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Albergues on the Madrid Camino

Stephen B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino de Madrid (2017), Voie d'Arles (2018)
Hi everybody, I am thinking about doing the Madrid Camino in late April, early May 2017. I did the Camino Frances in April 1014. My question is about albergues along the Madrid way. I propose a somewhat less hectic pace for myself, something like 10 to 15 kms a day. I am looking for a good list of albergues for the Madrid camino. It seems that a couple of 30km treks are unavoidable. But I would definitely like to keep that to a minimum. Could anyone recommend a guidebook? Website?
 

Donovan

Active Member
I am looking for a good list of albergues for Madrid camino. Could anyone recommend a guidebook? Website?
Hi Stephen,
The CSJ guide is useful and lists all the towns/villages along the way, with distances and available accommodation. The Mundicamino website also contains a lot of information.
I made up a spreadsheet listing accommodation along the route. It's ca. 2014 information (from Mundicamino) but should form a useful starting point. If of interest, PM me your email address and I'll send it
Donovan
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
It seems that a couple of 30km treks are unavoidable.
Hola, Stephen!

Not true at all. The longest stretch without albergue is also the longest and toughest on the whole CdM and that's Cercedilla-Segovia and that one is 30kms. Otherwise albergues are much closer to each other. Browse through CdM subforum and suggested web sites and you'll get the picture. If you want I can e-mail you my list of accomodation and distances from 2014.

It's beautiful and quite solitary Camino but well worth walking it. Apart from Camino de Invierno I've found the nicest and most welcoming locals exactly on this Camino!

Ultreia
 

Stephen B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino de Madrid (2017), Voie d'Arles (2018)
Hi Stephen,
The CSJ guide is useful and lists all the towns/villages along the way, with distances and available accommodation. The Mundicamino website also contains a lot of information.
I made up a spreadsheet listing accommodation along the route. It's ca. 2014 information (from Mundicamino) but should form a useful starting point. If of interest, PM me your email address and I'll send it
Donovan
Thanks Donovan for your quick reply. I have offered checked out the CSJ. Maybe it is time to make a purchase. Kind regards, Steve
 

Stephen B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino de Madrid (2017), Voie d'Arles (2018)
Hola, Stephen!

Not true at all. The longest stretch without albergue is also the longest and toughest on the whole CdM and that's Cercedilla-Segovia and that one is 30kms. Otherwise albergues are much closer to each other. Browse through CdM subforum and suggested web sites and you'll get the picture. If you want I can e-mail you my list of accomodation and distances from 2014.

It's beautiful and quite solitary Camino but well worth walking it. Apart from Camino de Invierno I've found the nicest and most welcoming locals exactly on this Camino!

Ultreia
Thank you Ultreia for the references. I will check them out. If more is needed, I know where to find you. :). The CdM sounds exactly what I am looking for. Steve
 

evanlow

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances06
Primitivo07
Plata08
Norte12
Levante(14-15)
Vasco16
Mozarabe(16-17)
Madrid17
Portuguese18
Thanks Laurie,

Just started planning for my Camino del Madrid this coming Spring, the albergue guide is invaluable. :)

Incidentally, I have also found the kml (route overlay) for the Madrid Camino in case anyone is using an offline map like Maps.me on their smartphone and wants to make sure they are on the right track (not sure how well waymarked it is).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5saV2E-AKF7dnotMFd1dk5wTnc/view?usp=sharing
 
Last edited:

sulu

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Ronces-SdC (03-04/10);Oporto-SdC (10/2011); VdlP via Portugal 03/04 2012/2013;Part Invierno 2012; Toulouse to Sarrance 2012; Ingles to Muxia June 2013 Cami Catala and Aragones 2014; El Salvador & Primitivo 2014; Camino de Madrid 2016; Levante 2015,2017
Actually from Cercedilla to La Granja de San Ildefonso is only 22kms if you stay at the Youth Hostel on the way up the hill, and there is an albergue in La Granja. This makes the walk to Zamarramala only 15kms and gives plenty of time to visit Segovia, you actually enter Segovia at the beginning of the aqueduct.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Actually from Cercedilla to La Granja de San Ildefonso is only 22kms if you stay at the Youth Hostel on the way up the hill, and there is an albergue in La Granja. This makes the walk to Zamarramala only 15kms and gives plenty of time to visit Segovia, you actually enter Segovia at the beginning of the aqueduct.
And even shorter from Cercedilla if you stay overnight in Valsain. Nothing like Parador in this hostal but excellent food:
https://www.google.si/maps/@40.8797782,-4.0183019,3a,75y,180h,90t/data=!3m6!1e1!3m4!1sgLg_jgK34ZfK3JZGUH0OQw!2e0!7i13312!8i6656!6m1!1e1?hl=sl
The view might be a bit misleading, but I took it from this direction because of the trees. That's Hostal/Restaurante El Torreon on the main street from Valsain to La Granja. Most of Valsain in this picture is directly down the road and to the right. To go to La Granja you would have to turn for 180 degrees. There's earth path alongside the main road so it makes for a nice walk.
Nothing much in Valsain but La Granja with its royal palace and gardens is really beautiful. From La Granja to Segovia is a bit dull and tarmaced walk although soon after La Granja (close to albergue turistico that @sulu mentioned) you cross the river and embalse which is a nice rest stop.
 

eli

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St JPdP 2004
Camino Frances from Burgos 2010
Camino Via de la Plata from Merida 2011
Camino Portuguese from Lisbon (2014)
European Peace Walk (2016)
Way of St Francis - Florence to Rome (2016)
Incidentally, I have also found the kml (route overlay) for the Madrid Camino in case anyone is using an offline map like Maps.me on their smartphone and wants to make sure they are on the right track (not sure how well waymarked it is).

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B5saV2E-AKF7dnotMFd1dk5wTnc/view?usp=sharing[/QUOTE]

Hi Evanlow,
I'll also now be starting along the Madrid Route this spring, in late April. Not far off and thought Id better start organising myself!!!. Was happy to see your post with the link to Map.me. However, the link doesn't seem to work. It tells me that the file selected does not exist. Are you able to let me know how you found the file, or better yet, are you able to check the link details?
 

Anniesantiago

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Nearly every year since 2006, often walking more than one route. 2018 was Camino #14
My favorite route . . .
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
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eli

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances from St JPdP 2004
Camino Frances from Burgos 2010
Camino Via de la Plata from Merida 2011
Camino Portuguese from Lisbon (2014)
European Peace Walk (2016)
Way of St Francis - Florence to Rome (2016)
Thank you! Works beautifully now.
 
N

nathanael

Guest

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, nathanael,
I think it depends on whether you want to walk from the Church of Santiago (in old Madrid, in between Sol and Opera) where you can get a nice sello, or whether you will go up to the Plaza Castilla to start with the arrows. What I did was walk on my arrival day from the church up to the Plaza Castilla, and then walk on the next day from the Plaza Castilla to Colmenar el Viejo, where I stayed in a nicer-than-typical-pilgrim lodging.

From the Church to Plaza Castilla, it can be a nice walk through old Madrid, up the Castellana, but some prefer just to get started further on. Some also take Cercanías as far out as Tres Cantos, it just depends on how you like leaving cities.

I will say that leaving Madrid on the camino is painless and not overly ugly. No industrial parks to go through, and the transition from city to country is stark. Walk under the M-40 (I think) and you are in the country.

And one last thing to point out, someone on the forum has said that the first arrow is no longer outside the Rodilla sandwich shop at the Plaza de Castilla. That's where it was when I walked and where it had been for years. Buen camino, nathanael, I think you will like this camino very much! Laurie
 

Stephen B

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2014), Camino de Madrid (2017), Voie d'Arles (2018)
Hi, nathanael,
I think it depends on whether you want to walk from the Church of Santiago (in old Madrid, in between Sol and Opera) where you can get a nice sello, or whether you will go up to the Plaza Castilla to start with the arrows. What I did was walk on my arrival day from the church up to the Plaza Castilla, and then walk on the next day from the Plaza Castilla to Colmenar el Viejo, where I stayed in a nicer-than-typical-pilgrim lodging.

From the Church to Plaza Castilla, it can be a nice walk through old Madrid, up the Castellana, but some prefer just to get started further on. Some also take Cercanías as far out as Tres Cantos, it just depends on how you like leaving cities.

I will say that leaving Madrid on the camino is painless and not overly ugly. No industrial parks to go through, and the transition from city to country is stark. Walk under the M-40 (I think) and you are in the country.

And one last thing to point out, someone on the forum has said that the first arrow is no longer outside the Rodilla sandwich shop at the Plaza de Castilla. That's where it was when I walked and where it had been for years. Buen camino, nathanael, I think you will like this camino very much! Laurie
Hello Peregrina Laurie. I will be on the CdM end of April/most of May. How moist does it get in May? I did the Frances in spring 2014, unseasonably mild and dry that year. I am anticipating a warm and dry CdM? Grateful for your/anyone's thoughts. Steve
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Hi, Steve, welcome to the forum!

I think the "averages" are for May to be warm and dry in that part of Spain, but we all know the weather is not like it used to be. Most people who walked almost anywhere in Spain in May 2013 remember an extremely wet month, so you never know. But since there is nothing to be done about it, the best thing to do is to be prepared. AFter all, it´s only water. Buen camino, Laurie
 

Undermanager

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Madrid (x2)
VDLP
Salvador
Primitivo
Fisterra
It is unpredictable but when I walked the Madrid two years ago in early May, I had nothing but sunshine and warm perfect conditions! You always need to be prepared for the worst though.
 

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