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Camino Arles

isnardj

New Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances
Here everyone
Newbie to the Camino community 🙏🏼

Where can I get hold of an English edition guide for the Camino Arles ?? Any assistance is totally appreciated.

Cheers
 
Down bag (90/10 duvet) of 700 fills with 180 g (6.34 ounces) of filling. Mummy-shaped structure, ideal when you are looking for lightness with great heating performance.

€149,-
isnardji,

Welcome to the forum!
While you search for an English guidebook you might enjoy reading this this earlier thread by a fellow forum member re walking the Arles camino.

This comprehensive CSJ web should also be most helpful.

Happy reading and planning.
 
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Ideal sleeping bag liner whether we want to add a thermal plus to our bag, or if we want to use it alone to sleep in shelters or hostels. Thanks to its mummy shape, it adapts perfectly to our body.

€46,-
For the Arles route we had to resort to a bicycle guide for distances and accommodation. But that was in 2011!
 
Technical backpack for day trips with backpack cover and internal compartment for the hydration bladder. Ideal daypack for excursions where we need a medium capacity backpack. The back with Air Flow System creates large air channels that will keep our back as cool as possible.

€83,-
Here everyone
Newbie to the Camino community 🙏🏼

Where can I get hold of an English edition guide for the Camino Arles ?? Any assistance is totally appreciated.

Cheers
I just finished the Arles away a few weeks ago. I relied on the Gronze website (which, as others have said, Chrome will translate for you) and Miam Miam Dodo, which is pretty easy to follow even if you don't speak French. Gronze is great for letting you quickly see the distances between places and what lodging there is - including some which aren't listed in Miam. Miam gives you lots of info about lodging as well as things like grocery stores, restaurants, bakeries, water fountains, etc. It also gives you profiles of trail elevations with better indications of difficulty than Gronze. You can get it as a hard copy or download it to your phone.
 
The CSJ guide is goodbut you will also need the Miam-Miam-Dodo Guide. This is in French but is very simple and mostly icon driven so I defy anyone tobe incapable of understanding it; it has information for each village and town covering accommodation/cafés/restaurants/shops & supermarkets/buses/trains/potable water........you get the idea and it also has basic maps. I met a guy who was walking the Arles and it was his only guide book.
Ultreïa!
 
I just finished the Arles away a few weeks ago. I relied on the Gronze website (which, as others have said, Chrome will translate for you) and Miam Miam Dodo, which is pretty easy to follow even if you don't speak French. Gronze is great for letting you quickly see the distances between places and what lodging there is - including some which aren't listed in Miam. Miam gives you lots of info about lodging as well as things like grocery stores, restaurants, bakeries, water fountains, etc. It also gives you profiles of trail elevations with better indications of difficulty than Gronze. You can get it as a hard copy or download it to your phone.
Hi Howie, I am thinking of doing this route this May and June. Do you have any pointers?
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Hi Howie, I am thinking of doing this route this May and June. Do you have any pointers?
Suzanne, I suggest that you take the Petit Rhône variant out of Arles, and take a bus/tram in and out of Montpelier to avoid excessive suburban walking. I also took a train out of Toulouse to Pibrac and started walking from there for the same reason. I broke up the walk in the Parc Regional du Haut Languedoc by walking off-trail near the Col de Serviès to a gîte in Avène.

 
Suzanne, I suggest that you take the Petit Rhône variant out of Arles, and take a bus/tram in and out of Montpelier to avoid excessive suburban walking. I also took a train out of Toulouse to Pibrac and started walking from there for the same reason. I broke up the walk in the Parc Regional du Haut Languedoc by walking off-trail near the Col de Serviès to a gîte in Avène.

Hi Pam, thanks for the tips, do you happen to have your itinerary ?
 
isnardji,

Welcome to the forum!
While you search for an English guidebook you might enjoy reading this this earlier thread by a fellow forum member re walking the Arles camino.

This comprehensive CSJ web should also be most helpful.

Happy reading and planning.
Salut, @mspath and tout le monde! I just stumbled across your referencing my earlier thread about my Chemin d'Arles/Via Tolosana pilgrimage in 2022. I feel quite happy and energised to be referenced! And promptly read through all my entries, and that has stirred up all sorts of emotions and longings. I notice I stopped writing after Beziers, but I assure you all that my journey continued as planned, right up until June 10th when Olivier drove me from Toulon back to Nice Aeroport for my flights back to Adelaide.
The remainder of 2022 and the beginning of 2023 have been challenging but I have not stopped planning for a return to France and to the Chemin, perhaps in 2024 (avoiding les jeux Olympiques but including a reverent visit to Notre Dame when she is re-opened).
Meanwhile, Jacques is reportedly doing well (I had an email from him in December) as he prepares for his 101st birthday in April. I continue in contact with a treasured group of women met en chemin last year - we call ourselves "les arlesiennes" and we communicate via Whatsapp.
And, I am looking forward to attending the 2nd National Conference of the Australian Friends of the Camino, later this week. I know I will be seeing some of the Forum members who cheered me on and encouraged me last year (see my thread). I thank them and all of you who responded. Life-changing.
 
Join the Camino Cleanup in May from Ponferrada to Sarria. Registration closes Mar 22.
Hi Pam, thanks for the tips, do you happen to have your itinerary ?
Suzanne, I'll have to check, but I walked over a 3-year period [pre and post-Covid] and relied heavily on Gronze [great for planning], Miam Miam Dodo and a little booklet from Webcompostella that I picked up at the pilgrim welcome in Arles, the Guide des Haltes https://www.webcompostella.com/preparation/guide-des-haltes/ I also had the Lepère guide [in French only] but ditched it early on as I found it busy looking, occasionally dated, and confusing. I am older [early 70s] and prefer to walk shorter distances when possible, particularly if the terrain is challenging. Parts of the Parc naturel régional du Haut-Languedoc were just that. I normally stayed in gîtes d'étape and, occasionally chez l'habitant when I couldn't find anything. Occasionally when I would call to reserve I would be told that something was closed/not available and would then ask for suggestions. I frequently depended on my current hosts for advice regarding the upcoming stage--was there lodging, a grocery store, etc. as all written documentation tends to lag.
 
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Yes, we heavily relied on our hosts to suggest the next night's accommodation - and often they were kind enough to ring through for us.

This is a route we walked in part - for much of the time we walked off the route because there was something else we wanted to do. For example we walked a long way on the Canal du Midi.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
We walked the Arles / Aragones Way departing Arles on 1 April 2016. We stayed in some charming gites along the way. I recall that we phoned ahead each day to make sure there were beds for us and, of course, a place at the dinner table - French way. My husband is French so language was no problem. But the hosts were all very friendly and welcoming and I'm sure would ring ahead, as others have reported.

It's a lovely path. I don't know why it's not more popular - but, on the other hand, it's wonderful to have some quieter paths to choose from.

I recommend a day or two in Arles before you begin. It's fabulous town with its strong connections to the Chemin, Roman history and Van Gogh. Quite a combination.

If interested, I'm happy to send a link to my blog from that walk which details our stages etc. Just send me a PM

Bon chemin.
 

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