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Vigo-Santiago: Will cushioned road shoes be OK?

couchkoala

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
May 2023
Hello everyone,

This is my first post but I've been lurking for quite a while and love the discussions here. I'll be walking the last 100 km of the Portugues from Vigo this May.

One of my walking companions is in her fifties with some previous ankle and toe issues. For that reason we are taking it quite easy, as follows:
Vigo - Redondela (15 km)
Redondela - Arcade (8 km)
Arcade - Pontevedra (12 km)
Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis (22 km)
Caldas de Reis - Padron (18 km)
Padron - Teo (12 km)
Teo - Santiago de Compostela (13 km)

We will also book luggage transfers the whole way.

I'm not concerned about my fitness level for the walk but of course need to get my shoes right. Unfortunately I am in Singapore and we don't have the same ability to try and return shoes the way US consumers can, so I do actually need to get the purchase correct in the shop.

I understand from forum discussions that good cushioning is important on the Portugues (and of course good fit etc.)

I've gone to shops and tried on most of the more cushioned trail/road shoes available in my (woman's) size in Singapore, but I'm finding it hard to choose between various options which feel OK in the shop.

The only option I could immediately eliminate was Hoka Speedgoat 5, which pressed into my inner arches. I also tried other Hoka shoes with the same feeling, so I guess they are made for people with higher arches than mine.

My question: for what I'm walking (Vigo-Santiago, short-ish days with daypack only), is there a big reason to choose well-cushioned trail shoes over well-cushioned road shoes? Some relevant points:
- As I'm only walking 100 km, the shoe I buy will presumably last beyond this Camino.
- A good road running shoe will be more useful for my daily life after the Camino than a good trail running shoe.
- I already have good trail running shoes (Inov-8 Roclite 290) which I use happily for day hikes, but I wouldn't say they're particularly cushioned.

If I can understand the question above better, I think it will help me choose between these options which all felt OK in the shops (they do differ in price; Altra is the most expensive):
- Altra Olympus 5
- Brooks Glycerin 20
- Brooks Cascadia 16
- Topo Ultrafly 4
- Topo MT4
- Salomon Pulsar

If you can give me any guidance, it would really help - thank you!
 
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Hello everyone,

This is my first post but I've been lurking for quite a while and love the discussions here. I'll be walking the last 100 km of the Portugues from Vigo this May.

One of my walking companions is in her fifties with some previous ankle and toe issues. For that reason we are taking it quite easy, as follows:
Vigo - Redondela (15 km)
Redondela - Arcade (8 km)
Arcade - Pontevedra (12 km)
Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis (22 km)
Caldas de Reis - Padron (18 km)
Padron - Teo (12 km)
Teo - Santiago de Compostela (13 km)

We will also book luggage transfers the whole way.

I'm not concerned about my fitness level for the walk but of course need to get my shoes right. Unfortunately I am in Singapore and we don't have the same ability to try and return shoes the way US consumers can, so I do actually need to get the purchase correct in the shop.

I understand from forum discussions that good cushioning is important on the Portugues (and of course good fit etc.)

I've gone to shops and tried on most of the more cushioned trail/road shoes available in my (woman's) size in Singapore, but I'm finding it hard to choose between various options which feel OK in the shop.

The only option I could immediately eliminate was Hoka Speedgoat 5, which pressed into my inner arches. I also tried other Hoka shoes with the same feeling, so I guess they are made for people with higher arches than mine.

My question: for what I'm walking (Vigo-Santiago, short-ish days with daypack only), is there a big reason to choose well-cushioned trail shoes over well-cushioned road shoes? Some relevant points:
- As I'm only walking 100 km, the shoe I buy will presumably last beyond this Camino.
- A good road running shoe will be more useful for my daily life after the Camino than a good trail running shoe.
- I already have good trail running shoes (Inov-8 Roclite 290) which I use happily for day hikes, but I wouldn't say they're particularly cushioned.

If I can understand the question above better, I think it will help me choose between these options which all felt OK in the shops (they do differ in price; Altra is the most expensive):
- Altra Olympus 5
- Brooks Glycerin 20
- Brooks Cascadia 16
- Topo Ultrafly 4
- Topo MT4
- Salomon Pulsar

If you can give me any guidance, it would really help - thank you!
I’m wearing my Brooks Glycerin…love them. They accommodate multiple ankle/foot fractures and neuroma with great support and cushioning/light weight. What luggage transfer company are you using?
 
All you need are your most comfortable shoes. No need to buy shoes for the camino unless you are carrying a LOT of weight or are racing someone. Mine were 10-year old tennis shoes. Not a hint of a problem. You will be on well-developed walking paths and city sidewalks day after day. Dress accordingly. You are almost guaranteed to take more than you need anyway. Remember the early pilgrims had almost nothing. Build from that starting point. Buen Camino!!
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Hello everyone,

This is my first post but I've been lurking for quite a while and love the discussions here. I'll be walking the last 100 km of the Portugues from Vigo this May.

One of my walking companions is in her fifties with some previous ankle and toe issues. For that reason we are taking it quite easy, as follows:
Vigo - Redondela (15 km)
Redondela - Arcade (8 km)
Arcade - Pontevedra (12 km)
Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis (22 km)
Caldas de Reis - Padron (18 km)
Padron - Teo (12 km)
Teo - Santiago de Compostela (13 km)

We will also book luggage transfers the whole way.

I'm not concerned about my fitness level for the walk but of course need to get my shoes right. Unfortunately I am in Singapore and we don't have the same ability to try and return shoes the way US consumers can, so I do actually need to get the purchase correct in the shop.

I understand from forum discussions that good cushioning is important on the Portugues (and of course good fit etc.)

I've gone to shops and tried on most of the more cushioned trail/road shoes available in my (woman's) size in Singapore, but I'm finding it hard to choose between various options which feel OK in the shop.

The only option I could immediately eliminate was Hoka Speedgoat 5, which pressed into my inner arches. I also tried other Hoka shoes with the same feeling, so I guess they are made for people with higher arches than mine.

My question: for what I'm walking (Vigo-Santiago, short-ish days with daypack only), is there a big reason to choose well-cushioned trail shoes over well-cushioned road shoes? Some relevant points:
- As I'm only walking 100 km, the shoe I buy will presumably last beyond this Camino.
- A good road running shoe will be more useful for my daily life after the Camino than a good trail running shoe.
- I already have good trail running shoes (Inov-8 Roclite 290) which I use happily for day hikes, but I wouldn't say they're particularly cushioned.

If I can understand the question above better, I think it will help me choose between these options which all felt OK in the shops (they do differ in price; Altra is the most expensive):
- Altra Olympus 5
- Brooks Glycerin 20
- Brooks Cascadia 16
- Topo Ultrafly 4
- Topo MT4
- Salomon Pulsar

If you can give me any guidance, it would really help - thank you!
Last spring I wore Olympus 4's, from Porto to Santiago, lots of padding that was needed for all of the cobblestone on the trail. I did my training in them from January 2022 then that stretch of Camino noted above. I still have that pair, can't part with them. I recently purchased the Olympus 5's, they changed the toe box a bit but they are still the great shoe with the vibrum sole and the cushion, I will be doing the Camino Frances in them this spring, I can't say enough good things about them.
 
Hello everyone,

This is my first post but I've been lurking for quite a while and love the discussions here. I'll be walking the last 100 km of the Portugues from Vigo this May.

One of my walking companions is in her fifties with some previous ankle and toe issues. For that reason we are taking it quite easy, as follows:
Vigo - Redondela (15 km)
Redondela - Arcade (8 km)
Arcade - Pontevedra (12 km)
Pontevedra - Caldas de Reis (22 km)
Caldas de Reis - Padron (18 km)
Padron - Teo (12 km)
Teo - Santiago de Compostela (13 km)

We will also book luggage transfers the whole way.

I'm not concerned about my fitness level for the walk but of course need to get my shoes right. Unfortunately I am in Singapore and we don't have the same ability to try and return shoes the way US consumers can, so I do actually need to get the purchase correct in the shop.

I understand from forum discussions that good cushioning is important on the Portugues (and of course good fit etc.)

I've gone to shops and tried on most of the more cushioned trail/road shoes available in my (woman's) size in Singapore, but I'm finding it hard to choose between various options which feel OK in the shop.

The only option I could immediately eliminate was Hoka Speedgoat 5, which pressed into my inner arches. I also tried other Hoka shoes with the same feeling, so I guess they are made for people with higher arches than mine.

My question: for what I'm walking (Vigo-Santiago, short-ish days with daypack only), is there a big reason to choose well-cushioned trail shoes over well-cushioned road shoes? Some relevant points:
- As I'm only walking 100 km, the shoe I buy will presumably last beyond this Camino.
- A good road running shoe will be more useful for my daily life after the Camino than a good trail running shoe.
- I already have good trail running shoes (Inov-8 Roclite 290) which I use happily for day hikes, but I wouldn't say they're particularly cushioned.

If I can understand the question above better, I think it will help me choose between these options which all felt OK in the shops (they do differ in price; Altra is the most expensive):
- Altra Olympus 5
- Brooks Glycerin 20
- Brooks Cascadia 16
- Topo Ultrafly 4
- Topo MT4
- Salomon Pulsar

If you can give me any guidance, it would really help - thank you!
The Frances has been walked barefoot in the past, so - yes - your choice of footware is entirely sufficient gor 100k

It’s more important to be comfortable and don’t sacrifice ‘good enough’ in pursuit of perfection.
 
Thank you everyone for your responses.

I’m wearing my Brooks Glycerin…love them. They accommodate multiple ankle/foot fractures and neuroma with great support and cushioning/light weight. What luggage transfer company are you using?

Hi sfisch801, glad to hear the Brooks Glycerin are working well for you. I've read many good reviews for them from running sites. Have you done / will you do the Camino Portuguese as well?

My walking companion (the one with ankle/toe issues) wants to book us with a tour company which will organize everything, so unfortunately I don't know which luggage transfer company we'll use. (I know, it seems really easy to just organize everything ourselves, but to cut a long story short, we'll do it her way this time.)

All you need are your most comfortable shoes. No need to buy shoes for the camino unless you are carrying a LOT of weight or are racing someone. Mine were 10-year old tennis shoes. Not a hint of a problem. You will be on well-developed walking paths and city sidewalks day after day. Dress accordingly. You are almost guaranteed to take more than you need anyway. Remember the early pilgrims had almost nothing. Build from that starting point. Buen Camino!!

Hi Walter James Palmer, was it the Portuguese which you did in old tennis shoes? I've read quite a few posts from people saying they specifically longed for better-cushioned shoes on the Portuguese, so I'm glad it wasn't a problem for you!

I don't mind buying shoes for the Camino if they will serve a purpose for me after it as well. Although I'm not running much at the moment, when I do run it's typically on concrete. A good pair of well-cushioned road running shoes will probably be better for this than the simple Decathlon ones I currently use.

Last spring I wore Olympus 4's, from Porto to Santiago, lots of padding that was needed for all of the cobblestone on the trail. I did my training in them from January 2022 then that stretch of Camino noted above. I still have that pair, can't part with them. I recently purchased the Olympus 5's, they changed the toe box a bit but they are still the great shoe with the vibrum sole and the cushion, I will be doing the Camino Frances in them this spring, I can't say enough good things about them.

Thanks jlamont808, the Altra Olympus does seem like a great choice for the Camino Portuguese. In the shop where I tried them, I asked the salesperson for other shoes I could try - he said I'd already tried the top option and everything else would feel like a downgrade! They're certainly still an option for me, it's just that they're also the most expensive one. Buen Camino!

The Frances has been walked barefoot in the past, so - yes - your choice of footware is entirely sufficient gor 100k

It’s more important to be comfortable and don’t sacrifice ‘good enough’ in pursuit of perfection.

Kudos to our hardy forbears for walking the Frances barefoot, but that doesn't sound like much fun for the Camino Portuguese! I'm planning to get the shoes soon and start training, so won't be pursuing perfection. Just wanted to assess if I might regret choosing road shoes over trail shoes, since I tend to see trail shoes mentioned more in this forum.
 
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You do not need specialty footwear to walk the Camino. People often wear trail shoes, but lots wear standard athletic shoes and sandals, as well as a variety of other types. Comfort and a shoe that fits YOUR foot perfectly is what matters. Whatever you are comfortable wearing now is a good place to start.
 
Thanks Rick M. As most shoes I've tried on felt reasonably comfortable (except Hoka), hopefully whichever I choose from the list in my initial post will work out. I'll just have to decide whether to get a third pair of trail shoes (my current 2 pairs are in my "normal" size and not particularly cushioned, whereas I see many people here recommend sizing up + cushioning for the Portuguese) or a first pair of road shoes.
 
Thank you everyone for your responses.































































Hi sfisch801, glad to hear the Brooks Glycerin are working well for you. I've read many good reviews for them from running sites. Have you done / will you do the Camino Portuguese as well?































My walking companion (the one with ankle/toe issues) wants to book us with a tour company which will organize everything, so unfortunately I don't know which luggage transfer company we'll use. (I know, it seems really easy to just organize everything ourselves, but to cut a long story short, we'll do it her way this time.)































































Hi Walter James Palmer, was it the Portuguese which you did in old tennis shoes? I've read quite a few posts from people saying they specifically longed for better-cushioned shoes on the Portuguese, so I'm glad it wasn't a problem for you!































I don't mind buying shoes for the Camino if they will serve a purpose for me after it as well. Although I'm not running much at the moment, when I do run it's typically on concrete. A good pair of well-cushioned road running shoes will probably be better for this than the simple Decathlon ones I currently use.































































Thanks jlamont808, the Altra Olympus does seem like a great choice for the Camino Portuguese. In the shop where I tried them, I asked the salesperson for other shoes I could try - he said I'd already tried the top option and everything else would feel like a downgrade! They're certainly still an option for me, it's just that they're also the most expensive one. Buen Camino!































































Kudos to our hardy forbears for walking the Frances barefoot, but that doesn't sound like much fun for the Camino Portuguese! I'm planning to get the shoes soon and start training, so won't be pursuing perfection. Just wanted to assess if I might regret choosing road shoes over trail shoes, since I tend to see trail shoes mentioned more in this forum.















Thank you everyone for your responses.































Hi sfisch801, glad to hear the Brooks Glycerin are working well for you. I've read many good reviews for them from running sites. Have you done / will you do the Camino Portuguese as well?















My walking companion (the one with ankle/toe issues) wants to book us with a tour company which will organize everything, so unfortunately I don't know which luggage transfer company we'll use. (I know, it seems really easy to just organize everything ourselves, but to cut a long story short, we'll do it her way this time.)































Hi Walter James Palmer, was it the Portuguese which you did in old tennis shoes? I've read quite a few posts from people saying they specifically longed for better-cushioned shoes on the Portuguese, so I'm glad it wasn't a problem for you!















I don't mind buying shoes for the Camino if they will serve a purpose for me after it as well. Although I'm not running much at the moment, when I do run it's typically on concrete. A good pair of well-cushioned road running shoes will probably be better for this than the simple Decathlon ones I currently use.































Thanks jlamont808, the Altra Olympus does seem like a greatCouchhh choice for the Camino Portuguese. In the shop where I tried them, I asked the salesperson for other shoes I could try - he said I'd already tried the top option and everything else would feel like a downgrade! They're certainly still an option for me, it's just that they're also the most expensive one. Buen Camino!































Kudos to our hardy forbears for walking the Frances barefoot, but that doesn't sound like much fun for the Camino



Portuguese! I'm planning to get the shoes soon and start training, so won't be pursuing perfection. Just wanted to assess if I might regret choosing road shoes over trail shoes, since I tend to see trail shoes mentioned more in this forum.

Thank you everyone for your responses.



Hi sfisch801, glad to hear the Brooks Glycerin are working well for you. I've read many good reviews for them from running sites. Have you done / will you do the Camino Portuguese as well?

My walking companion (the one with ankle/toe issues) wants to book us with a tour company which will organize everything, so unfortunately I don't know which luggage transfer company we'll use. (I know, it seems really easy to just organize everything ourselves, but to cut a long story short, we'll do it her way this time.)



Hi Walter James Palmer, was it the Portuguese which you did in old tennis shoes? I've read quite a few posts from people saying they specifically longed for better-cushioned shoes on the Portuguese, so I'm glad it wasn't a problem for you!

I don't mind buying shoes for the Camino if they will serve a purpose for me after it as well. Although I'm not running much at the moment, when I do run it's typically on concrete. A good pair of well-cushioned road running shoes will probably be better for this than the simple Decathlon ones I currently use.



Thanks jlamont808, the Altra Olympus does seem like a great choice for the Camino Portuguese. In the shop where I tried them, I asked the salesperson for other shoes I could try - he said I'd already tried the top option and everything else would feel like a downgrade! They're certainly still an option for me, it's just that they're also the most expensive one. Buen Camino!



Kudos to our hardy forbears for walking the Frances barefoot, but that doesn't sound like much fun for the Camino Portuguese! I'm planning to get the shoes soon and start training, so won't be pursuing perfection. Just wanted to assess if I might regret choosing road shoes over trail shoes, since I tend to see trail shoes mentioned more in this forum.
Hello CouchKoala,
Yes. I did the Portuguese Coast just to Vila Do Conde, then in to the central. Not a pain or hint of a blister. Comfortable shoes is the key, and decent socks.

I suggest your most comfortable EXISTING shoes since your feet are already happy in them. Any new shoe is going to require a "break-in" period or time for your feet to adjust to them - only after that period will you know if they are comfortable of not for walking EVERY day. I strongly urge you to put on your most comfy shoes and walk a few miles, ANY issue will become a BIG DEAL if you have to deal with it day after day. Your most comfortable shoes have already passed this test if you wear them every day. ANY new shoes will require some amount of time before YOUR body decides they are truly wonderful. Your existing comfy shoes are the standard of comfort for your feet and body - use them.

My old pair were purchased at a Goodwill store for $10, years before I walked Porto to Santiago. Nothing matters except how comfortable they are day to day for wearing. You already know which shoes are your best for walking - just trust your heart.

Buen Camino!!
 
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My question: for what I'm walking (Vigo-Santiago, short-ish days with daypack only), is there a big reason to choose well-cushioned trail shoes over well-cushioned road shoes? Some relevant points:
- As I'm only walking 100 km, the shoe I buy will presumably last beyond this Camino.
- A good road running shoe will be more useful for my daily life after the Camino than a good trail running shoe.
- I already have good trail running shoes (Inov-8 Roclite 290) which I use happily for day hikes, but I wouldn't say they're particularly cushioned.

If I can understand the question above better, I think it will help me choose between these options which all felt OK in the shops (they do differ in price; Altra is the most expensive):
- Altra Olympus 5
- Brooks Glycerin 20
- Brooks Cascadia 16
- Topo Ultrafly 4
- Topo MT4
- Salomon Pulsar

If you can give me any guidance, it would really help - thank you!
Hi there! I am in a very similar situation: first timer, CP, have tried on a bunch of shoes, need advice on road vs trail runners specifically for the CP. I'll be walking from Porto and plan to walk longer stages than you. I did my first long training walk (22k), all paved, no back pack (haven't got one yet), wearing my old formerly comfy trail runners. The soles of my feet became tender very quickly. I kept going but it was not enjoyable. I know it is highly personal but for those that have walked the CP and other Caminos, do you feel that the CP calls for a cushier shoe? Of the shoes I tried on I liked the Salomon Pulsar and the New Balance Fresh Foam. The fresh foam felt like they wouldn't last very long though and budget is a concern. I will go to more stores to try on more. Selection is spotty around here for some reason.
 
Of the shoes I tried on I liked the Salomon Pulsar and the New Balance Fresh Foam. The fresh foam felt like they wouldn't last very long though and budget is a concern. I will go to more stores to try on more. Selection is spotty around here for some reason.
Keep looking, but bear in mind that finding the right shoe is one place where saving money should not be a primary consideration. Stow away on a steamship, walk in tatters and dine from a dumpster if you must, but have the right shoes! And while I'm bearing unwelcome news, your suspicion about New Balance shoes not being very durable is correct. Everyone's experience is a little different, but I take two pairs to walk the Camino Frances, and wear them both out by the time I get home. On my feet, they are good for about 500 km/pair.
 
Keep looking, but bear in mind that finding the right shoe is one place where saving money should not be a primary consideration. Stow away on a steamship, walk in tatters and dine from a dumpster if you must, but have the right shoes! And while I'm bearing unwelcome news, your suspicion about New Balance shoes not being very durable is correct. Everyone's experience is a little different, but I take two pairs to walk the Camino Frances, and wear them both out by the time I get home. On my feet, they are good for about 500 km/pair.
I'm just doing the CP from Porto but I guess if I train in them I'll need to get a new pair for the Camino? They felt like marshmallows and it was only the Fresh Foam X not the Fresh Foam More. Those look like platforms.
 
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I have walked with several different NB runners, never the two models you mentioned. They are all a bit different for durability as well, so I can't say for sure what your experience with a specific model is likely to be. In general though - yeah - you train in a pair, and take a new pair when you set off from Porto.
 
I have walked with several different NB runners, never the two models you mentioned. They are all a bit different for durability as well, so I can't say for sure what your experience with a specific model is likely to be. In general though - yeah - you train in a pair, and take a new pair when you set off from Porto.
Thank you!
 
Any comfortable shoe will work, there are no technical trails on the CP, as was said before all perfectly comfortable (foot) paths.

Your schedule looks fairly comfortable, even more so with luggae transfer, This way, walking 15 km will quickly feel fairly easy, especially with a few stops on the way. Get started, walk for an hour, have a coffee break, walk for an hour, have a lunch break, walk for an hour, have a snack, walk for a bit and you are done. Taking your time to take in the views, you've got all day. (walking pace is considered somewhere around 4-5 km per hour on the flats).

Go for anything that you feel comfortable in in your daily life walking around.

What a wonderful adventure! You've got this!! Enjoy!
 
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Just popping back in with an update that I decided to buy Brooks Glycerin GTS 20, and finished the Vigo-Santiago route with no problems at all.

According to shoe salesmen, I have overpronation and slightly wide feet. In case it's helpful to anyone else in the same boat, here's the overthinking that went into my shoes and socks (since it ultimately worked out well). :D
  • I appreciated the advice of Walter James Palmer above but did not follow it since my existing trail shoes are my "normal" sports shoe size and I only wear them for day hikes with 1 pair of thin socks. I was concerned they would feel too tight after a double layer of socks, foot swelling after multiple days etc.
  • I didn't want to spend Altra money, since I'd also seen concerns about the Olympus 5's durability
  • After comparing reviews, the Brooks seemed to tick most boxes important to me (cushioning, breathability, durability) at a better price, and would perhaps help with my overpronation when road running with them post-Camino
My sizing overthinking went as follows:
  • In sandals I am a US women's 6 (or smaller, depending on the cut)
  • In my existing trail shoes I wear US women's 7 but as mentioned above, I was concerned they would still be too small for this particular use
  • The only sizes of the Brooks I could try in Singapore were US women's 7.5 or 8 (normal fit) or US men's 7
  • I eventually rolled the dice and ordered US women's 8 wide from Amazon USA (Amazon wasn't offering 7.5 wide or else I'd probably have bought that instead). It's possible that it's the same size as US men's 7, but I can't say.
I tried the following combinations of socks (+ Aquaphor on my feet beforehand). All worked well, but maybe it also helped that I changed up the combinations across the days.
  • Double-layer Wrightsocks
  • Double-layer 1000 Mile socks
  • Injinji liner toesocks (liner) + Darn Tough merino (outer)
  • 1000 Mile racing socks (liner) + Darn Tough merino (outer)
I also brought Teva Hurricane XLT sandals as my spare shoes, for using in the evenings and in case my Brooks didn't work out.

Many thanks to all who gave me input, and more generally to all who contribute such excellent and helpful content to this forum.

Hope this helps someone else out there, and my happy feet wish Buen Camino to yours!
 
Last edited:
Just popping back in with an update that I decided to buy Brooks Glycerin GTS 20, and finished the Vigo-Santiago route with no problems at all.

According to shoe salesmen, I have overpronation and slightly wide feet. In case it's helpful to anyone else in the same boat, here's the overthinking that went into my shoes and socks (since it ultimately worked out well). :D
  • I appreciated the advice of Walter James Palmer above but did not follow it since my existing trail shoes are my "normal" sports shoe size and I only wear them for day hikes with 1 pair of thin socks. I was concerned they would feel too tight after a double layer of socks, foot swelling after multiple days etc.
  • I didn't want to spend Altra money, since I'd also seen concerns about the Olympus 5's durability
  • After comparing reviews, the Brooks seemed to tick most boxes important to me (cushioning, breathability, durability) at a better price, and would perhaps help with my overpronation when road running with them post-Camino
My sizing overthinking went as follows:
  • In sandals I am a US women's 6 (or smaller, depending on the cut)
  • In my existing trail shoes I wear US women's 7 but as mentioned above, I was concerned they would still be too small for this particular use
  • The only sizes of the Brooks I could try in Singapore were US women's 7.5 or 8 (normal fit) or US men's 7
  • I eventually rolled the dice and ordered US women's 8 wide from Amazon USA. It's possible that it's the same size as US men's 7, but I can't say.
I tried the following combinations of socks (+ Aquaphor on my feet beforehand). All worked well, but maybe it also helped that I changed up the combinations across the days.
  • Double-layer Wrightsocks
  • Double-layer 1000 Mile socks
  • Injinji liner toesocks (liner) + Darn Tough merino (outer)
  • 1000 Mile racing socks (liner) + Darn Tough merino (outer)
I also brought Teva Hurricane XLT sandals as my spare shoes, for using in the evenings and in case my Brooks didn't work out.

Many thanks to all who gave me input, and more generally to all who contribute such excellent and helpful content to this forum.

Hope this helps someone else out there, and my happy feet wish Buen Camino to yours!
Very helpful to me! Thank you so much. Coincidentally I ended up getting some Brooks Ghost. So far, pretty good but not blown away. Im still in early stages of training so Ill keep going with them and make a call later.
 

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Hi! I'm traveling to Porto tomorrow and starting the Camino on the 19th, the problem is that I've just weighed my pack and it's 2 kilos more than it should be! Should I get rid of some stuff or...
Hello all - thank you all so much for all of the guidance on what is not my only first camino but first hike over about 5 miles! I've headed a lot of advice about backpacks and trekking poles and...
I’m leaving soon for CP and again attempted to use what’s app without success. I was trying to call a hotel in Spain, it just rings but nothing else. A few years ago I tried using in within Spain...
While reading through one of the more recent water bottle vs. hydration bladder debates, I was reminded of something I came across a few weeks ago, bookmarked, and promptly forgot about until said...
I've stopped procrastinating and done my first pack. Was a bit nervous about being under 7kg hand luggage, but on the first try I've come to 5.9kg (13 pounds). (Not counting one set walking...
Starting our Camino on May 6. Super excited! These forums have been awesome! Doing Coastal Portuguese from Porto with my daughter and her girlfriend. Definitely packing good lightweight rain...

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