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I swear if I ever see another cobble stone .......

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!
 

Bradypus

Moderator
Staff member
Camino(s) past & future
Too many and too often!

Glenn Rowe

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
.
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon.

I feel your pain, literally. My wife and I recently completed a tour of central Europe where we walked about 8 miles per day (the longest day was 13 miles), mostly on cobblestones. My sturdy, well-fitting walking shoes, exactly like those that took me through the West of Ireland and southern Spain, didn't do well.:oops::(

My feet and ankles took such a beating that I made myself a promise; I will never, EVER again take such a tour without my trusty hiking boots.

Note: This is a personal choice and is not intended as a general recommendation.
 

Kitsambler

Jakobsweg Junkie
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy 2010-11, Prague 2012, Nuremberg 2013, Einsiedeln 2015, Geneva 2017-19
If it is any consolation, in France the stones are allowed to run around loose on the trail, slipping and sliding under one's feet. How many times I wished they were set in mortar!
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
They disappear as (just before) you enter Spain. I agree: It was annoying with so much walking on cobbles.. You have some great days ahead.

Have a glass for me!

Buen Camino!
 
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Macomb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2014. Planning to walk part of Camino del Norte May 2016.
So...are the cobblestones pretty much everywhere along the Camino Portuguese all the way from Lisbon, or mostly found in certain sections? I remember cursing some of the Roman roads on the Frances, so it would help to be mentally prepared for where we'll find the cobblestones on the Portuguese. Thank you!
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
What
They disappear as (just before) you enter Spain. I agree: It was annoying with so much walking on cobbles.. You have some great days ahead.

Have a glass for me!

Buen Camino!
What ? nother two or three days ? That's means I really shall have to have a glass of wine for you ...
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
So...are the cobblestones pretty much everywhere along the Camino Portuguese all the way from Lisbon, or mostly found in certain sections?
Well, from Lisbon there is at least 4 days of asphalt walking (mostly) including one day on the shoulder of a highly trafficed highway... I quit after 4 days: No more days in the danger zone.: Train from Santarem to Porto. I should also mention that at least the first days out of Lisbon you will mostly have to rely on hostels/hotels. It will make it a more expensive Camino.

From Porto it is PLENTY of cobblestones. But a great and safe walk.

However, the last 500 meters or so before Spain, it is asphalt blessing... ;) And then you are in blessed Galicia, and all is well. :)

What ? nother two or three days ? That's means I really shall have to have a glass of wine for you ...

On the Portuguese, make it 2 glasses, thank you.
 
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Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
After arriving by foot in Santiago and Finesterre, we did a road trip by car in Portugal for two weeks. I thought those little granite squares in all the towns and cities were "so cute", but my feet eventually told me otherwise. I then realized they were all the "cobblestones" pilgrims complain about on the forum who have walked the Portuguese route!
 

suzie Gibbons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future- April 2017
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!
OMG, I'm starting from Lisbon on 5th September...... Where do the cobbles start?
Suzie
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
OMG, I'm starting from Lisbon on 5th September...... Where do the cobbles start?
Suzie
I only started in Porto but they've been with me ever since and someone has just told me the stop just before you arrive in Spain !! I'm cursing having decided to wear my new walking shoes instead if my trusty old , Camino veteran, lightweight hiking boots. At least then I wouldn't have felt every bump through the soles.....I should have taken the cobble threads seriously. But as nycwalking said 'this too shall pass' .....
 

suzie Gibbons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future- April 2017
I only started in Porto but they've been with me ever since and someone has just told me the stop just before you arrive in Spain !! I'm cursing having decided to wear my new walking shoes instead if my trusty old , Camino veteran, lightweight hiking boots. At least then I wouldn't have felt every bump through the soles.....I should have taken the cobble threads seriously. But as nycwalking said 'this too shall pass' .....
Oh dear... I've decided to wear lightweight trail-trainers this time as my walking boots are heavy and I got so many blisters while on the Spanish Camino... Now I'm having 2nd thoughts!
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Oh dear... I've decided to wear lightweight trail-trainers this time as my walking boots are heavy and I got so many blisters while on the Spanish Camino... Now I'm having 2nd thoughts!
You may we'll be fine. You know your feet better than anyone. I have seen a lot of boots here but that doesn't mean much. I love my boots but was convinced to try something lighter. That was silly of me because my boots just don't give me blisters. My own fault. Perhaps bring decent inserts just in case......go with your instincts - and read other cobble posts.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
OMG, I'm starting from Lisbon on 5th September...... Where do the cobbles start? Suzie
The way from Lisbon is lacking many sign & alberguess. I just walked the first 4 days before I called it a day and took the train to Porto. And mind you, I was not the only one. From porto there is a LOT of cobblestone road; but OK: I could handle it. but it was hurting some days. But a great walk. Coming into Spain, all was back to normal comfort zone.
 

Macomb

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Completed Camino Frances Sept/Oct 2014. Planning to walk part of Camino del Norte May 2016.
Thank you Alexwalker! I can handle asphalt, so what I'm mostly concerned with are the cobblestones. Do you know if there are lots of cobblestones on both the Coastal and Central routes north of Porto? Thanks very much.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Thank you Alexwalker! I can handle asphalt, so what I'm mostly concerned with are the cobblestones. Do you know if there are lots of cobblestones on both the Coastal and Central routes north of Porto? Thanks very much.
I have walked the Central route only. Plenty of cobblestones there. Too much, actually: hard on the feet.
 

suzie Gibbons

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Future- April 2017
You may we'll be fine. You know your feet better than anyone. I have seen a lot of boots here but that doesn't mean much. I love my boots but was convinced to try something lighter. That was silly of me because my boots just don't give me blisters. My own fault. Perhaps bring decent inserts just in case......go with your instincts - and read other cobble posts.
Thanks for the thumbs up, enjoy the rest of your journey
Suzie
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
OMG, I'm starting from Lisbon on 5th September...... Where do the cobbles start?
Suzie
They start from Porto, atleast. I do not know about further south, because I skipped it due to bad infrastructure for pilgrims. I advice you to bring solid boots on the CP: Normal trainers etc. will NOT do: You need something sturdy out there.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Thank you Alexwalker! I can handle asphalt, so what I'm mostly concerned with are the cobblestones. Do you know if there are lots of cobblestones on both the Coastal and Central routes north of Porto? Thanks very much.
Porto to Vila do Condo was mainly on wooden boardwalks and was actually a lovely walk. I don't know what happens beyond there as I crossed over to the central.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Now, a story to relieve you:

Somewhere on the CP, in a tiny village (on the Spanish side), I was thirsty, and came upon something looking like a small cafe. But there was no life there. I knocked on the door, and after some time, an old man came out and wondered what the noise was about. I told him I needed a cold beer (in Spanish). He went in and brought back a cold tin box of beer. Salvacion! Then he got interested since I could speak a little Spanish with him, so we had a discussion about pilgrimage etc.and he expressed his disappointment for pilgrims who knew no Spanish, so he couldn't talk with them.

After some time he asked me to follow him and so I did. He wanted to show me his own wine-producing cellar, where he made organic white wine. Very interesting indeed. He then poured a significant measure of his white wine into a bowl, and I was forced ;) to drink it all up. He resisted any payment, so I left with some Euros on the table when he was unaware. The power of language in action!

Lesson: Learn a few Spanish words to communicate, and your returns will multiply! Another lesson on "Give and you shall receive", indeed.
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
I disagree, and I walked from Porto. You need cushioning, not sturdy.
Whatever. You need proper shoes.

Edit: On second thoughts, you are wrong: You will need shoes that can distribute the energy of the cobblestones evenly, not softening them to various parts of your feet. This is a fact.
 
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A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Whatever. You need proper shoes.

Edit: On second thoughts, you are wrong: You will need shoes that can distribute the energy of the cobblestones evenly, not softening them to various parts of your feet. This is a fact.
Well, the fact is that with Hoka One Ones I never knew there were cobble stones or granite setts. And I actually walked from Porto. :cool:
 

alexwalker

Forever Pilgrim
Camino(s) past & future
(2009): Camino Frances
(2011): Sevilla-Salamanca, VdlP
(2012): Salamanca-SdC, VdlP
(2014): SJpdP-Astorga
(2015): Astorga-SdC
(2016) May Pamplona-Moratinos; Sept.:Burgos-SdC
(2016): August/Sept: Camino San Olav (Burgos-Covarubbias), Burgos-Sarria
(2017): May: Portuguese; Sept: Pamplona-SdC
Well, the fact is that with Hoka One Ones I never knew there were cobble stones or granite setts. And I actually walked from Porto. :cool:
Happy for you. The cobble stones from (atleast) Porto to the Spanish border,are really a challenge, even with my topnotch Salomon boots.
 

CaminoDebrita

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances SJPP to SdC Oct/Nov 2015
Frances Burgos toSdC March/April 2016
W. Highland Way August 2016
Camino Somewhere September 2017
Happy for you. The cobble stones from (atleast) Porto to the Spanish border,are really a challenge, even with my topnotch Salomon boots.

I have shoes ready, but am thinking of all the possible journeys.

Just a by the by commentary:

Invierno, dogs (whisperer companion necessary)

Porto, cobblestone and left-turn challenges. With only two weeks, I don't want to feel annoyed.

Le Puy, expensive and easier with French language skills

Ingles, quite short, but add on the Finisterre and Muxia

Norte, yes... need time to do it and perhaps spring time is better?

Via de la Plata, intriguing

Sanabres, a good taste

Primitivo, with a friend?

Port. Interior, with Aurigny perhaps! lol, or Peregrina 2000...

Porto Coastal, like the idea...

Frances, always

Camino Madrid, good idea

Just thinking, having read and read, and with a few weeks to walk after visiting family in France. It is all good stuff.

I'm glad to have so many walking and hiking shoes, but my Vasques got all walked out last April in Spain.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Happy for you. The cobble stones from (atleast) Porto to the Spanish border,are really a challenge, even with my topnotch Salomon boots.
I have to tell you, because I was going to walk 1000km this spring, and knew HOO thread would not last that long, I walked with Salomon Ultra2GTX and suffered. Four days in on VDLP, I was googling to find where I could purchase HOO and have them shipped to some albergue. I was so angry at myself for having prefered the Salomons.

I would have been much better off walking with HOO and sending a replacement pair from home to Salamanca or Ponferrada, where I was going to start the Invierno.

If you get the chance to try HOO, I really recommend it. I was suspicious when I first boight them, but I asked my podiatrist and she told me her Ultra marathoner clients swear by them, so I took them on the Portugues and never regreted it.
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...
After some time he asked me to follow him and so I did. He wanted to show me his own wine-producing cellar, where he made organic white wine. Very interesting indeed. He then poured a significant measure of his white wine into a bowl, and I was forced ;) to drink it all up. ...
Oh, Alex, how hard that must have been, geez. I can't even imagine. I really sympathize with you ;)
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
Oh, I see now. Huh, I thought when you were mentioning cobblestones it's a no go for me but that's not really what we call "cat heads" (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cobblestone#/media/File:ItalianStones.jpg). Well that's a tough time to walk on ;)
Granite cubes? Ahhh, nothing. Stone plates? No problem. Tarmac? A bit annoying. But "cat-heads" - go and try :D
 

nomadpeah

Have passport, will travel
Camino(s) past & future
CF 2015, CF 2018, Primitivo 2019
So...are the cobblestones pretty much everywhere along the Camino Portuguese all the way from Lisbon, or mostly found in certain sections? I remember cursing some of the Roman roads on the Frances, so it would help to be mentally prepared for where we'll find the cobblestones on the Portuguese. Thank you!
That Roman road... I'll not forget the stones!
 

JillGat

la tierra encantada
Camino(s) past & future
C. Frances SJPP - Finisterre - Muxia (May 2016)
C. Frances (Sept 2017)
Camino Portugues (June 2019)
If you get the chance to try HOO, I really recommend it. I was suspicious when I first boight them, but I asked my podiatrist and she told me her Ultra marathoner clients swear by them, so I took them on the Portugues and never regreted it.

IF they fit my feet, which they don't. I can hardly squeeze my wide feet into the men's Altras.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
IF they fit my feet, which they don't. I can hardly squeeze my wide feet into the men's Altras.
They now have a few ofmtheir models in a "wide" version. I agree, many of their regular models have a narrow toebox. I wore the Bondi 5 in regular width and it was very roomy. Now they have a Bondi 5W.
 

Carlos Santiago

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2018

HeidiL

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2004-), Portugués, Madrid, 4/5 Plata, 1/8 Levante, 1/8 Lana, Augusta, hospitalera Grado.
Huh, feet are certainly different. I walked the first six days out of Lisbon in fairly thin-soled Ecco sneakers and didn't feel a thing. Perhaps it's all that barefoot martial arts training?

(I have several times walked 10+ km in Lisbon in very thin-soled shoes with 5 cm heels. No problems, but the white stripes of the pedestrian crossings get really slippery when it's raining.)
 

jsalt

Jill
Camino(s) past & future
Portugués, Francés, LePuy, Rota Vicentina, Norte, Madrid, C2C, Salvador, Primitivo, Aragonés, Inglés
I quit after 4 days: No more days in the danger zone.: Train from Santarem to Porto. I should also mention that at least the first days out of Lisbon you will mostly have to rely on hostels/hotels. It will make it a more expensive Camino.

Hi, sorry to hijack the thread on cobblestones, but I can’t let this remark go.
Alex, it’s too bad that you quit after 4 days, as you missed so much from Santarem onwards.
There is an albergue or cheap place EVERY night between Lisbon and Porto:

Alpriate, 22.4, Albergue de Peregrinos
Vila Franca de Xira, 17.5, Ribatejana (pilgrim rates)
Azambuja, 19.4, Albergue de Peregrinos
Santarem, 32.3, Santarem Hostel (private albergue)
Golega, 31.2, Quartos do Lagar (cheap rooms)
Tomar, 29.7, Hostel 2300 Thomar (private albergue)
Alvaiazere, 31.3, Albergaria Pinheiro
Alvorge, 23.9, Albergue de Peregrinos
Conimbriga, 19.3, Albergue de Conimbriga
Coimbra, 18.8, Albergue Rainha Santa Isabel
Mealhada, 24.0, Albergue Hilario
Agueda, 24.0, Albergue Santo Antonio
Albergaria-a-Velha, 16.3, Albergue de Peregrinos
Sao Joao, 29.2, Santa Casa de Misericordia
Grijo, 19.0, Albergue Sao Salvador de Grijo
Porto, 15.3, Albergue de Peregrinos

Jill
 

Stephen Nicholls

Steve Nicholls, Suffolk, U.K.
Camino(s) past & future
Too many caminos to list in the permitted 100 characters!!
I came across a lot of these "setts" on my first camino in 2011. A note in my diary says "Even with proper shoes it's easy to twist your ankle on some of these roads!"
P1090021.JPG

However, one of the advantages is that you can hear a car coming from a kilometer away!

Talking of accommodation, Jill, that's fine if you're happy to walk over 30 kms a day - I'm not. 20 is my MAXIMUM which restricts availability of accommodation.
But then, I'm just getting old!
Health permitting I may just try the Portuguese coastal route next April. We will see!
Buen camino .... con setts ;)
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I disagree, and I walked from Porto. You need cushioning, not sturdy.
I sort of agree and disagree. You certainly need cushioning BUT , I do wish I had my support as well. The fact that the cobbles ( granite sets !!) make my feet move from side to side and I'm constantly re-adjusting rather than rolling flat means that my legs are sore too. If I had my sturdy ankle support boots I wouldn't be in so much trouble. It's horses for courses. If you normally like ankle support then come with boots. Those who don't need ankle support don't always understand those of us who do. I'll survive this but would be much be happier in different footwear.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I sort of agree and disagree. You certainly need cushioning BUT , I do wish I had my support as well. The fact that the cobbles ( granite sets !!) make my feet move from side to side and I'm constantly re-adjusting rather than rolling flat means that my legs are sore too. If I had my sturdy ankle support boots I wouldn't be in so much trouble. It's horses for courses. If you normally like ankle support then come with boots. Those who don't need ankle support don't always understand those of us who do. I'll survive this but would be much be happier in different footwear.
HOO makes boots.
 

LTfit

Veteran Member
Porto to Vila do Condo was mainly on wooden boardwalks and was actually a lovely walk. I don't know what happens beyond there as I crossed over to the central.

Walked a combo of the coastal and the Senda Litoral in June and it was boardwalks, granite blocks in numerous forms and asphalt all the way to Spain. Now and again a soft surface appeared to only disappear again.

Between the asphalt on the Norte before Porto and again on the Inglés my Salomon trail runners were ready for the garbage. I say way too much asphalt this Camino!
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I'
I have to tell you, because I was going to walk 1000km this spring, and knew HOO thread would not last that long, I walked with Salomon Ultra2GTX and suffered. Four days in on VDLP, I was googling to find where I could purchase HOO and have them shipped to some albergue. I was so angry at myself for having prefered the Salomons.

I would have been much better off walking with HOO and sending a replacement pair from home to Salamanca or Ponferrada, where I was going to start the Invierno.

If you get the chance to try HOO, I really recommend it. I was suspicious when I first boight them, but I asked my podiatrist and she told me her Ultra marathoner clients swear by them, so I took them on the Portugues and never regreted it.
ll certainly have a look ....
 

jmcarp

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, 2013
Camino del Norte a Chimayó (USA), 2015
Camino Portugues, 2017
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!
Look at it this way...if those narrow roads with no shoulders were paved with asphalt, you probably wouldn't hear the freight train-like roar of the tiny Renault approaching from behind at 80km/hr. :D
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
H
Look at it this way...if those narrow roads with no shoulders were paved with asphalt, you probably wouldn't hear the freight train-like roar of the tiny Renault approaching from behind at 80km/hr. :D
Hahaha - very very true. They don't do slow do they ?! tbh - I was just having a tiny let off of frustration as I sat nursing three blisters in 3 days having only ever had 1 in total in two CF's. I didn't expect to touch such a nerve. Entertaining though
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
...I was just having a tiny let off of frustration as I sat nursing three blisters in 3 days having only ever had 1 in total in two CF's. I didn't expect to touch such a nerve. Entertaining though
Yeah, tarmac and cobbled paths do that. Stop every two hours, have a beer and put your boots/shoes off to dry the socks. Maybe put ladies hygienic pads in your boots???

Bom Caminho!
 

zrexer

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2014, 15,16 & 19 Camino Frances
2017 Camino Portuguese
2018 Camino Primitivo
2020 Camino Del Norte
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!

HaHa...I feel your pain having walked the Portuguese Camino from Porto via the central route this past April. We started to refer to the cobble stones and the even worse granite setts as 'hobble stones' after our first day out of Porto. Walking on asphalt after walking on them felt almost like foam rubber in comparison.
Red wine therapy at night does help.
Still, we loved Portugal and even with their love of cobble stones and the granite setts, we will be back in the future at some point.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
What

What ? nother two or three days ? That's means I really shall have to have a glass of wine for you ...
It turned out to be Sangria - hope that's ok.
 

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Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Oh dear... I've decided to wear lightweight trail-trainers this time as my walking boots are heavy and I got so many blisters while on the Spanish Camino... Now I'm having 2nd thoughts!
Suzie - the trek from Barcelo onwards has been SO much better. Still cobbles ( granite sets !!) but nowhere near as many.....so only three days of hell. You'll be fine.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
Hoka One Ones are a must for the Portugues. I never felt a single granite sett.
Ahhhh but they've changed. I was a huge Hoka fan, I sung their praises from the roof tops. I think they were bought or something. Curious as to when your lovefest with them happened. Mine was almost three years ago, loved them!
Last year they got me through but no where as well as 2014.
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
Well, the fact is that with Hoka One Ones I never knew there were cobble stones or granite setts. And I actually walked from Porto. :cool:
I'm going to give them another try based on your vote! It does make me admit they did provide the cushion! I bought six pairs this time last year ( a huge financial hit), my whole family had them.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
Ahhhh but they've changed. I was a huge Hoka fan, I sung their praises from the roof tops. I think they were bought or something. Curious as to when your lovefest with them happened. Mine was almost three years ago, loved them!
Last year they got me through but no where as well as 2014.
Oh oh, not good news. My last pair was bought last summer. Jere I was excited they started making more wider models ... :(
 

shefollowsshells

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Several alone and with children
I have shoes ready, but am thinking of all the possible journeys.

Just a by the by commentary:

Invierno, dogs (whisperer companion necessary)

Porto, cobblestone and left-turn challenges. With only two weeks, I don't want to feel annoyed.

Le Puy, expensive and easier with French language skills

Ingles, quite short, but add on the Finisterre and Muxia

Norte, yes... need time to do it and perhaps spring time is better?

Via de la Plata, intriguing

Sanabres, a good taste

Primitivo, with a friend?

Port. Interior, with Aurigny perhaps! lol, or Peregrina 2000...

Porto Coastal, like the idea...

Frances, always

Camino Madrid, good idea

Just thinking, having read and read, and with a few weeks to walk after visiting family in France. It is all good stuff.

I'm glad to have so many walking and hiking shoes, but my Vasques got all walked out last April in Spain.
The Norte is where my heart is!
I'm willing to do what is necessary to make room for others but I love it! I did it in the Spring and late Oct/ November- it was marvelous both times!
 

annakappa

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Part frances jun 07/rest frances may- jun 2008/Frances sept-oct 2009/ Sanabres Oct 2010/Frances sept-oct 2011/Aragones Sept-Oct 2012. Hospitalero Sept 2010, Amiga in Pilgrim's Office Oct 2013. Part Primitivo Oct 2013. Portugues from Porto June 2015.
A Portuguese road in the making.
 

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long trails

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances 2012
This made me laugh out loud. I'd completely forgotten about the cobbles. Not sure from Lisbon, but from Porto they were everywhere!
 

Addicted

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2015,
Camino Primitivo (5 days in 2015)
Camino Portugal 2015,
Camino Muxia,Finiserra 2015,
Camino Primitivo complete 2016
Camino Norte Sept 2017
Whenever you purchase a house the three most important things to look for is location, location, and location. When you walk the Portuguese you will see cobble, cobble and more cobble. I said many prayers after cursing the cobble. Regardless loved every step.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I disagree, and I walked from Porto. You need cushioning, not sturdy.
I'm counting on your experience and advice, Anemone del Camino. I'll be wearing Hoka One One's, with SuperFeet inserts and am hoping that they'll save my feet. I start from Porto on October 7, along the coast for two days and then inland.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I'm counting on your experience and advice, Anemone del Camino. I'll be wearing Hoka One One's, with SuperFeet inserts and am hoping that they'll save my feet. I start from Porto on October 7, along the coast for two days and then inland.
Fingers crossed fir you it all goes well. You are certainly doubling up on comfort.
 

Rina22

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Arriving in Porto Portugal May 22 2017 to walk the coastal camino.
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!
I left Porto May 23rd finished in Santiago June 5th and went back to Porto for 4 more days to sightsee...my body seems to still be experiencing the after effects of the very nasty cobblestones 2 plus months later...my feet Achilles tendons and a number of legs muscles still hurt or act up I have hardly walked at all since returning home...think the body got way overstressed. Will eventually fully recover I believe but interesting how the body tries to cope. All that being said I probably would do it again.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues 2017
The way from Lisbon is lacking many sign & alberguess. I just walked the first 4 days before I called it a day and took the train to Porto. And mind you, I was not the only one. From porto there is a LOT of cobblestone road; but OK: I could handle it. but it was hurting some days. But a great walk. Coming into Spain, all was back to normal comfort zone.

Hi Alex,
I'm walking the Portuguese at the moment and I have to disagree with you about the waymarks, there are loads and i think are pretty obvious to spot. I agree that the cobbles are a pain and some of the road walking is tense at times but at least now that 6km stretch from Vila Nova da Rainha into Azambuja,that used to go along the N3, has been rerouted to a gravel road that runs alongside the rail tracks.

All the best on your journey,
Jon
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Portugues 2017
Hi, sorry to hijack the thread on cobblestones, but I can’t let this remark go.
Alex, it’s too bad that you quit after 4 days, as you missed so much from Santarem onwards.
There is an albergue or cheap place EVERY night between Lisbon and Porto:

Alpriate, 22.4, Albergue de Peregrinos
Vila Franca de Xira, 17.5, Ribatejana (pilgrim rates)
Azambuja, 19.4, Albergue de Peregrinos
Santarem, 32.3, Santarem Hostel (private albergue)
Golega, 31.2, Quartos do Lagar (cheap rooms)
Tomar, 29.7, Hostel 2300 Thomar (private albergue)
Alvaiazere, 31.3, Albergaria Pinheiro
Alvorge, 23.9, Albergue de Peregrinos
Conimbriga, 19.3, Albergue de Conimbriga
Coimbra, 18.8, Albergue Rainha Santa Isabel
Mealhada, 24.0, Albergue Hilario
Agueda, 24.0, Albergue Santo Antonio
Albergaria-a-Velha, 16.3, Albergue de Peregrinos
Sao Joao, 29.2, Santa Casa de Misericordia
Grijo, 19.0, Albergue Sao Salvador de Grijo
Porto, 15.3, Albergue de Peregrinos

Jill


I agree, they are definitely there and asking locals always helps.

Cheers,
Jon
 

stevov

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
walked the portuguese way (senda littoral). from porto, vila do conde via viana and redondela Jun 17
I swear if I ever see another cobble stone again in my life ever, it will be way too soon. Don't the Portugues have asphalt ? Just where do they find so much granite ?? Will my feet ever recover ???.... and does it ever stop ???? All rhetorical questions of course - I just felt the need for a rant while I hide in the cafe in Pereira.There I feel better now !!
Smiled when I saw this...i did the Portuguese coastal senda route...and my blog on return includes a section on surfaces...where I share your views about the cobblestones..(although I rate uneven granite pavement the absolute worst) ..here is a cut and paste of my comments...'..Tarmac is Ok and boardwalks are generally nice to walk on (when not in disrepair or incomplete), but cobblestones do not provide the most comfortable surface. I’m amazed at the dedication of the portuguese, even in the most remote of areas, to cobble almost every street. Whilst these are attractive to look at, I sense the soles of my feet starting to complain and I try to walk on the sides of cobbled streets where possible..'.
 

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janonajourney

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago 2010
Coastal Portuguese (September/October 2017)
Stevov - where can I find your blog? We are starting the coastal camino from Porto at the end of September and wondering at what point to join the central route. Any recommendations?
 

stevov

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
walked the portuguese way (senda littoral). from porto, vila do conde via viana and redondela Jun 17
Stevov - where can I find your blog? We are starting the coastal camino from Porto at the end of September and wondering at what point to join the central route. Any recommendations?
Hi Janona
I tried to follow the senda Litoral and following what advice I could find in the Brierley Guide mostly managed to do stay on the sea coast although sometimes the boardwalks are incomplete and way markers at other times take me via the nearby inland coastal route. Generally after Vigo you are walking towards the traditional central route and i joined it at Redondela.
My blog is as yet unfinished but you can find it at https://stevov.wordpress.com
I hope this is of some help
Bom Caminho!
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I left Porto May 23rd finished in Santiago June 5th and went back to Porto for 4 more days to sightsee...my body seems to still be experiencing the after effects of the very nasty cobblestones 2 plus months later...my feet Achilles tendons and a number of legs muscles still hurt or act up I have hardly walked at all since returning home...think the body got way overstressed. Will eventually fully recover I believe but interesting how the body tries to cope. All that being said I probably would do it again.
Almost into Santiago now and have to say my feet have really suffered and my Achilles is surprisingly painful. I have enjoyed the time here and as ever met some lovely people and had some great moments, but there is simply way too much cobble followed by asphalt and road walking for me. It's not a Camino I will return to I think - unless I do the coastal. I rather regret cutting over to Rates purely for the feet issue. Now got that final climb into Santiago to look forward to :eek:
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Fingers crossed fir you it all goes well. You are certainly doubling up on comfort.
One more question, Anemone. Did you find that the cobblestones caused your ankles to roll? My doctor is worried for me about that and suggests that I get ankle supports, but they don't sound comfortable, and the point of wearing the Hoka's is for the comfort. I'll be using hiking poles, by the way.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
One more question, Anemone. Did you find that the cobblestones caused your ankles to roll? My doctor is worried for me about that and suggests that I get ankle supports, but they don't sound comfortable, and the point of wearing the Hoka's is for the comfort. I'll be using hiking poles, by the way.
Singingheart - Anemone may not have had a problem with rolling but I have which is why I usually wear boots in the first place. The constant readjusting is what has given me problems. There are also one or two really hard sections of uphill with large boulders and stone which again without boots gave me trouble. If I hadn't had my poles I'd have had problems. I think the issue isn't whether other people have had problems or found it easy. I think the issue is - do you normally like/need support ? I do and wish I'd had my boots then I would
Possibly not be suffering so much now with my Achilles and various other muscles. Only you know what you need in the end.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Singingheart - Anemone may not have had a problem with rolling but I have which is why I usually wear boots in the first place. The constant readjusting is what has given me problems. There are also one or two really hard sections of uphill with large boulders and stone which again without boots gave me trouble. If I hadn't had my poles I'd have had problems. I think the issue isn't whether other people have had problems or found it easy. I think the issue is - do you normally like/need support ? I do and wish I'd had my boots then I would
Possibly not be suffering so much now with my Achilles and various other muscles. Only you know what you need in the end.
Thanks for your comments. I really don't know what I need, which is the problem for me. I wore low-rise boots on the CF and didn't have ankle problems, but I don't know if I would have or not without them. I think with all the loose rock on CF, the boots probably helped me. But I've never really had an ankle problem. It's just that my doctor was concerned for me, probably because of my age. I had a huge issue with foot pain (a blister, bunion pain) and I was hoping that the light-weight Hoka's might prevent that.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Thanks for your comments. I really don't know what I need, which is the problem for me. I wore low-rise boots on the CF and didn't have ankle problems, but I don't know if I would have or not without them. I think with all the loose rock on CF, the boots probably helped me. But I've never really had an ankle problem. It's just that my doctor was concerned for me, probably because of my age. I had a huge issue with foot pain (a blister, bunion pain) and I was hoping that the light-weight Hoka's might prevent that.
I used lightweight low rise boots on both my CF's and really wish I'd had them here. I'll try and send you a few pictures of the bits I've found hard here. It may help you decide.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
One more question, Anemone. Did you find that the cobblestones caused your ankles to roll? My doctor is worried for me about that and suggests that I get ankle supports, but they don't sound comfortable, and the point of wearing the Hoka's is for the comfort. I'll be using hiking poles, by the way.
Hi @Singingheart , i had no problem with rolling ankles, but I also never have. The "cobblestones" are really quite even. I didn't even use my poles except to climb up an embankment once.

Good luck.
 
A

Anemone del Camino

Guest
I wore low-rise boots on the CF and didn't have ankle problems, but I don't know if I would have or not without them. I think with all the loose rock on CF, the boots probably helped me. But I've never really had an ankle problem.
For what it's worth, I would the terrain on the Frances to be much more of an issue when it comes to balance because of the uneven tire tracks loose stones and small ravines caused by rain. Never blinked on the Portuguese. Only thing that came close to that terrain was the 90 minute walk down the Ruta de Piedra & Agua on the Variante Espiritual.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
For what it's worth, I would the terrain on the Frances to be much more of an issue when it comes to balance because of the uneven tire tracks loose stones and small ravines caused by rain. Never blinked on the Portuguese. Only thing that came close to that terrain was the 90 minute walk down the Ruta de Piedra & Agua on the Variante Espiritual.
This is the kind of information that is so helpful. Thank you! I don't think I'll be taking the Variante Espiritual, so I'll miss that. I think I should take a deep breath and trust in my Koka's and my ankles.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Hi @Singingheart , i had no problem with rolling ankles, but I also never have. The "cobblestones" are really quite even. I didn't even use my poles except to climb up an embankment once.

Good luck.
Hmmm - I'm beginning to feel quite useless and inferior here, what with my need for poles and boots.......
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
For what it's worth, I would the terrain on the Frances to be much more of an issue when it comes to balance because of the uneven tire tracks loose stones and small ravines caused by rain. Never blinked on the Portuguese. Only thing that came close to that terrain was the 90 minute walk down the Ruta de Piedra & Agua on the Variante Espiritual.
It's clearly horses for courses. I found the CF terrain infinitely easier with no problems.
 
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
Hmmm - I'm beginning to feel quite useless and inferior here, what with my need for poles and boots.......
Never feel useless and inferior!!! You know how individual each person's experience is. I imagine that I'll use my poles constantly, because I depend on them for balance and propelling me and helping me in countless ways.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
Never feel useless and inferior!!! You know how individual each person's experience is. I imagine that I'll use my poles constantly, because I depend on them for balance and propelling me helping me in countless ways.
I'm a great pole user. I swear by them whether on the flat, uphill or for me most importantly down hill. The 'little stroll' uphill out of Ponte di Lima a few days ago would have been rather an ankle disaster for me without them !
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
September/October 2015 CF; October 2017 PC from Porto; Camino Ingles October 2019; Le Puy (2020)
I'm a great pole user. I swear by them whether on the flat, uphill or for me most importantly down hill The 'little stroll' uphill out of Ponte di Lima a few days ago would have been rather an ankle disaster for me without them !
I didn't mean to suggest that your posts haven't been helpful, Gillyweb. I would love to see the pictures you mentioned earlier.
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
I didn't mean to suggest that your posts haven't been helpful, Gillyweb. I would love to see the pictures you mentioned earlier.
You didn't suggest at all my posts hadn't been helpful - sorry if that's what you thought. I'm just lying here rather battered and bruised with incredibly sore Achilles' tendons and badly aching muscles, rather dreading the last kilometers into Santiago for the first time, feeling rather touchy that what was supposed to be a lighthearted, let off steam, faintly amusing rant about cobbles, became something that right now makes me feel I must be pathetic not to have bounded over the not-very-uneven cobbles with ease, and to have actually had to use my poles more than once. Right now my feet take slight umbrage. By the weekend all will be back in perspective !!
 

Gillyweb

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Villafranca - Santiago (2013)
SJPP - Santiago (2014)
Portugues (2017)
So ....... 24 hours after arriving, I'm already planning Camino number four !! - it just won't be the Portugues ( for awhile at least :)
 

MTtoCamino

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francis SJPdP to Finnestere April(2014)
Very good info, thank you all. It really makes me realize the CM seems to have a stronger pull, amazing the choices available.
 

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