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Luggage Transfer Correos

14 Days to Go.... Checklist Checkoffs For the Day

Santiago Photo Book

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Fourteen days to departure out of SeaTac airport to Madrid. As the next 13 days countdown, there are specific things which will be done.

For today:

1. All clothing and gear items are in my Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack. Hmmm..... Mariposa; Spanish for 'butterfly', which at it's current 9.25 pounds seems pretty apt. But.... the first day out of SJPdP to Roncesvalles will add an additional 1 pound of GoPro video gear .... which will be mailed home at Pamplona. So with water, that will bring my total pack weight to 12 pounds for the first day.

2. All travel documents are in my travel pouch, along with the 120 Euros left over from last year's Camino. That is in my pack for now. I carry the pouch around my neck or in a zippered shorts or pants pocket while traveling and walking Camino. It is completely waterproof, with zippered compartments on the back and front sides. Very light weight.

3. Outlining what information, instructions, reminders, etc that I need to finish writing up and leaving at home for others to have access to detailing the regular stuff I take care of (bills, aquarium, irrigation water, bird care, passwords, etc)

4. Routine workouts. For the next 9 days, I will gently increase my efforts toward a maximum peak level. At day 10, workouts are increasingly dialed back for the next three days. Then no workout on day 14 -- which will leave 3 days of downtime, including travel days and light walking and touring around in SJPdP, before heading out to Roncesvalles.

I like lists when things like this trip back to Camino happen. I find that if I jot things down as they flash into my mind, I don't feel scattered and anxious about getting stuff done. :)
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'Portuguese,Frances,Norte,Salvador/primitivo,Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, VDLP spring19
@davebugg

May you absolutely, totally, and completely have the time of your life.

Buen camino a million times over!
@davebugg
I second the above.
So happy that you are getting back to the reality of the camino - you give so much help to us and hope that yours is a pain and injury free walk.
Buen Camino
Annie
 

Anthony18

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2019
Can't imagine how excited your are for your trip with it being so close! I'm doing my first Camino Frances in 9 months and I'm struggling with focusing on anything non-Camino related. Be safe, take it all in, get some awesome pics and Buen Camino!
 

hel&scott

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2004 St Jean - Santiago, 2008 &18 Seville - Finesterre, 2010 Ferrol - Lisbon, 2012 from Cartehenga.
Will you be lifting off? I have visions of your chopper landing in front of me to take care of my wounded feet, or perhaps using a monsoon bucket to drench hot and weary pilgrims.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Will you be lifting off? I have visions of your chopper landing in front of me to take care of my wounded feet, or perhaps using a monsoon bucket to drench hot and weary pilgrims.
:) I thought about taking it, but it's just too heavy for the backpack and TSA would have a cow.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Can't imagine how excited your are for your trip with it being so close! I'm doing my first Camino Frances in 9 months and I'm struggling with focusing on anything non-Camino related. Be safe, take it all in, get some awesome pics and Buen Camino!
Thanks, Anthony :)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I love the few days just before a new camino, it's really exciting (and always slightly scary). But as soon as I take those first steps from my start point it's like 'ah, I'm home'!

Buen Camino!
You..scared, even slightly? I don't believe it! :)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
@davebugg
I second the above.
So happy that you are getting back to the reality of the camino - you give so much help to us and hope that yours is a pain and injury free walk.
Buen Camino
Annie
I third the above! Ditto, Dave!
 

tomnorth

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances: September 24 - October 31 (2015)
Fourteen days to departure out of SeaTac airport to Madrid. As the next 13 days countdown, there are specific things which will be done.

For today:

1. All clothing and gear items are in my Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack. Hmmm..... Mariposa; Spanish for 'butterfly', which at it's current 9.25 pounds seems pretty apt. But.... the first day out of SJPdP to Roncesvalles will add an additional 1 pound of GoPro video gear .... which will be mailed home at Pamplona. So with water, that will bring my total pack weight to 12 pounds for the first day.

2. All travel documents are in my travel pouch, along with the 120 Euros left over from last year's Camino. That is in my pack for now. I carry the pouch around my neck or in a zippered shorts or pants pocket while traveling and walking Camino. It is completely waterproof, with zippered compartments on the back and front sides. Very light weight.

3. Outlining what information, instructions, reminders, etc that I need to finish writing up and leaving at home for others to have access to detailing the regular stuff I take care of (bills, aquarium, irrigation water, bird care, passwords, etc)

4. Routine workouts. For the next 9 days, I will gently increase my efforts toward a maximum peak level. At day 10, workouts are increasingly dialed back for the next three days. Then no workout on day 14 -- which will leave 3 days of downtime, including travel days and light walking and touring around in SJPdP, before heading out to Roncesvalles.

I like lists when things like this trip back to Camino happen. I find that if I jot things down as they flash into my mind, I don't feel scattered and anxious about getting stuff done. :)
Lists are essential. If I don’t check items off on a list, I can’t be sure they’re in the backpack. Buen Camino!
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
Dave, you have contributed so much good sense and knowledge to this forum - I hope the good karma will rise up from the path and meet you. You deserve a great and wonderful experience.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Dave, you have contributed so much good sense and knowledge to this forum - I hope the good karma will rise up from the path and meet you. You deserve a great and wonderful experience.
Well bless your heart for saying so. I appreciate the thought. I feel the same way toward you and so many of our Forum members :)
 

KER

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - Oct 2018
Fourteen days to departure out of SeaTac airport to Madrid. As the next 13 days countdown, there are specific things which will be done.

For today:

1. All clothing and gear items are in my Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack. Hmmm..... Mariposa; Spanish for 'butterfly', which at it's current 9.25 pounds seems pretty apt. But.... the first day out of SJPdP to Roncesvalles will add an additional 1 pound of GoPro video gear .... which will be mailed home at Pamplona. So with water, that will bring my total pack weight to 12 pounds for the first day.

2. All travel documents are in my travel pouch, along with the 120 Euros left over from last year's Camino. That is in my pack for now. I carry the pouch around my neck or in a zippered shorts or pants pocket while traveling and walking Camino. It is completely waterproof, with zippered compartments on the back and front sides. Very light weight.

3. Outlining what information, instructions, reminders, etc that I need to finish writing up and leaving at home for others to have access to detailing the regular stuff I take care of (bills, aquarium, irrigation water, bird care, passwords, etc)

4. Routine workouts. For the next 9 days, I will gently increase my efforts toward a maximum peak level. At day 10, workouts are increasingly dialed back for the next three days. Then no workout on day 14 -- which will leave 3 days of downtime, including travel days and light walking and touring around in SJPdP, before heading out to Roncesvalles.

I like lists when things like this trip back to Camino happen. I find that if I jot things down as they flash into my mind, I don't feel scattered and anxious about getting stuff done. :)
Yikes. I begin the CF on 9/27 from SJPP and am not yet as organized as you...your update makes me feel that a mere mortal may struggle in getting fully ready!! Did you pack a sleeping bag or liner or both? If a sleeping bag - what brand/type? I have a 28L pack and will keep it under 10lbs as I am petite. I already have a silk liner. Thx for any other advise on keeping pacK weight down.
 

Thomas@Albany

Member
Camino(s) past & future
First Part Oct. 5 2018 (StJ)-Oct. 19 (Boadillo); 2nd Part May 5 (Boadilla) to May 26, 2019.
Buen Camino! For me it's 4 weeks, I am getting excited, too.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking.
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
It's still hard to believe, Davey. Anyone who walks for months at a time, walks backwards from Santiago, carries a tent and occasionally sleeps outdoors seems rather fearless to me, cuz I'm too "scared" to do any of that on the Caminos!
But at least, like you, once I set my feet down at the start, the jitters all quickly fade away.
 

BucketBabe

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances planned for October 3-mid November (2018)
Fourteen days to departure out of SeaTac airport to Madrid. As the next 13 days countdown, there are specific things which will be done.

For today:


4. Routine workouts. For the next 9 days, I will gently increase my efforts toward a maximum peak level. At day 10, workouts are increasingly dialed back for the next three days. Then no workout on day 14 -- which will leave 3 days of downtime, including travel days and light walking and touring around in SJPdP, before heading out to Roncesvalles.

I like lists when things like this trip back to Camino happen. I find that if I jot things down as they flash into my mind, I don't feel scattered and anxious about getting stuff done. :)
do you mind sharing your training plan? :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
do you mind sharing your training plan? :)
I can share with you the quick basics I follow when I train, that way each person can apply the principals for their individual needs, physical conditions, and limitations.

[NOTE: Before undertaking any change in activity level or exercise, be sure to check with your medical provider first. Even a quick phone call informing him/her of your plans will allow your provider to give you any guidance that is deemed important.]

There are two parts to how I train:

1. Cardiovascular fitness.
2. Muscle strengthening.

With both parts to an exercise plan, it is far better to go slower and be more deliberate and committed to your fitness time, than to overdo it by rushing the exercises and risking overuse injuries and becoming discouraged. Using THR zones, you will always make progress even though you take more time to reach your goal.

Cardiovascular fitness is the ability for the heart and lungs to supply oxygenated blood to your muscles during exercise while under load, and your muscles ability to use that oxygen efficiently so they can produce energy.

A valuable and important tool that is easy and good to follow for developing cardio capacity is the concept of Target Heart Rate zones (THR). It doesn't matter what your fitness level is, THZ will allow each person to develop at their own speed and point of fitness.

Exercises should be used which will allow you to hit a target heart rate (THR) zone, over a set period of time during exercising, which provides the needed aerobic effort for conditioning. This is a website which will help you calculate what your target heart rate zones will be.

https://www.lifespanfitness.com/fitness/resources/target-heart-rate-calculator

Treadmills at incline, running, walking at a faster than normal pace, walking up hills, using rowing machines, HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) workouts, riding a bicycle at a faster than normal pace, swimming, etc. are all examples of effective aerobic exercises when used to achieve target heart rates.

Keep in mind that as your fitness level improves, it will take a more sustained effort to hit the same heart rate zones. That is why using THR zones is so effective. They don't change relative to one's fitness level. Someone extremely out of shape who cannot exercise as hard and as long as someone who is extremely fit, will still reach the exact same THR during their exercise sessions. It takes more intensity in training for the person who has a great fitness level to reach 140 heart beats per minute (BPM). An out-of-fitness individual will reach that same 140 BPM in a far shorter amount of time and with far less intensity to the exercise.

As you gain fitness, it will take a longer period of exercise and a harder effort at the exercise to keep reaching 140 BPM. It is this THR phenomenon which allows a person to use their own fitness levels as a guide to steady progress rather than relying on some formula laid out by someone who doesn't know you from a hill of beans.

This is what I do for Cardio. It is based on MY current fitness level as an example of how to use what you have around you as an exercise resource. You do not need a gym membership.

During most of the year, I alternate days of effort and length during the week. Every other day I do a Long Loop Trail which is about 7.5 miles in length and gains a total of 2800 feet in elevation. During the other two or three days, I do the Short Loop Trail, which is 3.8 miles in length and only gains 1215 feet of elevation. When I am up backpacking, that will, of course, serve as a daily workout.

For really crummy weather days --- and lately over the last four weeks when smoke from wildfires made the air hazardous for outdoor activity --- I use a treadmill that can achieve a 30 degree incline, and which I spent a bit of time carefully calibrating to make sure it is reasonably accurate for both speed and incline settings. If I didn't have a treadmill, I could jump rope, stair step, run in place, etc. A lot of times the local high school will let the folks in the district use their facilities.

I decided that I would save money by using a treadmill at home -- not to mention the convenience -- rather than paying a gym membership to use THEIR treadmill. It wasn't cheap, but I now have over 7100 miles on it over the course of several years. I learned how to maintain it and keep it accurate in it's measurements. Having the treadmill at home actually decreases the amount of time spent exercising by eliminating the 'getting to and coming back' from a gym.


Muscle strength is a function of how much maximum force your muscles can exert against resistance. Exercises for strength will also provide a temporary aerobic cardio-vascular workout and effect, but the main goal is to increase your capability to function while under resistance.

Think about having to lift the weight of your body, with a pack, with each step going up the Pyrenees. Or being able to lift and carry a load. Or the constant resistance of your body weight and pack to your shoulders and to the 'core' muscles in your back and abdomen.

Some basic strengthening exercises for home include:
1. push-ups
2. lunges
3. squats
4. planks.

Rather than try and describe the steps involved in properly doing each exercise, do a google search to show you the way to do these exercises.

Again, make steady progress NOT quick progress. The goal is to keep you injury free while you are getting stronger.

This is what I do for strength training and core conditioning. Again, take it easy and build gradually.

In addition to the exercises I listed, I use two pieces of equipment:

1. A cheap set of dumb bells
2. A TRX strap system.

Again, Google will provide and describe and show the basic exercises for this type of equipment. The TRX system is an offshoot of what several folks used in the military while in combat zones where there is no weight lifting equipment. Back then, it was cargo webbing straps. From that, someone made a gazillion dollars with a nicer, more modern iteration all nicely packaged up and all professional looking :)

Why didn't I think of doing that? o_O

Other conditioning issues involve things like ankles, feet, and flexibility. Do a search on this forum for posts I have made about exercises to help prevent shin splints and to help prevent plantars fasciitis.

Regardless of which exercises you are doing, include frequent walks. Not workouts ... just walk at a comfortable pace and for a comfortable period of time. Use this opportunity to try out footwear for Camino. Look for the beginning niggling of potential problems with your feet and joints so that you have plenty of time to have them looked at by a provider and deal with any treatment plan.

After you've been involved in your fitness regimen for about three months, put on the clothing and footwear you will be using on Camino, load up your pack, and for several days in a row walk for a 3 to 4 hour period. See how you feel and at what pace you are able to best sustain yourself. That will give you a baseline estimate to calculate logistical issues surrounding the question of how far can I comfortably walk within a given amount of time. If you feel you need more time with conditioning before doing that type of walking, then wait for another month or two.

Yes, things and conditions can be different once you are on Camino as the unexpected arises, but those walks will help not only give you some insight and guidance, but also help build your confidence.

It will also let you know how your feet, knees, back and shoulders are doing.

More than anything else, enjoy the entire process of getting ready for Camino. Keep thinking about your personal goals for doing Camino and what type of experience you are hoping for. Also, think about what you can contribute, as a pilgrim, to the spirit and nature of the Camino when you begin your first steps toward Santiago.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Yikes. I begin the CF on 9/27 from SJPP and am not yet as organized as you...your update makes me feel that a mere mortal may struggle in getting fully ready!! Did you pack a sleeping bag or liner or both? If a sleeping bag - what brand/type? I have a 28L pack and will keep it under 10lbs as I am petite. I already have a silk liner. Thx for any other advise on keeping pacK weight down.
I packed a backpacking sleeping quilt rated for 45 degrees. I got away from sleeping bags when I thru hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and needed to really develop an ultralight set of gear. The bottom of a sleeping bag provides no warmth as the insulation is all compressed from body weight. The funny thing is, I am even re-thinking the sleeping quilt and tempted to leave it at home, and just use my clothing to sleep in.

Just toying with the idea. I would really like to offset the added weight of that GoPro stuff. But the sleeping quilt is still, at only 11 ounces, lighter than the 1.5 pounds of GoPro stuff. That means I would still need to find 13 more ounces of weight to drop. :)
 

BucketBabe

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances planned for October 3-mid November (2018)
I packed a backpacking sleeping quilt rated for 45 degrees. I got away from sleeping bags when I thru hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and needed to really develop an ultralight set of gear. The bottom of a sleeping bag provides no warmth as the insulation is all compressed from body weight. The funny thing is, I am even re-thinking the sleeping quilt and tempted to leave it at home, and just use my clothing to sleep in.

Just toying with the idea. I would really like to offset the added weight of that GoPro stuff. But the sleeping quilt is still, at only 11 ounces, lighter than the 1.5 pounds of GoPro stuff. That means I would still need to find 13 more ounces of weight to drop. :)
I just bought a down quilt and it is very light..took an extra pound off my sleep kit. I'll be a few weeks behind you and am also taking an emergency bivy (8 ounces)...I keep packing and repacking...taking a few things out each time. I'm under 20# now and have never been this light with my pack on a multi day hike.

@davebugg - I've done a LOT of AT section hiking in Georgia - lots of ascent - 12 mile days for 3 - 4 days in a row. I believe you have done some AT as well. It has certainly refined my choice in footwear. In your opinion, how does this compare to the Frances? I'll be leaving Oct 2 for Madrid and will begin on 10/4 or 5.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
I can share with you the quick basics I follow when I train, that way each person can apply the principals for their individual needs, physical conditions, and limitations.

[NOTE: Before undertaking any change in activity level or exercise, be sure to check with your medical provider first. Even a quick phone call informing him/her of your plans will allow your provider to give you any guidance that is deemed important.]

There are two parts to how I train:

1. Cardiovascular fitness.
2. Muscle strengthening.

With both parts to an exercise plan, it is far better to go slower and be more deliberate and committed to your fitness time, than to overdo it by rushing the exercises and risking overuse injuries and becoming discouraged. Using THR zones, you will always make progress even though you take more time to reach your goal.

Cardiovascular fitness is the ability for the heart and lungs to supply oxygenated blood to your muscles during exercise while under load, and your muscles ability to use that oxygen efficiently so they can produce energy.

A valuable and important tool that is easy and good to follow for developing cardio capacity is the concept of Target Heart Rate zones (THR). It doesn't matter what your fitness level is, THZ will allow each person to develop at their own speed and point of fitness.

Exercises should be used which will allow you to hit a target heart rate (THR) zone, over a set period of time during exercising, which provides the needed aerobic effort for conditioning. This is a website which will help you calculate what your target heart rate zones will be.

https://www.lifespanfitness.com/fitness/resources/target-heart-rate-calculator

Treadmills at incline, running, walking at a faster than normal pace, walking up hills, using rowing machines, HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) workouts, riding a bicycle at a faster than normal pace, swimming, etc. are all examples of effective aerobic exercises when used to achieve target heart rates.

Keep in mind that as your fitness level improves, it will take a more sustained effort to hit the same heart rate zones. That is why using THR zones is so effective. They don't change relative to one's fitness level. Someone extremely out of shape who cannot exercise as hard and as long as someone who is extremely fit, will still reach the exact same THR during their exercise sessions. It takes more intensity in training for the person who has a great fitness level to reach 140 heart beats per minute (BPM). An out-of-fitness individual will reach that same 140 BPM in a far shorter amount of time and with far less intensity to the exercise.

As you gain fitness, it will take a longer period of exercise and a harder effort at the exercise to keep reaching 140 BPM. It is this THR phenomenon which allows a person to use their own fitness levels as a guide to steady progress rather than relying on some formula laid out by someone who doesn't know you from a hill of beans.

This is what I do for Cardio. It is based on MY current fitness level as an example of how to use what you have around you as an exercise resource. You do not need a gym membership.

During most of the year, I alternate days of effort and length during the week. Every other day I do a Long Loop Trail which is about 7.5 miles in length and gains a total of 2800 feet in elevation. During the other two or three days, I do the Short Loop Trail, which is 3.8 miles in length and only gains 1215 feet of elevation. When I am up backpacking, that will, of course, serve as a daily workout.

For really crummy weather days --- and lately over the last four weeks when smoke from wildfires made the air hazardous for outdoor activity --- I use a treadmill that can achieve a 30 degree incline, and which I spent a bit of time carefully calibrating to make sure it is reasonably accurate for both speed and incline settings. If I didn't have a treadmill, I could jump rope, stair step, run in place, etc. A lot of times the local high school will let the folks in the district use their facilities.

I decided that I would save money by using a treadmill at home -- not to mention the convenience -- rather than paying a gym membership to use THEIR treadmill. It wasn't cheap, but I now have over 7100 miles on it over the course of several years. I learned how to maintain it and keep it accurate in it's measurements. Having the treadmill at home actually decreases the amount of time spent exercising by eliminating the 'getting to and coming back' from a gym.


Muscle strength is a function of how much maximum force your muscles can exert against resistance. Exercises for strength will also provide a temporary aerobic cardio-vascular workout and effect, but the main goal is to increase your capability to function while under resistance.

Think about having to lift the weight of your body, with a pack, with each step going up the Pyrenees. Or being able to lift and carry a load. Or the constant resistance of your body weight and pack to your shoulders and to the 'core' muscles in your back and abdomen.

Some basic strengthening exercises for home include:
1. push-ups
2. lunges
3. squats
4. planks.

Rather than try and describe the steps involved in properly doing each exercise, do a google search to show you the way to do these exercises.

Again, make steady progress NOT quick progress. The goal is to keep you injury free while you are getting stronger.

This is what I do for strength training and core conditioning. Again, take it easy and build gradually.

In addition to the exercises I listed, I use two pieces of equipment:

1. A cheap set of dumb bells
2. A TRX strap system.

Again, Google will provide and describe and show the basic exercises for this type of equipment. The TRX system is an offshoot of what several folks used in the military while in combat zones where there is no weight lifting equipment. Back then, it was cargo webbing straps. From that, someone made a gazillion dollars with a nicer, more modern iteration all nicely packaged up and all professional looking :)

Why didn't I think of doing that? o_O

Other conditioning issues involve things like ankles, feet, and flexibility. Do a search on this forum for posts I have made about exercises to help prevent shin splints and to help prevent plantars fasciitis.

Regardless of which exercises you are doing, include frequent walks. Not workouts ... just walk at a comfortable pace and for a comfortable period of time. Use this opportunity to try out footwear for Camino. Look for the beginning niggling of potential problems with your feet and joints so that you have plenty of time to have them looked at by a provider and deal with any treatment plan.

After you've been involved in your fitness regimen for about three months, put on the clothing and footwear you will be using on Camino, load up your pack, and for several days in a row walk for a 3 to 4 hour period. See how you feel and at what pace you are able to best sustain yourself. That will give you a baseline estimate to calculate logistical issues surrounding the question of how far can I comfortably walk within a given amount of time. If you feel you need more time with conditioning before doing that type of walking, then wait for another month or two.

Yes, things and conditions can be different once you are on Camino as the unexpected arises, but those walks will help not only give you some insight and guidance, but also help build your confidence.

It will also let you know how your feet, knees, back and shoulders are doing.

More than anything else, enjoy the entire process of getting ready for Camino. Keep thinking about your personal goals for doing Camino and what type of experience you are hoping for. Also, think about what you can contribute, as a pilgrim, to the spirit and nature of the Camino when you begin your first steps toward Santiago.

Thanks Dave! Sounds like you are ready! I wish you a blessed, peace-filled, healthy Camino filled with surprise!

We are definitely in the senior ranges so our preparation is a bit different. We do use a combination of real trails 4-5 a week combined trails with elevation and streets around our home with the dog for 3-4 miles a day daily. We do use stretch bands and do ankle and calf exercises as well as several core exercises which we do before we start our walking, and in the evening before bed! When the rains are bad we use the treadmills at our little town center. We are averaging between levels 5 and 10...probably averaging level 7 for 45minutes at a time. But we really have no idea what the actual road grade equivalent is....

We are trying to get everything ready in the next two weeks and then put everything aside because we have a terrier rescue dog who does not do well with change and is attached to my hip! We send him to a wonderful Kennel with the best care and play time when Iam gone, but it is not home and he has separation issues! Getting the bags done and out of the way, and giving our dog two weeks to settle with us before we go feels right for all of us.

Thanks for your support, to us all, and know when we climb up the Napoleon route, two weeks after you, I will remember that you tread this sacred soil! Buen Camino.
 
Last edited:

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thanks Dave! Sounds like you are ready! I wish you a blessed, peace-filled, healthy Camino filled with surprise!

We are definitely in the senior ranges so our preparation is a bit different. We do use a combination of real trails 4-5 a week combined trails with elevation and streets around our home with the dog for 3-4 miles a day daily. We do use stretch bands and do ankle and calf exercises as well as several core exercises which we do before we start our walking, and in the evening before bed! When the rains are bad we use the treadmills at our little town center. We are averaging between levels 5 and 10...probably averaging level 7 for 45minutes at a time. But we really have no idea what the actual road grade equivalent is....

We are trying to get everything ready in the next two weeks and then put everything aside because we have a terrier rescue dog who does not do well with change and is attached to my hip! We send him to a wonderful Kennel with the best care and play time when Iam gone, but it is not home and he has separation issues! Getting the bags done and out of the way, and giving our dog two weeks to settle with us before we go feels right for all of us.

Thanks for your support, to us all, and know when we climb up the Napoleon route, two weeks after you, I will remember that you tread this sacred soil! Buen Camino.
Thanks Dave! Sounds like you are ready! I wish you a blessed, peace-filled, healthy Camino filled with surprise!

We are definitely in the senior ranges so our preparation is a bit different. We do use a combination of real trails 4-5 a week combined trails with elevation and streets around our home with the dog for 3-4 miles a day daily. We do use stretch bands and do ankle and calf exercises as well as several core exercises which we do before we start our walking, and in the evening before bed! When the rains are bad we use the treadmills at our little town center. We are averaging between levels 5 and 10...probably averaging level 7 for 45minutes at a time. But we really have no idea what the actual road grade equivalent is....

We are trying to get everything ready in the next two weeks and then put everything aside because we have a terrier rescue dog who does not do well with change and is attached to my hip! We send him to a wonderful Kennel with the best care and play time when Iam gone, but it is not home and he has separation issues! Getting the bags done and out of the way, and giving our dog two weeks to settle with us before we go feels right for all of us.

Thanks for your support, to us all, and know when we climb up the Napoleon route, two weeks after you, I will remember that you tread this sacred soil! Buen Camino.
The average grade up the Napoleon route to the point near the Col de Loepeder where one starts downhill to Roncesvalles is a total average grade of about 12 to 15 percent. In a few spots prior to Orisson it approaches 18 to 22 percent -- but in short segments, thankfully.

You sound like you are going to be fine with where you are fitness-wise. Use a pace that you can sustain for a period of time, as it uses far more energy to do a faster pace and then to stop frequently, then to do a slow pace and stop for breaks periodically.

Those that are of the same fitness level who just push themselves too fast and keep stopping not only end up taking longer than you to get to the destination, but will be far more spent and beat up when they finally arrive.

Eat something as a snack every 25 to 30 minutes to keep your engine stoked, and stay hydrated, too. If I am not eating an energy gel and nuts in that time frame, it is a 1/4 of something like a Snicker bar and a handful of almonds. Others like trail mix stuff, still others will munch on a part of a chorizo or bocadillo, etc.

BTW, I am 65.5 years old, so I think I entered into that 'senior range', too. We all get to stick together, don't we :)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Fourteen days to departure out of SeaTac airport to Madrid. As the next 13 days countdown, there are specific things which will be done.

For today:

1. All clothing and gear items are in my Gossamer Gear Mariposa backpack. Hmmm..... Mariposa; Spanish for 'butterfly', which at it's current 9.25 pounds seems pretty apt. But.... the first day out of SJPdP to Roncesvalles will add an additional 1 pound of GoPro video gear .... which will be mailed home at Pamplona. So with water, that will bring my total pack weight to 12 pounds for the first day.

2. All travel documents are in my travel pouch, along with the 120 Euros left over from last year's Camino. That is in my pack for now. I carry the pouch around my neck or in a zippered shorts or pants pocket while traveling and walking Camino. It is completely waterproof, with zippered compartments on the back and front sides. Very light weight.

3. Outlining what information, instructions, reminders, etc that I need to finish writing up and leaving at home for others to have access to detailing the regular stuff I take care of (bills, aquarium, irrigation water, bird care, passwords, etc)

4. Routine workouts. For the next 9 days, I will gently increase my efforts toward a maximum peak level. At day 10, workouts are increasingly dialed back for the next three days. Then no workout on day 14 -- which will leave 3 days of downtime, including travel days and light walking and touring around in SJPdP, before heading out to Roncesvalles.

I like lists when things like this trip back to Camino happen. I find that if I jot things down as they flash into my mind, I don't feel scattered and anxious about getting stuff done. :)
The one big "reveal" that I am waiting to hear is -- what shoes are you wearing? ;)

Oh, lucky you, to be in the midst of pre-Camino jitters is such a wonderful state of mind. Buen camino, Laurie
 

KER

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF - Oct 2018
I packed a backpacking sleeping quilt rated for 45 degrees. I got away from sleeping bags when I thru hiked the Pacific Crest Trail and needed to really develop an ultralight set of gear. The bottom of a sleeping bag provides no warmth as the insulation is all compressed from body weight. The funny thing is, I am even re-thinking the sleeping quilt and tempted to leave it at home, and just use my clothing to sleep in.

Just toying with the idea. I would really like to offset the added weight of that GoPro stuff. But the sleeping quilt is still, at only 11 ounces, lighter than the 1.5 pounds of GoPro stuff. That means I would still need to find 13 more ounces of weight to drop. :)
Thanks. I will research ultra-light and compressible backpacking sleep quilt vs taking a sleeping bag. Buen Camino.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
The one big "reveal" that I am waiting to hear is -- what shoes are you wearing? ;)

Oh, lucky you, to be in the midst of pre-Camino jitters is such a wonderful state of mind. Buen camino, Laurie
I decided on the Hoka One One Bondi 6. The Bondi 6 is a brand new release. I was fortunate to get a pair in a 'pre-release' shipment about 7 weeks ago. I had been using the Bondi 5, and had decided to take those with me. Then the Bondi 6 came out and I requested a pair to try. I didn't know if they would have much of a noticeable difference to me over the Bondi 5.

As I used them, I did notice a bit of a difference in the width (a bit more room in the WIDE version), they are a bit lighter per pair, and the cushioning to me seems a bit beefier and 'cushy'er.

I wouldn't advise anyone with a still good pair of the Bondi 5 to rush out and get the Bondi 6. I have the luxury of getting a big discount as an equipment tester, although I am not testing the Bondi 6, so I paid about 25% of the retail as a 'professional courtesy', instead of the full markup. I will be giving Hoka an informal feedback on the shoe, though.

I also have a brand new pair of the Hoka One One Bondi 5. I got the new pair BEFORE I knew about the release of the Bondi 6. Originally, I was going to take the new pair of Bondi 5 on Camino because I had put a lot of use and abuse on the Bondi 5 and would leave the used ones behind.

Because my son, Caleb, will meet me in Leon 18 days after I depart from SJPdP, I am going to do something I normally wouldn't do. I'm having Caleb bring the new pair of Bondi 5 with him. If the Bondi 6 is not holding up the way I expect it to, I will say a silent prayer for their 'soles' (you see what I did there :) ) and swap them out for the unused pair of Bondi 5.

If such is the case, I'l just put them on top of someone's rock pile, spray them with graffiti, then pile another stone on top.

Just kidding o_Oo_O;)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thanks. I will research ultra-light and compressible backpacking sleep quilt vs taking a sleeping bag. Buen Camino.
Kerr, Amazon has some inexpensive stuff. If you have access to Costco, the carry a set of down quilts that a lot of pilgrims from the US have used.

Also.... Check with our Forum member Trecile; she has developed a sleep liner/sack system which looks terrific. This is from her post:

 

AndreaCT

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Fall 2016 Camino Frances to Leon
Fall 2017 Camino Frances to Finisterre
May 2019 Portuguese
Dave, have a fantastic time and I know that many in this group are looking forward to hearing about your trip.
Blessings to you for safe travel, a fantastic walk and a great time spent with your son.
 

lruault

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sep 2018)
Another list maker - YES! My countdown is shorter... I leave from British Columbia (just north of you!) on Friday, and begin walking on Monday the 10th from SJdPP. As a Camino newbie I have a slight amount of trepidation, mostly around the choices in my backpack. I have it down to 12 pounds before water, but would like to try and get it to 12 pounds in total. I want to express my sincere appreciation to you for so freely imparting all your knowledge and wisdom of experience in such a kind and respectful manner. Buen Camino...so marvellous that you get to share a part of this with you son!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Dave, have a fantastic time and I know that many in this group are looking forward to hearing about your trip.
Blessings to you for safe travel, a fantastic walk and a great time spent with your son.
Thanks Andrea, your good thoughts are appreciated. :)
 

MicheleK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning first one, Camino Frances, in September 2018.
Hello @lruault l am from Vancouver Island and will be heading out of SJPP on Sept 10th, also on my first Camino. I share your trepidations. My pack weighs 12 lbs also, more than 10% of my weight trying to figure out how to make it lighter. Hope to meet you along the way. Buen Camino!
 

lruault

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (Sep 2018)
Hello @lruault l am from Vancouver Island and will be heading out of SJPP on Sept 10th, also on my first Camino. I share your trepidations. My pack weighs 12 lbs also, more than 10% of my weight trying to figure out how to make it lighter. Hope to meet you along the way. Buen Camino!
I am on Air France out of Vancouver on the 7th to Paris. You???
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
When I was in kindergarten, the Chaplain at our school came to talk to us every week (rather than making us squirmy wee ones sit through chapel). One day he brought a boomerang and threw it a couple of times, telling us that what we throw out comes back to us. I've never forgotten that lesson.
You have thrown out continuous help and kindness here - so may all that come back to you 1000-fold, Dave! Super buen camino to you...may you have perfect health, strength when you need it, and ease when you need it.
 

MicheleK

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning first one, Camino Frances, in September 2018.
I am on Air France out of Vancouver on the 7th to Paris. You???
There are four of us flying out of Nanaimo on the 6th to London, from there to Biarritz and bus to SJPP.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
When I was in kindergarten, the Chaplain at our school came to talk to us every week (rather than making us squirmy wee ones sit through chapel). One day he brought a boomerang and threw it a couple of times, telling us that what we throw out comes back to us. I've never forgotten that lesson.
You have thrown out continuous help and kindness here - so may all that come back to you 1000-fold, Dave! Super buen camino to you...may you have perfect health, strength when you need it, and ease when you need it.
Wow... just, wow. I am touched by such kind thoughts and words. Thank you :)
 

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
I am touched by such kind thoughts and words.
As I have been by your endless helpfulness here, Dave.
Lots of people will have a happier, healthier, and more comfortable walk because of your advice.
So may you also have all that - and may those Hokas be like best friends you never met before.:cool:;)
 
Camino(s) past & future
2015 -SJPP- Santiago .Oct/Nov
2017 -Porto to Santiago.Oct
2017- Santiago- Finesterre. Nov
Buen Camino Dave . I am a week or so behind you . I leave on 22 September to Madrid from Melbourne Australia . I packed my back pack as well & coming in at around 6 kg - it's 28 k pack and that'll be enough weight for me . This will be my 3 rd Camino and I feel a bit more ready and better prepared but also nervous as well . Cheers
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Another list maker - YES! My countdown is shorter... I leave from British Columbia (just north of you!) on Friday, and begin walking on Monday the 10th from SJdPP. As a Camino newbie I have a slight amount of trepidation, mostly around the choices in my backpack. I have it down to 12 pounds before water, but would like to try and get it to 12 pounds in total. I want to express my sincere appreciation to you for so freely imparting all your knowledge and wisdom of experience in such a kind and respectful manner. Buen Camino...so marvellous that you get to share a part of this with you son!

Wishing you a wonderful Camino!
 

Kiwi-family

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Past: (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2018)-Frances, Baztan, San Salvador, Primitivo, Fisterra,VdlP, Madrid
Thanks Dave - I’m two days behind you and need to add #3 to my own list (I can’t believe I had forgotten about leaving details for those who are left behind!)
May you have a rewarding solo walk and enjoy meeting up with your son in Leon. Might see you there!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Thanks Dave - I’m two days behind you and need to add #3 to my own list (I can’t believe I had forgotten about leaving details for those who are left behind!)
May you have a rewarding solo walk and enjoy meeting up with your son in Leon. Might see you there!
You and I could very possibly meet up. :)
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I decided on the Hoka One One Bondi 6. The Bondi 6 is a brand new release. I was fortunate to get a pair in a 'pre-release' shipment about 7 weeks ago. I had been using the Bondi 5, and had decided to take those with me. Then the Bondi 6 came out and I requested a pair to try. I didn't know if they would have much of a noticeable difference to me over the Bondi 5.

As I used them, I did notice a bit of a difference in the width (a bit more room in the WIDE version), they are a bit lighter per pair, and the cushioning to me seems a bit beefier and 'cushy'er.

I wouldn't advise anyone with a still good pair of the Bondi 5 to rush out and get the Bondi 6. I have the luxury of getting a big discount as an equipment tester, although I am not testing the Bondi 6, so I paid about 25% of the retail as a 'professional courtesy', instead of the full markup. I will be giving Hoka an informal feedback on the shoe, though.

I also have a brand new pair of the Hoka One One Bondi 5. I got the new pair BEFORE I knew about the release of the Bondi 6. Originally, I was going to take the new pair of Bondi 5 on Camino because I had put a lot of use and abuse on the Bondi 5 and would leave the used ones behind.

Because my son, Caleb, will meet me in Leon 18 days after I depart from SJPdP, I am going to do something I normally wouldn't do. I'm having Caleb bring the new pair of Bondi 5 with him. If the Bondi 6 is not holding up the way I expect it to, I will say a silent prayer for their 'soles' (you see what I did there :) ) and swap them out for the unused pair of Bondi 5.

If such is the case, I'l just put them on top of someone's rock pile, spray them with graffiti, then pile another stone on top.

Just kidding o_Oo_O;)
Hi, Dave, I switched to Altras this year (oh, yes you probably remember that since you talked me through it step by step ;)). I am hooked, but wonder if you can compare the Bondi to the Lone Peak. Maybe I should consider switching it up? That no drop feature was not something I loved but it didn’t really bother me.

Thanks as always.
 

AZ Hiker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
14 days- does that mean you are flying out on Sept. 16? If so, do you have a layover in Atlanta? I’m flying out of PHX on the 16th on Delta.
 

Marbe2

Active member
Camino(s) past & future
2015 SJPD to Burgos
2017 Leon to Santiago
Pamplona to Santiago Mar. 2018
Burgos - SCDC (Oct 18)
Hey Dave, what did you settle on for your first aide kit....just in case I missed something I might need!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi, Dave, I switched to Altras this year (oh, yes you probably remember that since you talked me through it step by step ;)). I am hooked, but wonder if you can compare the Bondi to the Lone Peak. Maybe I should consider switching it up? That no drop feature was not something I loved but it didn’t really bother me.

Thanks as always.
Hi, Laurie...
You know how some folks just can never get used to the zero drop concept of an Altra? Yup... I'm one of those. I really, really tried to get used to them, with the Timp being the latest earlier this year. So I don't have a long time use comparison. Here is what I can comment on, though, for what it's worth"

1. Traction. From the few days I wore the Timp, the traction seems to be comparable to the Bondi. I recall not being too concerned about the traction on the Timp when I saw the sole, but I was initially concerned with the Bondi's traction based on the look of the sole. However, the Bondi uses a 'siping' type of technology incorporated into the treads of the sole which, in effect, creates hundreds of tiny 'edges' as flexion in the sole occurs during each step. That makes the sole much more aggressive than it looks.

So I would say that the Altra and the Bondi are both competent with traction.

2. Cushioning. The Altra Timp was noticeably less cushioned than the Hoka One One Bondi.

For some feet, lots of cushioning is essential -- it can help with problem areas like the metatarsals. For other feet, cushioning is less of an issue or not an issue at all. For those who want a lot of cushioning, Hoka One One in general, and the Bondi series in particular are as good as it gets.

A good insole can help with a lean-cushioned shoe. But it is far better to have a shoe that is designed and constructed from the outer sole through the mid-sole specifically to incorporate a good and long lasting cushion. This not only helps with the feet, but with the lower legs, knees, and back as well.

The Bondi is noticeably better cushioned than the Altra. But as I stated, not everyone needs or wants that level of cushioning. Obviously, the Altra works extremely well for a lot of people.

3. Stability and motion control. If not carefully designed, a heavily cushioned shoe can have a serious problem with stability and motion control. This will show up in shoes in several ways: Over pronation, which is readily observed when a shoe is off and looks bent over and tilted to the side. Knee pain, shin splints and lower back pain. The shoes will possibly feel almost 'wobbly' when worn. There is also the issue of the shoe being more prone to causing ankle injuries on unstable ground.

The possibility of such instability was my biggest concern with the Bondi. That turns out to be of no concern at all. After several weeks of wearing a trail shoe that has less stability/motion control in its construction, I can easily see where my right foot's pronation issue is imprinted on the shoe --- it will be tilted like the Leaning Tower of Pisa.

That has not happened with the Bondi. When I first put on a pair, my initial thought was, "uh oh, I'm going to wobble". But that quickly passed, and the shoe has proven it is a stable platform.

I never had any question about the motion control aspects of the Altra. I would rate them evenly in this category.

4. Trail debris or rock shield. How well does the shoe keep rocks and other 'pokey' debris on the trail from impacting the bottom of one's foot. Do you go 'owww' when that kind of impact occurs, with possible sore spots or bruising showing up later? Or does the shoe do a good job of blunting those impacts?

The Bondi has no real 'rock plate', which is the thin and flexible thermoplastic sheet installed as part of the mid-sole in a lot of trail runners. I spent a lot of time when I first wore the Bondi purposefully hiking on rough trails and rocky terrain to see how much trail 'pokeyness' I could feel. At first I thought I was missing the pokey stuff, but quickly realized that I was stepping on the debris and rocks, but the amount of cushion was, itself, serving as the rock shield.

I do not recall having any issues with the Altra with trail debris; they provided good protection. So both shoes are good in this category.

5. Drainage and drying time. Neither shoe is waterproof, which in my mind is a good thing for a large variety of reasons. But unless the shoe can provide sufficient drainage and will dry out in a reasonable time, it is just as bad as a 'waterproof' shoe in this regard.

Laurie, you are far more familiar with this aspect of the Altra than I am so you already know how they perform in this category.

While I never wore the Altra in wet weather conditions, but I am familiar with its construction and materials. The uppers and interior would perform great in wet weather. It would drain well and the materials are mostly hydrophobic and will not trap water which means the shoe will dry quickly.

The Hoka One One Bondi are also superbly suited for wet weather performance.

Laurie, the Hoka One One Bondi, or any of the other Hoka, are significantly different enough from the Altras that it would be worth trying. You will clearly feel the difference in the philosophy of each manufacturer's design, which at a minimum should be interesting for you to compare. it will also be very likely that you will feel a clear preference in either the Altra model or the Hoka One One model.

My reason for switching to a different shoe is that it provides a benefit. If after trying the Bondi or other Hoka One One you are not perceiving a foot-felt benefit, stick with what you already like. As they say, it doesn't hurt to look. Also, if you have access to an REI, you can wear the Bondi outside and do enough hiking around to know for sure whether they are a new match or not.... and if it's 'meh' on the Bondi, they are easily returned. :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
14 days- does that mean you are flying out on Sept. 16? If so, do you have a layover in Atlanta? I’m flying out of PHX on the 16th on Delta.
Hi, AZ...

I am actually flying out of Seattle on the 15th with a layover in Frankfurt. Because of my arrival time in Madrid on Sept. 16, I will spend the night near to the airport there. I fly out of Madrid to Biarritz the next morning (Sept 17), then catch Express Bouricott, and arrive in SJPdP at around 11:30 am or so. I head to Roncesvalles the next morning (Sept 18) :)

What's your itinerary for your 9/16 departure?
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Are
There are four of us flying out of Nanaimo on the 6th to London, from there to Biarritz and bus to SJPP.
Are you bringing Nanaimo bars and, if so, will you be in SdC 24th Sept to 10th Ocotober . . . . ?
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Hi Dave,

Your GoPro weighs 1 to 1.5 pounds? My action camera including housing weighs in at 136gms! What were you going to carry?

Walk softly along the way and take care of you.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hi Dave,

Your GoPro weighs 1 to 1.5 pounds? My action camera including housing weighs in at 136gms! What were you going to carry?

Walk softly along the way and take care of you.
Nah... the GoPro PLUS the ancillary stuff, like the powerbank that will be used to provide 10+ continuous hours of video recording. You're so right about the weight of just the camera... both it and the small batteries weigh a pittance. When I get to Pamplona, I plan on mailing the powerbank and some other accessories home, which will put the GoPro back into the featherweight category. :)
 

AZ Hiker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2018)
Hi, AZ...

I am actually flying out of Seattle on the 15th with a layover in Frankfurt. Because of my arrival time in Madrid on Sept. 16, I will spend the night near to the airport there. I fly out of Madrid to Biarritz the next morning (Sept 17), then catch Express Bouricott, and arrive in SJPdP at around 11:30 am or so. I head to Roncesvalles the next morning (Sept 18) :)

What's your itinerary for your 9/16 departure?
I arrive in Madrid on the 17th, take two slow days to arrive in SJPP on the 19th, and start walking on the 20 th. I’ll probably never catch up with you. Buen Camino.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Nah... the GoPro PLUS the ancillary stuff, like the powerbank that will be used to provide 10+ continuous hours of video recording. You're so right about the weight of just the camera... both it and the small batteries weigh a pittance. When I get to Pamplona, I plan on mailing the powerbank and some other accessories home, which will put the GoPro back into the featherweight category. :)
Must be a big powerbank! I use a 3000mah tucked inside a grip (BMX handlebar grip!)



along with the internal 1050 I get about 3 hours life in total
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
I just bought a down quilt and it is very light..took an extra pound off my sleep kit. I'll be a few weeks behind you and am also taking an emergency bivy (8 ounces)...I keep packing and repacking...taking a few things out each time. I'm under 20# now and have never been this light with my pack on a multi day hike.

@davebugg - I've done a LOT of AT section hiking in Georgia - lots of ascent - 12 mile days for 3 - 4 days in a row. I believe you have done some AT as well. It has certainly refined my choice in footwear. In your opinion, how does this compare to the Frances? I'll be leaving Oct 2 for Madrid and will begin on 10/4 or 5.
You will be fine with the hiking experience you have. The AT has more overall elevation gain and loss than Frances, and HOW that elevation is gained on the AT (few switchbacks compared to the PCT) will feel familiar to you. If you go from SJPdP to Roncesvalles via the Napoleon route, the uphill grade is far longer what you typically find on US backpacking trails (about 21 - 22 kilometers of uphill). Nothing to fear though. :)

I might suggest that you drop the bivy, though. And anything else that is specific to backcountry needs. You're just not going to need it. :) Keep in mind that because you are just walking from town to town, if you find that you really need something, you can pick it up as you go. So don't be afraid to really pack lean. :)

You sound really excited, and you have the walking experience to give you confidence. You will have a good Camino :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Must be a big powerbank! I use a 3000mah tucked inside a grip (BMX handlebar grip!)



along with the internal 1050 I get about 3 hours life in total
Yup... and Anker 14,000 mah. :-( I tried with a 7000mah, and it just didn't last for the continuous number of hours (10+) I need. Sigh. Oh, well, it's just for one day.
 

Dutchwalk53

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015 with son #1, CF 2016 alone, CF 2017 with son #2 and husband , CF Sept 2018 with daughter
Jeez.....what a post ha ha. I am leaving in 8 days and for the first time ever....NO prep. I and going to wing it. I broke a toe badly 5 weeks ago and it's finally healing to the point I feel comfortable starting to walk. But aside from a few 3 mile walks with my pack, that will be it this time. But somehow I am ok with it. My pack is ready as always and me ....????? We will see how this short (2 weeks ) Camino will go. On the bright side....I will be in Spain, with my daughter , on the trail walking :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Jeez.....what a post ha ha. I am leaving in 8 days and for the first time ever....NO prep. I and going to wing it. I broke a toe badly 5 weeks ago and it's finally healing to the point I feel comfortable starting to walk. But aside from a few 3 mile walks with my pack, that will be it this time. But somehow I am ok with it. My pack is ready as always and me ....????? We will see how this short (2 weeks ) Camino will go. On the bright side....I will be in Spain, with my daughter , on the trail walking :)
I am so very happy for you.... :)

My biggest prep wasn't gathering the gear and documents, they were already pretty much together. I just needed to pull stuff out of my pack and run through my inventory list from last year to make sure everything was still there. The documents and stuff were in the safe, so I just needed to grab those and put them with the pack.

My workouts are part of my daily routine and not special just for Camino... staying in shape for backpacking is how I earn part of my income for consulting and gear testing.

The biggest thing --- and what I envy you for -- is that I take sole care of the house and animals and finances and maintenance on the property, etc. She Who Must Be Obeyed (SWMBO) requires that I leave the details, in writing, of what she needs to do while I am gone. And to make hiring arrangements for any property chore stuff.

Sigh

It's a bit ... uh ... (think of a nice word, Dave) ... tedious, as SWMBO refuses to try and learn what I do while I am doing it. So.... what can ya do? Plus, I'll be gone for near to 5 weeks.

Even though it might sound like it, I am not complaining about this stuff. It's just that for me, grabbing stuff and going comes with the need to make arrangements for my absence :)
 

Dutchwalk53

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015 with son #1, CF 2016 alone, CF 2017 with son #2 and husband , CF Sept 2018 with daughter
I am so very happy for you.... :)

My biggest prep wasn't gathering the gear and documents, they were already pretty much together. I just needed to pull stuff out of my pack and run through my inventory list from last year to make sure everything was still there. The documents and stuff were in the safe, so I just needed to grab those and put them with the pack.

My workouts are part of my daily routine and not special just for Camino... staying in shape for backpacking is how I earn part of my income for consulting and gear testing.

The biggest thing --- and what I envy you for -- is that I take sole care of the house and animals and finances and maintenance on the property, etc. She Who Must Be Obeyed (SWMBO) requires that I leave the details, in writing, of what she needs to do while I am gone. And to make hiring arrangements for any property chore stuff.

Sigh

It's a bit ... uh ... (think of a nice word, Dave) ... tedious, as SWMBO refuses to try and learn what I do while I am doing it. So.... what can ya do? Plus, I'll be gone for near to 5 weeks.

Even though it might sound like it, I am not complaining about this stuff. It's just that for me, grabbing stuff and going comes with the need to make arrangements for my absence :)
I am lucky enough that my husband joined me last year....just for a week...but due to that , he understands my love for the Camino. My hope is that people are always willing to try the unknown. Certainly at the age I am. Life is going fast....better enjoy it to the fullest :)
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Jeez.....what a post ha ha. I am leaving in 8 days and for the first time ever....NO prep. I and going to wing it. I broke a toe badly 5 weeks ago and it's finally healing to the point I feel comfortable starting to walk. But aside from a few 3 mile walks with my pack, that will be it this time. But somehow I am ok with it. My pack is ready as always and me ....????? We will see how this short (2 weeks ) Camino will go. On the bright side....I will be in Spain, with my daughter , on the trail walking :)
I walked with my son with NO prep (except packing the bags, booking the tickets, etc.), although we walked for a bit longer (3 weeks). What we did was, after the first day, walk shorter distances (about 15 km) foir the next three days as "on the camino" training.
 

Jeff Crawley

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Contemplating yet another "final" Camino
but 2019?
Jeez.....what a post ha ha. I am leaving in 8 days and for the first time ever....NO prep. I and going to wing it. I broke a toe badly 5 weeks ago and it's finally healing to the point I feel comfortable starting to walk. But aside from a few 3 mile walks with my pack, that will be it this time. But somehow I am ok with it. My pack is ready as always and me ....????? We will see how this short (2 weeks ) Camino will go. On the bright side....I will be in Spain, with my daughter , on the trail walking :)
My sympathies on the toe, hope it goes well but 5 weeks? My doctor never told me that!

Buen Camino!
 

BucketBabe

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances planned for October 3-mid November (2018)
You will be fine with the hiking experience you have. The AT has more overall elevation gain and loss than Frances, and HOW that elevation is gained on the AT (few switchbacks compared to the PCT) will feel familiar to you. If you go from SJPdP to Roncesvalles via the Napoleon route, the uphill grade is far longer what you typically find on US backpacking trails (about 21 - 22 kilometers of uphill). Nothing to fear though. :)

I might suggest that you drop the bivy, though. And anything else that is specific to backcountry needs. You're just not going to need it. :) Keep in mind that because you are just walking from town to town, if you find that you really need something, you can pick it up as you go. So don't be afraid to really pack lean. :)

You sound really excited, and you have the walking experience to give you confidence. You will have a good Camino :)
Thanks so much for your help in this and everything you give to all in this forum. Buen Camino, @davebugg ! :D
 

LBG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 20 2018
Dave I have been watching your threads as I head off on my first camino leaving SJPDP on the 20th. I fly out of Toronto to Paris and then taking the train to SJPDP. Bit worried about finding a place on the night of the 19th to sleep but ok with taking it as it comes. I have done a ton of walking and activity to get ready for this but finding hills to train on in southern Ontario just doesn't happen. I have done some ski hills but worried about the first leg up the Napoleon route. I only have 14 days to walk and Burgos is my target but I am ok if I don't make it that far. I am fit but still concerned about that first leg. Anyway, my pre camino jitters are on full tilt(doing it solo) despite having done tons of travel in the past. I wish I could do the whole walk but I just cant take that much time so I am doing it in sections. I want to thank you for your insights.
Buen Camino
Deb
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Dave I have been watching your threads as I head off on my first camino leaving SJPDP on the 20th. I fly out of Toronto to Paris and then taking the train to SJPDP. Bit worried about finding a place on the night of the 19th to sleep but ok with taking it as it comes. I have done a ton of walking and activity to get ready for this but finding hills to train on in southern Ontario just doesn't happen. I have done some ski hills but worried about the first leg up the Napoleon route. I only have 14 days to walk and Burgos is my target but I am ok if I don't make it that far. I am fit but still concerned about that first leg. Anyway, my pre camino jitters are on full tilt(doing it solo) despite having done tons of travel in the past. I wish I could do the whole walk but I just cant take that much time so I am doing it in sections. I want to thank you for your insights.
Buen Camino
Deb
Hi, Deb...

With some level of cardio fitness, making it up a long uphill grade is a matter of pace, maintaining calorie intake, hydration, and utilizing meaningful breaks.

1. As you head uphill, adjust your pace to a comfortable level that you can maintain without needing to stop and start frequently. Starting and stopping frequently adds to exhaustion. It doesn't matter if your pace is 4 miles per hour or 0.5 miles per hour. What matters is if you can continuously walk between planned breaks. Setting your pace is a dynamic process, you need to adjust it as circumstances dictate. Please set your pace based on what you need, not on how you feel.

How do you maintain a pace at a set speed? My trick is to silently hum a tune... the same tune.... which is easy to sync to each step I take. Don't laugh, but I use 'Hark The Herald Angles Sing'.

As the grade uphill gets steeper and I need to slow, I don't slow how fast I step, I adjust the length of each step. In other words, in keeping time with my song, I might go from, say, 10 inches between one footstep to the next, to only 5 inches between steps. That will automatically slow how fast I am moving and still keep me in step with my song.

Inexperienced folks will start out fast and try to maintain that pace because they are fresh, full of energy, and not at all tired. Yet. They want to keep up with those in better shape. They are in a race for beds. Etc. But they will start to crump within a fairly short distance up the hill. And the crumping will become cumulative with each step even if they slow down later, because they have burned through their energy producing stores with that initial fast pace. They not only will crump, but they are now going to stay in a state of depleted energy which only a prolonged break over several hours can solve.

So start slower than you feel is normal for you, let people pass you by, and see how that pace feels as you continue uphill. If you start feeling too out of breath, slow down. If your leg muscles start feeling too fatigued, slow down. Set a planned interval for a short and deliberate break -- say every 20 minutes. Set your pace so that you can walk until that break time.

2. At break, eat something. A quarter of a Snicker bar and a bite of cheese, a handful of trail mix, a bit of bocadillo, some energy gel with some nuts, etc. The idea is to replenish your energy producing stores that your muscles will need in the next 25 to 30 minutes. It is important to eat small amounts frequently. You will also need to be sipping and drinking water as you are walking. You need to stay hydrated without overdoing the water.

3. If it starts to become very difficult to go the 20 minutes without stopping in-between, then lengthen your break from 5 minutes to 8 minutes or 10 minutes. Give your calorie intake a longer period to do its job and for you to re-oxygenate and your muscle cells to replenish themselves.. If you find that it fairly easy to walk 20 minutes before stopping, then add 5 more minutes to your walk time between breaks. Still fairly easy? Then keep adding 5 minutes to the interval before stopping. However, I would advise not going longer than 1 hour without taking a break.

It is understandable that you have some jitters.; while you have experience traveling, the Camino is in a different category of travel. Rather than doing the 'tourist' thing, you are committed to becoming sort of a "stranger in a strange land". :) You are walking town to town, interacting with -- and becoming part of -- Spanish life in a more intimate way than the typical 'tourist'. You are making yourself vulnerable by having to 'play it be ear' at finding anything that you need, every day, while moving down the Way in the most deliberate manner possible, walking.

You have no single home base to return to each night (a hotel room, etc) after spending the day touring around seeing the sights. While the typical tourist is pondering over the number of great places to eat at near to the hotel that is home base, you are wondering where you will be sleeping that night and IF there might be at least ONE decent place nearby which has good food. The tourist has the luxury of luggage holding an inventory of clothing containing several choices of a single item like dresses, pants, shirts, etc. As a pilgrim who must carry the lightest load you can devise on your back, you are deciding if there is time to wash the dust out of the pants you are wearing -- when you get to wherever you are spending the night -- so that they dry out enough to wear to dinner.

There is no concierge, no travel agency itinerary, no time to become a bit familiar with the area around home base. Nope... you are dealing with your day to day living needs on the fly in constantly changing environs. While there might be a guide, or internet apps, or friendly Hospitaleros to give a heads up, you are almost always in 'Discovery Mode', truly living in the moment as you walk, find lodging, eat, sleep, then get up and do it all over the next day.

You don't really know what's around the next bend. You don't know if your primary mode of transport will become blistered or otherwise compromised. You wonder just how you can live out of a pack for so many days. You worry about inspecting your bed area every night in a new location for bedbugs. You wonder what your tolerance is for snoring, alarms going off in the very early morning, people too close to your sense of 'personal space' in shared dorm spaces. You have no guarantees of top or bottom bunk, blankets, privacy with showers, how to get your sparse inventory of multi-tasking clothing washed and dried, or if your planned albergue stop will be Completo.

You wonder if you are actually capable of walking so many kilometers, can avoid injuries, and stay relatively healthy enough to actually enjoy all of the wonderful facets of Spain through which you will be walking.

CAN I DO THIS????!!!! is the piercing and persistent blathering which your mind and gut keep demanding that you focus on. They don't wait for any sort of evidence, conclusion, or answer, all they are concerned with is casting doubt.

I go through at least a portion of the above every time I go on a multi-day backpacking trek. I went through that before last years Camino. I am hearing those voices again now as I am near to departing for Spain.

I just simply respond to the question of 'can I do this' with the answer that "I am as prepared as I can be, I will be flexible to things happening around me, and regardless of what happens life will continue on".

After all, I am not going into combat or heading into a burning building; I am just going for a walk. :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Hey Dave, what did you settle on for your first aide kit....just in case I missed something I might need!
Sorry I missed seeing this earlier.

My first aid kit contains very basic stuff. I have a separate kit for blisters, though.
1. Bandaids x 2
2. Single use packet of triple antibiotic x 2. These a small, little tear-open packets.
3. Adhesive tape x 1 meter
4. Small gauze dressing pad x 2
5. Butterly closures x 3
6. Super Glue x 1/2 ounce tube

Altogether, just a few ounces in weight in a zip lock bag.

For more extensive injuries, I have training and experience using items on hand. There are also items not in the kit which are available for first aid: for example a small bottle of hand sanitizer that I keep in a pocket for frequent hand cleansing when eating or after a nature call.

My philosophy is to adapt the kit to the relative ease of access to medical facilities. And to the access to medical and first aid supplies, like pharmacies.
 

HuntingDrog

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Hi, Deb...

With some level of cardio fitness, making it up a long uphill grade is a matter of pace, maintaining calorie intake, hydration, and utilizing meaningful breaks.

1. As you head uphill, adjust your pace to a comfortable level that you can maintain without needing to stop and start frequently. Starting and stopping frequently adds to exhaustion. It doesn't matter if your pace is 4 miles per hour or 0.5 miles per hour. What matters is if you can continuously walk between planned breaks. Setting your pace is a dynamic process, you need to adjust it as circumstances dictate. Please set your pace based on what you need, not on how you feel.

How do you maintain a pace at a set speed? My trick is to silently hum a tune... the same tune.... which is easy to sync to each step I take. Don't laugh, but I use 'Hark The Herald Angles Sing'.

As the grade uphill gets steeper and I need to slow, I don't slow how fast I step, I adjust the length of each step. In other words, in keeping time with my song, I might go from, say, 10 inches between one footstep to the next, to only 5 inches between steps. That will automatically slow how fast I am moving and still keep me in step with my song.

Inexperienced folks will start out fast and try to maintain that pace because they are fresh, full of energy, and not at all tired. Yet. They want to keep up with those in better shape. They are in a race for beds. Etc. But they will start to crump within a fairly short distance up the hill. And the crumping will become cumulative with each step even if they slow down later, because they have burned through their energy producing stores with that initial fast pace. They not only will crump, but they are now going to stay in a state of depleted energy which only a prolonged break over several hours can solve.

So start slower than you feel is normal for you, let people pass you by, and see how that pace feels as you continue uphill. If you start feeling too out of breath, slow down. If your leg muscles start feeling too fatigued, slow down. Set a planned interval for a short and deliberate break -- say every 20 minutes. Set your pace so that you can walk until that break time.

2. At break, eat something. A quarter of a Snicker bar and a bite of cheese, a handful of trail mix, a bit of bocadillo, some energy gel with some nuts, etc. The idea is to replenish your energy producing stores that your muscles will need in the next 25 to 30 minutes. It is important to eat small amounts frequently. You will also need to be sipping and drinking water as you are walking. You need to stay hydrated without overdoing the water.

3. If it starts to become very difficult to go the 20 minutes without stopping in-between, then lengthen your break from 5 minutes to 8 minutes or 10 minutes. Give your calorie intake a longer period to do its job and for you to re-oxygenate and your muscle cells to replenish themselves.. If you find that it fairly easy to walk 20 minutes before stopping, then add 5 more minutes to your walk time between breaks. Still fairly easy? Then keep adding 5 minutes to the interval before stopping. However, I would advise not going longer than 1 hour without taking a break.

It is understandable that you have some jitters.; while you have experience traveling, the Camino is in a different category of travel. Rather than doing the 'tourist' thing, you are committed to becoming sort of a "stranger in a strange land". :) You are walking town to town, interacting with -- and becoming part of -- Spanish life in a more intimate way than the typical 'tourist'. You are making yourself vulnerable by having to 'play it be ear' at finding anything that you need, every day, while moving down the Way in the most deliberate manner possible, walking.

You have no single home base to return to each night (a hotel room, etc) after spending the day touring around seeing the sights. While the typical tourist is pondering over the number of great places to eat at near to the hotel that is home base, you are wondering where you will be sleeping that night and IF there might be at least ONE decent place nearby which has good food. The tourist has the luxury of luggage holding an inventory of clothing containing several choices of a single item like dresses, pants, shirts, etc. As a pilgrim who must carry the lightest load you can devise on your back, you are deciding if there is time to wash the dust out of the pants you are wearing -- when you get to wherever you are spending the night -- so that they dry out enough to wear to dinner.

There is no concierge, no travel agency itinerary, no time to become a bit familiar with the area around home base. Nope... you are dealing with your day to day living needs on the fly in constantly changing environs. While there might be a guide, or internet apps, or friendly Hospitaleros to give a heads up, you are almost always in 'Discovery Mode', truly living in the moment as you walk, find lodging, eat, sleep, then get up and do it all over the next day.

You don't really know what's around the next bend. You don't know if your primary mode of transport will become blistered or otherwise compromised. You wonder just how you can live out of a pack for so many days. You worry about inspecting your bed area every night in a new location for bedbugs. You wonder what your tolerance is for snoring, alarms going off in the very early morning, people too close to your sense of 'personal space' in shared dorm spaces. You have no guarantees of top or bottom bunk, blankets, privacy with showers, how to get your sparse inventory of multi-tasking clothing washed and dried, or if your planned albergue stop will be Completo.

You wonder if you are actually capable of walking so many kilometers, can avoid injuries, and stay relatively healthy enough to actually enjoy all of the wonderful facets of Spain through which you will be walking.

CAN I DO THIS????!!!! is the piercing and persistent blathering which your mind and gut keep demanding that you focus on. They don't wait for any sort of evidence, conclusion, or answer, all they are concerned with is casting doubt.

I go through at least a portion of the above every time I go on a multi-day backpacking trek. I went through that before last years Camino. I am hearing those voices again now as I am near to departing for Spain.

I just simply respond to the question of 'can I do this' with the answer that "I am as prepared as I can be, I will be flexible to things happening around me, and regardless of what happens life will continue on".

After all, I am not going into combat or heading into a burning building; I am just going for a walk. :)
Super post. Tks
 

Stewpot

Stewpot
Camino(s) past & future
Porto to Santiago Coastal Route (Future)
It is "squeaky bum" time. I am sure your prep is sound. May I join everybody in wishing you a safe camino . Keep us all in touch with your journey. Go Well my friend
 

tj.pttr

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
fall 2018 or 2019
Davebugg- Starting my first Camino mid September. Would add my thanks to those above for all the wisdom you have shared.
Is your packing list the same as your July 2017 post?
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Future (2018)
Just realised Davebugg that you will be just a day ahead of me. I stay at Roncevalles on the 19th. I'm getting a kind of occasional aching in the palms of my hand which I know is related to anxiety. However, nothing ventured nothing gained. I have a collection of shells and stones picked up from various walks and they are kept in a tall glass jar. There was a scallop shell in there that I picked up from some unknown beach. I drilled a hole in the top of it this morning and it is now attached to the rucksack. Another tick on the check list.
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Davebugg- Starting my first Camino mid September. Would add my thanks to those above for all the wisdom you have shared.
Is your packing list the same as your July 2017 post?
Hi, tj....

Yes, the list is much the same. I added a GoPro Hero 6 plus an extended power bank for a continuous 1 day shoot, which added 1.5 pounds. The battery pack and a few other things will bee mailed back home when I get to Pamplona, though. :)
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
Just realised Davebugg that you will be just a day ahead of me. I stay at Roncevalles on the 19th. I'm getting a kind of occasional aching in the palms of my hand which I know is related to anxiety. However, nothing ventured nothing gained. I have a collection of shells and stones picked up from various walks and they are kept in a tall glass jar. There was a scallop shell in there that I picked up from some unknown beach. I drilled a hole in the top of it this morning and it is now attached to the rucksack. Another tick on the check list.
We may meet up along the way. That's pretty cool that you are bringing a scallop shell which you collected :)

Buen Camino, Ian :)
 

Hilarious

Hilarious
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage Camino Frances from SJPdP (Sept. 2019)
I can share with you the quick basics I follow when I train, that way each person can apply the principals for their individual needs, physical conditions, and limitations.

[NOTE: Before undertaking any change in activity level or exercise, be sure to check with your medical provider first. Even a quick phone call informing him/her of your plans will allow your provider to give you any guidance that is deemed important.]

There are two parts to how I train:

1. Cardiovascular fitness.
2. Muscle strengthening.

With both parts to an exercise plan, it is far better to go slower and be more deliberate and committed to your fitness time, than to overdo it by rushing the exercises and risking overuse injuries and becoming discouraged. Using THR zones, you will always make progress even though you take more time to reach your goal.

Cardiovascular fitness is the ability for the heart and lungs to supply oxygenated blood to your muscles during exercise while under load, and your muscles ability to use that oxygen efficiently so they can produce energy.

A valuable and important tool that is easy and good to follow for developing cardio capacity is the concept of Target Heart Rate zones (THR). It doesn't matter what your fitness level is, THZ will allow each person to develop at their own speed and point of fitness.

Exercises should be used which will allow you to hit a target heart rate (THR) zone, over a set period of time during exercising, which provides the needed aerobic effort for conditioning. This is a website which will help you calculate what your target heart rate zones will be.

https://www.lifespanfitness.com/fitness/resources/target-heart-rate-calculator

Treadmills at incline, running, walking at a faster than normal pace, walking up hills, using rowing machines, HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) workouts, riding a bicycle at a faster than normal pace, swimming, etc. are all examples of effective aerobic exercises when used to achieve target heart rates.

Keep in mind that as your fitness level improves, it will take a more sustained effort to hit the same heart rate zones. That is why using THR zones is so effective. They don't change relative to one's fitness level. Someone extremely out of shape who cannot exercise as hard and as long as someone who is extremely fit, will still reach the exact same THR during their exercise sessions. It takes more intensity in training for the person who has a great fitness level to reach 140 heart beats per minute (BPM). An out-of-fitness individual will reach that same 140 BPM in a far shorter amount of time and with far less intensity to the exercise.

As you gain fitness, it will take a longer period of exercise and a harder effort at the exercise to keep reaching 140 BPM. It is this THR phenomenon which allows a person to use their own fitness levels as a guide to steady progress rather than relying on some formula laid out by someone who doesn't know you from a hill of beans.

This is what I do for Cardio. It is based on MY current fitness level as an example of how to use what you have around you as an exercise resource. You do not need a gym membership.

During most of the year, I alternate days of effort and length during the week. Every other day I do a Long Loop Trail which is about 7.5 miles in length and gains a total of 2800 feet in elevation. During the other two or three days, I do the Short Loop Trail, which is 3.8 miles in length and only gains 1215 feet of elevation. When I am up backpacking, that will, of course, serve as a daily workout.

For really crummy weather days --- and lately over the last four weeks when smoke from wildfires made the air hazardous for outdoor activity --- I use a treadmill that can achieve a 30 degree incline, and which I spent a bit of time carefully calibrating to make sure it is reasonably accurate for both speed and incline settings. If I didn't have a treadmill, I could jump rope, stair step, run in place, etc. A lot of times the local high school will let the folks in the district use their facilities.

I decided that I would save money by using a treadmill at home -- not to mention the convenience -- rather than paying a gym membership to use THEIR treadmill. It wasn't cheap, but I now have over 7100 miles on it over the course of several years. I learned how to maintain it and keep it accurate in it's measurements. Having the treadmill at home actually decreases the amount of time spent exercising by eliminating the 'getting to and coming back' from a gym.


Muscle strength is a function of how much maximum force your muscles can exert against resistance. Exercises for strength will also provide a temporary aerobic cardio-vascular workout and effect, but the main goal is to increase your capability to function while under resistance.

Think about having to lift the weight of your body, with a pack, with each step going up the Pyrenees. Or being able to lift and carry a load. Or the constant resistance of your body weight and pack to your shoulders and to the 'core' muscles in your back and abdomen.

Some basic strengthening exercises for home include:
1. push-ups
2. lunges
3. squats
4. planks.

Rather than try and describe the steps involved in properly doing each exercise, do a google search to show you the way to do these exercises.

Again, make steady progress NOT quick progress. The goal is to keep you injury free while you are getting stronger.

This is what I do for strength training and core conditioning. Again, take it easy and build gradually.

In addition to the exercises I listed, I use two pieces of equipment:

1. A cheap set of dumb bells
2. A TRX strap system.

Again, Google will provide and describe and show the basic exercises for this type of equipment. The TRX system is an offshoot of what several folks used in the military while in combat zones where there is no weight lifting equipment. Back then, it was cargo webbing straps. From that, someone made a gazillion dollars with a nicer, more modern iteration all nicely packaged up and all professional looking :)

Why didn't I think of doing that? o_O

Other conditioning issues involve things like ankles, feet, and flexibility. Do a search on this forum for posts I have made about exercises to help prevent shin splints and to help prevent plantars fasciitis.

Regardless of which exercises you are doing, include frequent walks. Not workouts ... just walk at a comfortable pace and for a comfortable period of time. Use this opportunity to try out footwear for Camino. Look for the beginning niggling of potential problems with your feet and joints so that you have plenty of time to have them looked at by a provider and deal with any treatment plan.

After you've been involved in your fitness regimen for about three months, put on the clothing and footwear you will be using on Camino, load up your pack, and for several days in a row walk for a 3 to 4 hour period. See how you feel and at what pace you are able to best sustain yourself. That will give you a baseline estimate to calculate logistical issues surrounding the question of how far can I comfortably walk within a given amount of time. If you feel you need more time with conditioning before doing that type of walking, then wait for another month or two.

Yes, things and conditions can be different once you are on Camino as the unexpected arises, but those walks will help not only give you some insight and guidance, but also help build your confidence.

It will also let you know how your feet, knees, back and shoulders are doing.

More than anything else, enjoy the entire process of getting ready for Camino. Keep thinking about your personal goals for doing Camino and what type of experience you are hoping for. Also, think about what you can contribute, as a pilgrim, to the spirit and nature of the Camino when you begin your first steps toward Santiago.
Thank you bucketbabe for asking this question and Dave for sharing your training plan as well as all the other comprehensive information you provide on all things Camino. I wish you both and everyone starting in the next couple of months the bestest "Buen Camino". I look forward to sharing your journeys on this forum.
 

LBG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sept 20 2018
Hi, Deb...

With some level of cardio fitness, making it up a long uphill grade is a matter of pace, maintaining calorie intake, hydration, and utilizing meaningful breaks.

1. As you head uphill, adjust your pace to a comfortable level that you can maintain without needing to stop and start frequently. Starting and stopping frequently adds to exhaustion. It doesn't matter if your pace is 4 miles per hour or 0.5 miles per hour. What matters is if you can continuously walk between planned breaks. Setting your pace is a dynamic process, you need to adjust it as circumstances dictate. Please set your pace based on what you need, not on how you feel.

How do you maintain a pace at a set speed? My trick is to silently hum a tune... the same tune.... which is easy to sync to each step I take. Don't laugh, but I use 'Hark The Herald Angles Sing'.

As the grade uphill gets steeper and I need to slow, I don't slow how fast I step, I adjust the length of each step. In other words, in keeping time with my song, I might go from, say, 10 inches between one footstep to the next, to only 5 inches between steps. That will automatically slow how fast I am moving and still keep me in step with my song.

Inexperienced folks will start out fast and try to maintain that pace because they are fresh, full of energy, and not at all tired. Yet. They want to keep up with those in better shape. They are in a race for beds. Etc. But they will start to crump within a fairly short distance up the hill. And the crumping will become cumulative with each step even if they slow down later, because they have burned through their energy producing stores with that initial fast pace. They not only will crump, but they are now going to stay in a state of depleted energy which only a prolonged break over several hours can solve.

So start slower than you feel is normal for you, let people pass you by, and see how that pace feels as you continue uphill. If you start feeling too out of breath, slow down. If your leg muscles start feeling too fatigued, slow down. Set a planned interval for a short and deliberate break -- say every 20 minutes. Set your pace so that you can walk until that break time.

2. At break, eat something. A quarter of a Snicker bar and a bite of cheese, a handful of trail mix, a bit of bocadillo, some energy gel with some nuts, etc. The idea is to replenish your energy producing stores that your muscles will need in the next 25 to 30 minutes. It is important to eat small amounts frequently. You will also need to be sipping and drinking water as you are walking. You need to stay hydrated without overdoing the water.

3. If it starts to become very difficult to go the 20 minutes without stopping in-between, then lengthen your break from 5 minutes to 8 minutes or 10 minutes. Give your calorie intake a longer period to do its job and for you to re-oxygenate and your muscle cells to replenish themselves.. If you find that it fairly easy to walk 20 minutes before stopping, then add 5 more minutes to your walk time between breaks. Still fairly easy? Then keep adding 5 minutes to the interval before stopping. However, I would advise not going longer than 1 hour without taking a break.

It is understandable that you have some jitters.; while you have experience traveling, the Camino is in a different category of travel. Rather than doing the 'tourist' thing, you are committed to becoming sort of a "stranger in a strange land". :) You are walking town to town, interacting with -- and becoming part of -- Spanish life in a more intimate way than the typical 'tourist'. You are making yourself vulnerable by having to 'play it be ear' at finding anything that you need, every day, while moving down the Way in the most deliberate manner possible, walking.

You have no single home base to return to each night (a hotel room, etc) after spending the day touring around seeing the sights. While the typical tourist is pondering over the number of great places to eat at near to the hotel that is home base, you are wondering where you will be sleeping that night and IF there might be at least ONE decent place nearby which has good food. The tourist has the luxury of luggage holding an inventory of clothing containing several choices of a single item like dresses, pants, shirts, etc. As a pilgrim who must carry the lightest load you can devise on your back, you are deciding if there is time to wash the dust out of the pants you are wearing -- when you get to wherever you are spending the night -- so that they dry out enough to wear to dinner.

There is no concierge, no travel agency itinerary, no time to become a bit familiar with the area around home base. Nope... you are dealing with your day to day living needs on the fly in constantly changing environs. While there might be a guide, or internet apps, or friendly Hospitaleros to give a heads up, you are almost always in 'Discovery Mode', truly living in the moment as you walk, find lodging, eat, sleep, then get up and do it all over the next day.

You don't really know what's around the next bend. You don't know if your primary mode of transport will become blistered or otherwise compromised. You wonder just how you can live out of a pack for so many days. You worry about inspecting your bed area every night in a new location for bedbugs. You wonder what your tolerance is for snoring, alarms going off in the very early morning, people too close to your sense of 'personal space' in shared dorm spaces. You have no guarantees of top or bottom bunk, blankets, privacy with showers, how to get your sparse inventory of multi-tasking clothing washed and dried, or if your planned albergue stop will be Completo.

You wonder if you are actually capable of walking so many kilometers, can avoid injuries, and stay relatively healthy enough to actually enjoy all of the wonderful facets of Spain through which you will be walking.

CAN I DO THIS????!!!! is the piercing and persistent blathering which your mind and gut keep demanding that you focus on. They don't wait for any sort of evidence, conclusion, or answer, all they are concerned with is casting doubt.

I go through at least a portion of the above every time I go on a multi-day backpacking trek. I went through that before last years Camino. I am hearing those voices again now as I am near to departing for Spain.

I just simply respond to the question of 'can I do this' with the answer that "I am as prepared as I can be, I will be flexible to things happening around me, and regardless of what happens life will continue on".

After all, I am not going into combat or heading into a burning building; I am just going for a walk. :)
Thank you. You really summed it up beautifully. My heart swelled reading that and I deeply appreciate the time you took to write it
Deb
 

chinacat

Veteran Member
Hi, Deb...

With some level of cardio fitness, making it up a long uphill grade is a matter of pace, maintaining calorie intake, hydration, and utilizing meaningful breaks.

1. As you head uphill, adjust your pace to a comfortable level that you can maintain without needing to stop and start frequently. Starting and stopping frequently adds to exhaustion. It doesn't matter if your pace is 4 miles per hour or 0.5 miles per hour. What matters is if you can continuously walk between planned breaks. Setting your pace is a dynamic process, you need to adjust it as circumstances dictate. Please set your pace based on what you need, not on how you feel.

How do you maintain a pace at a set speed? My trick is to silently hum a tune... the same tune.... which is easy to sync to each step I take. Don't laugh, but I use 'Hark The Herald Angles Sing'.

As the grade uphill gets steeper and I need to slow, I don't slow how fast I step, I adjust the length of each step. In other words, in keeping time with my song, I might go from, say, 10 inches between one footstep to the next, to only 5 inches between steps. That will automatically slow how fast I am moving and still keep me in step with my song.

Inexperienced folks will start out fast and try to maintain that pace because they are fresh, full of energy, and not at all tired. Yet. They want to keep up with those in better shape. They are in a race for beds. Etc. But they will start to crump within a fairly short distance up the hill. And the crumping will become cumulative with each step even if they slow down later, because they have burned through their energy producing stores with that initial fast pace. They not only will crump, but they are now going to stay in a state of depleted energy which only a prolonged break over several hours can solve.

So start slower than you feel is normal for you, let people pass you by, and see how that pace feels as you continue uphill. If you start feeling too out of breath, slow down. If your leg muscles start feeling too fatigued, slow down. Set a planned interval for a short and deliberate break -- say every 20 minutes. Set your pace so that you can walk until that break time.

2. At break, eat something. A quarter of a Snicker bar and a bite of cheese, a handful of trail mix, a bit of bocadillo, some energy gel with some nuts, etc. The idea is to replenish your energy producing stores that your muscles will need in the next 25 to 30 minutes. It is important to eat small amounts frequently. You will also need to be sipping and drinking water as you are walking. You need to stay hydrated without overdoing the water.

3. If it starts to become very difficult to go the 20 minutes without stopping in-between, then lengthen your break from 5 minutes to 8 minutes or 10 minutes. Give your calorie intake a longer period to do its job and for you to re-oxygenate and your muscle cells to replenish themselves.. If you find that it fairly easy to walk 20 minutes before stopping, then add 5 more minutes to your walk time between breaks. Still fairly easy? Then keep adding 5 minutes to the interval before stopping. However, I would advise not going longer than 1 hour without taking a break.

It is understandable that you have some jitters.; while you have experience traveling, the Camino is in a different category of travel. Rather than doing the 'tourist' thing, you are committed to becoming sort of a "stranger in a strange land". :) You are walking town to town, interacting with -- and becoming part of -- Spanish life in a more intimate way than the typical 'tourist'. You are making yourself vulnerable by having to 'play it be ear' at finding anything that you need, every day, while moving down the Way in the most deliberate manner possible, walking.

You have no single home base to return to each night (a hotel room, etc) after spending the day touring around seeing the sights. While the typical tourist is pondering over the number of great places to eat at near to the hotel that is home base, you are wondering where you will be sleeping that night and IF there might be at least ONE decent place nearby which has good food. The tourist has the luxury of luggage holding an inventory of clothing containing several choices of a single item like dresses, pants, shirts, etc. As a pilgrim who must carry the lightest load you can devise on your back, you are deciding if there is time to wash the dust out of the pants you are wearing -- when you get to wherever you are spending the night -- so that they dry out enough to wear to dinner.

There is no concierge, no travel agency itinerary, no time to become a bit familiar with the area around home base. Nope... you are dealing with your day to day living needs on the fly in constantly changing environs. While there might be a guide, or internet apps, or friendly Hospitaleros to give a heads up, you are almost always in 'Discovery Mode', truly living in the moment as you walk, find lodging, eat, sleep, then get up and do it all over the next day.

You don't really know what's around the next bend. You don't know if your primary mode of transport will become blistered or otherwise compromised. You wonder just how you can live out of a pack for so many days. You worry about inspecting your bed area every night in a new location for bedbugs. You wonder what your tolerance is for snoring, alarms going off in the very early morning, people too close to your sense of 'personal space' in shared dorm spaces. You have no guarantees of top or bottom bunk, blankets, privacy with showers, how to get your sparse inventory of multi-tasking clothing washed and dried, or if your planned albergue stop will be Completo.

You wonder if you are actually capable of walking so many kilometers, can avoid injuries, and stay relatively healthy enough to actually enjoy all of the wonderful facets of Spain through which you will be walking.

CAN I DO THIS????!!!! is the piercing and persistent blathering which your mind and gut keep demanding that you focus on. They don't wait for any sort of evidence, conclusion, or answer, all they are concerned with is casting doubt.

I go through at least a portion of the above every time I go on a multi-day backpacking trek. I went through that before last years Camino. I am hearing those voices again now as I am near to departing for Spain.

I just simply respond to the question of 'can I do this' with the answer that "I am as prepared as I can be, I will be flexible to things happening around me, and regardless of what happens life will continue on".

After all, I am not going into combat or heading into a burning building; I am just going for a walk. :)
And still you are giving so much to others ... :)

I’m late reading your thread, @davebugg, and as I scroll through it, what stands out is how many of the long posts, offering help to others, were written by you.
This is as it is ... this is who you are, for us.
You will be accompanied by so much warmth, love, gratitude, prayers ... and Will for your Way.
May you receive what you have given to others .... ❤
Buen Camino, friend!
 

davebugg

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2017)
Camino Frances (2018)
Camino Ingles (2019)
And still you are giving so much to others ... :)

I’m late reading your thread, @davebugg, and as I scroll through it, what stands out is how many of the long posts, offering help to others, were written by you.
This is as it is ... this is who you are, for us.
You will be accompanied by so much warmth, love, gratitude, prayers ... and Will for your Way.
May you receive what you have given to others .... ❤
Buen Camino, friend!
Bless your heart for saying such nice things.. I'm blushing. And i thank you for your very kind words. This Forum has given me a lot, and it is my privilege to be able to contribute back in order to help others in whatever way possible. :)
 

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