A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

See the full Camino Forum Store here with many more camino products.

Camino Francigena Questions

Sunny Fitgirl

Fast Little Canadian
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May/June 2017)
Camino Norte (May/June 2018)
Hi! I am planning on doing the Tuscany section of the Camino Francigena in May from Lucca to Siena then on to Lisbon to do the Camino de Santiago Portugeuse in June. I have done the Francis and Norte Routes. I was wondering approximately how many pilgrims might I expect to be walking with/meeting each day. Also, what kind of (albergues (not sure what they are called in Italy)) accommodations are there for pilgrims on that route? I read perhaps you sleep on the floor in churches, convents, etc ? I am walking solo and don't always want to be in the middle of nowhere by myself. Also, how difficult is it compared to the above mentioned Caminos? I am very fit but just wondering. I have a very little but very heavy backpack. I found both other Caminos fine. Thanks.
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!
First point: It is the Via Francigena, not the Camino Francigena ;) While you will not find the hundreds of pilgrims that you would see on the Camino Frances every day you are unlikely to be alone for long unless you choose to be. Especially at night in the pilgrim ostellos. Hard to estimate exactly how many but tens rather than hundreds I would expect. Between Lucca and Siena I never had to sleep on a floor - all the ostellos I used had bunk beds, though I did choose to stay in a youth hostel on the edge of Siena. The stretch from Lucca to Siena is beautiful with a lot of gently rolling hills with only a couple of short steep sections like the climb to San Miniato which is over in a few minutes. Nothing like the mountain stages of the Camino Frances (or what I have heard of the Norte). If you want mountains on the VF they are all north of Lucca.
 

Harington

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vézelay/Francés 2011, Primitivo 2012, VdlP 2013, Via Domitia 2014, Inglés 2015, Francigena 2016
First point: It is the Via Francigena, not the Camino Francigena ;) While you will not find the hundreds of pilgrims that you would see on the Camino Frances every day you are unlikely to be alone for long unless you choose to be. Especially at night in the pilgrim ostellos. Hard to estimate exactly how many but tens rather than hundreds I would expect. Between Lucca and Siena I never had to sleep on a floor - all the ostellos I used had bunk beds, though I did choose to stay in a youth hostel on the edge of Siena. The stretch from Lucca to Siena is beautiful with a lot of gently rolling hills with only a couple of short steep sections like the climb to San Miniato which is over in a few minutes. Nothing like the mountain stages of the Camino Frances (or what I have heard of the Norte). If you want mountains on the VF they are all north of Lucca.
You can find a list of hostel accommodation here https://www.viefrancigene.org/it/resource/blog/Webmaster/accoglienza-pellegrina-e-turistica/
 

Kirby852

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances in Sept. 2016, Finisterre 2016, Portuguese 2018, Le Puy 2019
Hi! I am planning on doing the Tuscany section of the Camino Francigena in May from Lucca to Siena then on to Lisbon to do the Camino de Santiago Portugeuse in June. I have done the Francis and Norte Routes. I was wondering approximately how many pilgrims might I expect to be walking with/meeting each day. Also, what kind of (albergues (not sure what they are called in Italy)) accommodations are there for pilgrims on that route? I read perhaps you sleep on the floor in churches, convents, etc ? I am walking solo and don't always want to be in the middle of nowhere by myself. Also, how difficult is it compared to the above mentioned Caminos? I am very fit but just wondering. I have a very little but very heavy backpack. I found both other Caminos fine. Thanks.
Sunny, I sent you a private note but also meant to tell you, there is a Via Francigena Facebook page that you might find helpful. Lots of great folks and information there as well as here. Hope to see you on the path. Buen Camino!
 

Sunny Fitgirl

Fast Little Canadian
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May/June 2017)
Camino Norte (May/June 2018)
First point: It is the Via Francigena, not the Camino Francigena ;) While you will not find the hundreds of pilgrims that you would see on the Camino Frances every day you are unlikely to be alone for long unless you choose to be. Especially at night in the pilgrim ostellos. Hard to estimate exactly how many but tens rather than hundreds I would expect. Between Lucca and Siena I never had to sleep on a floor - all the ostellos I used had bunk beds, though I did choose to stay in a youth hostel on the edge of Siena. The stretch from Lucca to Siena is beautiful with a lot of gently rolling hills with only a couple of short steep sections like the climb to San Miniato which is over in a few minutes. Nothing like the mountain stages of the Camino Frances (or what I have heard of the Norte). If you want mountains on the VF they are all north of Lucca.

Jeff,

Thanks so much for that info and the corrections. :)

Carla
 

Sunny Fitgirl

Fast Little Canadian
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (May/June 2017)
Camino Norte (May/June 2018)

Jbirk

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, SJPP to Finesterre April (2018)
Via Francigena Sept (2018)
Del Norte Aug (2019)
From Lucca to Rome in October 2018 we met less than 20 pilgrims in 3 weeks
 

celinehenriette

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Zwolle - Rome 2013
Jacobsweg Austria 2018
Camino Frances 2018
Camino Portugues 2018
Finisterre 2018
From Lucca to Rome in October 2018 we met less than 20 pilgrims in 3 weeks
I met 7 pilgrims in 3 months on the via Francigena in 2013..
 

Stripey Socks

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances '13, Via de la Plata '14, Portuguese '16, Via Francigena - Italy '18, Madrid Combo'20
Hi there. I walked solo from Great Saint Bernard Pass to Rome in Aug/Sept last year. I had MANY days were I spoke to no one except the person who was at the ostello at night. You must enjoy your own company to walk the Via. It is very beautiful and the Tuscan section is extra special. I never slept on the floor and always had a bed and a shower at every convent/ostello I stayed at. They are often simple and spartan, but the welcome is always warm. Enjoy, Mel
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Most downloaded Resources

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store

Casa Ivar Newsletter






Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 54 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 196 15.1%
  • May

    Votes: 323 24.9%
  • June

    Votes: 94 7.2%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 373 28.7%
  • October

    Votes: 157 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock