A donation to the forum removes ads for you, and supports Ivar in his work running it

Advertisement

Footwear advice

Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
 

NiniSum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances (2012: Leon to SdC) C Finisterre (2012) C Frances (2015: SJPP to Leon) C Inglés (2019)
I have worn Salomon boots and shoes on all of my Camino routes. Salomon X Ultra 3 have both non-goretex and goretex models. I find that they provide me with great support, last quite well, and with my last Camino in the June/July timeframe, the non-waterproof version was perfect.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
Which model of Hoka are you now using? There may be a similar New Balance offering that can offer near the same level of cushioning, depending on the Hoka you use.

Do you need a wider than normal width, or do most regular width shoes fit you ok?
 
I have a hoka one one challenger ATR 3. Perhaps there are more durable models? Fortunately an average width foot, and no other issues. I took your advice last year and used a foot glide, worked so well! Having diabetes, avoiding blisters is really important.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
The Hoka women's Challenger ATR is now a version 5, so it is two generations newer than the ATR 3 you've had the problem with. There were some production quality issues with a run of ATR 3's that were problematic for a small percentage of users. Hoka did allow for replacements, regardless of use, if a failure occurred in that batch of shoes. I do not know if that is even an option at this point, given the time frame from when the ATR 3 were first released.

If you found the ATR was suitable otherwise, than I would recommend trying the newer Challenger ATR v5. I know with the problems you had, that you may wish to avoid them, but, as with all manufacturers, identified issues in quality do get addressed in future productions.

If you have a local shop, ask them if they will work with you if the shoes have a premature breakdown. I do not know what country you live in, but in America, REI carries the shoe and they can be returned up to a year after purchase for ANY reason related to use.

At 500 miles / 800 km your shoe's problem may be within a normal range of wear, but not at 300 km.

A similar Hoka shoe in the level of cushioning and stability is the Hoka Speedgoat v4, but it is built for more rugged terrain so the materials in the sole are different.

The New Balance Women's Fresh Foam Hierro v5 has a cushion level near to the Hoka Challenger ATR and is designed for the same type of use. For those who report that they fit well, they give it high marks in the same performance areas that the Hoka shoes also are meant for.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk.
This doesn't sound normal, and as @davebugg has already noted, there may be reason to think that there might have been production defects. There is the issue of whether you can get this addressed. But more importantly, I suggest it would mean thinking twice about whether to move to another brand of shoe. If Hoka have worked well for you in the past, and you know that they address any underlying issues you have, buying the current version of the same shoe might still be a reasonable option.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016), VDLP (2017), Mozarabe (2018), Vasco/Bayona (2019)
Yay!!! A footwear thread! :D

My comment is not particularly relevant to your questions, but I am keen to encourage this non-COVID thread!

I have been using Brooks Ghost 11s, even though they are not as sturdy and long-lasting as my Salomon boots and shoes were. I accept that compromise because of the comfort of the mesh tops over my ageing toes. They are super comfortable when new but lose some of the underfoot cushioning at some point - I didn't really notice it until after 800 km or so. That is a more reasonable time than your 300 km.
 

K Turner

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
August-October 2019 CF
My husband and I both wore Merrell Moab 2 on our CF last fall. We had them for years before our trip so we fully expected they would have to be tossed after getting back home in October. We only got rid of them last month, and reluctantly at that. We both replaced them with Moab 2 again.

I appreciate all the footwear info people share. Thank you everyone! You are all such a tremendous resource.
 

Kanga

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés x 5, Le Puy x 2, Arles, Tours, Norte, Madrid, Via de la Plata, Portuguese, Primitivo
I too love the footwear question! Never thought I'd say that. I wear sandals now, but for several caminos I wore Asics and they were well cushioned and the wear was fantastic, well over 1000 km in one pair.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I have a friend who would have been flying to Barcelona today to start her Camino with her husband. She bought some Hokas about 6 weeks ago, and has been wearing them on walks of about 5 miles a few times a week. They are developing holes in the liner part of the shoe along the ankle. Fortunately, she bought them at REI, so she will be able to return them when the stores open up again.

hokas.jpg
 

haikutaxi

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugués (May 2012)
Coastal Camino Portugués (October 2013)
Camino Inglés (planning for ?)
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
Try Ahnu Sugarpine II ... lightweight, sturdy, great tread and wears well. I also have a pair of Anhu Montara, also great hiking shoes though a bit heavier and with a stiffer sole.

 

Attachments

MyDestinationGalicia

Mark Auchincloss
Camino(s) past & future
Camino de Invierno,Portuguese Ways x15 French Way Sarria x5, Silver Way Ourense, Santiago-Muxia x2..
Anything fron Ecco biom range like Venture. They're quality walking shoes so light and durable and very comfortable. They happen to be the most socially responsible and environmentally friendly footwear company that I know.
 

GraemeHall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017/18; Portugués 2019
I wore Moab 2s on both my Caminos. I'm sure the first ones would still be going but I stood on a sharp stone and pierced the sole, letting water in.
The second pair is still like new after around 1000km. I love them. Not at all waterproof but because they breathe so freely they dry in no time.
 

GraemeHall

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés 2017/18; Portugués 2019
I'm intrigued: what is a foot glide?
Foot glide is a brand name for a kind of salve that you can put on your feet to help avoid blisters. Works in much the same way as Vaseline but is more effective and less unpleasant.
We don't seem to be able to get in Australia, but the same people make another product Body Glide or just Glide - equally good.
 

Felice

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
Not sure that you'll want my choice of footwear - these: https://www.sportsdirect.com/reebok-quick-chase-mens-trainers-130004#colcode=13000437

I bought Moab goretex shoes for my first camino but at the last moment, I realised they made my feet far too hot and so I switched to an already well worn pair of Reebok running shoes. They just made it to Santiago, and that was after having a piece of sole stuck back on by a cobbler at Najera!
Crucial to the comfort of my feet, are my insoles. I use a pair of cushioned insoles that my podiatrist has customised for me, with the front half of a decent insole underneath it. Makes for a very comfortable walk.

After returning from that first trip, I tried several pairs of Asics, Hoka etc, but they just did not work for me. And the price tag shocked me, knowing how long they last for. So for my next walk, I bought another pair of Reebok runners, for about £30. They lasted for a couple of years, as did their identical replacements. They make me look like en inexperienced walker, but do I care? One of the welcomers at Le Puy abbey was really rude about my shoes, until I told him that I had already walked from Le Puy in them, without a blister.
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
I wore Merrels for the vf last year, did it in 3 stages and wore out a pair per stage as the soles are not robust but they were light and comfortable . I also did the camino in the same make two years before and managed to find 3 pairs of the exact same old stock online so stuck with what works!
I have changed now to keen targhee 111 as my partners keen boots lasted the whole of the vf - much more robust, and also more waterproof being part leather as opposed to merrells fabric goretex, and more secure sole grip. They are heavier but so far feel good, lots of room in the toe box . Time will tell how they work out - sadly they should have been tested ( haviing been broken in of course ) starting this friday on the vdlp, but who knows when now.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago.
2020 May or end of September - NO!
2021 ?

MaryOswald

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
planning a fall 2019 trip
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks

I wore Hoka Stinson ATA 4 when we hiked the 800 km Norte Camino last fall. The shoes held up wonderfully. In fact I am still using them. I too love the cushioning. I tried a different pair of Hokas while training last summer for the camino and they fell apart, but these are incredible. BTW I DO have a pair of semi-custom insoles in them. I am picky with my footwear and never had even one inkling of a blister with these shoes.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2014
Pamplona to Santiago 2017
Norte. 2018
I had the same problem with them. I will admit my walking is very hard on any shoe I wear. I have found that Brook's shoes seem to last thru a whole Camino. 4 done and was leaving in Sept but who knows now.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I wore Merrell Moabs on my last two caminos, but that was before I tried Hokas. I expect to wear Hokas on my next. The difference in cushioning is that noticeable.
 

Barbara

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte (twice)and Primitivo, Sureste, In France From home Tours and Vézelay, also Le Puy.
Or you could just walk in the shoes you wear every day. I just buy a new pair around once a year. The old ones get used for gardening scruff. Insoles last a bit longer.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
Everything is a compromise. Obviously the lighter, more breathable trail running type shoes simply will not have the durability and cushioning of the hiking type shoes.
The New Balance trail runners I wore on one Frances from Saint Jean all the way to Finisterre were absolutely trashed when I finished, and I had them only for a couple of weeks before I started. They went in the bin when I got home.
The Oboz Sawtooth's I have now have three Caminos on their treads and could do another one I think.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
I am praying that I will one day make my second Camino. I've been planning it but now am experiencing a lot of hip and knee problems. I try to ignore, but hard to do when the pain keeps me awake at night and I have trouble walking when I get up in the morning. Does get better during the day. However, looking to the hopeful future, my question on footwear is... does anyone have advice on good "vegan" footwear. I wore leather in 2017, but would really like to adhere to my convictions going forward. I've researched brands, but haven't tried any yet. Any thoughts from fellow vegans or anyone else in the know?
 

RRat

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Planning 2017
Try something different. Find a shoe that is half the price but fits well. Stay out of REI. For me $60 Hitec works for me because they fit. No problems SJPDP to Santiago except for stitching starting to separate on arrival to Santiago. Shoe glue at home fixed. I've purchased a new pair but don't have the heart to throw out old faithful.
 

Attachments

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
I am praying that I will one day make my second Camino. I've been planning it but now am experiencing a lot of hip and knee problems. I try to ignore, but hard to do when the pain keeps me awake at night and I have trouble walking when I get up in the morning. Does get better during the day. However, looking to the hopeful future, my question on footwear is... does anyone have advice on good "vegan" footwear. I wore leather in 2017, but would really like to adhere to my convictions going forward. I've researched brands, but haven't tried any yet. Any thoughts from fellow vegans or anyone else in the know?
I really feel for you with your hip and knee issues - they do say with arthritis though to keep moving, so maybe gentler daily distances on camino might be tolerable for you and actually help. My homeopath recommended scheussler calc. flour. tablets 1 per day for my knee problems, plus arnica pillules three of four times every day whilst walking until the body adjusts to the physical demands then only arnica at night, but carry on with the calc flour. It could be placebo effect but it definetly helped me, though your issues sound more advanced than mine - but its all i have to offer i am afraid, except to say walk a little when you have warmed up then take a bus to your evening destination. You still get the atmosphere and you are still doing it.
As for footwear, any boot/shoe constructed of strengthened fabric, as many are, should be ok. Best of luck with your plans, I am sure you can do it.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
Everything is a compromise. Obviously the lighter, more breathable trail running type shoes simply will not have the durability and cushioning of the hiking type shoes.
I can't speak to the durability, but I have worn plenty of hiking boots and hiking shoes over the years and none have come close to the cushioning of Hoka trail runners.
 

RJM

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
A few times
I can't speak to the durability, but I have worn plenty of hiking boots and hiking shoes over the years and none have come close to the cushioning of Hoka trail runners.
With that glowing review of them, I'm thinking they must have given you a free pair. 😄
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
With that glowing review of them, I'm thinking they must have given you a free pair. 😄
I'm not saying they are perfect shoes, just that one thing that they certainly don't lack is cushioning. I think just about everyone who has worn them has attested to this, including the post that started this thread.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
I really feel for you with your hip and knee issues - they do say with arthritis though to keep moving, so maybe gentler daily distances on camino might be tolerable for you and actually help. My homeopath recommended scheussler calc. flour. tablets 1 per day for my knee problems, plus arnica pillules three of four times every day whilst walking until the body adjusts to the physical demands then only arnica at night, but carry on with the calc flour. It could be placebo effect but it definetly helped me, though your issues sound more advanced than mine - but its all i have to offer i am afraid, except to say walk a little when you have warmed up then take a bus to your evening destination. You still get the atmosphere and you are still doing it.
As for footwear, any boot/shoe constructed of strengthened fabric, as many are, should be ok. Best of luck with your plans, I am sure you can do it.
Thank you so much for you kind advice. Not sure what the flour tablets and arnica pillules are but will do research.
 

katie@camino

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF, SJPDP-Finisterre 2016;CP (Central) Porto-SdC 2017;CP (Coastal) Porto-SdC 2018;CF Leon-SdC 2019
I'll put my vote in for Altra Olympus.

Zero drop, cushioned, good grip, dries quickly.
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
Thank you so much for you kind advice. Not sure what the flour tablets and arnica pillules are but will do research.
Just to be clear it is calc. Flour. - calcium flouride., a homeopathic remedy. Best of luck
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
By definition of homeopathic, there are no active ingredients in homeopathic "remedies"
As i said in my original post, “it could be the placebo effect”.
I make no claims for it, merely reporting subjective experience and trying to be helpful. My mistake. The op is going to do research they said and then i am sure they can make their own mind up.
I think it is common parlance to call them remedies but I can see why that might be objected to by some and thought to be potentially misleading so will take care not to use that word in connection with homeopathy again as i certainly wouldn’t wish to mislead anyone.
 

evanscl

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Oct 2016
Thank you so much for you kind advice. Not sure what the flour tablets and arnica pillules are but will do research.
As Trecile has pointed out, there are no active ingredients in homeopathic pillules so I apologise if I have in any way made you think they might be a ‘remedy’ for your issues. It was incorrect to use that word, i didnt think how it might come across.
I can only say It is something i have a belief in, but there is no scientific evidence to back that belief up.
All the best anyway .
 

tjb1013

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2017)
Portugués (2019)
I've got severe neuropathy in my feet, so I have foot drop, parasthesia and hypersensitivity (that makes blisters a holy hell). So I sympathize with OP!

My latest issue is a tailor's bunion, probably from supination and the way my feet basically flop to the ground. I need a wider shoe.

The Hoka Speedgoat 4 wide has turned out to be wide enough, but the Hoka Bondi 6 wide is not.

I love Hokas, but they do seem to wear out fast, and they are very expensive. Even if the Hoka uppers and soles hold up (I haven't been that disappointed with either), the midsole with the cushioning seems to collapse pretty fast. (I end up buying several pairs of the same shoe when I find one that works, and trying on a "fresh" pair makes it easy to notice the decline of the midsole.)

I'd like to try the Altras but I need a "shelf" on the sole for my exterior ankle-foot orthotic to rest, and they don't have it.

Finding the right shoe can be an expensive mission, especially for people with foot problems. I can't really tell if a shoe is going to work until I've used it a while, and I don't feel I can return them by the time I "know" if they work.

Right now I like the Speedgoat 4 wide (without waterproofing). The Speedgoat 4 is heavily cushioned, but not as cushioned as the Bondi 6, which I would prefer when walking on mostly hard surfaces. (However, the Speedgoat 4 is great when walking/hiking rocky paths.)

I've resigned myself to constantly scouting for sales online. I very rarely have found any Hokas for more than 25% off, but I usually can find a coupon code somewhere that gets me 10-20%.

After two Caminos, I've also resigned myself to spending a good bit for the best shoe I can find, even if I have to grit my teeth a bit to do it.
 

JCB

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
CN(2019)
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk. So can anyone recommend a women’s model that is lightweight and cushioned but still durable? Not a fan of the waterproof, as feet always get wet anyway. Thanks
You might take a look at Altras. I walked the Norte last fall in my Lone Peaks and they held up well. And without a blister!
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
I did two caminos in a pair of New Balance leather (non-gortex) hiking shoes and they were by far my favourite. But they don’t make that exact shoe anymore and I don’t like the replacement.

I have a pair of Hoka Clifton 5, which I use daily and love as the arch hits the sweet spot. I’d consider them perfect in the wide version for a camino, ... but the traction on them on wet grassy paths is crap (and I have had the mud on my butt to prove it).
 

LoriLosch

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to SJPP (Sept 2018)
Hello,
I have now had 2 pairs of Hokas and love the lightweight cushioning, on my second Portuguese I barely felt the cobblestones. But they don’t last at all, my new pair have around 300km and are cracking where the shoe bends when I walk.
I’m surprised. I used Hokas (Speedgoat 2 non-waterproofs) Le Puy to SJPP. It’s about the same distance as SJPP to Santiago. That was 2 years ago and I still have my shoes. And they’re still going strong. (I only use them once every month or so ... can’t seem to bear to throw them out.) 😂 You’re right ... they are exceptionally comfy. I’ve used various Solomon ones for all my other mountain treks, but man, these Hokas are something special. Maybe try the Speedgoats. They are the trail runner version so maybe have tougher soles?
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
Regarding trail runners or street runners and life expectancy:

Defective materials or manufacture of a shoe is quite a different issue from an expected and normal longevity of a shoe or boot due to the materials used.

Trail and street runners absolutely will not last as long as a boot or heavier hiking shoe. When a lighter weight and cushioning for the feet are the primary focus, the materials are more friable than those used on heavier footwear. The actual reasons for choosing a trail or road running shoe is what makes their overall lifespan shorter.

On average, it is expected that the midsole cushioning on these types of shoes will last an average of around 500 miles/ 800 kilometers before the useful cushioning decreases, from wear and tear, to less than half of what it was when new. And that can be dramatically lessened even further because of the weight , the stride, the gait, or the motion-control issues of an individual user.

In other words, a 150 lbs /60 kg man with a neutral gait, short stride, and very little pronation, will get longer life from a shoe, than for a 185 pound /83 kg man with a waddling gait and moderate pronation.

The type of cushioning used in these types of shoes exchanges durability for having an ability to absorb high amounts of shock. Technology does not exist where the foams of these types of shoes can be made to be both durable AND highly cushiony.

The same issue also applies to outersoles used in most trail runners or street runners. Here, though, there IS more capability to trade benefits of flexibility and some tractionability and protection from trail debris for that of durability.

I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail. I bought 6 pairs ahead of time and mailed a new pair to various resupply points at defined intervals along the way. Only one pair that I was wearing was truly trash-worthy when I picked up a new replacement pair. The other 4 pair had some good life left to them. The issue, however, is that I did not have the luxury of waiting for the BEST and optimal time for replacement of shoes as the hike proceeded, so I had to be exceedingly conservative on determining the margin for usability before replacement.

So when offering advice to those who are looking for a highly cushioned shoe for walking or backpacking, etc, I have to keep in mind that it does no good to mention other types of footwear, like a Lowa hiking boot, or a Merrell Moab trail shoe, or other models of lesser cushioned trail or street runners.

Every type of footwear for backpacking or hiking or trekking or walking has a user which will find one of the various styles not just satisfactory, but preferable. But the feet and associated musculoskeletal structures of most individuals have issues so highly unique, that what is comfortable and workable for some, is sheer torture to others.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Rozzie

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Portuguese coastal Camino March 2020
Started Portuguese coastal Camino (this past March) with Merrill Moab, after 6 days switched to Saloman trail runners. The Moab's were too much shoe for this Camino. They were broken in, but still had problems with my feet. Saloman were light weight and held up for 303 km, worked like a charm. So glad I brought them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (14), Portuguese (15), Le Puy (17), Ingles (17), VDLP (18), Lana (18), Madrid (19) + more
I am very happy with the Salomon Odyssey Pro hiking shoe. It is designed for long-distance hiking (not trail running).

It is lightweight, dries fairly quick, and comfortable on hard surfaces. I have also worn it backpacking in all conditions including sandy desert, deep mud, and through the snow. The shoe has a nice, wide footbox for toes to spread out. The life span of the shoe depends on terrain, but I usually get at least 700 miles before it starts to become uncomfy. I've never worn out the tread on the shoe. Sometimes the fabric area near my pinky toe develops a small hole.

Unfortunately, it isn't available in Canada, and I don't know if it is available outside the United States. It is a fantastic shoe choice for the Camino.
 

NiniSum

Member
Camino(s) past & future
C Frances (2012: Leon to SdC) C Finisterre (2012) C Frances (2015: SJPP to Leon) C Inglés (2019)
I am very happy with the Salomon Odyssey Pro hiking shoe. It is designed for long-distance hiking (not trail running).

It is lightweight, dries fairly quick, and comfortable on hard surfaces. I have also worn it backpacking in all conditions including sandy desert, deep mud, and through the snow. The shoe has a nice, wide footbox for toes to spread out. The life span of the shoe depends on terrain, but I usually get at least 700 miles before it starts to become uncomfy. I've never worn out the tread on the shoe. Sometimes the fabric area near my pinky toe develops a small hole.

Unfortunately, it isn't available in Canada, and I don't know if it is available outside the United States. It is a fantastic shoe choice for the Camino.
I hadn't seen this shoe before, and I swear by Salomon's; then I read the 'isn't available in Canada' which explains why this shoe hasn't been on my radar. Maybe for next Camino whenever that may be. Thanks for profiling this one.
 

firstshirt

Member
Camino(s) past & future
November (2018)
The Hoka women's Challenger ATR is now a version 5, so it is two generations newer than the ATR 3 you've had the problem with. There were some production quality issues with a run of ATR 3's that were problematic for a small percentage of users. Hoka did allow for replacements, regardless of use, if a failure occurred in that batch of shoes. I do not know if that is even an option at this point, given the time frame from when the ATR 3 were first released.

If you found the ATR was suitable otherwise, than I would recommend trying the newer Challenger ATR v5. I know with the problems you had, that you may wish to avoid them, but, as with all manufacturers, identified issues in quality do get addressed in future productions.

If you have a local shop, ask them if they will work with you if the shoes have a premature breakdown. I do not know what country you live in, but in America, REI carries the shoe and they can be returned up to a year after purchase for ANY reason related to use.

At 500 miles / 800 km your shoe's problem may be within a normal range of wear, but not at 300 km.

A similar Hoka shoe in the level of cushioning and stability is the Hoka Speedgoat v4, but it is built for more rugged terrain so the materials in the sole are different.

The New Balance Women's Fresh Foam Hierro v5 has a cushion level near to the Hoka Challenger ATR and is designed for the same type of use. For those who report that they fit well, they give it high marks in the same performance areas that the Hoka shoes also are meant for.
Plus one on the Hoka Speedgoat--Sweeeet.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
Just to be clear it is calc. Flour. - calcium flouride., a homeopathic remedy. Best of luck
Yes, saw that when researching but thanks for adding the clarification.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2020) Camino Frances (not - Covid 19)
As Trecile has pointed out, there are no active ingredients in homeopathic pillules so I apologise if I have in any way made you think they might be a ‘remedy’ for your issues. It was incorrect to use that word, i didnt think how it might come across.
I can only say It is something i have a belief in, but there is no scientific evidence to back that belief up.
All the best anyway .
Not to worry and no need to apologize. I use remedy loosely... it something works for me, it's my remedy. I interpret a remedy as fixing something, so if something fixes an ache or pain, it becomes my remedy. A glass or two of red wine is my evening remedy for overcoming a highly stressful day. Thank you very much for your help.
 

trevorcc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
Which model of Hoka are you now using? There may be a similar New Balance offering that can offer near the same level of cushioning, depending on the Hoka you use.

Do you need a wider than normal width, or do most regular width shoes fit you ok?
I am looking at Hoka as well, I have always worn NB Leadville model that I import from the states as you could not get them in Oz. they were terrific never a blister but they no longer make them...a shame . look on utube.. ginger runner who does reviews and work out what suits you.
 

trevorcc

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPD to Santiago 2013,2014, Camino de Levante Sept. 2016, Frances March 2018, planning 2020
Speedgoat now come in a wide fit. also look at Altra.
 
D

Deleted member 67185

Guest
I am looking at Hoka as well, I have always worn NB Leadville model that I import from the states as you could not get them in Oz. they were terrific never a blister but they no longer make them...a shame . look on utube.. ginger runner who does reviews and work out what suits you.
I don't need any shoes.
 

NorthernLight

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy to Santiago via the Frances 2012-2013. EPW2015
Aragonese & Frances 2016
Burgos to Muxia 2017
How many pairs do you currently have, @davebugg ?
😉
 

Get on our Mailing list for new products on the Camino Store and news from the Camino Forum








Advertisement

Booking.com

Camino Conversations

Camino Conversations

Forum Rules

Forum Rules

Forum Donation

Forum Donation
For those with no forum account, it is possible to donate here as well. Thank you for your support! Ivar

Follow Casa Ivar on Instagram

Most downloaded Resources

When is the best time to walk?

  • January

    Votes: 16 1.2%
  • February

    Votes: 10 0.8%
  • March

    Votes: 55 4.2%
  • April

    Votes: 197 15.0%
  • May

    Votes: 325 24.8%
  • June

    Votes: 95 7.3%
  • July

    Votes: 24 1.8%
  • August

    Votes: 27 2.1%
  • September

    Votes: 379 28.9%
  • October

    Votes: 158 12.1%
  • November

    Votes: 17 1.3%
  • December

    Votes: 7 0.5%

Camino Forum Store

Camino Forum Store
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock