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Backpack

Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#1
Buen Camino
I have been doing walks with backpack and breaking in hiking boots in preparation for Camino Frances. As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist. Am very determined to and so very much looking to commencing walk April 23rd. My question is-is there a way to have my backpack transported THE ODD DAY if needed ? I don’t want to have my pack carried everyday as I am certain I won’t need to and part of the walk is so step a little away from a pre-organised walk schedule...so looking forward to less routine!
Look forward t9 any suggestions you ma6 have, fellow pilgrims .

Kindest regards Kathleen
 

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Dorpie

Active Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago to Finisterre to Muxia 2013
Camino Frances May 2015
Camino Frances July 2017
#2
Hi Kathleen,

Have no fear. Pretty much every albergue will be able to help you make arrangements to send your bag on. All you need to know is where you will be staying that night, have €5 and fill in the transfer form.

Buen Camino,

Rob.
 

simeon

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP LosArcos 09\14 Tricastella SDDC 0515 Porto SDDC 1015 LosArcos Burgos 1016 Burgos Leon 0917
#3
If you have time left try experimenting with the straps. Changing the weight ratios from shoulder to hip or vise versa can make all the difference.
 

martin1ws

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
From Somport Jul-Sep 2018
#5
... As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist...
If you haven't done it, maybe you can try this: Try to find a experienced hiker (e. g. a friend or a shop assistant in a hiking shop or a member of the local pilgrim association or ...) who could look after your shoes, socks and backpack:
Does everything really fit?
Is everything correctly adjusted (e. g. the backpack straps mentioned above or the lacing of the shoes)?
 

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Ian L

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances summer 2017 (SJPP to Fromista)
Plan on returning in 2019 (Fromista to Santiago)
#6
You may want to try using trekking poles, if you haven't already. If used properly they may help take some stress off of your hips. There are some good tutorials on how to use them on youtube.
 
Camino(s) past & future
I´ll be doing the camino in march
#8
Buen Camino
I have been doing walks with backpack and breaking in hiking boots in preparation for Camino Frances. As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist. Am very determined to and so very much looking to commencing walk April 23rd. My question is-is there a way to have my backpack transported THE ODD DAY if needed ? I don’t want to have my pack carried everyday as I am certain I won’t need to and part of the walk is so step a little away from a pre-organised walk schedule...so looking forward to less routine!
Look forward t9 any suggestions you ma6 have, fellow pilgrims .

Kindest regards Kathleen
Hello Kathleen,
I just arrived to Pamplona. Started at Sjpp.
When I arrived to RONCESVALLES, I asked for the bagpack transportation. At the price of 14€ the bagpack was waiting for me here. Quite safe and I enjoyed a lot the walk with out all that weight.
You have a lot of companies that do it. You’ll find that information once you get to each stage.

Buen camino
 

trecile

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Aug - Sept (2016) SJPDP - Finisterre
July - Aug (2017) SJPDP - Muxia - Finisterre
#9
When you have things transported will still need to carry the basics such as water, snacks, rain gear, extra socks and first aid stuff. Rather than having the entire pack sent ahead, by our can bring a lightweight tote bag - put the heavy gear in that and have it sent ahead.
This one weighs just 3 ounces: https://www.ebags.com/product/lewis-n-clark/electrolight-duffel/306244
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 14, May 17, September 18
#10
Buen Camino
I have been doing walks with backpack and breaking in hiking boots in preparation for Camino Frances. As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist. Am very determined to and so very much looking to commencing walk April 23rd. My question is-is there a way to have my backpack transported THE ODD DAY if needed ? I don’t want to have my pack carried everyday as I am certain I won’t need to and part of the walk is so step a little away from a pre-organised walk schedule...so looking forward to less routine!
Look forward t9 any suggestions you ma6 have, fellow pilgrims .

Kindest regards Kathleen
Hi, just a thought, have you checked into orthotics? I could not have made my two caminos without them. Walking is one thing, but walking with weight, is a whole different ballgame. Made all the difference in the world. All the best.
Linda.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: 2013, 2014
Madrid: 2016
Portuguese: 2015, 2017
Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
#11
My considered recommendations are:

1. Reduce your carried weight - lighten your load - less carried is good.
2. Use hiking poles, two of them, to distribute weight from your shoulders and back to your arms & legs.
3. Consider using a 'belly bag' or some other bag attached to the front of your harness, to balance weight
4. Carry your water in the front of your harness using clips, to balance weight.
5. Use mochila transport services or the correos (post) to move your bag each day from lodging to lodging.

Hope this helps.
 
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Santiago de Compestela in May(2016)
#12
I can certainly recommend trekking poles for a variety of reasons, but, and this is important, you need to watch at least half a dozen youtube videos on how to use them!
And another thing.............if you are going to treat yourself to a pair of poles, do your research first and get ones that meet your needs.
And finally.............................make sure you get some rubber stoppers to go on the pointed ends.:cool:
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: 2013, 2014
Madrid: 2016
Portuguese: 2015, 2017
Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
#13
Regarding hiking or trekking poles. Everyone has an opinion, or three concerning them. I am in the HECK YES group.

Over five Caminos I have used adjustable-length Leki Ultralight poles with traditional twist fittings (2013, 2015), heavier weight Leki conventional poles with twist fittings (2014), Black Diamond Aluminum alloy compact FLZ poles with flip-clip adjustment length fittings (2016 & 2017), and Black Diamond Carbon Fiber poles that are single-sized to my exact needs (120 cm) (2018), see below explanation.

I am moving in the direction of (single) custom-length non-adjustable poles that are über light and small when collapsed. The collapsed size makes it easier to pack poles when checking luggage.

I plan to use the 120 cm carbon fiber Black Diamond Carbon Distance poles this year. They are only 16 inches or 40 cm long when collapsed, and weigh only 10 ounces or 284 grams FOR THE PAIR. Not cheap, but I managed to score a pair form REI Outlet, on sale, and used my annual member rewards discount to get them for about USD 70 the pair. That is about one-third the usual retail value.

Lighter is better...ALWAYS...

Hope this helps.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#14
I concur on the use of trekking poles, they take stress off the knees and allow one to walk more efficiently, but.......
They don't have to be the expensive variety. I have used both aluminium ones I bought on the Francais for 20 euro a pair, and have used a more expensive set that cost me about 50 euro. Honestly I noticed no difference, besides a few grams of weight. One thing I do recommend is to bring extra rubber tips.
As I have said on here before, you could actually just use two broomsticks cut to proper length. It is the use of the poles, not the variety that is most important (take note future pilgrims reading this). Also, using them properly does not require a great deal of training, but it is best to take them out on a few 5-10 km walks first. Can you walk and swing your arms in a normal, natural rhythm in step? Congratulations, you are a trekking pole champ.
 
Camino(s) past & future
future
#15
Regarding hiking or trekking poles. Everyone has an opinion, or three concerning them. I am in the HECK YES group.

Over five Caminos I have used adjustable-length Leki Ultralight poles with traditional twist fittings (2013, 2015), heavier weight Leki conventional poles with twist fittings (2014), Black Diamond Aluminum alloy compact FLZ poles with flip-clip adjustment length fittings (2016 & 2017), and Black Diamond Carbon Fiber poles that are single-sized to my exact needs (120 cm) (2018), see below explanation.

I am moving in the direction of (single) custom-length non-adjustable poles that are über light and small when collapsed. The collapsed size makes it easier to pack poles when checking luggage.

I plan to use the 120 cm carbon fiber Black Diamond Carbon Distance poles this year. They are only 16 inches or 40 cm long when collapsed, and weigh only 10 ounces or 284 grams FOR THE PAIR. Not cheap, but I managed to score a pair form REI Outlet, on sale, and used my annual member rewards discount to get them for about USD 70 the pair. That is about one-third the usual retail value.

Lighter is better...ALWAYS...

Hope this helps.
Wow, how much does all that cost?
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: 2013, 2014
Madrid: 2016
Portuguese: 2015, 2017
Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
#17
Once I determine the poles are not to my long term satisfaction, they usually get donated somewhere. I either leave them at the Pilgrim House in Santiago (#19 Rua Nova) or pass them to my local APOC chapter members.

Presently, I retain the first, Leki aluminium twist-fit poles I ever bought. They literally saved my life on my first Camino in 2013 and I am rather attached to them. I use them for training. The aluminium Black Diamond poles cost about USD 150 two years ago, IIRC. Once I use the new Black Diamond Carbon Fiber poles this year, I will determine how to pass along the Black Diamond aluminium poles.

So, I know have three sets, but will be down to two by this summer.

BTW, I mentioned above I obtained the single length BD carbon fiber poles on sale from REI for a very good price. However, not on sale, I believe they cost about USD 190. Quality is not cheap, and these are the best I have encountered.

NOTE: I have a personal saying, based on experience, that "you remember the value of an item long after you forgot what you paid for it." Also, I recently learned an old Italian saying from my mom that says something similar: "You buy cheap, you pay twice..."

You can find less expensive and very good quality hiking poles from Leki, Black Diamond, MSR, Komperell, and other makers. I am partial to the traditional twist to tighten poles, but the flik-lock poles are also good. I would plan to spend about USD 60 at the low end, and sky's the limit, at the upper end. In the end you are paying for comfort, low weight and reliability.

I am able to settle on a single length because I know my height, my walking style, and how to use the poles going up and down hills. Generally, I advised against a single-length pole if you are a beginner. Adjustable poles give you the ability to vary the pole length according to your comfort and needs.

Hope this helps.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Donating Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances: 2013, 2014
Madrid: 2016
Portuguese: 2015, 2017
Voluntario: 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017
#18
Yes, you can certainly buy a pair of basic trekking poles at St. Jean Pied de Port that will work well enough. Consider them as one-time use poles, to get you to Santiago, once. However, they will be of heavier construction.

AVOID the anti-shock poles. IMHO this is a gimmick. The springy bits that simulate shock absorption will rattle and the noise will drive you nuts.

If you go this route, and many do, (1) try the pole at proper length - your forearms should be PARALLEL to the ground at proper pole length. (2) buy a pair of rubber tips for the poles.

The incessant click-clack of the tungsten tips striking paved surfaces drives everyone crazy. This is especially true of village folks trying to sleep in the early morning.

At the pilgrim office at Santiago, one of the things I do as a volunteer is remove metal poles from the trash box for recycling. In my direct experience, anti-shock poles are the most discarded hiking poles, followed by most basic varieties sold by Decathlon and elsewhere. Higher quality poles are usually discarded if they are broken. I cannibalize these, scavenging parts to recycle the best. These wind up at Pilgrim House for donativo.

Hope this helps too.
 

RJM

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times, but soon again I hope....
#19
Most, if not all of the inexpensive trekking poles available in various shops in Saint Jean to Pamplona are of the anti-shock variety. While it is true, it's a bit of a gimmick, I never really noticed any rattle noise or anything else about them that was annoying, and I had one set I bought for 22 euros that I used on two Caminos and other than replacing the rubber tips, they looked good as new after over 1500 kms on them. I adjusted them to length, locked them in place and left them at that the entire route, and occasionally made sure they were locked tight. If they broke on me I would have bought another set at less than 25 euro a pair and continued on, still having spent less than one super lightweight, high tech set would have cost.
From what I can see on this forum, there seems to be a lot of money spent on equipment. I want the pilgrims with tighter budgets to know they do not have to spend a lot of money to walk the Camino de Santiago and not be put off by discussions involving equipment to walk it that goes into the several hundred euros mark.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#21
Hi, just a thought, have you checked into orthotics? I could not have made my two caminos without them. Walking is one thing, but walking with weight, is a whole different ballgame. Made all the difference in the world. All the best.
Linda.
Thank you Linda have been strapping my feet and it has helped. Regards
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#22
Hi Kathleen,

Have no fear. Pretty much every albergue will be able to help you make arrangements to send your bag on. All you need to know is where you will be staying that night, have €5 and fill in the transfer form.

Buen Camino,

Rob.
Yippee, thank you very much Rob, good to know this!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#23
Hi Kathleen,

Have no fear. Pretty much every albergue will be able to help you make arrangements to send your bag on. All you need to know is where you will be staying that night, have €5 and fill in the transfer form.

Buen Camino,

Rob.
Hi Kathleen,

Have no fear. Pretty much every albergue will be able to help you make arrangements to send your bag on. All you need to know is where you will be staying that night, have €5 and fill in the transfer form.

Buen Camino,

Rob.
My considered recommendations are:

1. Reduce your carried weight - lighten your load - less carried is good.
2. Use hiking poles, two of them, to distribute weight from your shoulders and back to your arms & legs.
3. Consider using a 'belly bag' or some other bag attached to the front of your harness, to balance weight
4. Carry your water in the front of your harness using clips, to balance weight.
5. Use mochila transport services or the correos (post) to move your bag each day from lodging to lodging.

Hope this helps.
Thank you! Good points to consider, i have just purchased poles, will start using them this weekend, regards
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#24
I can certainly recommend trekking poles for a variety of reasons, but, and this is important, you need to watch at least half a dozen youtube videos on how to use them!
And another thing.............if you are going to treat yourself to a pair of poles, do your research first and get ones that meet your needs.
And finally.............................make sure you get some rubber stoppers to go on the pointed ends.:cool:
Hi Gareth, read your post and will do as you recommend. Kind regards
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2009, Camino Finisterre, 2009, Camino Portuguese, 2009, Via de La Plata, 2011. Pending: VdlP April-May 2014
#26
Buen Camino
I have been doing walks with backpack and breaking in hiking boots in preparation for Camino Frances. As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist. Am very determined to and so very much looking to commencing walk April 23rd. My question is-is there a way to have my backpack transported THE ODD DAY if needed ? I don’t want to have my pack carried everyday as I am certain I won’t need to and part of the walk is so step a little away from a pre-organised walk schedule...so looking forward to less routine!
Look forward t9 any suggestions you ma6 have, fellow pilgrims .

Kindest regards Kathleen
Hiking boots are not necessary on the Camino Frances. They are, in fact, an impediment. High quality, sturdy walking shoes or high-rise shoes are enough.
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#27
Hello Kathleen,
I just arrived to Pamplona. Started at Sjpp.
When I arrived to RONCESVALLES, I asked for the bagpack transportation. At the price of 14€ the bagpack was waiting for me here. Quite safe and I enjoyed a lot the walk with out all that weight.
You have a lot of companies that do it. You’ll find that information once you get to each stage.

Buen camino
Thank you! Makes alot of sense to help enjoy the Camino and help this jolly sore hip. Buen Camino, enjoy !!!!! Regards
 

Lynda t

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago May 2010
Lisbon to Santiago May 2012
#28
Buen Camino
I have been doing walks with backpack and breaking in hiking boots in preparation for Camino Frances. As a result, my body right hip is giving my grief as are feet....have been to both chiro and physiotherapist. Am very determined to and so very much looking to commencing walk April 23rd. My question is-is there a way to have my backpack transported THE ODD DAY if needed ? I don’t want to have my pack carried everyday as I am certain I won’t need to and part of the walk is so step a little away from a pre-organised walk schedule...so looking forward to less routine!
Look forward t9 any suggestions you ma6 have, fellow pilgrims .

Kindest regards Kathleen
Try to get the weight off your hips. See if that helps. May be a shorter back pack?
 

SeaHorse

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
(May-June 2015)
#30
One more vote for the poles.

Also have a specialist to adjust your backpack correctly, the correct length of ALL the straps together is what matters! There are even different bags (adjustable to a degree) for different length of the persons back. Maybe you need a different bag. When I got mine in the specialised bag shop I tried 4 that the consultant picked out for me and only 1 did fit pleasantly.

But for the boots, well, if you have to break them in and they behave in such a way - very sure those are the wrong boots. Good boots on the Camino are heavensent, I walked during the warm period May-June and had proper walking boots (Merrell), they didn't bother me on hot days or paved roads and they were all the difference needed to pull me through the hard mountain paths, there are some that resemble a stone covered river bed, stones everywhere and nothing more. They had properly shaped soles and could hold my ankles on uneven ground.

P.S. I have hip replacement, wobbly ankles, balance that greatly depends on walking poles, I walked all the way SJPDP - Finisterre/Muxia and enjoyed it, not a single blister.

Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2018
#31
One more vote for the poles.

Also have a specialist to adjust your backpack correctly, the correct length of ALL the straps together is what matters! There are even different bags (adjustable to a degree) for different length of the persons back. Maybe you need a different bag. When I got mine in the specialised bag shop I tried 4 that the consultant picked out for me and only 1 did fit pleasantly.

But for the boots, well, if you have to break them in and they behave in such a way - very sure those are the wrong boots. Good boots on the Camino are heavensent, I walked during the warm period May-June and had proper walking boots (Merrell), they didn't bother me on hot days or paved roads and they were all the difference needed to pull me through the hard mountain paths, there are some that resemble a stone covered river bed, stones everywhere and nothing more. They had properly shaped soles and could hold my ankles on uneven ground.

P.S. I have hip replacement, wobbly ankles, balance that greatly depends on walking poles, I walked all the way SJPDP - Finisterre/Muxia and enjoyed it, not a single blister.

Buen Camino!
Hehe, thank you SO much, feel very encouraged by your comment and will kerp in mind all youhave suggested-will take bag tobspirts shopbto see if it is adjusted aok. Thank you SeaHorse
 

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