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Lauren from New York on Planning my 1st Camino!

laurenligreci

Active Member
Time of past OR future Camino
June 24' Portuguese
Hello! My name is Lauren and I am a 37yo in Upstate New York! I have so many topics I would like to chat about with you fine folks on here in preparation for my First Camino in June 2024. I thought I would start by introducing myself here and then do individual topical posts after that so its all easily searchable for the forum users (and myself)!

I don't have anything booked yet, but am planning the Portuguese Coastal Way with maybe some Spiritual route in there from June 6 - June 26th, followed by my cousin's wedding in Southern Portugal on 6/29 and then some travel with my family to Lisbon and hopefully those stunning islands after that for just a few days. I may or may not be bringing my then 9yo daughter to Walk the Camino with me, my hubby cannot get that much time off of work though (and I'd probably kill him).

I am a part-time CPA by day and also follow my creative whims with hobbies like knitting, sewing, crocheting, painting! I love playing pickleball (I will be a certified instructor soon!), swimming, the beach, gardening, architecture, cooking & FOOD, music, and my family (hubby and 8yo daughter).

I was quite the athlete back in "the day" but am finding myself very PLUS size / overweight presently (I believe the technical term is morbidly obese). I am a full disclosure human and have no problem sharing that I am currently, 5ft 4in and 240lbs, with very high body fat. I will post about these challenges as I would like your thoughts on some of the different things I find myself having to consider given my size. I am planning a slower walk due to this!

I ask a lot of questions, so be prepared for many topical posts relating to things like traveling alone with children, private rooms vs albergues, eating low carb, slower walking, injuries, training plans, plus size clothing and accessories, and who knows what else I will come up with, ha!

Buen Camino!
^ first time I have said that, did I do it right?

Lauren L.
 
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Well, congratulations! You have a lot to look forward to a good amount of time to plan. If you’re gonna walk slower, and I am a slow walker, perhaps you will walk 10 to 12 miles a day. I typically average around 15, which is possible, even as a slow walker in about six hours at 4K per hour. This is certainly possible on a relatively flat, Portuguese Camino, but by no means indicative of anything you should do. I have only walked the last three days of the Portuguese, in order to enter Santiago from a different approach, than from Sarria. I will say that I really did enjoy those last three days. If you can manage 10 to 12 miles a day and eat a healthy low-carb diet, you will also probably lose some weight. The Portuguese are quite friendly people and when you greet people on this Camino, you may say Bom Caminho.
In any case, I’m sure you’ll have a great walk, and a memorable experience, perhaps with your daughter. We are constantly being reminded that there are a lot of cobblestones along the central way, and if you’re going to follow that path before the Spiritual Way, then I would recommend a cushion Cross training type sneaker. I like the Hoka speed goat.
 
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BTW, my comment about losing weight is only meant as something ancillary to what you are undertaking. It will be warm in June and daily mileage of this sort is beyond anyones norm. You seem very straightforward and positive.
I wish you a Bom Caminho!
 
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Well, congratulations! You have a lot to look forward to a good amount of time to plan. If you’re gonna walk slower, and I am a slow walker, perhaps you will walk 10 to 12 miles a day. I typically average around 15, which is possible, even as a slow walker in about six hours at 4K per hour. This is certainly possible on a relatively flat, Portuguese Camino, but by no means indicative of anything you should do. I have only walked the last three days of the Portuguese, in order to enter Santiago from a different approach, than from Sarria. I will say that I really did enjoy those last three days. If you can manage 10 to 12 miles a day and eat a healthy low-carb diet, you will also probably lose some weight. The Portuguese are quite friendly people and when you greet people on this Camino, you may say Bom Caminho.
In any case, I’m sure you’ll have a great walk, and a memorable experience, perhaps with your daughter. We are constantly being reminded that there are a lot of cobblestones along the central way, and if you’re going to follow that path before the Spiritual Way, then I would recommend a cushion Cross training type sneaker. I like the Hoka speed goat.
Hello! Thank you so much for your insight Richmond! I am excited for the journey and to see what I can do, maybe prove a few things to myself! I've been walking to and from work each day lately, and that is 4m round trip, so I am hoping I can at least double that everyday!

I would love to shed a few #'s while walking, especially because I am bookending The Walk with a family wedding! I am sure I will mentally be a different person afterwards, physical changes are welcome as well, ha!

I haven't settled on a route yet. I typically wear barefoot zero drop style shoes (xeros), even for hours of pickleball as that was the only thing that cured my plantar fasciitis. However everyone says cushioning is necessary on the camino so I am currently wearing Altra Lone Peak Alpines and have some Lone Peak 7's on order to test along with my Alpines for the walks. It also sounded appealing to wear Chacos to avoid blisters along the route, however, not sure what my feet would look like after that for the wedding LOL.

Bom Caminho, got it!! Thank you!
 
BTW, my comment about losing weight is only meant as something ancillary to what you are undertaking. It will be warm in June and daily mileage of this sort is beyond anyones norm. You seem very straightforward and positive.
I wish you a Bom Caminho!
All of your insight was happily received by me Richmond, no worries there!

Do you think it will be hard to stay low carb on The Way? I will be doing a post about this askin folk's opinions, I am a little worried about over indulging in too many treats along the way.
 
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You don't say where you want to start, but most people recommend to start in Porto rather than Lisbon. I have not taken this route, but I think it could also be quite hot in June.
Hello! I will be starting in Porto. I am nervous about the temps to be honest! But I have this wedding in Portugal on 6/29 and it only gets hotter in July, so, that's where I am at! I am also an early riser by nature, so i was hoping for an early 5am start.

I am very nervous about the temperature but trying not to dwell on it and make it scare me out of the walk! I walk to work in the 55F temps here and am sweating after 4 miles.
 
Pronunciation guide - the "nh" in Caminho makes a sound like the ñ in Spanish.
And I don't believe the "m" in "Bom" is exactly pronounced, if we are getting particular about pronunciation. It just serves to nasalize the preceding "o". So it sounds like "bon" if you don't pronounce the "n" but say the "o" as if you were going to. There - is that complicated enough?
 
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I am very nervous about the temperature but trying not to dwell on it and make it scare me out of the walk! I walk to work in the 55F temps here and am sweating after 4 miles.
Welcome! If you walk the board walks along the Senda Litoral the ocean breezes really make a huge difference. There isn't much shade but I found it quite tolerable even when it was supposedly in the 80s. There are also frequent water stations where you can wash your feet if you've gone wading in the ocean. We walked a few days on the central and it was almost unbearably hot.
 
Welcome! If you walk the board walks along the Senda Litoral the ocean breezes really make a huge difference. There isn't much shade but I found it quite tolerable even when it was supposedly in the 80s. There are also frequent water stations where you can wash your feet if you've gone wading in the ocean. We walked a few days on the central and it was almost unbearably hot.
Ahh!! Thanks for your input. I thought maybe the central way was more shaded with trees etc! But maybe sticking on the coast is “the way”.
 
And I don't believe the "m" in "Bom" is exactly pronounced, if we are getting particular about pronunciation. It just serves to nasalize the preceding "o". So it sounds like "bon" if you don't pronounce the "n" but say the "o" as if you were going to. There - is that complicated enough?
Haha I can do complicated! I feel like nothing is worse than the nonsensical nature of the English language lol!
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
And I don't believe the "m" in "Bom" is exactly pronounced, if we are getting particular about pronunciation. It just serves to nasalize the preceding "o". So it sounds like "bon" if you don't pronounce the "n" but say the "o" as if you were going to. There - is that complicated enough?
So kinda like “boh camiño”?
 
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Welcome! you can already call yourself a pilgrim, as you have commited yourself to do the walk. Consider yourself "A pilgrim in progress!".

Your biggest decision has already been taken: Walk the Camino!

Use the Search function (Menu bar upper right on the screen) to search for topics before you post new threads: There are tons of information here on the world's largest Camino community.

I would advice against the central Way: I am 150 lbs, a Camino veteran, and I was much in pain under my feet on the CP Central, due to extensive walking on cobblestones/setts (stone paved walk). You being slightly heavier than me, may feel even worse. I second the advice above on walking along the breazy seaside. Once you enter Spain, it is all well. End of cobblestones and setts.

Bom Caminho!
 

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Welcome! you can already call yourself a pilgrim, as you have commited yourself to do the walk. Consider yourself "A pilgrim in progress!".

Your biggest decision has already been taken: Walk the Camino!

Use the Search function (Menu bar upper right on the screen) to search for topics before you post new threads: There are tons of information here on the world's largest Camino community.

I would advice against the central Way: I am 150 lbs, a Camino veteran, and I was much in pain under my feet on the CP Central, due to extensive walking on cobblestones/setts (stone paved walk). You being slightly heavier than me, may feel even worse. I second the advice above on walking along the breazy seaside. Once you enter Spain, it is all well. End of cobblestones and setts.

Bom Caminho!
Thank you so much for the advice! A Pilgrim in Progress, I love it!
 
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Hey. Welcome to the fold. Done the trek from Porto. It’s incredibly straight forward and I can’t imagine you will have any issues at all! You seem to have a fair chunk of time to do it so you can relax.
 
Hey. Welcome to the fold. Done the trek from Porto. It’s incredibly straight forward and I can’t imagine you will have any issues at all! You seem to have a fair chunk of time to do it so you can relax.
This gives me such confidence, thank you thank you!
 
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This gives me such confidence, thank you thank you!
Walking (any) Camino is much easier than you and most/all other firsttimers think/fear. The most difficult part of the whole adventure is the decision to get on with it. You have already taken that decision. Good on you.

Then:

You should get a guide book/app for your Camino. I recommend the app for CP by @wisepilgrim. Easy.
Plan your pack/clothes (Search the forum). Easy.
You need to have a travel plan and booking sequence to get to your starting point. Easy.
You should book a place to stay upon arrival (Porto in your case), for ease of mind. Easy.

Daily while on the Camino:

You should start walking next (early) morning to a place you know (from your guide book/app) you can reach by foot. Your app will give you distances/problems/sights/etc. Easy.
Book ahead if you are afraid of not finding a bed. My recommended app will give you your options. Easy.
Settle in at your place for the night. Easy.
Wash your clothes and prepare your pack for your next day. Easy.
Find out where you should be heading out next morning. In the day/afternoon's light. very comforting. Easy.
Find a place to eat or buy food. Easy.
Go to your bed and sleep. Easy.

Repeat for all other days.

One day you will arrive in Santiago de Compostela, wondering why you thought this would be difficult. Easy.

Enjoy tapas and vino tinto in SdC (I recommend Do Bispo in Rua Franco) with newfound Camino friends. Easy.

Take a bus/train/plane from Santiago to the place of that wedding. Easy.

All in all: Easy. Relax and prepare for a lifetime experience.
 
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Portuguese Coastal Way with maybe some Spiritual route in there from June 6 - June 26th
Hi Lauren!
Welcome to the forum.
The Coastal ,Senda Littoral and the Spiritual Variant were my first Camino in 2021;they were a great choice for a first walk.
I love the sea and it's an easy walk out of Porto.
It's pretty much flat along the boardwalks which are easy on your feet and legs.
Once you turn inland its pavement, road and woodland tracks no significant hills!
The Spiritual after Pontevedra is a wonderful walk.
I said i will do it again one day; well that one day has come sooner than i thought!
Going again in May with my sister in law ;as she doesn't want to do the English way from Ferrol as planned.
You have plenty of time to do both of those you mentioned ,
even with some rest days !
You will love it.
Buen Camino (Spanish version:))
Woody
EDIT: Good advice from Alex above!!
 
Walking (any) Camino is much easier than you and most/all other firsttimers think/fear. The most difficult part of the whole adventure is the decision to get on with it. You have already taken that decision. Good on you.

Then:

You should get a guide book/app for your Camino. I recommend the app for CP by @wisepilgrim. Easy.
Plan your pack/clothes (Search the forum). Easy.
You need to have a travel plan and booking sequence to get to your starting point. Easy.
You should book a place to stay upon arrival (Porto in your case), for ease of mind. Easy.

Daily while on the Camino:

You should start walking next (early) morning to a place you know (from your guide book/app) you can reach by foot. Your app will give you distances/problems/sights/etc. Easy.
Book ahead if you are afraid of not finding a bed. My recommended app will give you your options. Easy.
Settle in at your place for the night. Easy.
Wash your clothes and prepare your pack for your next day. Easy.
Find out where you should be heading out next morning. In the day/afternoon's light. very comforting. Easy.
Find a place to eat or buy food. Easy.
Go to your bed and sleep. Easy.

Repeat for all other days.

One day you will arrive in Santiago de Compostela, wondering why you thought this would be difficult. Easy.

Enjoy tapas and vino tinto in SdC (I recommend Do Bispo in Rua Franco) with newfound Camino friends. Easy.

Take a bus/train/plane from Santiago to the place of that wedding. Easy.

All in all: Easy. Relax and prepare for a lifetime experience.
Wow, parceled out it does sound quite “easy”. Can’t wait! Thank you for your insight!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
bringing my then 9yo daughter

This is actually a thread from someone who walked the Francés, but it might be useful info about walking with young children, and you´ll find a lot of threads and posts here about walking with children. I have seen quite a few families walking and the kids all seem to be having a whale of a time. Spain and Portugal are child-friendly cultures, although be warned they are very relaxed about bed times.
 
Ama
Hi Lauren!
Welcome to the forum.
The Coastal ,Senda Littoral and the Spiritual Variant were my first Camino in 2021;they were a great choice for a first walk.
I love the sea and it's an easy walk out of Porto.
It's pretty much flat along the boardwalks which are easy on your feet and legs.
Once you turn inland its pavement, road and woodland tracks no significant hills!
The Spiritual after Pontevedra is a wonderful walk.
I said i will do it again one day; well that one day has come sooner than i thought!
Going again in May with my sister in law ;as she doesn't want to do the English way from Ferrol as planned.
You have plenty of time to do both of those you mentioned ,
even with some rest days !
You will love it.
Buen Camino (Spanish version:))
Woody
EDIT: Good advice from Alex above!!
Amazing, I’m glad to hear it’s a goood choice for a first! I’m glad you enjoyed it so much that you’re going back! I am not familiar with the Senda Littoral so I will have to look into that! Thanks a bunch!
 

This is actually a thread from someone who walked the Francés, but it might be useful info about walking with young children, and you´ll find a lot of threads and posts here about walking with children. I have seen quite a few families walking and the kids all seem to be having a whale of a time. Spain and Portugal are child-friendly cultures, although be warned they are very relaxed about bed times.
😂😂😂 very relaxed about bedtimes, my daughter will surely love that!! Little Miss will think she’s getting away with murder, ha! Thanks for the link!!
 
Ideal pocket guides for during and after your Camino. Each weighs just 40g (1.4 oz).
Do you think it will be hard to stay low carb on The Way? I will be doing a post about this askin folk's opinions, I am a little worried about over indulging in too many treats along the way.
You can't possibly visit Portugal and not try Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata) ☺️

There are also lots of other temptations in both Portugal and Spain, see

Thread 'Making lemonade' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/making-lemonade.81417/

Thread 'Making lemonade in Leon' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/making-lemonade-in-leon.81784/

Thread 'Valencian breakfast' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/valencian-breakfast.82239/
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Wow, parceled out it does sound quite “easy”.

I agree that ”the drill” is quite easy which is one of the really nice aspects of walking a Camino. It’s like life comes down to the simple routine of walk-eat-sleep-repeat, that may bring you into a state of reflection and peace of mind. Nevertheless, I don’t think it would be wise to start out with the conviction that walking a Camino is like “a walk in the park”, especially if you are not used to long distance walking. There will probably be days when you will feel physically as well as mentally challenged and where you will have to dig deep into your personal resources. I’m not saying this to discourage you in any way (myself being a ‘Camino addict’), it’s all part of the experience.

Anyway, I’m sure you will have a wonderful time and I wish you Bom Caminho/Buen Camino.
 
Amazing, I’m glad to hear it’s a goood choice for a first! I’m glad you enjoyed it so much that you’re going back! I am not familiar with the Senda Littoral so I will have to look into that! Thanks a bunch!
Just means path by the shore; if you walk out of Porto with the Douro river on your left you end up on the Senda!
 

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You can't possibly visit Portugal and not try Portuguese Custard Tarts (Pasteis de Nata) ☺️

There are also lots of other temptations in both Portugal and Spain, see

Thread 'Making lemonade' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/making-lemonade.81417/

Thread 'Making lemonade in Leon' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/making-lemonade-in-leon.81784/

Thread 'Valencian breakfast' https://www.caminodesantiago.me/community/threads/valencian-breakfast.82239/
I will definitely be tasting things! I’m a foodie and love to taste! Would prefer not to be a statistic that gains weight on the walk but whatever! Ha! I will check out the links, thank you!!!
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
Keep up those training walks and dietary changes. The better condition you are physically the more enjoyable your Camino will be and it lessens the chances of your having to stop your Camino due to injuries etc. It's absolutely no fun dragging yourself into an albergue everyday, miserable because the walking was so difficult and painful and dreading doing it again the next day, and the next day, and....
Also don't depend upon walking the Camino to get you in physical condition to walk it. Yes, it does get you into better physical condition, but only if you can walk it in the first place.
Choose your footwear wisely and make a lot of walks in them before you start the Camino. That's the only way of knowing if they'll work for you.
As far as low carb diets go, I've never encountered low carb anything on my Camino Portugues or Camino Frances experiences. Bread, pasta, beer, pizza etc seemed to be daily staples.
 
Keep up those training walks and dietary changes. The better condition you are physically the more enjoyable your Camino will be and it lessens the chances of your having to stop your Camino due to injuries etc. It's absolutely no fun dragging yourself into an albergue everyday, miserable because the walking was so difficult and painful and dreading doing it again the next day, and the next day, and....
Also don't depend upon walking the Camino to get you in physical condition to walk it. Yes, it does get you into better physical condition, but only if you can walk it in the first place.
Choose your footwear wisely and make a lot of walks in them before you start the Camino. That's the only way of knowing if they'll work for you.
As far as low carb diets go, I've never encountered low carb anything on my Camino Portugues or Camino Frances experiences. Bread, pasta, beer, pizza etc seemed to be daily staples.
I heard someone say that they focused so much on reducing their pack weight, they should have focused reducing their bodyweight instead. That is surely my focus the next 6 months.

Thanks for chiming in. I'm trying not to let my weight dissuade me, but it has me nervous for sure. I am planning shorter stages. Right now I am walking 4 miles every day and feel great. Hopefully I can get up to 8-10 miles and still feeling good. I am also always on asphalt here so I am hoping the boardwalks of the Senda Littoral are easier!

I am planning to order off the menu most places when that is an option so that I can order meats and veggies. I will be doing a thread / post about that asking for advice on how to order for protein, not carby foods (which drag my energy down personally). Stay tuned for that!

Thanks RJM.
 
3rd Edition. More content, training & pack guides avoid common mistakes, bed bugs etc
Are you doing your daily walks with or without a backpack with similar weight as on your Camino?
I have been walking with a backpack filled with heavy shoes and clothing because I walk to work and change there! I have yet to weigh the work backpack though. I have a few osprey packs arriving next week, a 28L, 30L, and 38L to test out. I have been throwing a sample of what I plan to carry in a garbage bag on my scale and will throw that in the packs to test them. One day I walked without the backpack and boy was that a dream. It has made me realize I want the lightest pack possible. I am making it a personal pack weight target of 11lbs (incl water food etc) which is (75% of max suggested pack weight of 10% of my ideal body weight of 150lbs).

This is on my mind a lot!
 
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An easy and simple way to add known weight to your pack is to use standard 1/2 litr bottles of water.

One liter of water weighs 2.2 lbs..thus a standard bottle of water is 1 lb.

Weigh your empty pack and then add the number of bottles to match your desired training pack weight.
 
An easy and simple way to add known weight to your pack is to use standard 1/2 litr bottles of water.

One liter of water weighs 2.2 lbs..thus a standard bottle of water is 1 lb.

Weigh your empty pack and then add the number of bottles to match your desired training pack weight.
Oh that is so smart! Thanks for the tip!
 
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Welcome to the forum Lauren.

I'm glad to hear about you previously being athletic. That means you are likely to know your limits and when it is appropriate to ease up on yourself or to try to go a bit beyond.

For a walking fitness plan I normally suggest Aerobics or The New Aerobics by Dr. Kenneth Cooper but he has versions of these books for women too. They are somewhat old but that doesn't mean they are out-of-date. Here's a link for the women's book at an online bookstore:

With your weight I'm concerned about heat problems. The forum's search engine can be used to find threads with umbrella in the thread's title. I did this and it created a temporary page with the search results. You'll have to rerun the search at some point.

 
Welcome to the forum Lauren.

I'm glad to hear about you previously being athletic. That means you are likely to know your limits and when it is appropriate to ease up on yourself or to try to go a bit beyond.

For a walking fitness plan I normally suggest Aerobics or The New Aerobics by Dr. Kenneth Cooper but he has versions of these books for women too. They are somewhat old but that doesn't mean they are out-of-date. Here's a link for the women's book at an online bookstore:

With your weight I'm concerned about heat problems. The forum's search engine can be used to find threads with umbrella in the thread's title. I did this and it created a temporary page with the search results. You'll have to rerun the search at some point.

Hi Rick! I am concerned with the heat too. My ideal camino walk would probably happen in the winter, I love braving the cold. The family wedding bookending the trip has me traveling in June and I'm nervous about the heat. Umbrella sounds like a great idea. Thank you for sending the search along.

I will check out the book by Dr. Kenneth Cooper. Thanks for the recommend!
 
I heard someone say that they focused so much on reducing their pack weight, they should have focused reducing their bodyweight instead. That is surely my focus the next 6 months.

Thanks for chiming in. I'm trying not to let my weight dissuade me, but it has me nervous for sure. I am planning shorter stages. Right now I am walking 4 miles every day and feel great. Hopefully I can get up to 8-10 miles and still feeling good. I am also always on asphalt here so I am hoping the boardwalks of the Senda Littoral are easier!

I am planning to order off the menu most places when that is an option so that I can order meats and veggies. I will be doing a thread / post about that asking for advice on how to order for protein, not carby foods (which drag my energy down personally). Stay tuned for that!

Thanks RJM.
Bread is always available but you don't have to eat it. We just ordered seafood and a mixed salad. The most basic salads were delicious in Portugal! So fresh and perfectly dressed. Breakfast could take some work but that's true everywhere. Just buy fruit, yoghurt, nuts, etc. the night before and then stop for coffee.
I have a friend about your weight that walked the Frances. She did 10k a day, stopped every hour, took her socks and shoes off and elevated them. She had a wonderful time and is planning to do it again. You got this!
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Hi Lauren, welcome and Buen Camino! I know you said you'd be asking specific questions in future posts, but because this caught my eye now, I wanted to pass along a video that you might find useful, from Jeremiah who posts as 'Camino Guide' on YouTube (he's a great person and his videos are so informative and helpful!). He occasionally talks about being overweight on the Camino, so he could be a good resource if you have questions or concerns. Here's a recent video:
 
I have been walking with a backpack filled with heavy shoes and clothing because I walk to work and change there! I have yet to weigh the work backpack though. I have a few osprey packs arriving next week, a 28L, 30L, and 38L to test out. I have been throwing a sample of what I plan to carry in a garbage bag on my scale and will throw that in the packs to test them. One day I walked without the backpack and boy was that a dream. It has made me realize I want the lightest pack possible. I am making it a personal pack weight target of 11lbs (incl water food etc) which is (75% of max suggested pack weight of 10% of my ideal body weight of 150lbs).

This is on my mind a lot!
Before my 1st Camino, I bought a backpack with size that would pass as a carry-on. Advantages:
  • Your pack is always with you. No lost luggage.
  • You don't have to pay extra air fare for it (or just minimum).
  • You can leave the airport directly after landing. No waiting.
  • You don't have to wait in line for baggage drop on departure.
  • You will look cool and very much a "real" pilgrim. :cool:
  • Most importantly: It will not allow you to pack excessive, so you don't have to dump items you really do not need for your Camino, underway. Many don't get it until they have started their walk. Too late.
Also most importantly: Leave at home your hair dryer, beautybox, evening dress, and all that other "woman/man necessities": On the Camino, nobody will care or notice the effects of you using such items: In the afternoon/evenings, you will want food and sleep. So will the rest of us. Really. We are all about the basics.

To sum up packing advice: Ask yourself the following questions for each and every item:
  • Do I really need to bring this item? If yes: Pack it.
  • Would this item be nice to have? If yes: Drop it.
In several albergues you will find a donativo box, containing items free for grabbing, that other pilgrims have found completely needless for walking a Camino, and have left behind to lessen their backpack weight. Wasted money for them; a bargain (or not) for you.

Everything you can buy at home, you can buy in Portugal/Spain. Cheaper and most likely better. Portugal/Spain are very civilized 1st world countries: More than both yours and mine, and most other countries as well, with a rich and grand history. You may be surprised, when on the ground.

Edit: All you need for the wedding; hair dryer, beauty box, dresses, jewelry, shoes, presents, etc., and more, can be flown in by your husband (at his expenses...). Transformation from a true pilgrim in rural Portugal/Spain to a styled wedding guest with (much) less lbs will be formidable. Having done the Camino, you will be very popular that evening. Send us a picture. :cool:

Bom Caminho!
 
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Hi Rick! I am concerned with the heat too. My ideal camino walk would probably happen in the winter, I love braving the cold. The family wedding bookending the trip has me traveling in June and I'm nervous about the heat. Umbrella sounds like a great idea. Thank you for sending the search along.

I will check out the book by Dr. Kenneth Cooper. Thanks for the recommend!
I walked the Camino Portugues (central route) in August and didn't find it too be too warm at all. Quite pleasant, actually. I walked the Frances in June several years ago and found it to be nice weather that time of year, cool morning and nights and sunny pleasant days. Got cold at times when I reached Galicia.
Research online the weather for the days and locations from past years you plan on walking the Portugues. Some sites allow you to do this. You can look at that weather for the past 2-3 years and figure out an average and what to expect.
It's difficult to base weather by asking for opinions on sites like this. Someone might say it was dreadfully hot at 80F whereas I find that to be quite nice, especially with low humidity. They'll say mornings in the high 40's F are too cold, but to me that's perfect and I'm in t-shirt and shorts walking it.
Can't beat the science of an actual recorded forecast.
 
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I walked the Camino Portugues (central route) in August and didn't find it too be too warm at all. Quite pleasant, actually. I walked the Frances in June several years ago and found it to be nice weather that time of year, cool morning and nights and sunny pleasant days. Got cold at times when I reached Galicia.
Research online the weather for the days and locations from past years you plan on walking the Portugues. Some sites allow you to do this. You can look at that weather for the past 2-3 years and figure out an average and what to expect.
It's difficult to base weather by asking for opinions on sites like this. Someone might say it was dreadfully hot at 80F whereas I find that to be quite nice, especially with low humidity. They'll say mornings in the high 40's F are too cold, but to me that's perfect and I'm in t-shirt and shorts walking it.
Can't beat the science of an actual recorded forecast.
Great idea. I’ve been researching it a bit but never put pen to paper in it. I love a good 40F morning too. My daily walk to work is 20F and the walk home is 40F. Maybe I’ll waste some
more time planning and put together a spreadsheet, ha.
 
Here's a good site for historical weather patterns

Ooo thank you for this, what a great tool!

 
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