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Long haul flying

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Caligal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
I am getting ready for my 2nd Camino flying out of LAX non stop to Madrid. Last trip I was very lucky to have a 1/2 full plane so for much of the flight I had 2 seats. I’m sure this year I won’t be so lucky so I’ve been looking at this leg sling. The google reviews are 50/50 I’m curious if any fellow forum members have used one or seen one in use. Being its only $10. I would leave it in Madrid so carrying the extra weight would not influence my decision. Feedback please. Thanks Dee91A76952-147D-455F-90D8-E737D304F9D9.jpeg
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
SJPDP-Finisterre X 2 - 2016 & 2017, El Norte - Irun to Vilalba 2018
I am getting ready for my 2nd Camino flying out of LAX non stop to Madrid. Last trip I was very lucky to have a 1/2 full plane so for much of the flight I had 2 seats. I’m sure this year I won’t be so lucky so I’ve been looking at this leg sling. The google reviews are 50/50 I’m curious if any fellow forum members have used one or seen one in use. Being its only $10. I would leave it in Madrid so carrying the extra weight would not influence my decision. Feedback please. Thanks DeeView attachment 61098
Check with your airline. Many don't allow such devices.
 

Karl Oz

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances
Portuguese
Aragones
Sanabres
Piamonte
Elizabethpfad
It looks as though it hangs from the seat in front of you. You will be irritating its occupant if you are moving about in your seat with your legs hanging in this thing. Also, the picture shows legs extended at an angle unlikely to be achieved in economy class. Something to consider...
 

kazrobbo

Tassie Kaz
Camino(s) past & future
CF(2012)
CP(2015)
St Olavs Way Norway(2016)
88 Temples Japan(2017)
PWC & VF(2019)
Israel (2020)
I am getting ready for my 2nd Camino flying out of LAX non stop to Madrid. Last trip I was very lucky to have a 1/2 full plane so for much of the flight I had 2 seats. I’m sure this year I won’t be so lucky so I’ve been looking at this leg sling. The google reviews are 50/50 I’m curious if any fellow forum members have used one or seen one in use. Being its only $10. I would leave it in Madrid so carrying the extra weight would not influence my decision. Feedback please. Thanks DeeView attachment 61098
Airlines don't allow these as it would impede your ability to move in an emergency & also blocks the path of others.
Even if it was allowed, I agree with @Karl Oz there wouldn't be room in economy...& in other classes you wouldn't need such a thing! 😄
👣 🌏
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
My 5’ tall wife used one in her economy seat the last time we flew and swears by it! 👍. It does NOT work like the photo since no plane has that type of room, but instead provided a place to put her feet against since they usually dangle a few inches above the floor. As light travelers, she did not have a personal item big enough to serve as a footrest instead. Also, she often used it in the evenings to elevate her feet by hanging it from the underside of the top bunk.

If you are short, you might want to consider it.
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
I don't have a magic trick to ensure that I get an empty row, but there are a few things in my control that make my long haul economy experience better:
1) Start out well rested.
Some people have told me that they sleep better on the plane if they start out sleep deprived. Well, each person must go with what works for him/her. I can reach a state of partial slumber (not as good as bed sleep) without depriving myself of sleep. And I recover faster from the flight when I start out well rested.
2) Drink water. Only water. Before, during, and after the flight
Ten hours in a cabin with less than 20% humidity will dry you out. Start drinking water and nothing but water before you get to the airport. Keep it up through the flight and for a day after.
3) Avoid the airplane food
That stuff makes me feel meh. I can speculate that it's because it's full of chemicals to prevent it going bad. I have read that Gordon Ramsey, who once designed menus for British Airways First Class declines all meals (the ones he designed) on board. Maybe it's just because his palate is too sophisticated to be satisfied with the output of an industrial kitchen ... or maybe he knows that it's bad. Whenever I have the willpower to eschew all meals on board (which is less than half the time, if I'm honest), I feel better for it.
4) Get up every hour or two to walk a bit and stretch a bit.
That funny-looking, old, guy who's always stretching in the space by the exits. He got old by taking care of himself. He's got the right idea.
5) Start living on local time as soon as possible
Apparently, CIA agents start acclimating to local time before they even leave Langley. Well good for them. I start when I get to my destination. Wake early. Get out into the sunshine (or feel rain on your face) during the day. Go to bed at bedtime and just lie in the dark if you can't sleep.
 

omar504

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2006, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016,2017,2018
I don't have a magic trick to ensure that I get an empty row, but there are a few things in my control that make my long haul economy experience better:
1) Start out well rested.
Some people have told me that they sleep better on the plane if they start out sleep deprived. Well, each person must go with what works for him/her. I can reach a state of partial slumber (not as good as bed sleep) without depriving myself of sleep. And I recover faster from the flight when I start out well rested.
2) Drink water. Only water. Before, during, and after the flight
Ten hours in a cabin with less than 20% humidity will dry you out. Start drinking water and nothing but water before you get to the airport. Keep it up through the flight and for a day after.
3) Avoid the airplane food
That stuff makes me feel meh. I can speculate that it's because it's full of chemicals to prevent it going bad. I have read that Gordon Ramsey, who once designed menus for British Airways First Class declines all meals (the ones he designed) on board. Maybe it's just because his palate is too sophisticated to be satisfied with the output of an industrial kitchen ... or maybe he knows that it's bad. Whenever I have the willpower to eschew all meals on board (which is less than half the time, if I'm honest), I feel better for it.
4) Get up every hour or two to walk a bit and stretch a bit.
That funny-looking, old, guy who's always stretching in the space by the exits. He got old by taking care of himself. He's got the right idea.
5) Start living on local time as soon as possible
Apparently, CIA agents start acclimating to local time before they even leave Langley. Well good for them. I start when I get to my destination. Wake early. Get out into the sunshine (or feel rain on your face) during the day. Go to bed at bedtime and just lie in the dark if you can't sleep.
Not that easy to decline the food if you're on a real longhaul flight..my flight from london to oz will be 14 hours to brunei,4 hours stop over then a quick 7 hours to melbourne..yes 25 ho u r s
 

Raggy

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Not that easy to decline the food if you're on a real longhaul flight..my flight from london to oz will be 14 hours to brunei,4 hours stop over then a quick 7 hours to melbourne..yes 25 ho u r s
I've done my share of trips like that. I don't find it easy to turn down food on any long-haul flight; more because of boredom than hunger. But when I do, I feel better. Bring a couple of bananas and a sandwich from home if you're worried that you'll faint from hunger. You might find that it works for you too.
 

Caligal

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF April 4- May 12, 2018
CP April 2019
I don't have a magic trick to ensure that I get an empty row, but there are a few things in my control that make my long haul economy experience better:
1) Start out well rested.
Some people have told me that they sleep better on the plane if they start out sleep deprived. Well, each person must go with what works for him/her. I can reach a state of partial slumber (not as good as bed sleep) without depriving myself of sleep. And I recover faster from the flight when I start out well rested.
2) Drink water. Only water. Before, during, and after the flight
Ten hours in a cabin with less than 20% humidity will dry you out. Start drinking water and nothing but water before you get to the airport. Keep it up through the flight and for a day after.
3) Avoid the airplane food
That stuff makes me feel meh. I can speculate that it's because it's full of chemicals to prevent it going bad. I have read that Gordon Ramsey, who once designed menus for British Airways First Class declines all meals (the ones he designed) on board. Maybe it's just because his palate is too sophisticated to be satisfied with the output of an industrial kitchen ... or maybe he knows that it's bad. Whenever I have the willpower to eschew all meals on board (which is less than half the time, if I'm honest), I feel better for it.
4) Get up every hour or two to walk a bit and stretch a bit.
That funny-looking, old, guy who's always stretching in the space by the exits. He got old by taking care of himself. He's got the right idea.
5) Start living on local time as soon as possible
Apparently, CIA agents start acclimating to local time before they even leave Langley. Well good for them. I start when I get to my destination. Wake early. Get out into the sunshine (or feel rain on your face) during the day. Go to bed at bedtime and just lie in the dark if you can't sleep.
Thanks for the tips and link. I have same flight as last year leaving LA at 6 pm so dinner and a couple movies takes me to my usual bed time. When i arrived in Madrid at 3pm i was so tired i immediatly went to hotel and went to sleep for 3 hours big mistake when it was 10 pm i was wide awake☹ Lesson learned! 1st time usually teaches me what to/ not to do next time.
 

Vacajoe

Traded in my work boots for hiking ones
Camino(s) past & future
2019 Biarritz-Pamplona-Lourdes
2018 Aragon/Frances/Finis
2018 Operation Sabre
2018 Marin Ramble
Being wide awake at 10pm in a major Spanish city is simply a great start to a traditional night in Spain! At that “early” hour, you may even get an early bird special at dinner... 😎
 

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