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Ok entering the shoe debate with trepidation ...

Time of past OR future Camino
April 2024
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I walked the CF in a pair of Keen Boots with no problems whatsoever. And they were the waterproof kind with their Goretex equivalent.

Well, actually there was one problem but it wasn't the boot's fault. I had to wad paper under an insole to support an arch better.
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Well you nailed it, "it depends", on your foot, the anticipated weather, your experience etc. However since you are focused on your ankles let me add one more thing. I've noticed some people wear a style of sock that ends just below the ankle bone. I prefer the ones that end just above to avoid those blisters. Sure, at the end of the day you'll have an odd tan line but that's how everyone will know you're a pilgrim.

I've spent many hours with Pilgrims of certain (un-named) countries who swear by their beloved heavy leather boots. They're very Keen to discuss their wide experience in hiking...... and just as Keen to discuss the best way to deal with their blisters... needles, Compeed, duct tape. Just saying.......

My own preference is either the wide toed Altra Lone Peak or Olympus. Perhaps in our Forum signatures we should also list our shoe preferences as well as our trails.
 
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I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain...
hmmmmmm, well honestly, if they've worked for you this far, changing them might not be necessary, in the spirit of if it ain't broke, don't fix it ?
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Hello and Welcome
imho you answered your own question - You already have a good pair that you absolutely feel comfortable with (in) - sorry for the caps hit the button accidentally
anyways.... I presume you've walked in them many many times and feel comfortable. so.. who cares that they are 'heavy'? you may not even feel that they are....

[Edited by moderator to remove accidental caps]
 
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I would agree with domigee. As another Aussie, I'd say stick to your Keen boots and toe socks. You might just want some more room in the toe box if you have been losing toenails? Switching to elastic lock laces and gel insoles might also help. Buen Camino. 🚶‍♂️
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I am another from Aus. 🙂 Lots of good advice above, so I'm just going to chime in on the Brooks-specific part of the question.

I love my Brooks Cascadias, which I wear with toe socks. They are light, supportive, and have good grip. I've worn them on all kinds of terrain. Just bear in mind, you might need to go up a size. But if you like Brooks already, these might be worth a try.

PS. Speedgoats were not for me.

Hope this helps. Wishing you a buen camino.
 
I would agree with domigee. As another Aussie, I'd say stick to your Keen boots and toe socks. You might just want some more room in the toe box if you have been losing toenails? Switching to elastic lock laces and gel insoles might also help. Buen Camino. 🚶‍♂️
thanks so much ... I only realised this is a complicated topic. Had blithely assumed my tried and true keens would see me through ... Great to hear from a fellow Aussie pilgrim!
 
I am another from Aus. 🙂 Lots of good advice above, so I'm just going to chime in on the Brooks-specific part of the question.

I love my Brooks Cascadias, which I wear with toe socks. They are light, supportive, and have good grip. I've worn them on all kinds of terrain. Just bear in mind, you might need to go up a size. But if you like Brooks already, these might be worth a try.

PS. Speedgoats were not for me.

Hope this helps. Wishing you a buen camino.
thank you, may I ask why the Speedgoats were not for you? For me it is only the ankle support and Brooks are fantastic with their padding around the ankles (as are my Keen ankle boots) but I've seen so many swear by the Speedgoats ... but as said above once at home with the Speedgoats, I felt the ankle support was way too thin and already hurts ... I do wear long thick toe socks so that's not the issue, it's just how thin they are around the ankles. It's not easy to really try out shoes in the shop ...
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
hmmmmmm, well honestly, if they've worked for you this far, changing them might not be necessary, in the spirit of if it ain't broke, don't fix it ?
Losing toenails? Sounds pretty 'Broke' to me! Although, conceivably, simply just too small.
@Judeperegrino, don't get me wrong - they're great boots. And as someone who's also done a bit of hiking (NZ, Aus, Canada) I'll add that I also used boots when on back country trail's. (Although I may well reassess that).
However after extensive reading here and elsewhere (info from the PCT for example), I decided to give trail runners a try. ZERO regrets. As you point out, the terrain on the camino is very, very different.
As a hiker you know how important it is to keep the weight we carry reasonable. Supposedly the weight on your feet is equivalent to five times the weight on your back. So if you can save 300 grams and still be comfortable.....

Much as I like my Ultras they're zero drop - if you're leaving soon don't even think about it. Your tendons require significant time to properly adjust ( stretch).


As always though - Comfort is King.
Get a new pair of these, maybe moving up to the next size. Wear them for a couple of 15 km test walks, and take them if they still seem good.
Seems like very sound advice to me.
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
I started the CF in merrel moab 3 hiking shoes and they worked fine without blisters but after about 8 days decided to try my chaco Z sandals. They were a game changer for me. I never wore the shoes for the remainder of the walk. I did wear them with darn tough smart wool socks and a silk liner sock. What really amazed me beside the comfort was how dry they kept my feet even throughout a few heavy down pours.
No blisters! Hope you find a style that works for you.
Buen Camino...
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
I’m not sure if you already tried this but might socks that cover the ankle shield you from this? Or is that already what you are using and experiencing this? On a related note, I just started a two part series on my channel about foot gear that may have some take aways for you! (Part 2 comes out tomorrow) Hope this helps and Buen Camino!
 
I wear Keen boots on multi-day walks with a 12-17 kg pack in Aust & NZ (Larapinta Tk, Overland Tk, Kepler etc) where good ankle support is needed.

But I wore Altra Olympus trail runners for the French Camino because of my lighter pack weight - and because it’s not really a bushwalk for the most part so shoes suitable for walking on footpaths and sealed roads are fine.

How much have you actually walked in the new shoes? Have you walked in them outside yet? ( I bought some Vasques once and knew immediately that the top was going to irritate my shins - so returned them without ever taking them outside.’
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
You already know that Keens are good on your feet, so try a newer pair of lightweight Keens.
If you lose toenails maybe a size or half size up?
 
I always wear Meindl boots with Goretex. My feet love them and they are great on asphalt, cobblestones, gravel and mud. The thick soles are a great cushion for my feet. Trainers or running shoes make my feet ache so bad after about 8-10km that I can barely sleep. So, I never wear them, not even at home. Meindl boots all year round, all weather.
 
I would say stick to the shoes you run well on. I also thought a light shoe with lots of cushioning would be good for me. As a result, I have been recovering from a knee irritation for 4 weeks due to trying shoes with a lot of cushioning. Pretty annoying because I start walking on the 20th of March.

I ran into trouble with an Altra Lone peak shoe, my feet tilting inwards in the process resulting in overloading my knee. I haven't experienced this with any other shoe.

So I stick with my Vivobarefoot Forest, no cushioning but still feel good even after 30 kilometres.

Have fun!
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I started the CF in merrel moab 3 hiking shoes and they worked fine without blisters but after about 8 days decided to try my chaco Z sandals. They were a game changer for me. I never wore the shoes for the remainder of the walk. I did wear them with darn tough smart wool socks and a silk liner sock. What really amazed me beside the comfort was how dry they kept my feet even throughout a few heavy down pours.
No blisters! Hope you find a style that works for you.
Buen Camino...
I love does Darn Tough Socks. The only socks I take with me.
 
I have different pairs of Hokas. Last year, I wore a pair of Hoka Mafate trail shoes to walk the Mozárabe, San Salvador, and Primitivo. They were OK, but share a problem similar to what you described with the Speedgoats - the heel counter rubs the back of the ankle. Last year, I had to put Compeed bandages on the back of my ankles just above the heels. This year I was going to use Speedgoats, but decided that the vibram soles are not ideal for mixed asphalt/gravel/dirt. I'm using Hoka Stinson ATR. Took them out of the box the day I left Wisconsin on Feb 11. As of today, in Medina del Campo, I've put 735km on them with no blisters or issues - other than wear.
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
I can only speak from my own experience as an Aussie (familiar hiking in heavy leather Redback hiking boots) walking the Camino last year from SJPDP to Santiago, Finisterre and Muxia. I wore trail-running shoes. Big mistake! Boots give far more support, and at times this is needed. If you're used to wearing boots, don't get blisters wearing them, find they're comfortable and your feet don't ache after 20+ km's, wear your boots!
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Hey! I used to work in a sports shop selling running and hiking shoes. I personally did my 790km Frances in running shoes and they were great for me. If you would like some advice, you could post pics of your Brooks (sole and inside) for me to see and I can let you know what type I can recommend. I won't recommend brands or something, just stuff to look out for based on your wear pattern.
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
I wrote this in reply about two months ago to a ''Auburn 5'' ; he never made a reply I have walked the Camino Frances seven times since the Summer of 2012. I wore Italian hand crafted hiking boots by ACU men's Tribute II LTR; in the UK size 8 1/2 ie. size 9 in the USA. Trational hiking boot;good angle support ;
very light and practically no '' breaking -in ''. single seam cut; no goretex ; fully recommend ! So far have bought 6 pairs . Four times on the camino Frances have had to resole ; no problem , Zapatero repair shops every where; e20 for resoleing of both boots. Buy online for about $180 a pair ; free delivery by post.
Buen Camino ; from Canada brendano !
 
I wear Keen boots on multi-day walks with a 12-17 kg pack in Aust & NZ (Larapinta Tk, Overland Tk, Kepler etc) where good ankle support is needed.

But I wore Altra Olympus trail runners for the French Camino because of my lighter pack weight - and because it’s not really a bushwalk for the most part so shoes suitable for walking on footpaths and sealed roads are fine.

How much have you actually walked in the new shoes? Have you walked in them outside yet? ( I bought some Vasques once and knew immediately that the top was going to irritate my shins - so returned them without ever taking them outside.’
thanks: problem with walking in the new Hokas is that I may need to take them back ,... so can only try them out in the home., I was just talking to someone who recommended the Altar Olympus trail runners, though whether I can get used to zero drop in time is another question ... but they seem pretty good. I am usually in bare feet when not walking so may be able to get used to them in 6 weeks ...
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
I would say stick to the shoes you run well on. I also thought a light shoe with lots of cushioning would be good for me. As a result, I have been recovering from a knee irritation for 4 weeks due to trying shoes with a lot of cushioning. Pretty annoying because I start walking on the 20th of March.

I ran into trouble with an Altra Lone peak shoe, my feet tilting inwards in the process resulting in overloading my knee. I haven't experienced this with any other shoe.

So I stick with my Vivobarefoot Forest, no cushioning but still feel good even after 30 kilometres.

Have fun!
Hi @Bvdh
I'm just curious - do you have the Vivobarefoot Tracker Forest Escape or the slightly lower Vivobarefoot Magna Forest Escape?
 
thanks: problem with walking in the new Hokas is that I may need to take them back ,... so can only try them out in the home., I was just talking to someone who recommended the Altar Olympus trail runners, though whether I can get used to zero drop in time is another question ... but they seem pretty good. I am usually in bare feet when not walking so may be able to get used to them in 6 weeks ...
If you are looking at Altra trail runners try the Mont Blanc. They are in between Lone Peak and Olympus in terms of cushioning. I switched to zero drop trail runners before my third Camino and am now a fan.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
My wife and I did the C/F in '22 with Altra lone peak mids- only issue was the lack of a rock-plate. the new model has a thicker mid-sole = so that issue has been eliminated. Altra's are the #1 choice of hikers doing the PCT and the Appalachian trail - because they can be replaced mid hike and need no break in. cannot beat the comfort - right out of the box - or at the end of a hot day in the 'plains'!
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
Buckle up everyone, diverse opinions flying in on this one.

Here is what worked for me:
1. Comfort
2. Breathable
3. Light
4. Space in toebox
5. Keep feet dry - change socks every 2 to 3 hours if it's warm and feet sweat. Easily done on breaks, airing feet at the sane time. I kept a small microfibre towel to dry my feet too.
6. Talcum powder in the day while walking, vaseline or similar to give feet TLC after showering

I started with hill-walking boots (Salomon QUEST 4GTX), but they overheated my feet, which led to some blisters. They did provide good ankle support though, which was great for the section from SJPP to Puente la Reina. A bit further on, in Viana, I had to buy lighter, breathable trail shoes (Merrell ALLOUT BLAZE AERO) due to the heat, which "saved my Camino.

Despite these adjustments, I did suffer 12 days of uncomfortable shin splints, which was something I wasn't aware of before starting my Camino.

Buen camino!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
thank you, may I ask why the Speedgoats were not for you? For me it is only the ankle support and Brooks are fantastic with their padding around the ankles (as are my Keen ankle boots) but I've seen so many swear by the Speedgoats ... but as said above once at home with the Speedgoats, I felt the ankle support was way too thin and already hurts ... I do wear long thick toe socks so that's not the issue, it's just how thin they are around the ankles. It's not easy to really try out shoes in the shop ...
I don't remember exactly, because believe me, I tried ALL of the shoes. 🤣 So, I do understand where you are coming from. It's not easy to find the right shoe, and the choices are overwhelming. From memory, the Speedgoats were too narrow in the toe box, and were too soft for me. I need a supportive shoe, so it didn't work for me.

The right shoe is always going to be a very individual thing. Recommendations can give you an idea of what to try, but all that matters is whether it is comfortable for you.

Hope this helps. When are you starting, and which route?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
Nails coming off sounds like you need a larger size shoe. You don’t have to wear boots either. I have thin ankles so I don’t like boots and wore walking shoes instead. In my case Lowe vibram gortex shoes and I went up a whole size. I’ve not had any blisters or nail problems so far but I also wore bridgedale wool socks. The problem with Gortex is that the shoes stay wet inside if you are caught in a downpour. My only problem is Golfers Vasculitis which is probably due to the wool or not training enough. I might even try trainers this year and Teva sandles as it will be a June Camino. Good luck, there’s so much choice!
 
Glad to see the toenail discussion...thought it was just me and my semi paralysed big toes (back nerve disconnected). My shoes are big enough so that is not the cause... If there was a shoe that guarantees no big toenail loss I would buy but somehow I feel it is just going to happen anyway.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I wear Keen boots on multi-day walks with a 12-17 kg pack in Aust & NZ (Larapinta Tk, Overland Tk, Kepler etc) where good ankle support is needed.

But I wore Altra Olympus trail runners for the French Camino because of my lighter pack weight - and because it’s not really a bushwalk for the most part so shoes suitable for walking on footpaths and sealed roads are fine.

How much have you actually walked in the new shoes? Have you walked in them outside yet? ( I bought some Vasques once and knew immediately that the top was going to irritate my shins - so returned them without ever taking them outside.’
Thanks that is most helpful, managed to swap the speed-goats for Hoka Masadi which have padding in the tongue (the speedgoats are very thin here) and this seems to be a better combination, along with going for the men's size which is rounder and wider in the toe box ... But I was just recently told about the Altra Olympus ... so that is interesting,
I am seeing the podiatrist tomorrow with my array of current choices!!! hard as one can't take them back once one has worn them outside ... getting there!

And I swear by toe socks with a think ankle rim ...
 
I’m not sure if you already tried this but might socks that cover the ankle shield you from this? Or is that already what you are using and experiencing this? On a related note, I just started a two part series on my channel about foot gear that may have some take aways for you! (Part 2 comes out tomorrow) Hope this helps and Buen Camino!
Hi great to meet you! I had already watched your you tube with great interest and taken extensive notes! I've yet to try TOPO mountain racer as they aren't so available in the stores near me and we don't seem to be able to get Tabio signature toe socks only Injinji and that is all I wear now, but do go for the ones that have extra padding around the ankle shield which helps a lot ... also found a type of HOKAS that have a padded tongue so am giving that a whirl ... when you think about it, all these components are necessarily complicated as our feet are pretty amazing little things and a pity being so little they have to carry so much of us!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi great to meet you! I had already watched your you tube with great interest and taken extensive notes! I've yet to try TOPO mountain racer as they aren't so available in the stores near me and we don't seem to be able to get Tabio signature toe socks only Injinji and that is all I wear now, but do go for the ones that have extra padding around the ankle shield which helps a lot ... also found a type of HOKAS that have a padded tongue so am giving that a whirl ... when you think about it, all these components are necessarily complicated as our feet are pretty amazing little things and a pity being so little they have to carry so much of us!
BTW which specific Dry Mile Sock should one go for and what size (women's US 10) ...these I can get hold of in Australia ...
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
You can't beat waterproof hiking boots. Make sure they are a half size bigger than what you normally wear (for your toes). Wear them before leaving. I also took Teva Moutaineers for light days. Worked beautifully! Buen Camino
 
thank you, may I ask why the Speedgoats were not for you? For me it is only the ankle support and Brooks are fantastic with their padding around the ankles (as are my Keen ankle boots) but I've seen so many swear by the Speedgoats ... but as said above once at home with the Speedgoats, I felt the ankle support was way too thin and already hurts ... I do wear long thick toe socks so that's not the issue, it's just how thin they are around the ankles. It's not easy to really try out shoes in the shop ...
As a super pronator returned the Speedgoats and back to Challengers. With coolmax toe socks and alpaca socks over them. Training for 4 months - not a blister.
 
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I'm curious about folks saying the boots provide them needed ankle support. Would love to hear more about why they think they need ankle support. And why elastic style ankle support wraps wouldn't also provide that support for a lot less weight. I'm not trying to poke a bear. I am genuinely curious about their experience.

To the poster: Definitely return the trail runners you bought though. If your intuition is saying no, then listen! Try something else. So much good advice about buying a size up. Totally agree. Best advice I have gotten on both running and trail running shoes. I would say use your Brooks or look at other Brooks. And not just because their headquarters is 2 miles from my house. :D Simply because you know they have worked in the past. But keep trying until you find a fit that feels good/ok out of the box.

Something to consider. Keep in mind if the trail you are going on, is it mountaineering, or is it mostly road walking? Because I think that is the key to the answer to their question. So if it's the Frances route for example, from what I understand most of it is on gravel or pavement and relatively flat. (I would love to know if there is a percentage on that, if someone knows.) So I am taking that into consideration for my trip in July. Thinking about what I would be comfortable walking in vs. hiking in. As long as there is good tread on the bottom for when it is needed and they can withstand the mileage. And since I'm a trekking pole user, that will give me more stability on the parts that are steep, rocky or otherwise sketchy. I know I am comfortable walking in my Altra Lone Pines (love that wide toe box) and Chaco sandals. So that's what I will be bringing. (Regarding the zero drop of the Altras. Frankly I don't know what it all really does, so no opinion there. Just like the fit of the Altra shoe on my foot and the tread.)
 
Thank you ... a week later gathering advice and doing research and taking three new pairs bought on spec into the podiatrist and guess what he suggested .... tried and true! I think there is a moral there about the Camino and simplicity and not over thinking it ... but hey I now know why the shoes I have work and all sorts of things I didn't know before about the construction of shoes!!!!
 
I'm curious about folks saying the boots provide them needed ankle support.
It's from having particularly weak ankles that need the support else risk constant twists, sprains, or even falls.

Most pilgrims don't need it, but some of us do.
 
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Is that not something rectified with stretchy ankle braces or support wraps/tape? This is wear my curiosity lies.
Well I certainly wouldn't want to keep on strapping my ankles on a daily basis !!

There are different needs in different people, but without my boots, which I wear every day, I would twist or sprain my ankles with some frequency, and I'd also be at greater risk of falling.

My army boots do have straps, and on occasion when I might twist an ankle on or off the Camino, I can strap that boot up tight, which gives the foot sufficient stability to be able to keep on walking, carefully. Sometimes, that's even enough to untwist the ankle.

But anyway, most people need no such boots, though they are good anyway on some much longer Caminos (1,200K +) and on Caminos in wetter terrain and in the rainy season.
 
I’m a Speedgoat fan and just bought my fourth pair for an upcoming trip. I’m wondering if you’re getting ankle hotspots because they are too loose. I like to use the heel lock lacing to keep my heel back. For socks, I just use Darn Tough low socks without cushion. I find I get more blisters with cushioning and got between toe blisters when I tried the Inijis. Everyone’s so different! There’s lots of lacing videos on YouTube, here’s one: https://www.blister-prevention.com/blogs/prevention/heel-lock-lacing-technique
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
I’m a Speedgoat fan and just bought my fourth pair for an upcoming trip. I’m wondering if you’re getting ankle hotspots because they are too loose. I like to use the heel lock lacing to keep my heel back. For socks, I just use Darn Tough low socks without cushion. I find I get more blisters with cushioning and got between toe blisters when I tried the Inijis. Everyone’s so different! There’s lots of lacing videos on YouTube, here’s one: https://www.blister-prevention.com/blogs/prevention/heel-lock-lacing-technique
thank you, that's helpful! In the end I bought Brooks glycerines AND HOKA Mafate ... for different terrains and to alternate a bit ... I love the Inijis ... the Mafate have a cushioned tongue which works well. And thanks for the shoe lace tip: my podiatrist also said to experiment with different situations with how I tie the laces, such as not starting at the bottom (nearest the toes) to give my toes more toe spreading room ... all these posts have been useful thank you everyone and I hope they are helpful considerations for others as well as me!
 
Well I certainly wouldn't want to keep on strapping my ankles on a daily basis !!

There are different needs in different people, but without my boots, which I wear every day, I would twist or sprain my ankles with some frequency, and I'd also be at greater risk of falling.

My army boots do have straps, and on occasion when I might twist an ankle on or off the Camino, I can strap that boot up tight, which gives the foot sufficient stability to be able to keep on walking, carefully. Sometimes, that's even enough to untwist the ankle.

But anyway, most people need no such boots, though they are good anyway on some much longer Caminos (1,200K +) and on Caminos in wetter terrain and in the rainy season.
Thank you for sharing this with me. You have helped me understand your point of view and preferences.
 
Has anyone tried the new Dansko line of hiking and walking shoes?
 
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Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
I am also about to do my 1st Camino and have Hokas. My foot surgeon recommended these, and they were the only shoe I could wear for over a year after surgery to walk in. I bought Bondi in 1/2 size bigger, wide. I’ve worn them a bit to break them in, and then put them away and will be hoping for the best! They have been comfortable and I do highly recommend the brand!
 
Hi I am new to this, I am about to walk 500 k along the camino Frances .... I am used to bushwalking in Australia but ... and I know this is a topic where the answer is correctly 'it depends on your feet, as every foot is different' but ... I have only really cottoned onto what a huge topic this is ... I had, till about a few days ago, simply assumed my heavy duty, ankle supporting Keen walking boots were the go because I had never had blisters when using them (with toe socks) doing multiway pack walks in rugged remote mountainous terrain... but they ARE heavy ... and the camino is a different terrain than bushwalking in remote areas in Australia .... So I just rushed out and bought (as a back up) the seemingly famous Hoka speedboat 5 the professional trail running shop recommended for the camino ... I mean, I tried them on in the shop and they felt great, the guy selling them said that is what HE wore on the camino but taking them home and trying them out pacing up and down the corridor found that they feel fantastic underfoot, but ... they rub around the ankles and am afraid that will be where I get blisters. NOT my toes but my ankles ...My Brooks glycerines (street shoes) are worn out but they have a mass of soft cushioning around the ankles ... so am wondering whether Brooks might be better for me ....I had no idea about heal to toe drop ratios and what they mean in practice, I had no idea about how many factors one has to take into account. I also realise if the area around the toes is wide but foot stays firmly placed in the shoe, then one is going to get way less trauma to the toes (I keep losing toe nails when walking long distances for example) so I too am now Keen to wade into this discussion and see if I still have time to put prevention is better than trying to deal with it on the camino when too late ... any suggestions most welcome with thanks ... from a peregrine wading in the mud of a new terrain of expertise ... aka footwear ...
Find shoes that are comfortable, fit your feet and have a vibram sole.
 

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