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Luggage Transfer Correos

Women's Lightweight Hoody

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
What is your favorite cuddly, warm, and lightweight hoody. I used a Down Ghost Whisperer (6.8 oz) for the Norte...along with a Pategonia Houdini Windbreaker (3.3 oz).
I have gained weight and need to replace these. I'd like to keep the weight about the same 10-14 oz if possible for the two items (or even one item that does both). I hiked in September/October. These two pieces worked great for cool mornings and evenings. What are your favorites? I am hoping to get some good ideas...
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
What is your favorite cuddly, warm, and lightweight hoody. I used a Down Ghost Whisperer (6.8 oz) for the Norte...along with a Pategonia Houdini Windbreaker (3.3 oz).
I have gained weight and need to replace these. I'd like to keep the weight about the same 10-14 oz if possible for the two items (or even one item that does both). I hiked in September/October. These two pieces worked great for cool mornings and evenings. What are your favorites? I am hoping to get some good ideas...
Hi Hiker-Jill,
After converting ounces to grams (but let's not go there...THAT thread lit up the forum elsewhere!), my hoody which doubles as my jumper weighs 200gm (aprx 7oz). The brand is Kathmandu which is an Aussie/NZ outdoor/adventure clothing company...you could google them to have a look.
*My best tip which may be helpful; I take a pair of legwarmers (who said the 80's were a fashion disaster?!) which serve three purposes. As they're elasticised, they fit my arms & legs. I can wear a short-sleeved top starting out in the morning or on cooler days & as I warm up, just roll them off...you don't have to get changed, stop or even take off your pack! I never take long pants for any trip. Once again, if cooler, wear the leg warmers & just roll them off when not needed. Being elasticised, its easy to get them off without having to take off your shoes or boots. Third use of the leg warmers is they can be tucked in to provide padding if your pack is rubbing anywhere.
Mine weigh 45gm (less than 2oz) & were bought at a $2 shop. Considering they save carrying a jumper (windbreaker), long pants, provide padding & are cheap, you can't get better bang for your buck! I've walked thousands of km in different countries, climates & terrain & its worked for me.
Oh...& I hear you about the whole weight gain thing... 🤔 😁
Happy trails,
👣 🌏
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
Although pricey, it is worth it because I wear my Zpacks™ Ventum Wind Shell Jacket every day. Usually I wear it over my hiking tank top. If it is really cold I wear it next to the skin under my blouse as a vapor barrier. A large is 1.9 oz. Because it has a hood I stopped bringing a hoodie but I used to bring a OR WOMEN'S ECHO HOODY at 3.4 oz. It has sun protection factor and is cooling in the sun but warm covered by the wind shell. I rarely had to wear my Montbell down jacket (4.6 oz) with this combination.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Although pricey, it is worth it because I wear my Zpacks™ Ventum Wind Shell Jacket every day. Usually I wear it over my hiking tank top. If it is really cold I wear it next to the skin under my blouse as a vapor barrier. A large is 1.9 oz. Because it has a hood I stopped bringing a hoodie but I used to bring a OR WOMEN'S ECHO HOODY at 3.4 oz. It has sun protection factor and is cooling in the sun but warm covered by the wind shell. I rarely had to wear my Montbell down jacket (4.6 oz) with this combination.
sounds like you found a nice combination. What time of year? What were the highs and lows?
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Hi Hiker-Jill,
After converting ounces to grams (but let's not go there...THAT thread lit up the forum elsewhere!), my hoody which doubles as my jumper weighs 200gm (aprx 7oz). The brand is Kathmandu which is an Aussie/NZ outdoor/adventure clothing company...you could google them to have a look.
*My best tip which may be helpful; I take a pair of legwarmers (who said the 80's were a fashion disaster?!) which serve three purposes. As they're elasticised, they fit my arms & legs. I can wear a short-sleeved top starting out in the morning or on cooler days & as I warm up, just roll them off...you don't have to get changed, stop or even take off your pack! I never take long pants for any trip. Once again, if cooler, wear the leg warmers & just roll them off when not needed. Being elasticised, its easy to get them off without having to take off your shoes or boots. Third use of the leg warmers is they can be tucked in to provide padding if your pack is rubbing anywhere.
Mine weigh 45gm (less than 2oz) & were bought at a $2 shop. Considering they save carrying a jumper (windbreaker), long pants, provide padding & are cheap, you can't get better bang for your buck! I've walked thousands of km in different countries, climates & terrain & its worked for me.
Oh...& I hear you about the whole weight gain thing... 🤔 😁
Happy trails,
👣 🌏
I use smartwool long underwear...I tend to get very cold...but these keep my legs nice and warm...but yes, it is a big deal to take them off it gets hot during the day. Legwarmers I have never considered...so thank you for opening my mind to that. I will take a look.
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
sounds like you found a nice combination. What time of year? What were the highs and lows?
I have walked the Camino 7 times, twice in May, the rest September and October. The temperature varies from morning to night. I have kept warm while morning ice was still on the ground. I do also carry a OR rain jacket(6oz ) and a zpack rain skirt (1.8) for a complete system. So I am guessing the lows have been in the thirties and highs in the 90's.
Also I carry a silk mummy bag liner but no sleeping bag. I just wear the windbreaker if chilly. Think layers instead of heavy fleece you wear a couple of times.
Everything is multi purpose so my backpack weighs less than 10 pounds which is an ideal weight for my age and petite frame.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
Although pricey, it is worth it because I wear my Zpacks™ Ventum Wind Shell Jacket every day. Usually I wear it over my hiking tank top. If it is really cold I wear it next to the skin under my blouse as a vapor barrier. A large is 1.9 oz. Because it has a hood I stopped bringing a hoodie but I used to bring a OR WOMEN'S ECHO HOODY at 3.4 oz. It has sun protection factor and is cooling in the sun but warm covered by the wind shell. I rarely had to wear my Montbell down jacket (4.6 oz) with this combination.
Hello @easygoing, How water resistant is this? Probably not a good substitute for a rain jacket? I'm in the process of figuring out my layers and rain gear. Thanks!
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
The Zpack wind jacket is water resistant and dries fast if wet. I often wear it in the rain and with my Montbell umbrella (4.6) I stay warm and dry. I answered another inquiry just now but I repeat i also carry a OR (6oz) rain jacket and a Zpack (1.8 oz) rain skirt too for strong winds and heavy rain.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
The Zpack wind jacket is water resistant and dries fast if wet. I often wear it in the rain and with my Montbell umbrella (4.6) I stay warm and dry. I answered another inquiry just now but I repeat i also carry a OR (6oz) rain jacket and a Zpack (1.8 oz) rain skirt too for strong winds and heavy rain.
Great info, thanks for this.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
I have walked the Camino 7 times, twice in May, the rest September and October. The temperature varies from morning to night. I have kept warm while morning ice was still on the ground. I do also carry a OR rain jacket(6oz ) and a zpack rain skirt (1.8) for a complete system. So I am guessing the lows have been in the thirties and highs in the 90's.
Also I carry a silk mummy bag liner but no sleeping bag. I just wear the windbreaker if chilly. Think layers instead of heavy fleece you wear a couple of times.
Everything is multi purpose so my backpack weighs less than 10 pounds which is an ideal weight for my age and petite frame.
What backpack do you use? Does the (under 10 pounds) include the pack weight?
 

easygoing

Camino Sharon
Camino(s) past & future
I have walked the Camino Francis 7 times, twice in 2017 and 2018. (2019)
Yes that includes my backpack. I use the Zpack Scout and it weighs 22 ounces/1.6 pounds. The Arc Blast is essentially the same pack and actually weighs less, but I bought the Scout"youth version" because Iam only 5'3" . Mine weighs more because I added extra pockets
I used to use a lighter one by 6 Moons but it didn't have a frame which was uncomfortable on the hot days due to sweat.
I just ordered a hiking skirt from Montbell that weighs 2.8 oz. Which is half the weight of my shorts. Of note: if you order from Zpacks there is a 3 to 5 week delivery time as everything is made to order. If anyone is interested I can send you my gear list. My goal for this June Camino is under 10 pounds.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Spring 2016: Camino Frances, Finisterre and Muxia
April 2019: Frances, Salvador, Primitivo
If anyone is interested I can send you my gear list. My goal for this June Camino is under 10 pounds.
That is my goal too. I was close last time, but now I'm 3 years older and am beginning to have some minor back issues.

So I'd be interested in your packing list. And I use the Z-pack arc blast. I hardly notice I'm carrying a pack!
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
That is my goal too. I was close last time, but now I'm 3 years older and am beginning to have some minor back issues.

So I'd be interested in your packing list. And I use the Z-pack arc blast. I hardly notice I'm carrying a pack!
I would also like to see your packing list!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrano
The micro puff looks great...although a bit fragile.
Jill, I had the same concerns as you about about the Patagonia micro-puff hoodies looking fragile, but they survived daily hiking and biking for three months in the mountains in Spain without a single tear. The first time I snagged mine on a thorny bush, I feared the worst, but after unhooking the thorns, I couldn't even see the spots where it snagged. We thought they were warm, comfortable, and light - just what we needed.
 
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Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Jill, I had the same concerns as you about about the Patagonia micro-puff hoodies looking fragile, but they survived daily hiking and biking for three months in the mountains in Spain without a single tear. The first time I snagged mine on a thorny bush, I feared the worst, but after unhooking the thorns, I couldn't even see the spots where it snagged. We thought they were warm, comfortable, and light - just what we needed.
Thanks for that testimonial. I think the micro puff or even a down vest would work....gotta keep the weight down, right. Really glad to hear that the micropuff is durable
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Thanks for that testimonial. I think the micro puff or even a down vest would work....gotta keep the weight down, right. Really glad to hear that the micropuff is durable
Since I use a lightweight long sleeved merino wool shirt to walk in, and a second one that carry, I use a Ghost Whisperer Vest as my insulation layer during the 3 seasons, even when backpacking at high altitudes. I add my Patagonia Houdini windshell over that if needed. The total weight of the two is 9.8 ounces. Since you are familiar with and have used both brands, you might decide to stick with what has worked for you in the past.

Since I carry a very lightweight merino wool beanie hat, and use a 'buff' as needed, I don't personally use vests or jackets with built in hoods.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Since I use a lightweight long sleeved merino wool shirt to walk in, and a second one that carry, I use a Ghost Whisperer Vest as my insulation layer during the 3 seasons, even when backpacking at high altitudes. I add my Patagonia Houdini windshell over that if needed. The total weight of the two is 9.8 ounces. Since you are familiar with and have used both brands, you might decide to stick with what has worked for you in the past.

Since I carry a very lightweight merino wool beanie hat, and use a 'buff' as needed, I don't personally use vests or jackets with built in hoods.
You seem to be outfitted pretty much like I have been....
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Very similar. It seems that our backpack's loaded base weights are about the same. :)
Dave,
You have more experience it seems. So, in your opinion, would a pack without a belt (such as the ULA Photon) be a problem with total pack weight including water of 10 pounds. I am really torn about this idea of belt, no belt, frame, no frame. I am a minimalist...and love the small footprint of a small pack with no belt...no problems when you stop to eat, or travel....but don't want to hurt my shoulders and back....Just looking for another take on it.
Thanks..
Jill
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Dave,
You have more experience it seems. So, in your opinion, would a pack without a belt (such as the ULA Photon) be a problem with total pack weight including water of 10 pounds. I am really torn about this idea of belt, no belt, frame, no frame. I am a minimalist...and love the small footprint of a small pack with no belt...no problems when you stop to eat, or travel....but don't want to hurt my shoulders and back....Just looking for another take on it.
Thanks..
Jill
Hi, Jill..

The Photon DOES have a hipbelt, so if you decide you would want the belt, it is there.

If you don't want to use a hipbelt with any backpack which has one, you can wrap the belt around to the front of the pack and fasten the buckle so it is hugging the front of the pack. I do this when I want the belt out of the way, like when using it as a carry on when flying. Or when I am doing a bit of a technical scramble up a difficult pitch and need a lot of flexibility to stretch my legs at the hips.

Personally, I found that for my frame, the Photon didn't fit me as well across the width of my body as did the CDT. It is also something to note that the CDT actually weighs a bit less than the Photon, although it has a slightly larger capacity. But in either case, I do love the flexibility of their roll top closures.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
Hi
Yes that includes my backpack. I use the Zpack Scout and it weighs 22 ounces/1.6 pounds. The Arc Blast is essentially the same pack and actually weighs less, but I bought the Scout"youth version" because Iam only 5'3" . Mine weighs more because I added extra pockets
I used to use a lighter one by 6 Moons but it didn't have a frame which was uncomfortable on the hot days due to sweat.
I just ordered a hiking skirt from Montbell that weighs 2.8 oz. Which is half the weight of my shorts. Of note: if you order from Zpacks there is a 3 to 5 week delivery time as everything is made to order. If anyone is interested I can send you my gear list. My goal for this June Camino is under 10 pounds.
Hi there, would you mind sharing your packing list with me? Will be walking my first cool weather (April-May) camino after walking 3 summer ones. I am a bit of a cold frog but want to keep my super light so a bit confused about what to pack! Any guidance would be massively appreciated!
 

Eacinibulk

Eacinibulk
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Camino Frances
Hi
Hi there, would you mind sharing your packing list with me? Will be walking my first cool weather (April-May) camino after walking 3 summer ones. I am a bit of a cold frog but want to keep my super light so a bit confused about what to pack! Any guidance would be massively appreciated!
I’d also like to see your packing list.
 

Tertia B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2018 - next stop Port 2020?
Hi Hiker-Jill,
After converting ounces to grams (but let's not go there...THAT thread lit up the forum elsewhere!), my hoody which doubles as my jumper weighs 200gm (aprx 7oz). The brand is Kathmandu which is an Aussie/NZ outdoor/adventure clothing company...you could google them to have a look.
*My best tip which may be helpful; I take a pair of legwarmers (who said the 80's were a fashion disaster?!) which serve three purposes. As they're elasticised, they fit my arms & legs. I can wear a short-sleeved top starting out in the morning or on cooler days & as I warm up, just roll them off...you don't have to get changed, stop or even take off your pack! I never take long pants for any trip. Once again, if cooler, wear the leg warmers & just roll them off when not needed. Being elasticised, its easy to get them off without having to take off your shoes or boots. Third use of the leg warmers is they can be tucked in to provide padding if your pack is rubbing anywhere.
Mine weigh 45gm (less than 2oz) & were bought at a $2 shop. Considering they save carrying a jumper (windbreaker), long pants, provide padding & are cheap, you can't get better bang for your buck! I've walked thousands of km in different countries, climates & terrain & its worked for me.
Oh...& I hear you about the whole weight gain thing... 🤔 😁
Happy trails,
👣 🌏
I knew there was a reason for hanging onto my hot pink leg warmers all these years!!
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Hi
Hi there, would you mind sharing your packing list with me? Will be walking my first cool weather (April-May) camino after walking 3 summer ones. I am a bit of a cold frog but want to keep my super light so a bit confused about what to pack! Any guidance would be massively appreciated!
I'm not Forum member easygoing, but my list may help. I've also included some tips for cool weather walking. I've revised a few things from an earlier list because I'm nit picky :)

All of the clothing can be used in various layering configurations to provide a comfort range from 25F/ -4c to very hot. This is just an example of how a layering system can be flexible and cover a wide temperature range which is more than sufficient for the time of year you are going over the Pyrenees and Galicia.

1548543990121.png

I am not sure just how cold temps might become during your Camino, so the following may or may not apply in your situation.

Layering is a biggie. You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving at in exerting energy, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only those needed when full exertion is going to be achieved. For those who can't suck it up ;) for a few minutes, then wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes. Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
Portugues, Muxia-Finist(2015)
St Olavs Way(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF (2019)
I knew there was a reason for hanging onto my hot pink leg warmers all these years!!
Well, we won't miss you on the trail will we?! 😄 My leg (arm) warmers are a very subdued (& boring) basic black...tho I did fancy the bright multi-coloured stripey ones!
 

AfriCat

My camino tattoo
Camino(s) past & future
2014 - parts of Via Augusta, VdlP, Madrid and Portuguese
I'm not Forum member easygoing, but my list may help.
Wow, davebugg, thank you for the detailed information - very useful and most appreciated.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Hi Jill!!! I use Craghoppers microfibre half zip pullovers, collecting about a half dozen of them over the last couple of years. They are quite popular coming from the UK. My first one I bought in Dublin on my way to the CF in 2016. The rest, I have purchased on Amazon.ca. Very light but warm and durable. My first one is about 3 years old now and no pilling at all.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
I'm not Forum member easygoing, but my list may help. I've also included some tips for cool weather walking. I've revised a few things from an earlier list because I'm nit picky :)

All of the clothing can be used in various layering configurations to provide a comfort range from 25F/ -4c to very hot. This is just an example of how a layering system can be flexible and cover a wide temperature range which is more than sufficient for the time of year you are going over the Pyrenees and Galicia.

View attachment 51403

I am not sure just how cold temps might become during your Camino, so the following may or may not apply in your situation.

Layering is a biggie. You never dress with the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm at the start of walking or hiking... you wear the amount of clothing needed to keep you warm 10 minutes after you start walking.

In cold weather, or even cool weather, one needs to do what is necessary to prevent overheating and sweat. That includes how fast a pace one is moving at in exerting energy, as well as how much clothing one is wearing, and how much air circulation one is able to maintain.

It does not take long, with any layering amount, to saturate clothing with sweat. THAT is when the danger of hypothermia, and at the very least a chilly discomfort will begin to take its toll. If saturation or wetness happens, the only recourse is to change into dry clothing. Since there is usually a limited amount of clothing carried in a backpack, it is essential to adopt strategies to control sweating. Keep in mind that the material of your layers will also determine the effect to you from the above scenario. Focus on clothing made from merino wool or specialized synthetics. These will allow the garment to remain somewhat insulative even though saturated with sweat. Cottons and cotton blends are a menace and can accelerate a hypothermic condition.

Strategies include those mentioned above:
  • Limit layers of clothing to only those needed when full exertion is going to be achieved. For those who can't suck it up ;) for a few minutes, then wear only layers which can be quickly and easily removed. For instance, adding a poncho will add about a 15 degree F advantage to existing layers. It allows for good air circulation. As you warm up during the first 10 minutes of your walk, the poncho is easily removed and stashed into a side pocket of your pack.
  • Move as slow as you need to, within reason, to keep perspiration to a minimum. This may also mean stopping to allow your body to cool down. Even with a single, lightweight layer, some folks walking under load will tend to over-heat. Keep monitoring yourself.
  • Keep an insulative layer near at hand so that if you are wetting-out while walking, you can put it on quickly when you stop for a break. Keep it in an outside pocket or on top of the other contents in your pack. A light puffy jacket or mid-weight fleece or a down vest works well here. The key is to keep this layer dry and to use it as a last resort when at rest. If this strategy is needed, do not continue walking until you have been able to stop sweating and you can achieve some level of dryness to your clothes.
In the above scenario, you may actually become warmer by removing your saturated layers so that you only have on your dry insulative layer. Dig out a towel and dry off excess sweat as best you can. Wring out your other layers and let them start to dry. If you have a second shirt, put it on. Hang your wet things from your pack so that they can dry. After you have cooled down, and with your dry layer and your insulative layer on, walk slowly to avoid re-heating. You will make progress down the path, stay warm, while letting your wet layers become dry. The real goal at this point is to dry your layers, not achieve distance.
  • Do not discount the amount of added warmth a light scarf or bandanna or a buff will bring as it insulates your neck. Wearing one can make wearing less layers very comfortable. It will also be a good first line of defense against over-heating and excess sweating by the ability to remove it, thus allowing the neck to act as a radiator in helping to shed body heat.
  • Yes, the type of head gear worn makes a big difference in one's body's heat loss or retention. A hat that works well for sun is not going to be the best choice for cold weather. Wool is king, as it is far less impacted by sweat affecting its inuslative properties than most other materials. And even though wool weighs more than other types of insulation, you do not need a heavy cap of wool to keep you warm. Wool is also far more breathable than many materials which aids in heat control.
As with neck wear, a wool cap can be easily removed to assist with cooling the body to prevent overheating.

Much of the above is what I have used when mountain climbing at high altitudes. Patience and light, multiple layers is the key to preventing hypothermia when being active outdoors.
@davebugg thankyou SO VERY much for your input - it's really valuable information. Oh to get my pack down to 3kgs! Living the dream!

I notice you don't pack/wear a puffer jacket or fleece? Is your pack combo warm enough for the afternoons, that post-5pm chilly breeze?

And I assume you are wearing some variation of what's in your pack, ie you take 2 sets of short/long sleeved tops and leggings, one to wear and one in your pack?

The info about sweating is super useful. I'm a cold frog but I also sweat a lot. When you mention a warm light insulating layer, would an example of this be a merino wool bottom layer? How do you rate Icebreaker clothing?

Also, are compression leggings good to walk a Camino in (ie, long distance walking). I wonder if wearing compression garments for extended periods of exertion is useful...?

Also, do you have a perspective on Aarn packs?
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@davebugg thankyou SO VERY much for your input - it's really valuable information. Oh to get my pack down to 3kgs! Living the dream!

I notice you don't pack/wear a puffer jacket or fleece? Is your pack combo warm enough for the afternoons, that post-5pm chilly breeze?

And I assume you are wearing some variation of what's in your pack, ie you take 2 sets of short/long sleeved tops and leggings, one to wear and one in your pack?

The info about sweating is super useful. I'm a cold frog but I also sweat a lot. When you mention a warm light insulating layer, would an example of this be a merino wool bottom layer? How do you rate Icebreaker clothing?

Also, are compression leggings good to walk a Camino in (ie, long distance walking). I wonder if wearing compression garments for extended periods of exertion is useful...?

Also, do you have a perspective on Aarn packs?
Hi, Katie. I'll try to answer your questions as best I can :)

1. No, I don't carry a fleece or puffer jacket. And yes, the layering options that I use keep me comfortable to -4c. Keep in mind that because you are on a Camino, it is relatively easy to purchase a piece of clothing if you find you need to add something.

The insulating layer is my vest. Combined with one or more baselayer long sleeved tops (depending on the temp) I cut down the weight of carrying a jacket or fleece and have the same level of protection. If the wind is adding to the chill, I also put on my windshell.

Layering not only gives the best flexibility to easily adapt to a wide temperature range, but it also is thermally more efficient and effective than a single, heavier insulating layer.

2. Yes, the contents of the pack are only what is carried in the pack. That is part of how a pack's 'base weight' is determined. Since very few folks walk or backpack in the nude as their normal kit, what I wear while walking will be similar to what I carry, and will also complement my backpack's clothes closet in order to add to overall layering efficiency.

I will usually backpack, for example, dressed in another long-sleeved, lightweight Merino wool or a long-sleeved synthetic blend shirt, like one of Patagonia's Capilene long sleeves. I only hike or walk in shorts, which will either be a lightweight nylon-synthetic runner's short with a liner, or in the short's part of my REI Sahara zip off pants. If there temperatures mandate it, or if rain is a bit chilly on the skin, I'll add the baselayer Merino wool lightweight bottoms (which are sorta like a slightly less tighter version of tights).

3. The insulating layer is usually thought of as the warmest garment worn over your base layer. Layering is done in three basic parts and goes something like this:
  • First layer is the 'base layer'; it is the layer that is directly on your skin. Primary consideration: The ability to move water vapor and perspiration away from the skin.
    • The materials will be either a synthetic blend or a wool (I love Merino wool products) that are naturally hydrophobic and can retain insulative value when damp.
    • Base layers are usually defined as 'light weight', 'mid weight', or 'heavy weight'. The planned environment and season usually will determine which weight to pack.
  • Second layer is the 'insulative or insulating' layer; it is the layer which sits on top of the base layer and is most responsible for maintaining your core body temperature during exposures to cold temperatures.
    • The insulating layer can be of any material or design: down jackets, fleeces, wool sweaters, synthetic puffers.
    • The primary goal is to choose a garment which is the lightest and most efficient and is able to function for the expected walking environment. For example, I am not going to take the 6 pound down parka that I wore while summiting Mt McKinley thru-hike the Pacific Crest Trail during late spring through late fall. That level of insulation is way too much both in warmth and in weight.
    • Synthetics vs Down or Feathers. It used to be that in wetter and warmer environments it was better to use a synthetic insulation than either down or feathers. While not a 100% loss of insulative quality, if down or feathers became wetly saturated, their ability to provide warmth crashed. Synthetic 'down' or fleece or wool were much better able to maintain their insulation even when wet.
    • Nowadays technology has advanced. Most down or feathers used in sleeping bags, sleeping quilts, jackets, vests, etc, are treated with products which do not impact the insulative qualities of the down, but which allows them to maintain insulation if exposed to wet conditions. Down is now very hydrophobic and will shed water so that they are far better now than even 5 years ago.
    • I have never used synthetic insulation for sleeping bags, quilts or my insulating layer, unless I was in a rain forest environment. Even when thru-hiking the PCT or on my Camino where it rained a lot, I prefer down for my insulation. It is not the job of the insulation (2nd) layer to be directly exposed to and protective from the outside weather.
  • The Third layer is the outside layer. It is supposed to keep the outside weather, well, outside. It can be called a shell, jacket, poncho, windbreaker, etc. The 3rd -- or weather layer -- can have insulation or not. Again, it's design matches the expected environment on will be in.
    • The 3rd layer can be an out-of-the-box piece of gear. A good example would be a backpacking umbrella. If one considers its function, it performs the same type of function as a wearable layer in protecting one from outside elements and conditions.
4. Compression leggings. There are medical conditions where there is a defined benefit, sometimes required, where compression garments are needed and useful. There are also many studies demonstrating the benefits of compression garments in high performance athletics and serious recreational athletes who compete at high levels and in grueling competitions.

It is less clear if compression benefits a healthy recreational walker, even one who walks a lot of miles over the course of a day for many days. This is one area where, if I were looking at the purported benefits and they were of interest to me, then I would be investigating how MUCH compression is required to see these benefits. Then I would obtain the garment and wear it under similar conditions to which I would be engaged in.

I would not be looking for the garment to INCREASE my comfort as a direct byproduct. Instead, I would be looking to determine if the garment DECREASES the impact to either performance or comfort with that physical effort I am engaged in compared to how I felt without wearing the garment.

If you, as some do, experience puffiness above the ankles after a long day of walking, a compression garment could also affect the amount of puffiness, although maintaining sufficient hydration during the day will also help, and elevating legs for a couple of hours in the evening will help resolve any temporary condition.

The other factor is if the garment is increasing my discomfort: does it feel too tight, is it making my legs too warm, with it needing to be frequently washed, is it drying out in time for me to wear it the next morning or is it still going to be damp?

Bottom line is that for me I see no benefits, even with the high level of backpacking and walking I typically do. But if you are unsure and think it is an interesting concept to try, it is unlikely to cause harm, so why not give it a go?

5. Aarn Backpacks. I cannot answer that question from direct experience. Since they are a New Zealand company that is like the counterpart to our Cottage manufacturers, I have never been contacted and hired by them to gear test their equipment. I have looked at their equipment descriptions and have viewed the pictures, but I have not had any hands on with their stuff.

My impression is that they produce a good product, although seemingly heavier than other quality backpacks of similar capacities and designs. While reviews are a tricky thing to use as an evaluation tool, Aarn seems to generate a lot of positive feedback, including from among our own Forum members that have used their packs.

What others think about a backpack is virtually meaningless as to whether or not YOU will like, and feel comfortable with, that same backpack. Good reviews and anecdotal reports are really good for three things: getting a sense of the QUALITY of the backpack (does it last), the warranty performance should a problem arise, and the basic usability of the backpack (how easy is it to put gear in and take gear out, exterior pockets for stashing water bottles, hipbelt pocket capacities, etc).

How the backpack FEELS to you can only be assessed when yours is properly fitted, properly adjusted and you are very familiar with how to make those adjustments, and you are carrying the backpack as your try it out for several hours with the heaviest load that you plan to carry with that pack.

Whether it is an Aarn backpack, Osprey, Gossamer Gear, Kelty, etc ad infinitum, do not pick a pack based on what other say, pick the backpack based on what your body tells you :).
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Hi Jill!!! I use Craghoppers microfibre half zip pullovers, collecting about a half dozen of them over the last couple of years. They are quite popular coming from the UK. My first one I bought in Dublin on my way to the CF in 2016. The rest, I have purchased on Amazon.ca. Very light but warm and durable. My first one is about 3 years old now and no pilling at all.
Thanks for that feedback, Michelle! I have never hear of Craghopper....looking at them now, they are very nice looking. I wonder if the microfleece might be too warm....clearly not for you though. What time of year have you used it? Did you have any problems sweating under it?
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
Hi, Katie. I'll try to answer your questions as best I can :)

1. No, I don't carry a fleece or puffer jacket. And yes, the layering options that I use keep me comfortable to -4c. Keep in mind that because you are on a Camino, it is relatively easy to purchase a piece of clothing if you find you need to add something.

The insulating layer is my vest. Combined with one or more baselayer long sleeved tops (depending on the temp) I cut down the weight of carrying a jacket or fleece and have the same level of protection. If the wind is adding to the chill, I also put on my windshell.

Layering not only gives the best flexibility to easily adapt to a wide temperature range, but it also is thermally more efficient and effective than a single, heavier insulating layer.

2. Yes, the contents of the pack are only what is carried in the pack. That is part of how a pack's 'base weight' is determined. Since very few folks walk or backpack in the nude as their normal kit, what I wear while walking will be similar to what I carry, and will also complement my backpack's clothes closet in order to add to overall layering efficiency.

I will usually backpack, for example, dressed in another long-sleeved, lightweight Merino wool or a long-sleeved synthetic blend shirt, like one of Patagonia's Capilene long sleeves. I only hike or walk in shorts, which will either be a lightweight nylon-synthetic runner's short with a liner, or in the short's part of my REI Sahara zip off pants. If there temperatures mandate it, or if rain is a bit chilly on the skin, I'll add the baselayer Merino wool lightweight bottoms (which are sorta like a slightly less tighter version of tights).

3. The insulating layer is usually thought of as the warmest garment worn over your base layer. Layering is done in three basic parts and goes something like this:
  • First layer is the 'base layer'; it is the layer that is directly on your skin. Primary consideration: The ability to move water vapor and perspiration away from the skin.
    • The materials will be either a synthetic blend or a wool (I love Merino wool products) that are naturally hydrophobic and can retain insulative value when damp.
    • Base layers are usually defined as 'light weight', 'mid weight', or 'heavy weight'. The planned environment and season usually will determine which weight to pack.
  • Second layer is the 'insulative or insulating' layer; it is the layer which sits on top of the base layer and is most responsible for maintaining your core body temperature during exposures to cold temperatures.
    • The insulating layer can be of any material or design: down jackets, fleeces, wool sweaters, synthetic puffers.
    • The primary goal is to choose a garment which is the lightest and most efficient and is able to function for the expected walking environment. For example, I am not going to take the 6 pound down parka that I wore while summiting Mt McKinley thru-hike the Pacific Crest Trail during late spring through late fall. That level of insulation is way too much both in warmth and in weight.
    • Synthetics vs Down or Feathers. It used to be that in wetter and warmer environments it was better to use a synthetic insulation than either down or feathers. While not a 100% loss of insulative quality, if down or feathers became wetly saturated, their ability to provide warmth crashed. Synthetic 'down' or fleece or wool were much better able to maintain their insulation even when wet.
    • Nowadays technology has advanced. Most down or feathers used in sleeping bags, sleeping quilts, jackets, vests, etc, are treated with products which do not impact the insulative qualities of the down, but which allows them to maintain insulation if exposed to wet conditions. Down is now very hydrophobic and will shed water so that they are far better now than even 5 years ago.
    • I have never used synthetic insulation for sleeping bags, quilts or my insulating layer, unless I was in a rain forest environment. Even when thru-hiking the PCT or on my Camino where it rained a lot, I prefer down for my insulation. It is not the job of the insulation (2nd) layer to be directly exposed to and protective from the outside weather.
  • The Third layer is the outside layer. It is supposed to keep the outside weather, well, outside. It can be called a shell, jacket, poncho, windbreaker, etc. The 3rd -- or weather layer -- can have insulation or not. Again, it's design matches the expected environment on will be in.
    • The 3rd layer can be an out-of-the-box piece of gear. A good example would be a backpacking umbrella. If one considers its function, it performs the same type of function as a wearable layer in protecting one from outside elements and conditions.
4. Compression leggings. There are medical conditions where there is a defined benefit, sometimes required, where compression garments are needed and useful. There are also many studies demonstrating the benefits of compression garments in high performance athletics and serious recreational athletes who compete at high levels and in grueling competitions.

It is less clear if compression benefits a healthy recreational walker, even one who walks a lot of miles over the course of a day for many days. This is one area where, if I were looking at the purported benefits and they were of interest to me, then I would be investigating how MUCH compression is required to see these benefits. Then I would obtain the garment and wear it under similar conditions to which I would be engaged in.

I would not be looking for the garment to INCREASE my comfort as a direct byproduct. Instead, I would be looking to determine if the garment DECREASES the impact to either performance or comfort with that physical effort I am engaged in compared to how I felt without wearing the garment.

If you, as some do, experience puffiness above the ankles after a long day of walking, a compression garment could also affect the amount of puffiness, although maintaining sufficient hydration during the day will also help, and elevating legs for a couple of hours in the evening will help resolve any temporary condition.

The other factor is if the garment is increasing my discomfort: does it feel too tight, is it making my legs too warm, with it needing to be frequently washed, is it drying out in time for me to wear it the next morning or is it still going to be damp?

Bottom line is that for me I see no benefits, even with the high level of backpacking and walking I typically do. But if you are unsure and think it is an interesting concept to try, it is unlikely to cause harm, so why not give it a go?

5. Aarn Backpacks. I cannot answer that question from direct experience. Since they are a New Zealand company that is like the counterpart to our Cottage manufacturers, I have never been contacted and hired by them to gear test their equipment. I have looked at their equipment descriptions and have viewed the pictures, but I have not had any hands on with their stuff.

My impression is that they produce a good product, although seemingly heavier than other quality backpacks of similar capacities and designs. While reviews are a tricky thing to use as an evaluation tool, Aarn seems to generate a lot of positive feedback, including from among our own Forum members that have used their packs.

What others think about a backpack is virtually meaningless as to whether or not YOU will like, and feel comfortable with, that same backpack. Good reviews and anecdotal reports are really good for three things: getting a sense of the QUALITY of the backpack (does it last), the warranty performance should a problem arise, and the basic usability of the backpack (how easy is it to put gear in and take gear out, exterior pockets for stashing water bottles, hipbelt pocket capacities, etc).

How the backpack FEELS to you can only be assessed when yours is properly fitted, properly adjusted and you are very familiar with how to make those adjustments, and you are carrying the backpack as your try it out for several hours with the heaviest load that you plan to carry with that pack.

Whether it is an Aarn backpack, Osprey, Gossamer Gear, Kelty, etc ad infinitum, do not pick a pack based on what other say, pick the backpack based on what your body tells you :).
@davebugg thankyou SO VERY MUCH for these thoughtful responses and useful information. I really appreciate the knowledge you generously share on this forum - I'm learning so much from you!!! I'm helping my 70 year-old parents prepare for our Camino (Leon-SdC) in April and passing on a lot of your advice and tips.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
@davebugg thankyou SO VERY MUCH for these thoughtful responses and useful information. I really appreciate the knowledge you generously share on this forum - I'm learning so much from you!!! I'm helping my 70 year-old parents prepare for our Camino (Leon-SdC) in April and passing on a lot of your advice and tips.
Thank you for your kind words, Katie. I am excited for you to be doing this with your parents; it will be a very special time for all of you. :)
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Thanks for that feedback, Michelle! I have never hear of Craghopper....looking at them now, they are very nice looking. I wonder if the microfleece might be too warm....clearly not for you though. What time of year have you used it? Did you have any problems sweating under it?
Hi Jill,

Sorry for the delay. I come on here only once a week, usually.

I wear Craghoppers all year round, except for Summer of course, but whenever a tshirt is just not enough. When I get too warm, it comes off.

A bit of a, "for instance," using just a tshirt, a Craghopper pullover and a rain jacket, I have found that I can stay quite comfortable in weather, dry or wet, down to about 0C or 32F. So, anything warmer than a Polar Vortex, it seems.

And of course, microfleece will dry faster than anything else on the clothes line.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
Hi Jill,

Sorry for the delay. I come on here only once a week, usually.

I wear Craghoppers all year round, except for Summer of course, but whenever a tshirt is just not enough. When I get too warm, it comes off.

A bit of a, "for instance," using just a tshirt, a Craghopper pullover and a rain jacket, I have found that I can stay quite comfortable in weather, dry or wet, down to about 0C or 32F. So, anything warmer than a Polar Vortex, it seems.

And of course, microfleece will dry faster than anything else on the clothes line.
Thanks for the response, Michelle. I wish they had this in a vest......When i search on microfleece, i get few results. I think...not sure....sleeves might bother me.
 
Last edited:

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Thanks for the response, Michelle. I wish they had this in a vest......When i search on microfleece, i get few results. I think...not sure....sleeves might bother me.
You could remove the sleeves (or have it done). Stitch-rip the seam and sew on a top stitch.
 

Glamgrrl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Travel318
Hi, Katie. I'll try to answer your questions as best I can :)

1. No, I don't carry a fleece or puffer jacket. And yes, the layering options that I use keep me comfortable to -4c. Keep in mind that because you are on a Camino, it is relatively easy to purchase a piece of clothing if you find you need to add something.

The insulating layer is my vest. Combined with one or more baselayer long sleeved tops (depending on the temp) I cut down the weight of carrying a jacket or fleece and have the same level of protection. If the wind is adding to the chill, I also put on my windshell.

Layering not only gives the best flexibility to easily adapt to a wide temperature range, but it also is thermally more efficient and effective than a single, heavier insulating layer.

2. Yes, the contents of the pack are only what is carried in the pack. That is part of how a pack's 'base weight' is determined. Since very few folks walk or backpack in the nude as their normal kit, what I wear while walking will be similar to what I carry, and will also complement my backpack's clothes closet in order to add to overall layering efficiency.

I will usually backpack, for example, dressed in another long-sleeved, lightweight Merino wool or a long-sleeved synthetic blend shirt, like one of Patagonia's Capilene long sleeves. I only hike or walk in shorts, which will either be a lightweight nylon-synthetic runner's short with a liner, or in the short's part of my REI Sahara zip off pants. If there temperatures mandate it, or if rain is a bit chilly on the skin, I'll add the baselayer Merino wool lightweight bottoms (which are sorta like a slightly less tighter version of tights).

3. The insulating layer is usually thought of as the warmest garment worn over your base layer. Layering is done in three basic parts and goes something like this:
  • First layer is the 'base layer'; it is the layer that is directly on your skin. Primary consideration: The ability to move water vapor and perspiration away from the skin.
    • The materials will be either a synthetic blend or a wool (I love Merino wool products) that are naturally hydrophobic and can retain insulative value when damp.
    • Base layers are usually defined as 'light weight', 'mid weight', or 'heavy weight'. The planned environment and season usually will determine which weight to pack.
  • Second layer is the 'insulative or insulating' layer; it is the layer which sits on top of the base layer and is most responsible for maintaining your core body temperature during exposures to cold temperatures.
    • The insulating layer can be of any material or design: down jackets, fleeces, wool sweaters, synthetic puffers.
    • The primary goal is to choose a garment which is the lightest and most efficient and is able to function for the expected walking environment. For example, I am not going to take the 6 pound down parka that I wore while summiting Mt McKinley thru-hike the Pacific Crest Trail during late spring through late fall. That level of insulation is way too much both in warmth and in weight.
    • Synthetics vs Down or Feathers. It used to be that in wetter and warmer environments it was better to use a synthetic insulation than either down or feathers. While not a 100% loss of insulative quality, if down or feathers became wetly saturated, their ability to provide warmth crashed. Synthetic 'down' or fleece or wool were much better able to maintain their insulation even when wet.
    • Nowadays technology has advanced. Most down or feathers used in sleeping bags, sleeping quilts, jackets, vests, etc, are treated with products which do not impact the insulative qualities of the down, but which allows them to maintain insulation if exposed to wet conditions. Down is now very hydrophobic and will shed water so that they are far better now than even 5 years ago.
    • I have never used synthetic insulation for sleeping bags, quilts or my insulating layer, unless I was in a rain forest environment. Even when thru-hiking the PCT or on my Camino where it rained a lot, I prefer down for my insulation. It is not the job of the insulation (2nd) layer to be directly exposed to and protective from the outside weather.
  • The Third layer is the outside layer. It is supposed to keep the outside weather, well, outside. It can be called a shell, jacket, poncho, windbreaker, etc. The 3rd -- or weather layer -- can have insulation or not. Again, it's design matches the expected environment on will be in.
    • The 3rd layer can be an out-of-the-box piece of gear. A good example would be a backpacking umbrella. If one considers its function, it performs the same type of function as a wearable layer in protecting one from outside elements and conditions.
4. Compression leggings. There are medical conditions where there is a defined benefit, sometimes required, where compression garments are needed and useful. There are also many studies demonstrating the benefits of compression garments in high performance athletics and serious recreational athletes who compete at high levels and in grueling competitions.

It is less clear if compression benefits a healthy recreational walker, even one who walks a lot of miles over the course of a day for many days. This is one area where, if I were looking at the purported benefits and they were of interest to me, then I would be investigating how MUCH compression is required to see these benefits. Then I would obtain the garment and wear it under similar conditions to which I would be engaged in.

I would not be looking for the garment to INCREASE my comfort as a direct byproduct. Instead, I would be looking to determine if the garment DECREASES the impact to either performance or comfort with that physical effort I am engaged in compared to how I felt without wearing the garment.

If you, as some do, experience puffiness above the ankles after a long day of walking, a compression garment could also affect the amount of puffiness, although maintaining sufficient hydration during the day will also help, and elevating legs for a couple of hours in the evening will help resolve any temporary condition.

The other factor is if the garment is increasing my discomfort: does it feel too tight, is it making my legs too warm, with it needing to be frequently washed, is it drying out in time for me to wear it the next morning or is it still going to be damp?

Bottom line is that for me I see no benefits, even with the high level of backpacking and walking I typically do. But if you are unsure and think it is an interesting concept to try, it is unlikely to cause harm, so why not give it a go?

5. Aarn Backpacks. I cannot answer that question from direct experience. Since they are a New Zealand company that is like the counterpart to our Cottage manufacturers, I have never been contacted and hired by them to gear test their equipment. I have looked at their equipment descriptions and have viewed the pictures, but I have not had any hands on with their stuff.

My impression is that they produce a good product, although seemingly heavier than other quality backpacks of similar capacities and designs. While reviews are a tricky thing to use as an evaluation tool, Aarn seems to generate a lot of positive feedback, including from among our own Forum members that have used their packs.

What others think about a backpack is virtually meaningless as to whether or not YOU will like, and feel comfortable with, that same backpack. Good reviews and anecdotal reports are really good for three things: getting a sense of the QUALITY of the backpack (does it last), the warranty performance should a problem arise, and the basic usability of the backpack (how easy is it to put gear in and take gear out, exterior pockets for stashing water bottles, hipbelt pocket capacities, etc).

How the backpack FEELS to you can only be assessed when yours is properly fitted, properly adjusted and you are very familiar with how to make those adjustments, and you are carrying the backpack as your try it out for several hours with the heaviest load that you plan to carry with that pack.

Whether it is an Aarn backpack, Osprey, Gossamer Gear, Kelty, etc ad infinitum, do not pick a pack based on what other say, pick the backpack based on what your body tells you :).
I was going to comment on the leg warmers and say I used medium level SmartWool compression leggings in place of the leg warmer option describes by the OP. You lose the easy benefit of just slipping them off your legs as it warmed up, I did that at first coffee stop. I also wore them flying to prevent blood clots, and after each day between evening shower and bedtime to help with recovery. They helped so much. Since we walked June July, I only needed them to double as pant extenders a couple times.
 

Hiker-jill

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino del Norte 2016
You could remove the sleeves (or have it done). Stitch-rip the seam and sew on a top stitch.
Michelle, To which Half-zip Cragshopper are you referring? I am looking at the Miska half-zip. It has raglan sleeves...so removing them would not be so easy.
 

NorthernLight

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
Oh! Good catch!
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Thanks for the response, Michelle. I wish they had this in a vest......When i search on microfleece, i get few results. I think...not sure....sleeves might bother me.
Hi Jill,

Not sure which country is yours but here is what I found in Canada;


There are other makers too but I decided to stick to the theme. Now, none I have offered are really hoodies. I used to love them but I never use the hood so these made a lot of sense.
 

Travellin Mom

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May 2011
June (2016)
Yes that includes my backpack. I use the Zpack Scout and it weighs 22 ounces/1.6 pounds. The Arc Blast is essentially the same pack and actually weighs less, but I bought the Scout"youth version" because Iam only 5'3" . Mine weighs more because I added extra pockets
I used to use a lighter one by 6 Moons but it didn't have a frame which was uncomfortable on the hot days due to sweat.
I just ordered a hiking skirt from Montbell that weighs 2.8 oz. Which is half the weight of my shorts. Of note: if you order from Zpacks there is a 3 to 5 week delivery time as everything is made to order. If anyone is interested I can send you my gear list. My goal for this June Camino is under 10 pounds.
Hi yes I would appreciate your gear list. I am under 5ft and would love to carry under 10 pounds.......thx
 

Moorwalker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
none yet
Something I haven't sen mentioned at all in these discussions is arm warmers. They are well known to cyclists and triathletes but very little known otherwise and you will almost certainly need to go to a cycling clothing supplier to find them. They are exactly what they sound like, close fitting, very lightweight elastic arm warmers, like leg warmers but for your arms! Cyclists often use them when starting out on a chilly morning because they make a surprising difference to warmth but are very easy to take off when it warms up, and then you're left with your normal short-sleeved jersey.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrano
Something I haven't sen mentioned at all in these discussions is arm warmers....They make a surprising difference to warmth but are very easy to take off when it warms up, and then you're left with your normal short-sleeved jersey.
The arm warmers are a great idea. I just weighed mine, and a fleecy, warm, pair weighs a total of 2.15 ounces! REI carries a selection that ranges from insulated winter arm warmers to sun sleeves. I imagine Decathlon does also.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I always use long sleeves, even in hot weather. UV and suns protection aside, many do not realize that direct sun on skin can make a hot day much hotter.

There is a reason that desert dwellers keep most areas of their skin covered. sunburn protection is one. Protection from radiant and infrared energy is another. Keep the sun off the skin and you stay cooler, not to mention eliminate the application of sunscreens throughout the day. My shirt serves for both cold and hot weather regulation.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016; CPort (Central) from Porto 2017;
CPort (Coastal) from Porto 2018.
I always use long sleeves, even in hot weather. UV and suns protection aside, many do not realize that direct sun on skin can make a hot day much hotter.

There is a reason that desert dwellers keep most areas of their skin covered. sunburn protection is one. Protection from radiant and infrared energy is another. Keep the sun off the skin and you stay cooler, not to mention eliminate the application of sunscreens throughout the day. My shirt serves for both cold and hot weather regulation.
Dave what would you recommend for full arm coverage in summer? Lightweight merino wool or anything else?
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
Dave what would you recommend for full arm coverage in summer? Lightweight merino wool or anything else?
Hi, Katie..
Either a lightweight merino, or a synthetic blend will work well. As examples, the shirt I usually wear for walking is either the REI Sahara long sleeved t-shirt or the Kuhl Airspeed LS. I just take one or the other along for a trip. I get them so that they tend more toward the baggy side than form fitting, which helps with the heat and airflow.

In the backpack's closet, I have a long sleeved Smartwool baselayer top. The weight (thickness) of the material depends on the expected conditions of the trip. For summer and fall it is the Smartwool 150. There are other brands that have similar offerings.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Del Estrecho, Ruta Fray Leopoldo,
Vía Serrano
...what would you recommend for full arm coverage in summer?
Katie, on our last trip I used synthetic sun sleeves rated UPF 50, and was pleasantly surprised at how well they worked. They kept my arms cool, were lighter to carry than a tube of sunscreen, and were a lot less messy. I'll be taking them again on our next trip.
 

davebugg

"When I Have Your Wounded" - Dustoff Motto
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances...
Sept. 2017: SJPdP to Burgos
Sept./Oct. 2018: SJPdP to Santiago de Compostela
I find that sun sleeves, while a good idea on the surface, requires way too much fuss to put on and take off in addition to the shirt itself. Additionally, I do not like the snugness to the skin. My long sleeved shirts have loose fitting sleeves. And if for some reason I want to have bare arms, I just hike the sleeves up.

Sun sleeves are just an additional bit of kit I don't want to have to look for or keep track of.
 

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