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Albergue Etiquette

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Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
A lot depends on the albergue, and the people you´re sharing it with that night.

But off the top of my head?

Give your donativo soon after you arrive, so you don´t forget later on.

Find out what time the doors close, and be back in the albergue by then. If you plan to leave early, prepare your things the night before, to minimize the racket you´ll make when you get up. Rattling plastic liner bags or shining your headlights around the room at 5 a.m. will not endear you to your companions.

Don´t expect special treatment, and you will be pleasantly surprised when it comes your way.

If you are abled-bodied and have scored a lower bunk, and the place is filling up fast, and an elderly or obviously suffering pilgrim arrives, give him your lower and take the upper. Elderly and infirm pilgrims should always have lower bunks. Younger and more spry pilgrims must sometimes give them what is theirs by right.

If you get up at 5 am and rush through the next etapa to stand in queue for an albergue bed, do not expect the people who arrive later to creep quietly around the place so you can enjoy your siesta. You woke them up this morning. It´s their turn to wake you up in the afternoon.

If you tend to snore, don´t drink a lot of wine in the evening. It makes you reverberate.

Don´t prance around the albergue in your skivvies, No matter how buff you think you are. There is such a thing as Too Much Information.

Don´t leave your litter on the floor. Wash up what you dirty. Clean up after yourself.

Share. Be kind and thoughtful. Do unto others as you would have others do unto you.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Very well said, Rebekah. It is really a shame that the worst offenders will never read this forum and thus continue their annoying and rude ways. :wink:
I have never understood why people do not prepare their pack and "stuff" the night before and then take it out of the dorm in the morning to dress and get ready to walk....must be a reason.
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
Posting etiquette rules for all to read would seem an easy way to handle many of the common blunders by pilgrims. I remember the old saying about making assumptions only leads to making...well let's just say it makes us both become foolish. Common sense is a gift that is certainly not present in the lives of many of us. Tell us what we need to do and the vast majority will follow. Ignore us and god forbid what might happen. I suspect that many pilgrims have horror stories about the calloused behavior of others and even our own actions.
 
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falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Do it yourself.

Leave the place cleaner than when you arrived.

Take short showers to save a little water for later arrivals.

Use just one bunk. The surrounding bunks are not your clothes line.

The chair is there for everyone to sit on. It is not yours for pack storage just because you got there first.

The space under the bunk generally is shared by both occupants. Save half for the other guy.

No maid will wash your dishes, pans, or cutlery. YOU do it.

Wear earplugs so the unavoidable disturbances by others will not drive you to distraction.

No alarm clocks that others can hear.

Don't steal the toilet paper.

Trailside tissues are not biodegradable at a speed that will prevent them from being an eyesore (not an albergue rule)

If you have a cold, go to a private room in a hostal for a few days. No one will be happy sleeping in a dorm with typhoid Mary.
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
Both Rebekah have given a great list of do's and don'ts. I would like to add one more:
Don't put your backpack on the bed, it's been put down on the floor, in bars, on the street, in fields, near fountains, etc., so many times each day, before you ever get to see your precious bed for the night.
I have to admit that I have been very guilty over the past, until this was pointed out to me! Anne
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
Now that I'm done chuckling at the answers...and agree whole heartedly might I add, there is one more..DON"T use the hot air hand dryer to dry you clothes after others have gone to bed!! :roll:

Basically, treat others as you would want them to treat you!

Buen Camino, Karin
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
I agree with all that has been posted--especially what Grayland stated. If you are going to get up early, then for pete's sakes pack up your pack or atleast gather everything together in one lump and when you get up, take it immediately into another area away from those who are sleeping. My German ladies were the thorn of my last days on the Camino. They got up early, rustled around with plastic and conversation and the dreaded headlights, turned on the lights and otherwise woke everyone else up--then proceeded to sit around and make themselves tea before they left! Often they were the last ones to leave! When asked why they got up so early they said that it was because that was the time they always got up and they liked to enjoy their tea before starting out!!! It didn't seem to matter to them that they were making a whole lot of folks very angry--to the extent that folks tried to figure out how much further they would have to go to avoid them.

I carried a small LED light about the size of a quarter on a soft twine "necklace." It worked just fine for bathroom runs if the space was absolutely dark (only needed it once) and before sun-up trail marker finding. Because I always wore it around my neck, I always knew where it was. Some folks had big headlights and you cannot believe how irritating those suckers are in the morning or even on the Camino when flashed in your eyes. I also had a red one clipped to my pack so I could make a last minute check under my bunk if need be or to look at a map if I wanted to retain my night vision.

Another thing is to share clothesline space. If things are filling up, adjust your laundry so others have some room too. If yours is dry, you might want to remove it (especially if it is in a sunny spot) before someone else needing space takes yours down and puts it somewhere -- at one albergue this happened and someone thought the clothing pile was "for the taking." The owner of the clothes was not too happy.
 

William Marques

Moderator
Staff member
I agree with what has already been said and would add.

Don’t expect anything of the people on the Camino. “A pilgrim does not demand, a pilgrim is grateful. He leaves what he can and takes only that which he needs.” You have no rights as a pilgrim and must rely on the kindness of strangers.

Look after your things. The people around are the same as those at home. Don’t leave your wallet and passport lying about if you wouldn’t do the same at home. And if you would, tell us where this utopia you live is, so we can all move there.

You will find that most of the people leave the refuges at about the same time this means especially in summer that there are people-jams of those who have come from the refuges in the bigger towns. If you start earlier than the crowd and walk a little faster or leave after them and walk a little slower you can walk alone in the height of summer - if you want to. Think about staying in refugios in the smaller villages, they are often less crowded in the summer.

The route you take and the way you do it make you no better or worse than any other pilgrim. There is a tendency for a few of those who have walked, travelled further, carried a heavier pack, trekked in the most difficult weather or spent the least amount of money to think they are the truest pilgrims. This type of pride is out of place on the Camino where we are all pilgrims.
 

cecelia

several caminos- '03-'13
Hi all, And there's one more unless I missed it in another post. More and more people bring more and more to plug in for recharging (ipods, cameras etc). There are generally not many plug-ins in each room. Be considerate and share - even if it is right beside your bed.
Cecelia
 

alipilgrim

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2005, 2007; Madrid/Frances 2011; 1/2 VdP 2012; Portugese Litoral2019; Finisterre/Muxia2019
Perhaps those pilgrims who had a phone + ipod or whatever, might bring with them one of those extensions plugs (that turns one plug outlet into 3 outlets) so as to share the power????
 

dutchpilgrim

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002, 2005, 2008, 2012
alipilgrim said:
Perhaps those pilgrims who had a phone + ipod or whatever, might bring with them one of those extensions plugs (that turns one plug outlet into 3 outlets) so as to share the power????
And that is exactly what I did.
I had a three-in-one extension, so I always could unplug one charger, put in my plug, replace it and charge my own equippement, and even leave one extra outlet for the pilgrim to follow.

Ultreya,
Carli Di Bortolo.
 

muppet

Member
In Teo on the Portugese camino a week ago there was a bit of a commotion in the middle of the night. I had gone to bed at 10.30pm ready for the short walk into Santiago.

A Portugese group had arrived earlier in the evening and their bags had been dropped off earlier by the guy shifting their stuff....they werent walking with rucksacks. One or two people put al of their gear on some of the beds to reserve them and then they all stayed downstairs till late in the evening.

In the middle of the night I and a few others were woken up by those people looking for their bags with torch lights bed by bed and looking into and at other peoples bags trying to find their own. At one point it lead to a heated argument between one of my travelling companions (a Swiss girl) and the noise makers who reacted angrily and started swearing at her which left the friend of mine shaken and feeling very anxious which was a great pity as it was our last night in an albergue before santiago and had all gone very amicably up till then. They didnt seem to know what pilgrim etiquette was unfortunately.....

Motto of the story:

Prepare your bed and pack on time earlier in the evening if you are planning to stay up later than 10 or 10.30 so that you dont have to search for things or make loads of noise when you come in...Respect those who need a good nights sleep.

Prepare your stuff in the early evening for the next morning if you are planning to leave early so that even in the dark a minimal amount of packing or rummaging is needed. Choose a bed near the door if you need regular wc breaks in the night or want to exit quickly and quietly in the morning.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
It's nearly time for the "school trip" groups to begin walking a section of the Camino. These groups can range from high school to college. Generally, the college kids are a mature lot and on task when it comes to etiquette, the HS students have energy to burn and phone calls to make to family and friends. Many play rather annoying games on their IPods.

I make it a habit to seek out the chaperon. When the kids become a pain I go to this individual and explain the situation. Now, being a mild mannered individual myself, I inform the designated individual that I will stand by their bed and every ten minutes I will wake them up until the activity stops. It has worked just fine.

This solution is of course not for everyone. Therefore, bring ear plugs, three-way plugs or hair plugs to replace the roots you pull out as you suffer in silence.

Buen "it's 10 PM...lights out!!" Camino,
Arn
 

Marcel234

“Not all those who wander are lost.”
Camino(s) past & future
2009/10/11/12/13/14/15/16 and this June 2017
grayland said:
Very well said, Rebekah. It is really a shame that the worst offenders will never read this forum and thus continue their annoying and rude ways. :wink:
I have never understood why people do not prepare their pack and "stuff" the night before and then take it out of the dorm in the morning to dress and get ready to walk....must be a reason.
I never do that. :eek: I'm just too lazy/tired/or whatever to do it the night before. This year I'm going to try it. I'm just not that organised.

But I don't think I annoyed anyone last year ;)
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
Marcel234 said:
I never do that. :eek: I'm just too lazy/tired/or whatever to do it the night before.
Me too, I'm afraid. And I like to sit around drinking cup(s) of tea before I am ready to walk.

But we don't rush off early. We are happy to wait until others have done with the bathroom, the space on the floor to re-pack etc. We will tidy up after they have gone (not just our own stuff) and then be happy to walk/ride a shorter stage or arrive later in the day, having hopefully bought ingredients for an evening meal which we are happy to share.

It takes all sorts.

My 'Rule' for albergue etiquette - There will be something special about every other pilgrim - try to find it and enjoy it, don't think everyone has to be like you and don't think you are more special than anybody else.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
My 'Rule' for albergue etiquette - There will be something special about every other pilgrim - try to find it and enjoy it, don't think everyone has to be like you and don't think you are more special than anybody else.
Well said!!!

You both sound like ideal Pelegrinos/as to meet up with along the Camino :) .

Cheers,
LT
 

Bridget and Peter

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Home to Reims 2007
Reims to Limoges 2008
Camino Ingles 2009
Limoges to Gernica 2009
Gernica to San Vicente de la Barquera 2010
San Vicente to La Isla 2012
La Isla to Santiago Sept/Oct 2014
:oops:

Cheers,
LT
"We must be the change we wish to see in the world" M. Ghandi

Inspiring saying of Gandhi's - thanks.

(Ghandi, Ganhdi, Gandhi - I had to try them all and now I can't decide which looks right!)
 

Pacharan

Member
All the above is superb advice.
In the main the vast majority of pilgrims are kind, considerate and friendly. Ditto the hospitaleros.
I think we met only two people who thought they merited special treatment everywhere they went and they didn't seem to make many friends....
But from my personal experience of other people's habits....if you are wearing the same clothes to walk every day (t-shirt, shorts, socks) and not ever washing them but hanging them on the bunk for the sweat to dry every night then.....please please camp or go to a hotel, don't inflict this on a whole dorm.
Also, packing your stuff in the dark does not only disturb other people but gives you a much higher chance of not noticing any "passengers" you may have acquired and passing them onto the next place you stay.
If you can afford to, then donate/leave supplies at poorly equipped refugios. Think teabags, kitchen roll, handsoap...this not only helps others but can also lighten your pack! The times I got an unexpected cup of tea were true highlights!
 

sloeve43

New Member
Everything sounds great, but I would like to add a couple things. Hot water is very limited; take very short showers. The second should be elementary but does not seem to be: Use your own bedding with the albergue blankets and pillows, if there are such. Many people have used those blankets, and many more people will use them before they're washed again.

On your packing list: Don't forget the TP (seems like they're always out in the morning) and a plastic trowel (any outdoors store) for a "cat hole," should you need to take advantage of the countryside. Most of Spain is semi-desert; TP, etc., will not decompose soon, if ever. Bury it or pack it out, just like dog poop in the park.

Buen camino.
 

Alan Pearce

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aragones 2008, del Norte 2009, VdlP 2011, Ingles 2014, Camino de Madri 2015, Frances 2017
Is it considered good etiquette to waken bad snorers? I did this one night in Polanco on the del Norte, when we were staying in a little albergue with triple bunks in single rooms. Two German lasses who had begun the camino that day were sharing their room with an Italian gentleman, who was a extremely bad snorer, and the girls were unable to get any sleep. They were distraught, and eventually I awoke him. He was embarrasssed, and so was I. I don't think he got much sleep for the rest of the night, and he left very early in the morning. The two girls gave me big hugs of gratitude before they left the next day, but I have often wondered if I followed camino protocol.

buen camino

Alan

Be brave. Life is joyous.
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
Alan Pearce said:
Is it considered good etiquette to waken bad snorers? ..... I don't think he got much sleep for the rest of the night, and he left very early in the morning. The two girls gave me big hugs of gratitude before they left the next day, but I have often wondered if I followed camino protocol.
Well I don't know what Emily Post would say, but from someone who lives/sleeps with a terrific snorrer....Good for you! In truth...they aren't always getting the best of sleep anyway when they are on their backs, cutting down the trees! So waking him and making him...roll over, probably gave him slightly shorter...but better sleep! And for all you know..he was an early riser anyhow! So from one who knows what is its to tortured every evening... Thank you! :lol:

Buen Camino to all
Karin
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
It won't work.

The protocol in France is to whistle. Of course, that wakes everyone up! Snorers should be aware that they are loudest when lying on their back, so should sleep on their sides to the extent possible, and asking a snorer to roll onto his/her side will help, as pointed out above. Snorers: a good supply of foam ear plugs to hand out might help those around you (though they should have brought their own along if snorers bother them badly). Snoring is like the weather; you cannot do anything about it, so accept it. Every pilgrim probably has some characteristic that drives others nuts!! The Forum has, at a minimum, snorers, bag rustlers, pole clickers, long showers, talkers, packs on beds, insect sprayers, two-bunk hogs, clothes line hogs, flash lights, early risers, locked albergues, late socializing, cell phones, iPods, effete snobs, litterers, the unwashed, beggars, donativo means free, and silent bicyclists.
 

DylanRomero

Member
Being a snorer is tough on the Camino (I don't snore, thankfully); they can't help it if they snore, but it bothers everyone else terribly. I definitely recommend a good set of earplugs for non-snorers. They don't cut out everything, but there will always be noise and distraction, so they help.

The foam plugs eventually spring their way out of my ear every time, but I got these ones and they worked really well for me: http://earplugstore.stores.yahoo.net/silnatrubear.html
 

Beverley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
I love all the comments on this string. I must add some to the "what not to do's".

These two events really were not polite.

Pushing into the registration line:
Last year in Ponte de Lima my group and I arrived at the Albergue around 2 in the afternoon. It did not open until 5. Pilgrims gathered and laid their packs up against the wall of the Albergue which usually indicates first come first served. Now PdL is not the first on anyone's list of places to stop so pilgrims who observe the routine would know that pushing into the lineup is a no-no. About 4p.m. a group of 6 german people showed up, two older and 4 younger.

When the door opened, the older man ran into the building to register. He shot across the cobblestones to get there first. When he finished I heard him say to one of the young ones, "See I got there first!" I was blocking the door with my arms at this point so that none of the other late commers followed his lead.

Respecting the sleeping pilgrims

Later on that evening, the group of 6 came back from the evening meal, at 9:30 laughing and talking loudly. I was not in bed yet but many were. The lights in the room were already out when the group returned, they turned them on and began writing in the journals. Someone got up and turned out the light only to be snorted at by Mr. Me First.
i Suggested to the group that they might want to use the common room downstairs to write but was told to mind my own business and that they had until 10 before lights out.

I took my things and slept in another room. I winder if they ever picked up on the Pilgrim etiquette :(
 

Canuck

Veteran wanderer
Camino(s) past & future
?
Beverley,

Unfortunately, these people have that kind of inconsiderate behavior in their everyday life and get away with it. They will never change.

I have witnessed such situations many times as hospitalero and nothing you say or do will make a difference.
Sorry yes, if you stand 7 feet and decide to kick their unrully ass out the albergue they might take notice.

Aldult-rearing is not my forte and I only stand 5'10".

Jean-Marc
 

dislp38

Member
Alan Pearce said:
Is it considered good etiquette to waken bad snorers? I did this one night in Polanco on the del Norte, when we were staying in a little albergue with triple bunks in single rooms. Two German lasses who had begun the camino that day were sharing their room with an Italian gentleman, who was a extremely bad snorer, and the girls were unable to get any sleep. They were distraught, and eventually I awoke him. He was embarrasssed, and so was I. I don't think he got much sleep for the rest of the night, and he left very early in the morning. The two girls gave me big hugs of gratitude before they left the next day, but I have often wondered if I followed camino protocol.

buen camino

Alan

Be brave. Life is joyous.

I admit that I snore. I'm from a family where everyone snores. The most annoying thing ever is to be woken up from someone who suffers from insomnia. As fate would have it, I befriended a wonderful woman who suffered from insomnia. Paired with my snoring, we were a sleeping mismatch. Since their were 5 or so of us walking together, I tried to take care to sleep away from her, but she always took the bunk next to mine or the top bunk. Even when I reminded her that she might want to sleep away from me. So, she continued to wake me up. As a result, neither one of us slept well. And everyone who told me "I don't snore" -- snored!

And one of my other bad behaviors I'm guilty of-- being grumpy. As one of my uncles said to me when I was a child "waking you up is like poking a bear in the butt with a stick." Be careful who you wake up! More than once, I woke up immediately and cursed her out and went back to sleep. (not nice, but it was more of a reflex than rationality :oops: ) I've also (unconsciously) hit people who startle me in my sleep. Also a reflex. :oops: If you are going wake someone up,unless you know them, I wouldn't touch them. You just don't know. You could get punched in the eye.

So, I offered my friend sleeping pills and ear plugs and tried to let her go to sleep first.
I recommend that if you are a light sleeper or have a sleep disorder, you come armed with solutions for sleep for yourself.
Earplugs... good ones.

Ipods work really well to drown out noisy people too as well as relax you.. make yourself a relaxing "sleep mix" with soft music.

take a light muscle relaxer (not that I advise that normally-- only in worse case scenarios.)

Also learn relaxation techniques and meditation to help you sleep when you are feeling uptight because of the noise. Most of the time people can't sleep because of their inner tension not because of the noise.
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
I snore, or so I have been told. On my camino I normally warn people and ask them to wake me if I am too bad, I would rather be woken then suffer the glare of pissed off pilgrims in the morning. Most times I only need to change my sleeping position.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route.
One lady I met "barked" at snorers.. woke everyone else in the place up, gave me those giggles that won't stop, and generally wreaked havoc.

I think the only solution to snorers is to simply get yourself a bivy and sleep out under the stars! :D
 

johnBCCanada

Active Member
With respect to snorers my experience was that when I walked a long day and had a couple of drinks for dinner with good company I never noticed the snorers for more than a few minutes.

John
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Alan Pearce said:
Is it considered good etiquette to waken bad snorers? I did this one night in Polanco on the del Norte, when we were staying in a little albergue with triple bunks in single rooms. Two German lasses who had begun the camino that day were sharing their room with an Italian gentleman, who was a extremely bad snorer, and the girls were unable to get any sleep. They were distraught, and eventually I awoke him. He was embarrasssed, and so was I. I don't think he got much sleep for the rest of the night, and he left very early in the morning. The two girls gave me big hugs of gratitude before they left the next day, but I have often wondered if I followed camino protocol.
My view would be that you shouldn't have interfered with someone else's sleep, no matter how disruptive it might have been to people who were clearly not prepared for sleeping in a pilgrim dormitory. Leave any disruption to a partner or spouse. The onus is on individual pilgrims to be prepared, and that means having the sense to bring along earplugs if one is going to sleep in a dormitory.

I know I snore, and I was prepared to admit it last year until I was asked one night to sleep in the common room rather than the dormitory. I was reluctant to do so, but agreed. As a result:

  • I couldn't go to bed until the last of the others left the common room, which some did with bad grace because they wanted to avoid the 'lights out' in the dormitory
  • Every half hour or so, or so it seemed, someone would go to the toilet, and turn on all the common room lights because they were on the same switch panel as the toilet lights
  • then to top it off, the person who had asked me to sleep in the common room was up at 5am noisily packing their backpack to leave at the foot of my mattress with all the lights on
  • All of which resulted in one of the worst days that I had on the Camino the following day.

To top all that off, I was informed a couple of days later that there had been several snorers in the dormitory that night, despite the faithful pledges they had all made to the hospitalera that none of them snored.

My lesson. Don't offer the information, don't shift out of the dormitory, and if someone asks point out politely that you won't be the only snorer, and it was their responsibility to come prepared to sleep in a dormitory.

DougF
 
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+@^^

Active Member
here are 10 etiquette rules for children by Dr. M.E. Waters
theres not reason these shouldnt apply
to adults
to adults on the camino
to all of us
theyre kind of cute
....
Ten Etiquette Rules for Children

Do's1. Stay away from people who are troublemakers
2. Say please, thank you, excuse me, good morning/evening, I am sorry
3. Put your hand over your mouth when you cough
4. Be kind to other people
5. Be polite on the telephone
6. Be neat and clean
7. Obey parents/teachers/elders
8. Go to church
9. Boys should open the door and always pull the chair out for a girl
10. Boys should take their hats off inside the building

Don't
1. Chew gum in class or church
2. Talk with food in your mouth or throw it across the room
3. Talk when adults are talking
4. Use curse words
5. Smoke or drink alcohol
6. Curse parents/teachers
7. Be rude to other people
8. Act ugly in public
9. Put other people down or tease them all the time
10. Lie on other people and get them in trouble
 
S

Sojourner47

Guest
Paradise......
Most definately lost, nowadays, if it ever existed... :mrgreen:
Come back, Dr Waters, all is forgiven.
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
What does amaze me are the Pilgrims that have arrived hours before me at an albergue and sleep all afternoon. I have to tiptoe around them all evening. The same souls complain about my snoring at night because they just don't seem to be able to sleep and the next morning cause mayhem at 4am packing their kit. Ban all afternoon sleeping! :mrgreen:
 

Arn

Veteran Member
I had a friend who complained that the neighbor next door would play loud music until late at night. I asked what did she consider late? Her answer was...10PM. Knowing her to be an early riser and an early to bed type capable of sleeping thru a hurricane, I asked her how did she know the music was still playing at 10PM. Well, she offered, I set my alarm for 10PM and if the music is still on I complain and then can't get back to sleep.

The moral to the story: If you go looking for a reason to be miserable...you will find it!

Buen "now turn out that light...it's 10PM" Camino,

Arn
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
I came prepared with earplugs (good ones I bought from a safety supply store) and NOTHING aside from losing my hearing completely would have blocked out the snoring symphony of this one couple sleeping next to me in Tosantos (a very small albergue, BTW). I didn't get any sleep that night (no one did except for the happily snoring couple) and ended up taking a bus the next day because I couldn't walk I was so tired.

So, no matter how prepared one might be, sometimes that's just not enough.....and you just have to deal with it. It's all a part of the Camino experience. :)
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
dougfitz said:
Alan Pearce said:
Is it considered good etiquette to waken bad snorers? I did this one night in Polanco on the del Norte, when we were staying in a little albergue with triple bunks in single rooms. Two German lasses who had begun the camino that day were sharing their room with an Italian gentleman, who was a extremely bad snorer, and the girls were unable to get any sleep. They were distraught, and eventually I awoke him. He was embarrasssed, and so was I. I don't think he got much sleep for the rest of the night, and he left very early in the morning. The two girls gave me big hugs of gratitude before they left the next day, but I have often wondered if I followed camino protocol.
My view would be that you shouldn't have interfered with someone else's sleep, no matter how disruptive it might have been to people who we clearly not prepared for sleeping in a pilgrim dormitory. Leave any disruption to a partner or spouse. The onus is on individual pilgrims to be prepared, and that means having the sense to bring along earplugs if one is going to sleep in a dormitory.

I know I snore, and I was prepared to admit it last year until I was asked one night to sleep in the common room rather than the dormitory. I was reluctant to do so, but agreed. As a result:

  • I couldn't go to bed until the last of the others left the common room, which some did with bad grace because they wanted to avoid the 'lights out' in the dormitory
  • Every half hour or so, or so it seemed, someone would go to the toilet, and turn on all the common room lights because they were on the same switch panel as the toilet lights
  • then to top it off, the person who had asked me to sleep in the common room was up at 5am noisily packing their backpack to leave at the foot of my mattress with all the lights on
  • All of which resulted in one of the worst days that I had on the Camino the following day.

To top all that off, I was informed a couple of days later that there had been several snorers in the dormitory that night, despite the faithful pledges they had all made to the hospitalera that none of them snored.

My lesson. Don't offer the information, don't shift out of the dormitory, and if someone asks point out politely that you won't be the only snorer, and it was their responsibility to come prepared to sleep in a dormitory.

DougF

I am a snorer, I believe that I may be a bad snorer, but I have never heard myself. I would want someone to wake me if my snoring is disturbing their sleep, on most occaisions if I roll over I stop for long enough for the others to fall asleep before I start again. I normally advise thos sleeping near me that they can wake me if I snore, a prod from a walking pole normally does the trick, or just throw something at me, any valuables are the most effective in stopping my snoring.

regards

Frank
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
DougF said:
  • I couldn't go to bed until the last of the others left the common room, which some did with bad grace because they wanted to avoid the 'lights out' in the dormitory
  • Every half hour or so, or so it seemed, someone would go to the toilet, and turn on all the common room lights because they were on the same switch panel as the toilet lights
  • then to top it off, the person who had asked me to sleep in the common room was up at 5am noisily packing their backpack to leave at the foot of my mattress with all the lights on
  • All of which resulted in one of the worst days that I had on the Camino the following day.

To top all that off, I was informed a couple of days later that there had been several snorers in the dormitory that night, despite the faithful pledges they had all made to the hospitalera that none of them snored.My lesson. Don't offer the information, don't shift out of the dormitorm ......

DougF
I Myself , being a CHAMPION SNORER :oops: , would be more that willing to sleep in the common room and put up with all these hardships and more. I KNOW that I snore.In the common room I can unleash my terror and at least get some sleep myself.One thing I do is always volunteer to the Hospitalero that I am a big snorer - when it is not too buzy I would say that a 3rd of the time I am accommodated in a separate snoring room or at least a corner out of the way. :D
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011 (2019)
Frank and Renshaw, you both appear to be very tolerant and self-sacrificing - wonderful characteristics and I hope that you can continue to exhibit these values should you face the same hypocricy that I faced when pressured to sleep in an albergue common room.

While I admire your view that you would be happy to be woken, I still hold a different view. Any disruption of my sleep will provide little but short term relief for others, but deprive me of what might be a well earned rest. I think it is up to individual pilgrims to prepare themselves for a dormitory environment in the albergues, and bring whatever it takes for them to minimize the effects of snorers, late arrivals, early starters, noisy packers etc, etc.

Doug
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route.
Renshaw, I agree about the afternoon siesta. People should not expect you to be AS quiet.

Of course, we can be respectful of others at ALL hours. :D
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
At Roncenvalles some american girls kept gettiing up to prod the snorers. they kept everyone awake for much of the night. they apologised and pointed out that at home they slept in their own bedroom and had never slept in a communal room before. Huge culture shock.

At León a group of french blokes who were starting their Camino that day came in at 10.30, noisy and slightly drunk. they were shushed and replied by whistling. :evil:

at 6.00am the lights were put on and some of the braver souls shook them awake telling them it was time to get on the road. sweet revenge, eh? :wink:

I met one of them later that day when I stopped to collect a sello. He was already in a bunk bed half asleep but as I left he apologised for the night before.

there may be such a thing as redemption. :D
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
Hi

What i will say about sleeping in common rooms if you are a snorer is dont expect to get to sleep early; expect to be woken up early; be able to ignore the smell of stale cigarettes, not be bothered by the smell of spilt alcohol; not get too alarmed by strange bodily smells emiting from the sofa, be able to pretend to yourself that all the scratching you are doing is your imagination and nothing to do with that the sofa may be the weak link in any previous decontamination episodes, other than that you should have a good nights sleep - apart from the odd (or 10) person wandering in during the night and turning the light on.

Mike
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
mikevasey said:
apart from the odd (or 10) person wandering in during the night and turning the light on.

Mike
What Light?? That extra glass of vino works it's magic and in the common room there is no barking , prodding , lizard clucks(which works amazingly well in waking snorers), bed shaking , hand clapping , forced coughing , pillow hurling........ Loss of friends ..no thank you . Give me the option of the common room any day as I truely feel that I am the benefactor here.
There may be one problem though which I have become aware of during my HOSVOL Hospitalero course - Insurances pertaining directly to an Albergue may not allow for Pilgrims sleeping in rooms other than the designated sleeping rooms.In another insurance example , some Albergues have insurance for a specific maximum occupancy and may not take a single extra Pilgrim over the quota.As Pilgrims we sometimes come accross what we think are strange rules but there is always some reason for them.
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
RENSHAW said:
Give me the option of the common room any day as I truely feel that I am the benefactor here.
OH yes dont i feel it. Just need at certain times(10pm - 5am) reminding of it.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
some Albergues have insurance for a specific maximum occupancy and may not take a single extra Pilgrim over the quota.
In June 2009 I was initially turned away at Negreira because all the beds were filled. When I showed the warden my hospital letter explaining why I was carrying an insulin pump, they promptly let me sleep on a mat on the floor.

The rules also stated that no chronically ill person carrying a hospital or doctor's letter could be turned away.

My guess is that the insurance covers that.
 

Beverley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
I love this thread, it makes me laugh. My solution for snorers is that extra glass of wine BUT MOST IMPORTANT is silicone earplugs. No other type of plug works. I have been withmy husband for 20 years and the only thing that blocks out his bedtime noise is silicone ear plugs. I sent many a pilgrim to the pharmacias to buy them. They are available on this side of the pond too (North America) :lol:
 

ffp13

Addicted pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Caminos: 2009 SJPP, 2011 Roncessvalle , 2012 Pamploma, 2013 Roncessvalle, 2013 Porto, 2014 Burgos, 2014 Porto

Future: Roncessvalle
As a snorer I would be appreciative for all the extra glasses of wine that the non snorers want to provide, if it is helpful:)
 

Beverley

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2009, Camino Portuguese 2010, Del Norte 2011, Pamplona to Burgos and Santiago to Finnesterra 2012
Well then, I hope to meet you on the Camino one day or several days for that matter. :lol:
 

teresaokane

New Member
I just have two to add to the wonderful suggestions already mentioned.

When you arrive at the refugio don't wait for the volunteer to ask for your credentials. Have your Camino passport in hand when you enter. And smile! The volunteer will appreciate it and it will help you to remember that having a gratitude attitude is part of the spirit of the Camino.

Cut people some slack. Some days are harder than others and we are all in this together!

Buen Camino!
Teresa O'Kane
http://bootsbedouinsandabridge.blogspot ... thing.html
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Great additions to this thread Teresa!

Each time I observe a new poster jump right in with sage advice I'm renewed in the belief that the Forum is an incubator for new life on the Camino.

We each have a unique perspective on what works on any topic and are open to new and better solutions as they are presented.

Well done and keep the thoughts coming!

Saludos,

Arn
 

Chignecto

Member
I love this thread. There is so much good information about the alberque do's and don'ts. I like the idea of keeping it simple so "Always be consderate of others" works for me. I would like to know what time in the afternoon's do the alberques generally open and is there a protocol for queuing up to sign in?
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Most open at 3 p.m., and there will be a line of packs already formed. Just add yours to the end.
 

tipperary

Member
hi all
If you walk in March, early April, mid October to mid November you will never ever join a line, probably get a bottom bunk and have a good chance of good walking weather.
buen camino
justin
 

schui

New Member
grayland said:
Very well said, Rebekah. It is really a shame that the worst offenders will never read this forum and thus continue their annoying and rude ways. :wink:
I have never understood why people do not prepare their pack and "stuff" the night before and then take it out of the dorm in the morning to dress and get ready to walk....must be a reason.
I have been backpacking since i was 10, the first then you learn is to pick up your own trash, and then when you get older, you begin to pick others trash up, well maybe when its your own property.

I know and agree that 90 percent or even more will never even see this forum, but how do people now in 2011, clean up there digital trash. I know people want too ruin other peoples right to have an expression and thoughtfullness. If you are in a 20 person alberrque, and you have mobile wifi or mobile internet, do you allow others to all have a go to there home page? and is it the way nowdays, to go on the camino with or without all this wireless? and it is also a form of ettique?

I know this is an old thread, but I'am a new member and i have read some good information, and regardless who you speak to about it, before you have your first experience, its like any other thing you do for this 1st time, so if a man of 40 years has always grown up in a castle, and or in a shack, and sets out with his 1st pack, and doesnt have any clues or any rules he uses for our sake, then do you go up to them and set them straight, if your keen on being polite.
Cant judge a book by its cover.
if iam registered handicap, do i need to prove this with my card, or do i just do as i would if iam on the tram in rotterdam, and the lady with the baby, or the oldman with the stick gets my seat first....


americans may understand it better, but i could be wrong


gs

i hope to respond to other threads thank you
 
I've been on 4 caminos and read through the camino etiquete page and agree with everthing. When I arrived onto the bit about people that snore I felt that I had to contribute. I snore. When I arrive in an albergue I tell the unfortunate people in my room about the snoring. I tell them that I snore and give them permission to wake me up to stop the snoring. I also carry extra ear plugs to lend out.
 

Camino2010

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés
SJPP to Santiago (2010)
SJPP to Fisterra (2011)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2012)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2015)
SJPP to Fisterra/Muxia (2016)
Lovely reminder to read all of these tips! I want to echo something that's already been said because I think it bears repeating:

If you are very ill, for example coughing, sneezing, and contagious with a bad cold, please... if you can afford the additional cost... consider staying at a hostel or private albergue where you can have a private room to rest and recuperate for at least one night and keep your germs away from fellow pilgrims.
 

La Hormiguita

New Member
There are some very good etiquette rules on this thread! And I would like to add one more:

Take your mobile/cell phone with you when you go to the bathroom!!!

I was staying at a hostal in Tarifa one time and I am a very very deep sleeper (I slept the whole 11 hours on a flight from San Francisco to London one time!) But I was woken by the most irritating ring tone. It was quite late in the morning (around 9am) so it was wake up time anyway, but wow so so annoying. It was coming from a mobile on the bunk next to mine and the owner did not return. After about 5 mins of constant ringing, we guessed it was an alarm and not a call lol. It went on for about an hour with regular intervals of 5 mins or so. Extremely irritating. No one wants to touch other's belongings and I think everyone was just hoping for the owner to come back asap. I couldn't resist and I put it under the pillow of the bed it was on to muffle the high pitch ringing.

Eventually the owner of the phone came in and turned it off. She seemed so embarrassed and I did feel a bit bad for her. At least I learned from her mistake minus the shame and minus losing friends lol.
 

Portia1

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2009, Portuguese 2012
Frances 2016, (Frances 2019)
Having just returned from the Portuguese route, I wish alberques with multiple dorm space/rooms would declare one for early to bed, early to rise and the other for late to bed, late to rise. I think there was more tension over this issue than any other. If all the beds in one are filled, I guess you would have to bite the bullet--but atleast you'd know what you were in for.

There are those who come in at 10 pm and are shocked that others are sleeping and do not appreciate all the lights being turned on, the bathroom doors being slammed, loud conversations, etc. Then they are irritable when those who went to bed early get up and do the same thing before the light of day (which does come later in the fall!). There was almost a fight in one alberque over this. Toss a few snorers into the mix, along with those who want the windows closed (which makes for a VERY hot, airless night) and who will get up and close them if you open them up a crack, and you have a tense environment indeed!
 

SabineP

Camino = Empathy + Compassion.
Camino(s) past & future
some and then more. see my signature.
Portia1 said:
Having just returned from the Portuguese route, I wish alberques with multiple dorm space/rooms would declare one for early to bed, early to rise and the other for late to bed, late to rise. I think there was more tension over this issue than any other. If all the beds in one are filled, I guess you would have to bite the bullet--but atleast you'd know what you were in for.

There are those who come in at 10 pm and are shocked that others are sleeping and do not appreciate all the lights being turned on, the bathroom doors being slammed, loud conversations, etc. Then they are irritable when those who went to bed early get up and do the same thing before the light of day (which does come later in the fall!). There was almost a fight in one alberque over this. Toss a few snorers into the mix, along with those who want the windows closed (which makes for a VERY hot, airless night) and who will get up and close them if you open them up a crack, and you have a tense environment indeed!

Interesting idea Portia!!
Reminds me of an encounter I had in the private albergue of Molinaseca. Around 6.45 in the morning I woke up ( this was in April , still no need to rush and get up early ) and noticed that from the 14 people in my dorm already 6 had left. Six others hem were preparing and organising their backpack. One older german guy ( whom I knew ) was awake but still in his bed and than there was me , also awake but also still in bed. Noticing so that everyone was awake and seeing that I was closest to the lightswitch I put on the light thinking it would be much easier for everyone for preparing. I knew that Hans, the german guy didn't mind because we talked about these issues on ealrier occasions. Anyway to make a long story short : one of the other guys ( a younger italian ) got very very cross with me because I did not show " any solidarity and grace " and I should have left the light out because there still was someone in bed. Even when Hans assured the italian that it was allright the guy insisted that I was out of order.
I was without words and this negative encounter stayed with me the whole day... . The italian guy ment very well, seeing his idea about courtesy. I think I ment well too, with my common sense...
Ah well, c'est la vie.
 

jpflavin1

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF(10,11,17), Vasco(12), Salvador(13), CP(13), CN(14), Madrid (16), Mozarabe (18), VdlP(19)
Buen Camino All:

Albergue Etiquette, in my opinion, varies somewhat on the Albergue. Some Albergues are very strict, doors locked and lights out at ......pm. Lights on and doors open at ......am. These are the easiest places to stay because the rules are rigid and someone is there to enforce them. There will still be issues with windows and snoring etc.

Then there are Albergues where they check you in and the rest is up to the Pilgrims. They might still post rules but noone is there to enforce. I suggest, in these instances, you speak with your fellow pilgrims and agree on questionable issues.

So my generic recommendation is buy earplugs, sleep close to or away from windows dependant on your preference (you can always try to switch bunks). Follow the Albergue rules regarding time and where not supervised, in smaller dorms, talk to your fellow Pilgrims. If you leave early, prepare the night before. If you arrive early, do not expect quiet afternoon naps. If all else fails and you are depressed by Albergue life, stay in private albergues or other accomodations.

Remember, your are fortunate enough to be hiking the Camino. Your friends and family are home working and dealing with lifes daily annoyances. If that doesn't help, remember when you get to Santiago, they will ask you if you suffered. These annoying situations will allow you to say, yes.

Ultreya,
Joe
 

newfydog

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Pamplona-Santiago, Le Puy- Santiago, Prague- LePuy, Menton- Toulouse, Menton- Rome, Canterbury- Lausanne, Chemin Stevenson, Voie de Vezelay
Portia1 said:
, along with those who want the windows closed (which makes for a VERY hot, airless night) and who will get up and close them if you open them up a crack, and you have a tense environment indeed!

The windows are a weird issue. I have an older French friend who closes all the shutters and roll downs in his house every night. He was raised to think the night air will make you sick.

He will concede that camping outside is a healthy activity, and opens everything each morning, but don't let that night air into the house! Screens are rare in Europe.

We have always had bedrooms with full sliding screens and doors, and leave them open if it is not below freezing. Different cultures--I guess no albergue can avoid some problems.
 
Great discussion!

When I was walking this summer, the alberges were very busy, so I think we got all the possible don'ts :roll:

However, I have to say that peregrinos are great people and anything that could potentially cause any problems seemed to be solved very quickly. I guess it's difficult to get stressed out on the Camino...

The snorers were a funny bunch. Most of them were aware of their snoring and really embarrassed about it. I had my earplugs with me but even with them I would get woken up by:
1. snorers themselves
2. people who were trying to shush the snorers by whistling or making clicking noises (I think the French thing is to whistle and the Spanish is to click :p )
3. people who were listening to their mp3 players in order not to hear the snorers but playing the music so loud that I could hear it.
4. and, on one occasion, a person who was banging on the bunk above them to shush the snorer - the snoring didn't wake me up, the banging did.

One of my Spanish walking companions was a really bad snorer. When we were saying goodbye, we referred to his snoring as 'the soundtrack to our Camino' :lol:

Un abrazo enorme para todos!

Agnieszka
 

RENSHAW

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2003 CF Roncesvalles to Santiago
2/4 weeks every year on CF reaching Burgos or Leon. Hospitalero San Anton June 2016.
The amazing thing is that the 'Spanish' Lizard click does work and is very gentle - I'm not sure how it works - but it does. :D
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
If you are a group of cyclists with support van and you turn up on mass at an albergue late at night, lets say 8.30pm and then decide to go out for a meal all together at lets say 10pm. Dont be suprised if the lone walking pilgrim there realises that hes not going to get much sleep tonight, decides to play you at your game and goes out for a meal and drink and rolls back up at the hostel at 3am and then snores his head off. Cycling from lets say Valenca to Pontevedra with support van is lot easier than walking from lets say Valenca to Porrino with backpack.
 

David

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Moissac to Santiago Spring 2005 was the first foray.
Great posts - I would add, don't wear your boots in the dormitories, leave them outside the door (the elves will clean them during the night).

'how to do it' is a really good lesson in adulthood - it is about thinking of others, not ourselves. As Rebekah said, "Share. Be kind and thoughtful. Do unto others as you would have others do unto you."
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
Blow the elves cleaning the boots......

Get them to prod the snorers instead.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004.SJPP-SdC-Finisterre)(1998-2012 completed in sections). Norte (2006.122km) Inglés (2009)
And while they're at it they can shut the windows as well. :D
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
I go to bed early. I snore. I wear ear plugs, so no amount of whistling or clicking will wake me up. Others who want to wake up the rest of the dormitory because I irritate them should feel free to do so. How is that for "attitude?"
 

Sansthing

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
French Camino (May 2009), French Camino (May 2011), Via de la Plata (April/May 2012)
Do as you would be done by!

Sandra :arrow:
 
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route.
Well, since this has turned into "preferences" here is mine :lol:

Please allow me to crack the window open by my bed. It's horribly stuffy breathing all that pilgrim stinky foot, stinky pit, and stinky breath!!! I NEED FRESH AIR!

:::Annie opens the window and sleeps with her nose next to the opening and her hand on the sil::::
 

MichaelB10398

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago de Compostela, Lourdes to SdC, SJPP to SdC
Anniesantiago said:
Well, since this has turned into "preferences" here is mine :lol:

Please allow me to crack the window open by my bed. It's horribly stuffy breathing all that pilgrim stinky foot, stinky pit, and stinky breath!!! I NEED FRESH AIR!

:::Annie opens the window and sleeps with her nose next to the opening and her hand on the sil::::
Yes, oh yes, please God in Heaven, let all our beds be near a window that can be opened with a cool breeze blowing in.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
Do as you would be done by!
I could not agree more, though I would add "intentional acts." Snorers can no more "not snore" than blind persons can see (and I have heard anti-snorer comments by persons who obviously have never heard themselves in the middle of the night). I simply choose to ignore mindless judgement in all areas! It is attitude, but reasonable. The intentional acts relating to cleaning up, being quiet, controlling the flashlight, etc. should get the etiquette attention, not snoring. I apologize to everyone for not getting as worked up as you do over things that irritate you. I know it is not very empathetic. :D
 

renegadepilgrim

Veteran Pilgrim and Traveler
Camino(s) past & future
2010: Camino Frances, 2011: Santo Domingo de la Calzada (Hospitalera), 2012: Camino Portuguese from Porto, 2015: Camino Norte
If the hospitalero assigns you to a bed, do not ask for another that is:
1)the bottom bunk
2)by the window
3)not near the door

and don't ask to save room for your friends who are "just behind you".

Believe it or not, there is a reason for the way the beds are assigned and unless you are obviously physically impaired then consider it to be very rude to other pilgrims who have taken the beds they were assigned without complaint.

If I was running this albergue my way, it would be a free for all, but unfortunately, I am not, so I too, as a hospitalera have to follow the "rules" and etiquette set forward by the albergue I am volunteering at. Sorry for the rant, but almost every pilgrim up to the first 30 today has asked for a different bed for different reasons (afraid of heights..valid point/claustrophobic...why are you in an albergue?) and it has been exhausting trying to explain the "why" when really all I want to do is tell them sleep wherever you want! :)
 

mishmumkin

New Member
I would like to add that whispering isn't really all that quiet. Prolonged conversations in the early hours of the morning or after lights-out DO wake other people up. All of this could be avoided if people prepped their beds/bags. I made a point after dinner to get out my toiletries and nightshirt as well as repacking my bag for the next day. That meant that if we went for a walk or for a nightcap before lights-out, I could grab everything easily and walk to the bathroom. It also made for an easy exit to another area of the alburgue the next morning.
 

dkenagy

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
April-June 2009 (Frances) (little bit of bus-riding)
March-May 2012 (Frances) (walked every inch)
April 2017: VDLP: I'll be 75
Plastic Bags: No need. THROW THEM AWAY!
Doors: In the middle of the night SHUT THEM GENTLY.
There. I vented.
 

onancyo

New Member
Yikes. I am about to tackle my first--and likely only--walk, and I am more and more convinced I should take the Portuguese route to avoid, as much as possible, such crowds and craziness. (Am I getting too old [53] and crabby for any albergue?)
 
M

mikevasey

Guest
onancyo said:
Yikes. I am about to tackle my first--and likely only--walk, and I am more and more convinced I should take the Portuguese route to avoid, as much as possible, such crowds and craziness. (Am I getting too old [53] and crabby for any albergue?)
Hi, the Portuguese route is still busy and with less albergues you could find yourself in a crowded hostel. Getting up early, rustling bags, snoring is not confined to the CF. There is a lot of discussion on this forum about going in between the recognised stages i.e not staying in the larger towns but in the smaller places in between, there tends to be less people heading for these places, you can have really nice and friendly albergues, and sometimes the option of an individual room if you feel you need it.

At 53 you are not too old for the camino, I have walked with people in their 60's and 70's, and they are not a rare occurrence.

The Frances route has more natural paths which I think is better for a first timer.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
It does take a lot of tolerance to stay in albergues. Only you know if you are capable of that. I suggest that you not ruin your camino by trying to do something you cannot do. Hape Kerkeling, a humorous and insightly German comedian, knew he did not like people enough to sleep with 120 strangers each night, and stayed in hotels. To have fun, do it your own way.
 

johnnyman

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July 2011 and 2013
onancyo said:
Yikes. I am about to tackle my first--and likely only--walk, and I am more and more convinced I should take the Portuguese route to avoid, as much as possible, such crowds and craziness. (Am I getting too old [53] and crabby for any albergue?)
My only unpleasant albergue stays were in the larger cities. When we stayed at the smaller albergues and avoided the traditional end stage locations, it ranged from pleasant to wonderful ...
 

ksam

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese '08, Frances '11, del Norte '14, Invierno '16, Ingles '17, Primitivo October 2018
onancyo said:
Yikes. I am about to tackle my first--and likely only--walk, and I am more and more convinced I should take the Portuguese route to avoid, as much as possible, such crowds and craziness. (Am I getting too old [53] and crabby for any albergue?)

Too old...oh HELL no!! Got you beat by a year or more!! And loved every (well almost) every single moment of my Camino this summer!

The Portuguese is less crowded (went in '08), but I only ever really had to look hard for a bed one time on the Frances this spring/summer. That's out of five and a half weeks. Just try what some of the others have recommended. Sometimes you stay in a Pension, or you stagger your stage ends. And trust that you will be provided for, as somehow, it always does work itself out!

Buen Camino!
 

dazzamac

Active Member
I remember being woken in one albergue by a very earnest man keen to impart some sort of warning. To this day, I'm not sure if he was asking if I snored or warning that he snored. All I really understood was the suggestion at the end that I should get another room if I had a problem.

My pet peeve from the Camino was those who insisted on rising early even when the albergue had a morning curfew. I had to suppress a smile when one hospitalerro informed us at check-in, that there was no point getting up before 6 because the doors wouldn't be open and no-one was getting up to let them out before then.

That said, I knew in advance that there would be early risers and that I would just have to accept that fact. Given that I'm a late riser and head to bed late at night, I had to adjust my own routines for the duration of the Camino.

To paraphrase George Bernard Shaw:
Do not do unto others as you would have done unto you - they may not share your tastes.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
I have the same pet peeve with my family. Some are morning people, some are night people.

The albergue locked door is a ruse. Fire regulations require that doors can be unlocked, so the key is always nearby. Early risers know this, and leave when they want. It is nice for the hospitalero to "herd cats," but it is ineffective. One person's convenience is another person's inconvenience, so Shaw is right -- tastes differ.
 

Rebekah Scott

Camino Busybody
Camino(s) past & future
Many, various, and continuing.
"albergue locked door is a ruse:"
No it´s not. Especially if you are staying at a monastic albergue, like the Benedictinas in Sahagun or the Cistercians at Santo Domingo. Once that door is locked, barred, and shuttered there´s NOBODY going out until the hospitalero or Sister is awake and brings the keys ... fire regulations be damned. Appealing to Health and Safety ideals is useless. Those doors are locked to keep out the Saracens. The idea of someone inside wanting to escape just isn´t part of the picture.

If early risers knew how little sleep most hospitaleros get, they might be a little more considerate.
 

nousername

New Member
falcon269 said:
I go to bed early. I snore. I wear ear plugs, so no amount of whistling or clicking will wake me up. Others who want to wake up the rest of the dormitory because I irritate them should feel free to do so. How is that for "attitude?"
I use earplugs so i don't wake myself from my own snoring :lol: . But what i still remember with much laughter was a fellow pilgrim telling me the next day, me blissfully unawares, what another pilgrim shouted loudly at me during the night before. "Shut the f**k up!". With no effect at all. :D

On the tune of "In the jungle - the lion king" this phrase is yet unbeatable. "On the Camino, the great camino, only the mighty snores at night" ."On the Camino, the great camino, only the sleepless walks at night"

The battle of/with the snorers will never be won
 

wingnut

New Member
snoring is not a choice but buying ear plugs is.... i hope my tolerance levels can cope with all this stuff, i had imagined that my fellow travellers would be intuitively and maximally respectful as i intend to be.... i start my first camino tomorrow...maybe i will see a lot of hotels and paradors :))
 

markss

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from SJPP (3/10 & 10/10); Primitivo (6/12)
wingnut said:
i had imagined that my fellow travellers would be intuitively and maximally respectful as i intend to be.... i start my first camino tomorrow...
Don't get a wrong impression. Sometimes we tend to use this forum as a venting outlet. It really isn't that bad. You will find that the overwhelming majority of people are considerate and respectful of others. The world should mirror the kindness and compassion that is the Camino.

Buen Camino! By the way, looks like the weather gods are on your side for the beginning of your journey. May it stay that way throughout.
 

grayland

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Yes
Mark makes an excellent and important statement....we do tend to overstate the negative and relate the stories of the less common occurrences.
For the most part you will have a pretty simple and pleasant experience in most albergues.
 

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