advice from her/him.
I only wear some brand of smartwool socks. I would suggest that you alternate your shoes/boots with walking sandals in the course of the day.
Having said that, my boots are so comfortable - whatever causes least pressure.
My podiatrist recommends closed toe sandals. Keep your feet well lubricated. Pay attention to your podiatrist first and foremost.
I forgot something important: hydrate yourself by drinking sufficient water,a nd replacing lost salts using your own best solution.
 
Last edited:
I received a diagnosis of T2 two weeks before I left. I am unmedicated and I had zero problems while in Spain. My diet became very carb free throughout my time in Spain, which in turn nerfed my sugar levels. I lost weight, gained fitness and came back feeling a lot better and my HBA1C bottomed out to under the levels of a person without T2. My doctor said if I hadn't had a crazy high HBA1C previously, he wouldn't have been the wiser. Saying that only my HBA1C was high originally. My day to day levels were normal. There were reasons for it.

I worked out that throughout my camino I only ever ate chorizo, cheese, rocket or lambs lettuce and drank sugar free yoghurt drinks and water, plus the odd sugar free monster. I had no food carbs for probably the vast majority of my walk. But I did drink beer and wine, so some sugar was going in, but i had no ill effects from it, probably because I was walking for 4-5 hours every day in hot temperatures with a fairly heavy pack.

I also had no issues with blisters, but had to replace my shoes on day 2 of my camino, so had to break in a new pair of shoes while walking. Get good shoes and break them in prior to going. Also carry loads of foot cream. I went through three tubes of the thick scholl heel cream while out there and was using decathlon walking socks of which I destroyed 3 pairs by the time I finished.
 
Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
Hola @MoniRose ask anyone who has walked the camino and they should tell that as your feet carry you then your footwear should be the best. What the "best" is, is really up to you. What are you most comfortable wearing.
Starting point again this is up to you. If you start in Pamplona (imho) then start with some shorter days - 12/15/18 km (or less than 13 miles) per day. Get yourself and those feet use to what is going on. Stopping at regular interval, keeping up water and snack intake I think you know more than I. Of course feel free to come back and ask any questions you have.
A special Buen Camino.
 
Hi All- I’d like to hear from someone who walked the Camino who had similar health issues.
Of course I’m feeling itchy about walking the Camino again, only this time I’ll be 12 years older (65) and a Type 2 Diabetic. I’m a little nervous about my feet. So far, I’ve had no issues at all but remember the blisters, etc I got in 2012.
Should I skip the Pyrenees and begin in, say, Pamploma or even Burgos? (I did some damage on that first day in 2012 that took a good week to recover). I walked down thru the Beech tree forest and my feet killed by the time I arrived in Roncevalles. Would there be an easier way around?
Any advise or ideas would be appreciated!
Monica
Hi Monica,
I was Type 2 on the first Camino, and I had no problems. The first stretch over the Pyrenees is my "happy place," so personally I'll always take that route—even with the ups and downs. Living in a mountain state makes it much more attractive to us— but the next time I believe we'll take the Camino Baztan from Bayonne to Pamplona. It looks to be a little easier for old bodies.
 
Hi All- I’d like to hear from someone who walked the Camino who had similar health issues.
Of course I’m feeling itchy about walking the Camino again, only this time I’ll be 12 years older (65) and a Type 2 Diabetic. I’m a little nervous about my feet. So far, I’ve had no issues at all but remember the blisters, etc I got in 2012.
Should I skip the Pyrenees and begin in, say, Pamploma or even Burgos? (I did some damage on that first day in 2012 that took a good week to recover). I walked down thru the Beech tree forest and my feet killed by the time I arrived in Roncevalles. Would there be an easier way around?
Any advise or ideas would be appreciated!
Monica
On my first Camino, nine out of 10 of my toes, had blisters. This is what I learned from that Camino, and a few more:
1. Yes, good footwear is imperative. if toe blisters have been a problem in the past, I would suggest Injinji toe socks then cover with either darn tough or smart wool socks, so that you have two pairs. For me, I either use a thin pair of a Injinji and midweight pair of Merino wool socks on top

OR
Use Injinji cool Max (which is a little thicker) with a lightweight pair of merino wool socks.
If you're not worried about toe blisters, you may be able to wear non-toe socks as your lower layer.
2. I don't lubricate my feet, but I know some people swear by this.
3. Now that I wear two pairs of socks, I wear a shoe with a wider toe box.
4. Shoes are critical. I recently changed to Hoka speedgoat, and I love them. They have a wider toe box for my double socks and for me, the bonus is, I have much less back pain from a previous injury, when I wear them.
5. Footcare is critical. Some people put their legs up at night or soak their feet or coat, their feet and something like Vaseline. I personally do not. What I do do as soon as I start having pain from an early blister, I immediately look at it. Early blisters are just pink and color. I'm from the US so I put on mole skin immediately over the pink area then I tape the mole skin down, to keep it in place while walking, which requires wrapping around the foot. I use a stretchy tape that is about 1 inch in diameter and white in color. I don't recall the name.
6. if I do go onto a blister, if it is small enough, I put a corn pad on (that has a hole in the middle) so as to try to protect the blister from bursting too soon. I put a Band-Aid over the corn pad (with the nonstick surface of the Band-Aid over the hole), then apply my stretchy tape all the way around the foot to hold it in place.
7. Only very occasionally do I put on a little bit of antibiotic ointment. Good early care likely will not require any antibiotic ointment.
Great footwear, great care early on for blisters or pre-blisters is the key for me.
Buen Camino
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I used to get blisters. Then I realised that when my feet get sweaty the skin gets soft and I got blisters. So now I use my anti perspirant not only under my arms but also on my feet. I use a stick one and I rub it in and make sure it is also between my toes, Since I started this I have had no blister.
In fairness I will add that my second toes are longer than my big toe and I used always to get blisters on them first day, so now I put a compeed on each one the night before I travel.
One of my mottos is 'Prevention is better than cure..'
Buen Camino.
 
I have been T2 for over 10 years and have never experienced any problems with my feet. On my first camino I got one small blister on my little toe, this was due to the wrong size shoes. I regularly walk 12/15 miles to stretch the legs and find with the right shoes and socks you'll be fine.
I am a great advocate of gaffer tape which I have on my poles, and should a hot spot raise its ugly head, on goes the tape. It's probably not for everyone but it works for me.
I have to say it's a bit of a pain having to carry all those tablets.
You'll be fine if you listen to your body, especially your feet, remember they are the engine that will get you there.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
As David has suggested in the past - always take your shoes/boots and socks off during the day - lunchtime etc. It lets your feet relax and regain their size (they swell while you walk) Also he has excellent advice on tying boots (search his posts)
I always take animal wool (in my case sheep's wool gathered off barbed wire fences! and washed) at even the hint of a hot spot - I remove the boots and put a wad of the wool there - this usually prevents any blisters starting.
Well-fitting footwear, careful care of feet during the day - equals no blisters and happy walking!!
 

Most read last week in this forum

Hey there! I wanted to chat about my experience on the 2017 Camino Frances. I'm pretty average physically, maybe a tad overweight, did some training (could've done more), and could've lightened my...
We are leaving to do the whole Camino Frances in a week. I have two corns on my right foot that are becoming very painful - I have had them for years with little issue but over the last month with...
I’ve been trying to decide on a fitness regime in preparation for the Camino, but upon reviewing this board, YouTube, etc, there’s an overwhelming array of suggestions and programs, but I’m less...

❓How to ask a question

How to post a new question on the Camino Forum.

Similar threads

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Updates on YouTube

Camino Conversations

Most downloaded Resources

This site is run by Ivar at

in Santiago de Compostela.
This site participates in the Amazon Affiliate program, designed to provide a means for Ivar to earn fees by linking to Amazon
Official Camino Passport (Credential) | 2024 Camino Guides
Back
Top