A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Live - Camino Francés Busy along the Camino!


Advertisment

Mike Savage

So many friends to meet . . . so little time
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Francés,Inglés
Muxia/Finisterre
Português Coastal
Português Central
Sanabrés
#3
It seems to me that the crowding is not consistent along the camino. I walk at a different pace than the majority and have days where it is much busier than others, then a couple of days later it is much less busy.

Buen Camino to you both!
 

Advertisment

Camino(s) past & future
Francés five times, Madrid two days, Ingles once.
#6
I was in Logroño two nights ago, Navarette last night and Najera tonight - no problems getting albergue, albergue and hostal. Good luck to those of you having problems! Buen Camino!!
 
Camino(s) past & future
April (2015) SJPdP to SdC; Porto to SdC April (2016)
#7
Just arrived in Los Arcos this evening and almost every albergue is full, as was the case in Estella last night. It's been pretty hot so everyone seems to be leaving at the crack of dawn! I've seen a few people get turned away from more than one place.
Hi @BéChuille, from my own experience and having read many posts over the past two years it does seem that demand regularly outstrips supply in Los Arcos. I was there in Easter 2016 and most of the private accommodation was full, felt lucky to be able to get a room as I was ill and needed to be away from infecting fellow pilgrims. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
May 2017
#8
Sarria full last night. I was turned away from hotels an albergues until two women outside bar sent me to internacional. Today in Portmarin I was told I was travelling on very bad days. Should have left Sarria on Monday. Lots of places full but squeezed into Villamartin and told it will be same for rest of week. Maybe I should stay here for a day? Packed too much, sore hip and blister but still LOVING it!
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#9
There is a wave-like pattern to traffic on the Camino Frances, and the other routes with a convenient starting place to do the final 100 km to qualify for a Compostela. The trick is to gauge and catch the "correct wave."

Sarria is the preferred starting place on the Camino Frances as it has the most infrastructure to support the greatest number of pilgrims. However, Tui on the Portuguese route and Ferrol also are convenient starting places for a short, but "legal" Camino.

Not all of these short Camino pilgrims are Spanish. That may have been the case, but no more.

Increasingly, tour companies are selling "a taste of the Camino" worldwide, starting from Sarria. Universities are also responding to student interest by organizing trips to Spain, including the segment fromSarria to Santiago. All of this commercialization is occurring because this is the best developed part of almost any Camino route.

During the year, the percentage of non-Spaniards coming from Sarria varies. During July & August the percentage can exceed 80 percent Spanish on some days. But annually, Spanish nationals account for about half of all pilgrims arriving at the Pilgrim Office.

The key to avoiding this crush is to time your arrival at and departure from the final starting nodes (Sarria, Tui, Ferrol) so that you do not need to leave on a Saturday or Sunday. During July & August, add Friday and Monday to this traffic avoidance scheme, especially at Sarria.

It works. I have used the model over five Camino's.

I hope this helps.
 

falcon269

no commercial interests
Camino(s) past & future
yes
#10
May will set a record, but it will behalf the numbers for July and August. Nodes will extreme in the summer. Aim for small places, not cities. You want a bed, not nightlife!!
 
#11
Just arrived in Los Arcos this evening and almost every albergue is full, as was the case in Estella last night. It's been pretty hot so everyone seems to be leaving at the crack of dawn! I've seen a few people get turned away from more than one place.

Iwill be murdered over this but here goes. As a 23 camino veteren bottle necks are 9caused by people only walking 8 /1012/ 15 km a day. If i walk 30km a day and somebody walked 10km then i only need 1 bed instead of 3. For example i left sansol and arrived in Logrono at 10 30 am. A big crowd of pilgrims outside albergue which opens at 1300.i walked to ventoso. Most if not all only walked from Viana or 9km.Grannon says pilgrims from further away than Santo Domingo but how many walk the7km only? Ask yourself ' am i a bed blocker'
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#12
Iwill be murdered over this but here goes. ...
Ask yourself ' am i a bed blocker'
Bingo! Blame the comfort seeking touriginos who are repeatedly told on gender specific fb pages "it's their C.".

I love your conclusion: "Ask yourself if you are a bed blocker". Surely a pilgrimage includes thinking about others and our impact on them? ;)
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
#13
Bingo! Blame the comfort seeking touriginos who are repeatedly told on gender specific fb pages "it's their C.".

I love your conclusion: "Ask yourself if you are a bed blocker". Surely a pilgrimage includes thinking about others and our impact on them? ;)
:rolleyes: Oh please ! Live and let live ... thinking about the impact on others for my whole life has done my head in ! o_O
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#14
:rolleyes: Oh please ! Live and let live ... thinking about the impact on others for my whole life has done my head in ! o_O
Now you know even on the Camino you are still having impact and that the Camino is not a pass on thinking on how we affect others.

Honnestly, the Camino, I walk every year, is where I am the most conscious about others and I do all I can to not get in the way of their Camino. I hurry up in the shower, I don't leave my bag in the middle of the room, nor on the chair by the bed. I don't use a flash light to go to the loo in the middle of the night, I clean my mess as I cook, I don't get up at 5 am to avoid the heat waking others up. I don't demand from hospies that they get me this or that, I invote people to join me for a drink or a meal, I don't come back to the albergue drunk, nor do I expect others to be quiet while I nap. Yes, on the Camino is probably when I try to erase my presence as much as possible, and of it has to be noticed, let it be for helping out.
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
St Olav/Francés ('16)
Baztanés/Francés ('17)
Ingles ('18)
#15
Coming a bit late to this tread, but I was just in that part of the Camino and stayed in Muruzabel and Villatuerta instead of Puente la Reina and Estella. There was plenty of space. I booked at an albergue in Los Arcos and arrived at 1:30 PM from Villatuerta, to fond that it was necessary to have done that.

The crowds stay at the popular 'nodes'--if you stay in smaller towns it will be much more likely to find a bed. I was sitting in the garden of the Albergue at Muruzabel, watching the flow of people press on to Puente la Reina--everyone seemed in a hurry. A pity, because that's not what the Camino is about.
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
#16
Now you know even on the Camino you are still having impact and that the Camino is not a pass on thinking on how we affect others.

Honnestly, the Camino, I walk every year, is where I am the most conscious about others and I do all I can to not get in the way of their Camino. I hurry up in the shower, I don't leave my bag in the middle of the room, nor on the chair by the bed. I don't use a flash light to go to the loo in the middle of the night, I clean my mess as I cook, I don't get up at 5 am to avoid the heat waking others up. I don't demand from hospies that they get me this or that, I invote people to join me for a drink or a meal, I don't come back to the albergue drunk, nor do I expect others to be quiet while I nap. Yes, on the Camino is probably when I try to erase my presence as much as possible, and of it has to be noticed, let it be for helping out.
Well done..... but the comment was about how far people walked to get a bed !
 

Annie Little

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct 2016
#18
I'm so glad you think so. I have always figured that impacting others positively on the C. is the least I can do for the priviledge of walking it so they can enjoy it as much as I do.
The comment referred to a previous poster commenting on how far people walked to get a bed .... if we walk 30 kms we will use less beds :mad:
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
#19
Nice edit, after the fact, since the original response was just "well done". Such a pity though. :cool:
 
Last edited by a moderator:
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#20
If you do not know each pilgrims' back-story or medical situation, you cannot possibly offer an informed opinion regarding whether they are walking far enough to suit your version of what constitutes a 'fair days' walk. I am not being critical of your post, just pointing out that many people only walk 15-20 km daily, for a variety of reasons, none of which is anyone's business.

Here, I hearken back to Camino Rule One: "No one has the standing, authority or right to judge the quality, manner, speed, or lack of another's Camino, or for that matter, the manner in which they choose to accomplish this challenge."

After five Camino's and reaching 64 years of age, I am discovering that I can no longer walk regular 25 - 30 Km days as I did in my first couple of Caminos. My personal "sweet spot" is about 18-21 Km. After that, pain, exceeding over-the-counter medication, presents itself. However, to not increase the bed burden, I opt to stay in private, commercial accommodations whenever possible. Only rarely must I stay in a private albergue. It works for me.

Personally, I view the Camino as a needed "time out" from the world. I do not go totally off-grid, but I dial all external contacts back significantly. Also, walking fewer kilometers daily helps to enhance the restorative effect, for me. Moreover, it enables me to walk at a leisurely enough pace to slow down, enjoy the scenery, and all that the Camino has to offer.

I always remind myself that the Camino ought never be a race. For many people it is a challenge to simply complete by walking. But, a race, it must never become, at least IMHO.

On several Caminos, I have actually encountered pilgrims who were literally "running" the Camino. They carried nothing beyond some energy drinks. Someone else was providing mochila transport. But these folks were apparently covering 50 - 60 km daily, each day. My only question was WHY?

Then again, I must remind myself that the Camino presents many challenges to anyone who does it. And it is not for me to question a person's choice to run the Camino. Perhaps I am missing something.

I do not think the runners or a "speed walker" pilgrim are nutters. But it does beg the logical question of why bother at all if you are in such a rush to finish?

I am perplexed...
 

notion900

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
>
#21
When there are simply too many people everything everyone does will start to annoy you. Did they walk too far? Or not far enough? Too fast or too slow? Bring too much luggage or not enough? Get up early and beat you to it, or get up late and walk a lazy short day? How dare they!

If you put too many mice in a cage they start eating each other.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#22
Iwill be murdered over this but here goes. As a 23 camino veteren bottle necks are 9caused by people only walking 8 /1012/ 15 km a day. If i walk 30km a day and somebody walked 10km then i only need 1 bed instead of 3. For example i left sansol and arrived in Logrono at 10 30 am. A big crowd of pilgrims outside albergue which opens at 1300.i walked to ventoso. Most if not all only walked from Viana or 9km.Grannon says pilgrims from further away than Santo Domingo but how many walk the7km only? Ask yourself ' am i a bed blocker'
Sorry, it might be because I am a second language English speaker, but your post doesn't make any sense to me. "As a 23 camino veteren bottle necks are 9caused by people only walking 8 /1012/ 15 km a day." What does that mean??? or "If i walk 30km a day and somebody walked 10km then i only need 1 bed instead of 3"

No, sorry, if you are one person, you only 'need' one bed - no matter how far you walked ...

BC SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
#24
If you look at the issue objectively, say as an analyst might, the issue is "beds per night demand." Someone who stops each 15 Km instead of 30 Km, logically "consumes" twice as many bed / nights over the span of their Camino. If you shorten this to only 10 Km walked daily, the bed demand for that particular pilgrim triples from a factor of 1 to 3 over the span of their Camino.

So, I do not disagree with the OP central premise that walking twice as far reduces that particular pilgrim's bed / night demand by 50 percent, etc. However, and this is MY central point, not all pilgrims CAN or CHOOSE to walk that distance each day. Moreover, Camino Rule One opposes this sentiment or judgement. Each pilgrim accomplishes his or her own Camino in the manner they choose. There is no right or wrong, too fast or too slow.

We might disagree with some aspect of how a Camino is done. In my case, I do not see the logic of literally running the entire length of the Camino as though it was some ancient Greek Olympic event. I also have issues with cyclists sharing off road unpaved segments with walkers. But, that is because it nearly cost me my life in 2013 and is a separate issue.

As regards the bicycling thing, there ARE credible and well-mapped routes that are totally on paved road surfaces. Some road bike riders avail themselves of these "parallel Camino routes. Conversely, mountain bike riders remain intent of sharing the path with walkers, mostly to the added hazard and risk to the hikers...but I digress...

The result is that the bed/night demand is what it is. As demand rises across the entire Camino system, either market forces will cause more beds to be brought on line to meet the demand, or the demand on one route may shift to other routes. As the overall, Camino-wide bed demand approaches and exceeds the total bed supply, people will logically opt out of walking the Camino altogether if they cannot find places to sleep. This will be a ways off, but it can happen.

This is economics 101. But, all said, there is another variable affecting this equation...demographic shift...

As the overall popularity of the Camino de Santiago spreads, and as more commercial entities see it as a product or service to market, we will see a concomitant growth in the number of older persons who have the time and economic means to devote to more casual, assisted Camino.

What these mature pilgrims may not have is the stamina and physical capacity to handle longer distances. This could be for any number of valid reasons, none of which makes their Camino effort any less worthy.

This will only add to the bed / night demand. On the bright side of this variable, most if not all of these commercial pilgrims will likely opt for commercial reserved lodging, in place of albergues. However, THAT is to the detriment of pilgrims like me, who voluntarily opt to stay in hostals, hotels, and casa rurals.

I hope this helps.
 

SYates

Camino Fossil AD 1999
Camino(s) past & future
First: Camino Francés 1999
...
Last: Camino Inglés 2018

Now: http://egeria.house/
#25
I think they mean over the course of the whole journey: if I walk 100km over 5 days I need half the number of bed nights as someone walking 100km over 10 days. So come on, chop chop everybody!
That makes sense, thank you, but unfortunately not all of us can 'chop,chop,chop' the kilometers. Buen Camino whatever your daily distance is, SY
 
Camino(s) past & future
April (2015) SJPdP to SdC; Porto to SdC April (2016)
#26
When there are simply too many people everything everyone does will start to annoy you. Did they walk too far? Or not far enough? Too fast or too slow? Bring too much luggage or not enough? Get up early and beat you to it, or get up late and walk a lazy short day? How dare they!

If you put too many mice in a cage they start eating each other.
As a citizen of London for decades, friends and I would often complain (good-naturedly) about the overcrowding in the city centre created by the massive influx of tourists and their tendency to stroll apparently aimlessly along main thoroughfares such as Oxford Street. The usual suggestion:p to the problem was I recall for the city authorities to create slow and fast lanes on the pedestrian pavements, with priority given to residents to use the fast lanes as they knew where thy were headed and wanted to get there quickly, not be obstructed by window-shopping, ice-cream/burger eating tourists ambling in a group. It was ever thus!:D
 

BéChuille

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2017)
#27
Well, I probably should have checked on this thread sooner! We're actually home now, hopefully I'll get enough leave from work next year to get from Burgos to Santiago...

As for the bed blocking, I think everyone's camino is their own. We walked 20-25km a day with the odd half day or extra long day, and I would never assume I deserved a bed more than someone who walked less.

Being mindful of others is all part of the experience, and judging them on how far they get each day turns it into some sort of ridiculous competition.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk The French route starting September 9, 2017
#28
We're in Logrono and I just sat in a cafeteria beside two pilgrims who spent their entire meal (at 3:30pm) trying to find a place to sleep tonight. They called every place in Logrono, two town ahead and two towns behind - everything was full. They left practically in tears. I have no idea about all the philosophical stuff discussed above. All I know is that the French Camino has been full to overflowing since we left Roncesvalles a week ago. A word to the wise should be sufficient. Buen Camino!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Plan to walk The French route starting September 9, 2017
#29
If you are in Logrono, you probably noticed that today, this Saturday 16 September, is the start of the San Mateo festival which lasts for 8 days until 23 September this year. This significantly increases the demand for rooms in Logrono. Plus, in general, the first two weeks of September were high volume pilgrims periods during the past few years in the first sections of the Camino Frances, and this year seems to confirm this trend.
Actually we are in Navarrete...I got confused
 

OLDER threads on this topic



A few items available from the Camino Forum Store



Pilgrims here right now

Advertisement

Most read today

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 8 1.1%
  • February

    Votes: 4 0.6%
  • March

    Votes: 32 4.6%
  • April

    Votes: 106 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 172 24.6%
  • June

    Votes: 51 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 14 2.0%
  • August

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • September

    Votes: 203 29.0%
  • October

    Votes: 85 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 10 1.4%
  • December

    Votes: 5 0.7%
Top