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Don't put off going back to Camino - count your remaining weeks!

David

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
First one in 2005 from Moissac, France.
Hi all - this is really for us older ones .... and those who may be putting off their Camino - don't! and here is why ... 😂

80 is the average death age in the UK - balances out from those who die younger and those who die much older -

If a person lives until their 80th birthday they have 4,170 weeks to spend before the sands run out.

Now, this sounds like a lot of weeks ... but ... if you are sixty-five? Well, you have just 782 weeks left out of your 4,170. (Where did they go???).

So maybe don't put off your Camino?

If you are 75, like me, you have a mere 260 weeks left!! o_O Just 260 weeks! Out of your 4,170

(mind you, I intend to live healthily until at least 98 so this number doesn't really affect me ;)).

Thing is - arithmetic and jokes aside it really shows that we need to grasp the time we have - so maybe don't dream about a future year to go - get out there on Camino!
 
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A side fact to consider: The average life expectancy takes into account all demises, including those not falling under what is commonly called "old age". So the statistic changes for people that have already "managed to survive" for some time.
I would guess that many countries do track statistics for this, but my english skill have boundries and i only looked up the one for Germany real quick as an example:
A 0-year male currently has a life expectancy of 78,33 years
A 80-year male currently has a (remaining) life expectancy of 7,97 years

So pretty much the older you get the higher your total life expectancy. But it's a statistic. I guess none of us really knows how much time we got left so i absolutely agree on the point of making every day count.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
A side fact to consider: The average life expectancy takes into account all demises, including those not falling under what is commonly called "old age". So the statistic changes for people that have already "managed to survive" for some time.
I would guess that many countries do track statistics for this, but my english skill have boundries and i only looked up the one for Germany real quick as an example:
A 0-year male currently has a life expectancy of 78,33 years
A 80-year male currently has a (remaining) life expectancy of 7,97 years

So pretty much the older you get the higher your total life expectancy. But it's a statistic. I guess none of us really knows how much time we got left so i absolutely agree on the point of making every day count.
And @David should take some heart from this. The average life expectancy for a 75 year old male in the UK is 87 years. On average, he would have another 12 years or 624 weeks. (source: https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopula.../articles/lifeexpectancycalculator/2019-06-07)

ps As we get older, we can expect to get even older. So if @David did reach 87, his life expectancy would be 92, another five years!
 
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I'm 60. My first wife died of cancer a couple of years ago. She was sick for years and couldn't do much for a long time. The lessons I learned from caring for her, from being by her side through her hospice and death.

The good Lord blessed me with a fantastic woman to partner with and make my wife. We married a week ago. When we were dating we planed a 2024 trip "out West" (USA). One day we were talking about bucket list things and I said that walking the Camino was at the top of my list. About three days later she said "Let's go!" So, we're going in May - July. This coming May.

Life is not what I thought it was and maybe I still don't have a clue. I sat with my wife of 37 years as she breathed her last. I do know this, it goes by really fast.

My perspective changed. One of the biggest lessons I learned is that we avoid what we think is risk because we want things to stay good and for that normal to last. Of course, we define what all of this means and we have to calculate in, the inherent neurosis of being a human. The truth is, there's not much to lose. We will surely die, and relatively soon. Go for it and go now.

I had a PT (physical training) instructor in the military that once waxed philosophical. I have tried to live by his words. He said that as men age (maybe women too) we seek comfort. We tend to want controlled temperatures and a soft place to sit down and get fat. His was advice wasn't to avoid doing these things. He said: "Seek the pain". Get down in the floor, exercise, push. Actively avoid comfort on the regular.

My wife is like me, even more so maybe. We love to hike, kayak, go to the gym, do yoga, etc.. I am soooo lucky. She says we're blessed.

As I sat with my first wife, after she could no longer talk, I could quietly review our last four decades together. I could sort of, die with her. When we are at that place we can't change anything. What happened, happened, what we are, we are.. The life we lived is over as we sit with this unable to affect anything.

Life is a gift to be lived in generosity and kindness, to self and others. Safety isn't a thing outside of being mindful. If there's something you need to say or do, make a plan and get on with it.

I know that I need this pilgrimage, at least I think I do. All that I can change is in me. And, that's bloody hard enough.
 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I'm 60. My first wife died of cancer a couple of years ago. She was sick for years and couldn't do much for a long time. The lessons I learned from caring for her, from being by her side through her hospice and death.

The good Lord blessed me with a fantastic woman to partner with and make my wife. We married a week ago. When we were dating we planed a 2024 trip "out West" (USA). One day we were talking about bucket list things and I said that walking the Camino was at the top of my list. About three days later she said "Let's go!" So, we're going in May - July. This coming May.

Life is not what I thought it was and maybe I still don't have a clue. I sat with my wife of 37 years as she breathed her last. I do know this, it goes by really fast.

My perspective changed. One of the biggest lessons I learned is that we avoid what we think is risk because we want things to stay good and for that normal to last. Of course, we define what all of this means and we have to calculate in, the inherent neurosis of being a human. The truth is, there's not much to lose. We will surely die, and relatively soon. Go for it and go now.

I had a PT (physical training) instructor in the military that once waxed philosophical. I have tried to live by his words. He said that as men age (maybe women too) we seek comfort. We tend to want controlled temperatures and a soft place to sit down and get fat. His was advice wasn't to avoid doing these things. He said: "Seek the pain". Get down in the floor, exercise, push. Actively avoid comfort on the regular.

My wife is like me, even more so maybe. We love to hike, kayak, go to the gym, do yoga, etc.. I am soooo lucky. She says we're blessed.

As I sat with my first wife, after she could no longer talk, I could quietly review our last four decades together. I could sort of, die with her. When we are at that place we can't change anything. What happened, happened, what we are, we are.. The life we lived is over as we sit with this unable to affect anything.

Life is a gift to be lived in generosity and kindness, to self and others. Safety isn't a thing outside of being mindful. If there's something you need to say or do, make a plan and get on with it.

I know that I need this pilgrimage, at least I think I do. All that I can change is in me. And, that's bloody hard enough.
Thank you for sharing. Buen camino
 
Having watched my biological grandmother die from Alzheimer’s, I would say,
"Go. Before your mind does."

Or, as I recently told a priest who told me that the Camino was on his "bucket list," but that he didn't have time...

"That bucket may be closer than you think."
As a Danish poet once said, over a new grave:

"So, this was where you were going, you hasty one".
 
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I'm 60. My first wife died of cancer a couple of years ago. She was sick for years and couldn't do much for a long time. The lessons I learned from caring for her, from being by her side through her hospice and death.

The good Lord blessed me with a fantastic woman to partner with and make my wife. We married a week ago. When we were dating we planed a 2024 trip "out West" (USA). One day we were talking about bucket list things and I said that walking the Camino was at the top of my list. About three days later she said "Let's go!" So, we're going in May - July. This coming May.

Life is not what I thought it was and maybe I still don't have a clue. I sat with my wife of 37 years as she breathed her last. I do know this, it goes by really fast.

My perspective changed. One of the biggest lessons I learned is that we avoid what we think is risk because we want things to stay good and for that normal to last. Of course, we define what all of this means and we have to calculate in, the inherent neurosis of being a human. The truth is, there's not much to lose. We will surely die, and relatively soon. Go for it and go now.

I had a PT (physical training) instructor in the military that once waxed philosophical. I have tried to live by his words. He said that as men age (maybe women too) we seek comfort. We tend to want controlled temperatures and a soft place to sit down and get fat. His was advice wasn't to avoid doing these things. He said: "Seek the pain". Get down in the floor, exercise, push. Actively avoid comfort on the regular.

My wife is like me, even more so maybe. We love to hike, kayak, go to the gym, do yoga, etc.. I am soooo lucky. She says we're blessed.

As I sat with my first wife, after she could no longer talk, I could quietly review our last four decades together. I could sort of, die with her. When we are at that place we can't change anything. What happened, happened, what we are, we are.. The life we lived is over as we sit with this unable to affect anything.

Life is a gift to be lived in generosity and kindness, to self and others. Safety isn't a thing outside of being mindful. If there's something you need to say or do, make a plan and get on with it.

I know that I need this pilgrimage, at least I think I do. All that I can change is in me. And, that's bloody hard enough.
I’m sorry for your loss, and happy for your new chapter. THANK YOU for the sage advice. I agree completely. And WOW, just wait for the magic of the Camino. You’ll never be the same! I’m so happy you’re going! Buen Camino!
“Life is what happens, while we’re busy making other plans.”
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I was out to dinner with some young friends last night ( we all met at a course last year). As one of them very kindly pointed out there is a 'generational difference'. She asked that if after all of my travels and life experiences I had any advice. Initially I said no and said we all have to live our own lives, based on who we are, where we are and who we're with.

Upon reflection, I asked them if they had a bucket list. And if no list, at least one item/ place they really wanted to do, see, visit etc. All did. I then strongly suggested that they start planning to tick that item off as soon as reasonably practical, because life is simply too short, and you just never know when that bus is coming around the corner with your number on it.

Carpe Diem.
 
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There have been some cracking posts on here!

I put it up as a joke really - who actually counts down their weeks???? But it is true - we must be kind now, we have to end enmity now, make good with those we have fallen out with, apologise where that is needed - oh, and go on Camino as soon as .. preferably a pilgrimage for me rather than a tourist hike (my opinion) ..

The 15thC German-Dutch monk (a Canon) Thomas A Kempis, in his The Imitation of Christ wrote about this (shortened for this post)

"Tomorrow is an uncertain day; how do you know you will have a tomorrow?
If you have ever seen a man die, remember that you, too, must go the same way. In the morning consider that you may not live till evening, and when evening comes do not dare to promise yourself the dawn.
Be always ready, therefore, and so live that death will never take you unprepared.

Many die suddenly and unexpectedly. When that last moment arrives you will begin to have a quite different opinion of the life that is now entirely past and you will regret very much that you were so careless and remiss.

Ah, foolish man, why do you plan to live long when you are not sure of living even a day? How many have been deceived and suddenly snatched away! How often have you heard of persons being killed by drownings, by fatal falls from high places, of persons dying at meals, at play, in fires, by the sword, in pestilence, or at the hands of robbers! Death is the end of everyone and the life of man quickly passes away like a shadow.

Who will remember you when you are dead? Who will pray for you? Do now, beloved, what you can, because you do not know when you will die, nor what your fate will be after death.


Keep yourself as a stranger here on earth, a pilgrim whom its affairs do not concern at all."

I don't know how many weeks he had left when he wrote that but he lived to over 90 and published that book in his 40s ..... so quite a few ....

By the way - his The Imitation of Christ, a small pocket sized book is THE book to take if you are going on deep pilgrimage - but whether you are or not - go to Camino!! ;)
 
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My gran told me “walk, that’s what we do”. She was really referring to the itinerant life she had led as a child and as a mother. And, I think, to the continuous westward migration of my ancestors over centuries lost to memory. There is a tendency in the permanent migrant to adopt, at least adapt to, the culture in which they find themselves. Sunday School was on my strict list. Pilgrimage to Muxia and the broken boat was something from another time. Pilgrimage to Santiago and the bones of one who may have touched the Divine. That made sense to her too. Pilgrimage to the city of priests and potentates weren’t in her book (sorry Rome) but Assisi was.

I’ve made pilgrimage down that Neolithic motorway (autopista Peregrino) that is The Ridgeway to Avebury and Stoned Henge (😉) and to a few places I can’t name here but @David ’s message, go, walk, that’s what we do. Gran would have gone along with that 😊
 
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Hi all - this is really for us older ones .... and those who may be putting off their Camino - don't! and here is why ... 😂

80 is the average death age in the UK - balances out from those who die younger and those who die much older -

If a person lives until their 80th birthday they have 4,170 weeks to spend before the sands run out.

Now, this sounds like a lot of weeks ... but ... if you are sixty-five? Well, you have just 782 weeks left out of your 4,170. (Where did they go???).

So maybe don't put off your Camino?

If you are 75, like me, you have a mere 260 weeks left!! o_O Just 260 weeks! Out of your 4,170

(mind you, I intend to live healthily until at least 98 so this number doesn't really affect me ;)).

Thing is - arithmetic and jokes aside it really shows that we need to grasp the time we have - so maybe don't dream about a future year to go - get out there on Camino!
@David, you (and anyone else longing for an existential crisis) might enjoy this article: https://waitbutwhy.com/2015/12/the-tail-end.html

Your post (although I’m a long way off that age group) hits close to home. My mother dreamed of walking the Camino for a long time. She passed before she had the chance to retire and fulfil that dream.

So I definitely second your advice - go and do it (whatever that it might be) while you have the chance.
 
@sun is shining , light-hearted as it is that's actually a pretty good article.
I love the breakdown into the number of weeks that we ( potentially ) have left to enjoy. Very much in keeping with the theme of this thread!
If our companion @David61 above is the world's worst procrastinator unfortunately i'm not far behind. (For example I'm typing here on the forum right now when I should be doing an online course.) And yet in other ways as I've posted above I firmly believe in 'Carpe Diem'!!.
I've seen too many people die young - my mother (33) my beloved wife (53), numerous friends (18,18,23,24, 27,32) and acquaintances...... . By some peoples standards I've done and experienced a reasonable amount in my life. But I'm always aware of how many weeks I've wasted....
I'm not about to go and walk on the Camino again this year - not because I'm procrastinating, because it's too bloody wet and cold!
But I have just booked a Hospitalero's course. And I'll be spending at least some of my (stolen course) time on further planning. Starting right now..!
 
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Hi all - this is really for us older ones .... and those who may be putting off their Camino - don't! and here is why ... 😂

80 is the average death age in the UK - balances out from those who die younger and those who die much older -

If a person lives until their 80th birthday they have 4,170 weeks to spend before the sands run out.

Now, this sounds like a lot of weeks ... but ... if you are sixty-five? Well, you have just 782 weeks left out of your 4,170. (Where did they go???).

So maybe don't put off your Camino?

If you are 75, like me, you have a mere 260 weeks left!! o_O Just 260 weeks! Out of your 4,170

(mind you, I intend to live healthily until at least 98 so this number doesn't really affect me ;)).

Thing is - arithmetic and jokes aside it really shows that we need to grasp the time we have - so maybe don't dream about a future year to go - get out there on Camino!
Yes, old NYSE's sand is running low and that's why, after completing the Camino Portuguese from Lisbon in November, I want to go back. You see, I left a part of myself on that trail 👣 and now I want to go back and find it (or relive it).
 
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Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
OMG Im booking my flight to Madrid for a spring 2024 Camino tomorrow!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
As @VNwalking says; do it now! It is a relief each time I have booked my flight, without a refund option: As pilots say: "V1! Rotate!": No possibility of going back... And then there's just planning to do (If you need to: You know how it works now, and how easy it really is to start a Camino).

As retired, I always go without a return ticket. I go back when I go back. Many things can change while walking: Family, health, own death (but then I don't care anymore), mood, etc.

Buen Camino! May be seeing you: I start April 1-2 from Pamplona, God and my better half willing.
 
Apparently I only have around 260 weeks left on this earth.

I went to visit my oldest brother when I was recently on the GC. My brother lives out in the bush in the far north NSW. He has gone a bit feral.

He is a Buddhist and has practised Reiki for about 30 years.

In between Goanna spotting on his back lawn and talking about life I managed to convince him to do a reading for me which ended somewhat abruptly. With some further coaxing he suggested that I only have five years left of my current life.

Without getting too much further into the Religion topic, for obvious reasons, it is worth noting that I am a scientist and I don't take what he said very seriously.

Nevertheless, after thinking about it for a while, I think that there is some merit in considering that I might indeed not have too many more weeks left to play with and so while I am still fit(ish) and (mostly) healthy, I may as well get on with living each day as it comes.

This, in turn, has lightened my approach to life, I am less interested in worrying about what I have not got and more inclined to make use of what I have got and to go out and explore the world around me and to interact with and enjoy the people who I meet when I do this.

Provided other things fall into place I see the possibility of another Camino next year, probably from the south or south east of Spain.

Edit:
I think that my immediate family are having some difficulties adjusting to my new approach, probably not helped by my teasing them about my impending demise. For example, when I mentioned my brother's prediction to my son his first reaction was "May as well go out and enjoy yourself now then". However, when I agreed with him and followed by saying that I planned to sell the house, cash up and move to Spain his lower jaw almost hit the ground.

It was fun for a moment but but I knew that I couldn't keep the joke going and so I laughed and told him that I was joking 😄.

I suspect that Christmas is going to be a little unusual this year.
 
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€46,-
I have decided that as i reach my 70th birthday in a few months; that's enough on the numbers!
Obviously i am aware i will age but i don't need reminding; live life and love every day you have.

As mspath always says Carpe Diem that's all we can do!

I don't need a countdown; cos when the day finally comes you won't know it's arrived!
 

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