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Continuing to Muxia or Finisterra

jennifer2012

New Member
I am hoping to do the Camino Frances next September and want to go all the way from Santiago de
Compostela to Muxia or Finisterra. There seems to be little information about the distance and conditions along the way. Can anyone give me info about the route and compare Muxia to Finisterra?
Somehow it seems important to me to go all the way to the Ocean. Jennifer
 
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tyrrek

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
SJPP-SdC (4-5/2011), Ferrol-SdC (9/2011), Pamplona-SdC (3-4/2012), Camino Finisterre (10/2012), Ourense-SdC (5/2014)
Hi Jennifer

Have you looked through the separate thread on the Finisterre route? I'm sure you'll find much of what you need here. santiago-to-finisterre-and-muxia/

You certainly won't be alone with the feeling that you need to get to the ocean. I didn't feel it myself but I met plenty of people who did!

Buen Camino!

Keith
 

windswept

Windswept
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2011) Camino Portuguese (2014) Camino del la Plata 2015
Hi Jennifer

I walked the camino last September and with time to spare before returning home walked to the coast. I felt the camino ended when I stood in front of the alter in Santiago cathedral and the ensuing walk was merely like licking my fingers after eating the cake. Do it if you have the time but don't get too hung up about it.

This year I will be walking the Gorges of the Verdon in Provence but the camino has left a deep imprint on my spirit and I think about it regularly. I am not in any way religeous and in fact walked the route to raise money for a charity I support. However, the camino has more to teach me, I think, and I will do the walk again one day. I will be thinking of you on your journey in September with a great deal of envy.

Enjoy yourself, don't get too hung up about Muxia, make Santiago your goal and make your decision about the coast when you get to the cathedral. You will see things from a different perspective then.

You will no doubt have read much about the walk and I humbly throw in my five penny worth at

http://www.justgiving.com/thepilgrim

Buen Camino

Roger
 

jennifer2012

New Member
windswept said:
Hi Jennifer

I walked the camino last September and with time to spare before returning home walked to the coast. I felt the camino ended when I stood in front of the alter in Santiago cathedral and the ensuing walk was merely like licking my fingers after eating the cake. Do it if you have the time but don't get too hung up about it.

This year I will be walking the Gorges of the Verdon in Provence but the camino has left a deep imprint on my spirit and I think about it regularly. I am not in any way religeous and in fact walked the route to raise money for a charity I support. However, the camino has more to teach me, I think, and I will do the walk again one day. I will be thinking of you on your journey in September with a great deal of envy.

Enjoy yourself, don't get too hung up about Muxia, make Santiago your goal and make your decision about the coast when you get to the cathedral. You will see things from a different perspective then.

Roger, thanks for the advice and many happy thoughts for your trip in the Gorges of Verdon, it sounds wonderful. I am pretty flexible, and have no fixed plans for the El Camino. I have done many spiritual practices and have found they evolve as they will, better without too much planning. I would like to see the ocean though, and may bus it after Santiago. I am going to start the Camino
August 31st and that is about all I know! If you like such walks you should try the American southwest, as the Navajo say, beauty before you, beauty behind you, beauty to the left of you, beauty to the right of you, beauty above you, and beauty below you...may you walk in beauty. Jenny

You will no doubt have read much about the walk and I humbly throw in my five penny worth at

http://www.justgiving.com/thepilgrim

Buen Camino

Roger
 

jennifer2012

New Member
tyrrek said:
Hi Jennifer

Have you looked through the separate thread on the Finisterre route? I'm sure you'll find much of what you need here. santiago-to-finisterre-and-muxia/

You certainly won't be alone with the feeling that you need to get to the ocean. I didn't feel it myself but I met plenty of people who did!

Buen Camino!

Keith
Keith, thanks for the tip, it is a very helpful link. I won't know if I am going for sure (maybe by bus!
who knows) until I get to Santiago, but I wanted to be prepared. Thanks, jenny
 
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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
I felt the camino ended when I stood in front of the alter in Santiago cathedral and the ensuing walk was merely like licking my fingers after eating the cake. Do it if you have the time but don't get too hung up about it.

Vive la différence!! The walk to Fistera, and the very last stele with the 0.00km mark was a psychological, physical and spiritual ending for me. It is a lovely route - one that I would walk every year if I could.
 

anthonyjt

New Member
I walked to Finisterre (via Muxia) basically because it seemed like a good idea at the time! I walked to Finisterre via Muxia which is slightly different to what most people did - walking from Muxia to Finisterre (although seemingly more logical to me) is actually the opposite direction to that which most people take. My abiding memory from this route was being given apples and then grapes by firendly locals along the way!

The distances between albergues are further, and the way marking not as obvious as the route to Santiago. There are also fewer people on the trail (far fewer compared to the last 100km before Santiago). Off the top of my head I'd say it's about another 100km to Finisterre (via Muxia) which takes about 4 - 5 days depending on how far / fast you like to walk. Of course, if you take the bus to Muxia / Finisterre it's a lot quicker. That said, the Xunta (Galaican government) albergue in Finisterre won't let you stay unless you walked there.

The sunset at Finisterre - along with the 0.00km (to go) waymaker - is definitely something not to be missed.
 

Thornley

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances x 2 , Norte x 2 , Le Puy x 3 , Portuguese x 2,
Mont St Michel , Primitivo .
Hi Jennifer,

We walked last year to Muxia and it was beautiful.
We had on four previous caminos [ Francis , Norte and Portuguese ] continued onto Finasterre.

However the walk into Muxia , staying in the new alberque in Dumbria made this way very enjoyable.
The spanish regard Muxia as the spiritual end , it is a special place or them and we found the area lovely. We were directed to lovely secluded coves and beaches and the the rest was lovely.
The camino from Le Puy was lonely at the start and lonely at the finish from Dumbria .
It is a must way from our point of view and i suggest you walk.
If you arrive by bus you will feel just this little difference to those pilgrims who walk in , and the walk is really a wonderful experience after Sarria onwards .
You will know when in Santiago what to do but you will be surprised by how many continue.
Enjoy but allow for the walk.
if you don't enjoy Santiago , its lovely .
D
 

JohnnieWalker

Nunca se camina solo
The spanish regard Muxia as the spiritual end D

Well, at least some of the folk in Muxia claim it is the spiritual end!

Is it preposterous to assume that the Camino de Santiago de Compostela ends in Santiago de Compostela? And anything thereafter is a bonus but not part of the Camino TO Santiago. :) Surely the 00.00 kms marker refers to the end of the route Finisterre from Santiago. Many people then go on to Muxia.

I think the route to Finisterre and Muxia is really beautiful and the extra day to reach Muxia is well worth it.
 

jennifer2012

New Member
Thornley said:
Hi Jennifer,

We walked last year to Muxia and it was beautiful.
We had on four previous caminos [ Francis , Norte and Portuguese ] continued onto Finasterre.

However the walk into Muxia , staying in the new alberque in Dumbria made this way very enjoyable.
The spanish regard Muxia as the spiritual end , it is a special place or them and we found the area lovely. We were directed to lovely secluded coves and beaches and the the rest was lovely.
The camino from Le Puy was lonely at the start and lonely at the finish from Dumbria .
It is a must way from our point of view and i suggest you walk.
If you arrive by bus you will feel just this little difference to those pilgrims who walk in , and the walk is really a wonderful experience after Sarria onwards .
You will know when in Santiago what to do but you will be surprised by how many continue.
Enjoy but allow for the walk.
if you don't enjoy Santiago , its lovely .

It sounds wonderful and I agree with JohnnyWalker that the end must be the ocean. I will no doubt walk the whole way but I never know. I wish it was closer, I feel ready to start now (my pudgy body my disagree....) Jenny


It all sounds wonderful. I prefer quiet and walking is very soothing to me (I may feel different after walking 600 miles but I doubt it.)
D
 
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Kennedy1

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - May & June 2013
Camino Finisterre and Camino Muxia - June 2013
Hi Jennifer. I will be starting my Camino in Sept. as well. I also plan on continuing to Muxia and possibly Finisterre depending on time. I live on the east coast of Canada next to the ocean. It will be very rewarding to see the ocean after walking for about six weeks and not feeling the salty sea breeze.

Kennedy
 

Kialoa3

Active Member
Hi Jennifer,

Last winter my wife and I walked from St. Jean to Muxia. The walk into Santiago was a huge emotional rush, but truthfully somehow the journey felt incomplete. After spending a few days in Santiago the urge to carry on to the coast was irresistible, so off we went. The sense of being underway, once again, on the Camino was pure bliss. The walk out to Finisterre is staged to typically take three days from Santiago, but we took four, and that worked out fine for us as the last day we were able to walk out to the Faro and then back into town to the albergue, and still arrive at a reasonable hour. That then allowed us to set out the next morning directly to Muxia which is a good days walk (about 32Km as I recall). If you try to reach Finisterre in three days, and want to go out to the Faro the same day, that makes for a long final day (certainly doable but long). If you don't go to the Faro upon arrival and decide to do it the day you are heading off to Muxia then that day becomes quite long. In short, I highly recommend both the route out to Finisterre and the extra day up to Muxia.
 

BoldenMD

Member
I plan to start Aug. 26 so I'll be on the road in September as well. I'll see how I feel when I get to Santiago, but ever since I've thought about doing this I've felt drawn to go to Fisterra. We may all end up there around the same time.
 

jemitch65

Rather than love, money or fame, give me truth
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances to Finisterre to Muxia(2012)
Hello Jennifer. I walked the Camino Frances from SJPDP to Santiago then on to Finisterra and ending in Muxia. I left St. Jean on May 23 and arrived in Muxia on June 27. As special as the Camino Frances was to me, the three day walk to Finisterra and one day walk to Muxia were most special because I walked them alone for personal reasons of putting my Camino experience into some perspective prior to coming home. When you walk the Camino you will meet many great people along the way. I called the five people I walked with my camino family and there were at least another dozen or so extended family members who were special also and to whom I will be in contact with for many years to come. After Santiago, many of my camino family went home but there were several who continued on. I used this time for me and walked it alone. I cannot put that experience into any coherant language right now except to say that when I look back on my camino, the images of the first day, my arrival in Santiago and the pilgrim's Mass and those last 4 days to Finisterra and Muxia mean the most to me. I think if you do walk to Finisterra and Muxia, you will not be disappointed.
 

Priscila schreiner

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
From Leon to Santiago/Fisterra - 05/2013
Hi everyone...I was with the same doubt of jennifer about endind the Camino in Finisterra and Muxia (i ll start from Leon on 18.05), and at least by now, I am in the mood to stay somedays at Compostela, where I intend to arrive 30/31.05 and go to Finisterra on june, the 3rd/4th.
If someone is going to be there and wanna exchage ideas or experiences just let me know. Well I feel like the Camino will tell me what doing when I arrive Compostela...
By the way it is my first time doing the Camino and I ll "celebrate" my 40 anniversary there and I am very honored in partipating to this Forum and learn and change experience and energy with so many experienced and first time (as me) pilgrims.
Thanks for this Splendid Forum!
Best regards and buen camino!
 
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