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which route?

rsepich

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
fall 2023
Hi all!
I am planning on hiking as a solo female next fall. I am not super experienced with hiking, at least not for a long distance like this would be. I just want to start out doing the last 100km. I've done research on all the major routes, but for the life of me I can't decide!

Which route would you suggest for the last 100 km only?
I love historical stuff, scenery. I don't really like massive crowds (so I'm thinking I probably won't start in Sarria). And a lot of up and down hills is probably more difficult than I would prefer.

Thank you!
 
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Those alleged crowds in Sarria may not be there when you walk, depending what month you choose and even what day of the week. Like most tourist areas, the numbers swell and shrink based on holidays, weekends, festivals, holy days, etc.

That said, the CF is by far the most supported route and for a new walker unsure of one’s ability, it may just be the right place for you. Certainly the easiest in terms of accommodations, medical assistance, taxi rides, etc.
 
Those alleged crowds in Sarria may not be there when you walk, depending what month you choose and even what day of the week. Like most tourist areas, the numbers swell and shrink based on holidays, weekends, festivals, holy days, etc.

That said, the CF is by far the most supported route and for a new walker unsure of one’s ability, it may just be the right place for you. Certainly the easiest in terms of accommodations, medical assistance, taxi rides, etc.
That's good to think about. You never know if you might need medical help, and I'd hate to be all alone if that happened.
 
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I haven't done this but if you take transportation from Santiago to Sarria you will likely have to stop in Lugo which is on the Primitivo. If your first sello is from the cathedral there then I believe you qualify for a compostela. You then have a couple of less crowded walking days before merging with the Camino Francés at Melida.
 
Let me suggest that you walk the second half of the Portuguese starting in Tui. You’re 100+ kilometers out from Santiago and the route is quite nice to walk. Tui
Itself is very charming. Along this route you also have wonderful towns/cities like Redondela, Pontevedra, and Padron. You have plenty of historical spots along the way. Plus, the terrain is quite moderate in terms of ups and downs. You can check this route out on Gronze.com. My major suggestion would be to add one additional day on so as to break up the very long Tui to Redondela stage.
 
I haven't done this but if you take transportation from Santiago to Sarria you will likely have to stop in Lugo which is on the Primativo. If your first sello is from the cathedral there then I believe you qualify for a compostela. You then have a couple of less crowded walking days before merging with the Camino Francés at Melida.
The Roman wall in Lugo does really interest me!
 
New Original Camino Gear Designed Especially with The Modern Peregrino In Mind!
Let me suggest that you walk the second half of the Portuguese starting in Tui. You’re 100+ kilometers out from Santiago and the route is quite nice to walk. Tui
Itself is very charming. Along this route you also have wonderful towns/cities like Redondela, Pontevedra, and Padron. You have plenty of historical spots along the way. Plus, the terrain is quite moderate in terms of ups and downs. You can check this route out on Gronze.com. My major suggestion would be to add one additional day on so as to break up the very long Tui to Redondela stage.
That's good to know, both about the terrain and breaking up the stage
 
I have been thinking about the last 100km a fair bit lately. My current belief is that the last 100km on all caminos is not close to being the best of any of those caminos ... with one exception: the Portugués from Tui, including the Variante Espiritual. So I second @Grousedoctor and that is my clear recommendation.

Lugo is a great town but personally I wouldn't recommend the last 100km of the Primitivo. The best of the Primitivo is before that, and the standard last 100km route includes 50km on the Francés (the last 100km of which is certainly not the best the Francés has to offer).
 
You never know if you might need medical help, and I'd hate to be all alone if that happened.
Actually I don't think this is an important consideration: you are in the EU, on a known camino route, always in the midst of the developed world and its trappings (good and bad).

My current belief is that the last 100km on all caminos is not close to being the best of any of those caminos ... with one exception: the Portugués from Tui, including the Variante Espiritual. So I second @Grousedoctor and that is my clear recommendation.
The Variante Espiritual and new(-ish) alternative Norte option are the only ones I haven't walked, so I can't comment on those. But for the rest, I'd choose the Camino Ingles. Yes, it does have quite a lot of pavement and empty small road walking, and that first schlep around the bay from Ferrol docks is a mixed bag. But it also has some lovely features, and the towns of Pontedueme and Betanzos are little Galician gems to overnight in. You also get to complete a whole camino!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Let me suggest that you walk the second half of the Portuguese starting in Tui. You’re 100+ kilometers out from Santiago and the route is quite nice to walk. Tui
Itself is very charming. Along this route you also have wonderful towns/cities like Redondela, Pontevedra, and Padron. You have plenty of historical spots along the way. Plus, the terrain is quite moderate in terms of ups and downs. You can check this route out on Gronze.com. My major suggestion would be to add one additional day on so as to break up the very long Tui to Redondela stage.
I agree completely. It is really a pretty easy walk. It is pretty easy from Sarria also. You may want to also check out the Norte starting in Baamonde. It is very pretty and quiet with only 2 days at the end on the CF. The monastery in Sobrado dos Monxas is definitely worth checking out and staying for the night, The last week from Ourense or on the Inglis may have too many hills for you. I would agree with Grousedoctor to check out Gronze and their stage profile for hills. One way or another you can't escape them!
 
Let me suggest that you walk the second half of the Portuguese starting in Tui. You’re 100+ kilometers out from Santiago and the route is quite nice to walk. Tui
Itself is very charming. Along this route you also have wonderful towns/cities like Redondela, Pontevedra, and Padron. You have plenty of historical spots along the way. Plus, the terrain is quite moderate in terms of ups and downs. You can check this route out on Gronze.com. My major suggestion would be to add one additional day on so as to break up the very long Tui to Redondela stage.
Too right about the Tui to Redondela stage, I am stopping after 8 km because I will do a bit of sight seeing, at Casa Alternativo (Os Eidos), pricey at 30 euros per night (for me) but includes everything and for me a treat, then walk 12 km and stop at Albergue Santa Baia de Mos at Rua Mos. it is then only 11 km to Redondela. They are very short stages but I am not in a hurry, and good distances for newbies, which I am.
 
Hi all!
I am planning on hiking as a solo female next fall. I am not super experienced with hiking, at least not for a long distance like this would be. I just want to start out doing the last 100km. I've done research on all the major routes, but for the life of me I can't decide!

Which route would you suggest for the last 100 km only?
I love historical stuff, scenery. I don't really like massive crowds (so I'm thinking I probably won't start in Sarria). And a lot of up and down hills is probably more difficult than I would prefer.

Thank you!
camino portugues the costal road
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.

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