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Looking For a 5-7 Day Easy and Relatively Flat Camino

Stephan the Painter

Veteran Member
Time of past OR future Camino
Frances 2022
I'm looking for a 5-7 day March 2024 easy Camino in Spain. The ideal route is walking on a soft flat trail working my way up from about 10 km a day to 20 km.

It should not end in Santiago and shouldn't be too hilly. And not part of the Camino France. The mild weather in southern Spain in March is attractive.

But anywhere as long as I can get there and back by public transportation. With so many people on this board that have walked so many Camino's, it seems like the perfect place to ask this question. The more suggestions the better! Don’t be shy! Thanks.

Edit: I deleted part of this post and changed the title that seemed to be distracting more from my question instead of helping me get the answers I wanted.
 
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Take a look at these. I think you can find one with fewer hills.
Thanks. I'll take a look. I'm not really familiar with that area.
(And I edited my original post to put less emphasis on the no elevation change part because I think maybe that makes it too difficult in Spain.)
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
The first that comes to mind is the Aragones. When you join the Frances at Obanos or Puenta Le Reina, you could continue from there or make your way back to SJPP.

It’s a fabulous path. 😎. The only downside is a few stages may be longer than you want. GRONZE has all the info.
 
The first that comes to mind is the Aragones. When you join the Frances at Obanos or Puenta Le Reina, you could continue from there or make your way back to SJPP.

It’s a fabulous path. 😎. The only downside is a few stages may be longer than you want. GRONZE has all the info.
Thank you, I'll definitely take a look.
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I've never looked closely at the Aragone, but my sense was that a lot of it through the mountains, and would be very hilly? Also, in March there might be snow?

And I edited my post to more prominently's show the date I was thinking of.
 
Honestly, to me, the BEST place to train is right on the Camino Frances. Start in Pamplona and walk half stages gradually increasing distance. You can always go back and walk the bit from SJPP back into Pamplona. Fully supported. Plenty of places to eat and easily accessed short stages.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Thank you, I'll definitely take a look.
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I've never looked closely at the Aragone, but my sense was that a lot of it through the mountains, and would be very hilly? Also, in March there might be snow?
It officially starts at the Col du Somport on border of France and Spain - but you could start further ‘down the hill’ at Canfranc Estacion. And walk a few short stages. Gronze shows you the options, subject to accommodation being open at the time you want to walk.
 
Honestly, to me, the BEST place to train is right on the Camino Frances. Start in Pamplona and walk half stages gradually increasing distance. You can always go back and walk the bit from SJPP back into Pamplona. Fully supported. Plenty of places to eat and easily accessed short stages.
Good and wise point. But I've done that part both on foot and bike, so I was looking for something new...
 
I'm looking for a 5-7 day March 2024 easy pre-Camino in Spain to get myself in better condition before I start from SJPP. The ideal route is walking on a soft flat trail working my way up from about 10 km a day to 20 km.

With so many people on this board that have walked so many Camino's, it seems like the perfect place to ask this question. It should not end in Santiago and shouldn't be too hilly to break myself in. And not on the Camino France. I am mild weather in southern Spain in March is attractive.

But anywhere as long as I can get there and back by public transportation. The more suggestions the better! Don’t be shy! Thanks.

More:
Originally, I just thought of walking one of the routes that lead to SJPP in France, but I realize that doesn't matter. It might be nicer and easier to do something in the south of Spain, where the weather is more mild at that time of year. The loose plan is to start about April 1 from SJPP.

My last Camino in 2022 was ruined by foot problems and I became a Bicigrino, but finally, things have come together enough that I'm starting to do daily walks and will eventually work myself up to walking a couple of hours a day with a full pack over this winter.

But before I really start walking whole difficult days with a backpack, I want to break myself in slowly and gently to walking long distances so I don't have problems again.

It always seems difficult to get away for enough long walks here. It'll be easier for me once I leave the distractions of my home office. Because of my schedule, I tend to do my walks here after dark and live in a cold and wet snowy place In the winter.
How about the Meseta, start at Burgos (easy to get to), walk to Leon (easy to get back from) . Fits in your timeframe, not too hilly, allows you to stop frequently, and would offer pack transfer for the first few days to ease you into it.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
How about the Meseta, start at Burgos (easy to get to), walk to Leon (easy to get back from) . Fits in your timeframe, not too hilly, allows you to stop frequently, and would offer pack transfer for the first few days to ease you into it.
It's a very good suggestion, nice and flat. And it's something to consider, although I'm hoping to find something new to me.
 
Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
Great that you’re planning another camino Stephan!

One option for your training walk could be what @Camino Chrissy has just done, or a variation of it: starting the Camino de Madrid from Segovia (thus avoiding the mountain pass) and walking for as long as you feel necessary before heading to SJPdP.

Segovia is easy to reach from Madrid and the walk is quite flat from there. It would be around 8 full stages to Sahagún but you could skip around a bit if you want fewer and/or shorter days. The first few days from Segovia are often among sandy pine forests while the last three or so are on the Meseta. Some places you might like to paint include the castle at Coca, the canal de Castilla coming out of Medina de Rioseco and the ruined tower at Tamariz.

Buen camino!
 
Great that you’re planning another camino Stephan!

One option for your training walk could be what @Camino Chrissy has just done, or a variation of it: starting the Camino de Madrid from Segovia (thus avoiding the mountain pass) and walking for as long as you feel necessary before heading to SJPdP.

Segovia is easy to reach from Madrid and the walk is quite flat from there. It would be around 8 full stages to Sahagún but you could skip around a bit if you want fewer and/or shorter days. The first few days from Segovia are often among sandy pine forests while the last three or so are on the Meseta. Some places you might like to paint include the castle at Coca, the canal de Castilla coming out of Medina de Rioseco and the ruined tower at Tamariz.

Buen camino!
Thanks so much for the specific suggestion, both walking and drawing! Very helpful, and I'll take a look.

I pulled up a map, and interestingly every time I look at a map of Spain, my eye goes to Salamanca. And there it was not far from Segovia.....

Edit: And I did read the Camino Madrid post. You're right, it's exactly what I was asking for. And hopefully, I can collect a few more perfect ones because I probably will not decide until a couple of days before I start.

And here's the thread of @Camino Chrissy on the Camino Madrid:

 
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The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Join the Camino Cleanup in May from Ponferrada to Sarria. Registration closes Mar 22.
This past March we walked from Almería to Granada. Two weeks. You could catch a bus to Granada when your time was up. Good training nice albergues great weather friendly people. Buen Camino

That might be a bit hilly for the OP
Thank you. I'll take a look. Maybe I can find a part of it that's not so hilly.
But what do you think @JerryStroebele, do you think that it's too hilly for someone who's looking for a relatively flat and easy training Camino?

I do like being in the south because the weather would be really mild in March. And Granada would be nice to see. I was there 25 years ago for one overnight, and that's not enough.
 
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The best place to train for the Camino is your own neighborhood!

If there are any problems, call a friend to pick you up. If you have a medical problem, see your local doctor. If you need to rest for several days, you can rest a home and try again when better. It's best to train slowly over many months, rather than just a few days.


-Paul
 
Join the Camino Cleanup in May from Ponferrada to Sarria. Registration closes Mar 22.
The best place to train for the Camino is your own neighborhood!

If there are any problems, call a friend to pick you up. If you have a medical problem, see your local doctor. If you need to rest for several days, you can rest a home and try again when better. It's best to train slowly over many months, rather than just a few days.


-Paul
Thanks for the input.

I don't think you carefully read my post. I did say I'm training all winter locally. I just want to top that off with five or so full days of walking on a soft, low-elevation change Camino before I walk across the Pyrenes on day 1! So additional training and a new adventure as well.

But you're right, of course. I'll think about how I can maximize the time I spend training here,

And I'd love to hear if you have any suggestions about my question!
 
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Stephen, For the first couple of days you are walking up a dry river bed. But where the river passes through a gorge, yes you have some steep climbs. Two as I recall. And there is one long stage between Albergues. We called a taxi to pick us up halfway then had the taxi return us to the pick up point the next morning so we could have the satisfaction of walking all of it. I’m 79 so I try to go easily. In the next ten days I will prepare a “slide show “ for the Anchorage Chapter of the American Pilgrims on the Camino for November 21 presentation. You can sign up to participate by Zoom at REI, Anchorage. My wife Mary and my French son in law Julien will be co presenters. Julien by Zoom. Participate and ask questions. If you search the web for the Camino Mozárabe you will find a lot of great information by the Almería Association. Actually a fantastic. Buen Camino
 
Stephen, For the first couple of days you are walking up a dry river bed. But where the river passes through a gorge, yes you have some steep climbs. Two as I recall. And there is one long stage between Albergues. We called a taxi to pick us up halfway then had the taxi return us to the pick up point the next morning so we could have the satisfaction of walking all of it. I’m 79 so I try to go easily. In the next ten days I will prepare a “slide show “ for the Anchorage Chapter of the American Pilgrims on the Camino for November 21 presentation. You can sign up to participate by Zoom at REI, Anchorage. My wife Mary and my French son in law Julien will be co presenters. Julien by Zoom. Participate and ask questions. If you search the web for the Camino Mozárabe you will find a lot of great information by the Almería Association. Actually a fantastic. Buen Camino
Thanks for the additional information, Jerry. And thanks for the heads up about your zoom presentation, I'll take a look.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I'm looking for a 5-7 day March 2024 easy pre-Camino in Spain to get myself in better condition before I start from SJPP. The ideal route is walking on a soft flat trail working my way up from about 10 km a day to 20 km.

With so many people on this board that have walked so many Camino's, it seems like the perfect place to ask this question. It should not end in Santiago and shouldn't be too hilly to break myself in. And not on the Camino France. The mild weather in southern Spain in March is attractive.

But anywhere as long as I can get there and back by public transportation. The more suggestions the better! Don’t be shy! Thanks.

More:
Originally, I just thought of walking one of the routes that lead to SJPP in France, but I realize that doesn't matter. It might be nicer and easier to do something in the south of Spain, where the weather is more mild at that time of year. The loose plan is to start about April 1 from SJPP.

My last Camino in 2022 was ruined by foot problems and I became a Bicigrino, but finally, things have come together enough that I'm starting to do daily walks and will eventually work myself up to walking a couple of hours a day with a full pack over this winter.

But before I really start walking whole difficult days with a backpack, I want to break myself in slowly and gently to walking long distances so I don't have problems again.

It always seems difficult to get away for enough long walks here. It'll be easier for me once I leave the distractions of my home office. Because of my schedule, I tend to do my walks here after dark and live in a cold and wet snowy place In the winter.
Not sure how much training you will have done and over what distances. Three months training is the ideal. A marathon runner doesn’t decide only a little time before.
The CF is like back to back half marathons at a walking pace week after week. Nearly 2 million steps in total.
If there is no alternative one one wise saying is “ if you want to finish like a young person, start off like an old one. Slowly and short distances.”
A week on the CF before StJpdp is a suggestion through Basque areas. Fabulous food
Buen Camino.
 
Not sure how much training you will have done and over what distances. Three months training is the ideal. A marathon runner doesn’t decide only a little time before.
The CF is like back to back half marathons at a walking pace week after week. Nearly 2 million steps in total.
If there is no alternative one one wise saying is “ if you want to finish like a young person, start off like an old one. Slowly and short distances.”
A week on the CF before StJpdp is a suggestion through Basque areas. Fabulous food
Buen Camino.
Thanks for your answer. You're absolutely right about everything you say about training. But since I'm not actually asking about training, I changed my post so we would stop talking about training.

"A week on the CF before StJpdp is a suggestion through Basque areas."

Not sure exactly which route this points to, but I would love to hear it if you have more specific suggestions. Thank you.
 
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Hi Stephen. I don’t know where you are travelling from / to - but a couple of straightforward options to bring you to SJPP via some delightful parts of Pays Basque that could fit your criteria, other than higher temps.

Del Norte from Bayonne to Irun or Irun to Bayonne. Or you could make the return loop in 5-7 days, and take advantage of some alternative sections. . Picturesque, largely by the coast and can be broken into short stages. Easy to make your way to SJPP from either Bayonne or Irun. This would also give you an opportunity to visit the fabulous town of Hondarribia, if you haven’t already.

Le Puy from, say, Arthez de Bearn or Navarrenx to SJPP. Train from Bayonne to Orthez, followed by taxi or possibly bus in the case of Navarrenx. More climbing in this option, but not difficult and you walk directly into SJPP. Some wonderful gites in this area.

Gronze will show you options for elevations for each and accommodation possibilities. 😎

There is also the Voie de la Nive from Bayonne to SJPP. I haven’t walked that path but, from what I’ve read, I think one of the above options may be easier navigation and accommodation wise. And perhaps offer more inspiration for your sketching. 🖼️
 
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Self-guided 4-7 day Walking Packages, Reading Abbey to Southampton, 110 kms
Any part of the Plata/Sanabres that includes Zamora. Z - Puebla de Sanabria perhaps. The valley of the Rio Tera is special and has many places to keep your brushes busy. And personally, as I've said before, I always want to see more o' Zamora. And I can only imagine what you would make of the ruins of the monasterio at Moreruela, just beyond Granja.
 
I just want to top that off with five or so full days of walking on a soft, low-elevation change Camino before I walk across the Pyrenes on day 1!

If you train sufficiently at home, you *will* be ready for the Pyrenes on Day 1. If you need to train more in Spain, then your training at home was not good enough.

I suggest erring on over-training at home so that the Camino will be easier than expected. That's much better then under-training and have the Camino be harder than what was expected.

The exception is the last week before travel where you should only do light training to prevent injury before your trip.


-Paul
 
I'm looking for a 5-7 day March 2024 easy Camino in Spain. The ideal route is walking on a soft flat trail working my way up from about 10 km a day to 20 km.

It should not end in Santiago and shouldn't be too hilly. And not part of the Camino France. The mild weather in southern Spain in March is attractive.

But anywhere as long as I can get there and back by public transportation.
Stephan, another route to consider is the new camino Ruta del Argar that starts in Almeria.

Here's how it measures up to your goals:
--It's in southern Spain.
--The first stages are parallel to the coast and have few elevation changes.
--The walking is mostly on dirt and gravel tracks. There is about 1 km of sand on Day 2 below, and about 7 km of pavement on Day 3 below.
--5-7 days working up from 10 to 20 km: If you break stage 1 into two days, it would look like this:
Day 1 Almeria to El Alquian 12.5 km. completely flat
Day 2 El Alquian to Cabo de Gata, 13 km, completely flat
Day 3 Cabo de Gata to San José, 20.3 km, 2 climbs 98 meters and 141 meters
Day 4 Local loop walk to Los Escullos, 23 km, 100 meter climb
Day 5 Local walk to beach where an Indiana Jones segment was filmed, 16 km, 100 meter climb
Day 6 Bus from San Jose back to Almeria
Stages 6-9 of this route are also pretty flat, but the stages from Las Negras to Mojacar have a lot of steep stretches.
--There is public transportation back to Almeria
--There are things to paint each day: watchtowers, Noria wheels, dramatic rock formations on the beaches

Let me know if you want more information or tracks for the local walks.
 
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€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Hi Stephen. I don’t know where you are travelling from / to - but a couple of straightforward options to bring you to SJPP via some delightful parts of Pays Basque that could fit your criteria, other than higher temps.

Del Norte from Bayonne to Irun or Irun to Bayonne. Or you could make the return loop in 5-7 days, and take advantage of some alternative sections. . Picturesque, largely by the coast and can be broken into short stages. Easy to make your way to SJPP from either Bayonne or Irun. This would also give you an opportunity to visit the fabulous town of Hondarribia, if you haven’t already.

Le Puy from, say, Arthez de Bearn or Navarrenx to SJPP. Train from Bayonne to Orthez, followed by taxi or possibly bus in the case of Navarrenx. More climbing in this option, but not difficult and you walk directly into SJPP. Some wonderful gites in this area.

Gronze will show you options for elevations for each and accommodation possibilities. 😎

There is also the Voie de la Nive from Bayonne to SJPP.🖼️
Great suggestions. I'll take a look. I have some friends not too far from Bayonne, and I love that part of the world, although I've never hiked there.

I seem to remember seeing elevation and topographic information somewhere on Gronze , but for the life of me, I can't find it when I go to their website?
 
Any part of the Plata/Sanabres that includes Zamora. Z - Puebla de Sanabria perhaps. The valley of the Rio Tera is special and has many places to keep your brushes busy. And personally, as I've said before, I always want to see more o' Zamora. And I can only imagine what you would make of the ruins of the monasterio at Moreruela, just beyond Granja.
I thank you, I'll take a look. I don't know anything about that area.
 
Great suggestions. I'll take a look. I have some friends not too far from Bayonne, and I love that part of the world, although I've never hiked there.

I seem to remember seeing elevation and topographic information somewhere on Gronze , but for the life of me, I can't find it when I go to their website?
Here you go - the page for starting del Norte from Bayonne


Under the map, on the left you’ll see Ver Perfil de la etapa, and on the right hand side you’ll see a plus sign - click the plus sign to reveal the elevation profile of that section . 😎
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Stephan, another route to consider is the new camino Ruta del Argar that starts in Almeria.

Here's how it measures up to your goals:
--It's in southern Spain.
--The first stages are parallel to the coast and have few elevation changes.
--The walking is mostly on dirt and gravel tracks. There is about 1 km of sand on Day 2 below, and about 7 km of pavement on Day 3 below.
--5-7 days working up from 10 to 20 km: If you break stage 1 into two days, it would look like this:
Day 1 Almeria to El Alquian 12.5 km. completely flat
Day 2 El Alquian to Cabo de Gata, 13 km, completely flat
Day 3 Cabo de Gata to San José, 20.3 km, 2 climbs 98 meters and 141 meters
Day 4 Local loop walk to Los Escullos, 23 km, 100 meter climb
Day 5 Local walk to beach where an Indiana Jones segment was filmed, 16 km, 100 meter climb
Day 6 Bus from San Jose back to Almeria
Stages 6-9 of this route are also pretty flat, but the stages from Las Negras to Mojacar have a lot of steep stretches.
--There is public transportation back to Almeria
--There are things to paint each day: watchtowers, Noria wheels, dramatic rock formations on the beaches

Let me know if you want more information or tracks for the local walks.
That does sound wonderful ! I'm going to look closely at that. Thanks so much for the detailed information. It would be really nice after coming from the cold north where I live to end up on a southern Spanish beach in March!

And you're the second person who suggested leaving from Almeria, although @JerryStroebele had a different route in mind.

I clicked on the links and lots of info on your post. It is practically a guidebook, thank you. I also found the wiki locs links. And do you have yet even more resources? It's probably enough already, but I would indeed like more information about it, although I don't have any specific questions yet.
 
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Get a spanish phone number with Airalo. eSim, so no physical SIM card. Easy to use app to add more funds if needed.
One that doesn't seem to have been mentioned so far is the Camino Ingles - you can do the whole Camino from Ferrol to Santiago in 5-6 days. There are some hills but they are gentle ones and not arduous. I used Gronze and John Brierley's guidebook to divide up into stages that fitted me - about 10-11 miles a day. Worth a look. All the very best with your Camino whichever one you choose!
 
One that doesn't seem to have been mentioned so far is the Camino Ingles - you can do the whole Camino from Ferrol to Santiago in 5-6 days. There are some hills but they are gentle ones and not arduous. I used Gronze and John Brierley's guidebook to divide up into stages that fitted me - about 10-11 miles a day. Worth a look. All the very best with your Camino whichever one you choose!
Thanks for your suggestion!
 
It would be really nice after coming from the cold north where I live to end up on a southern Spanish beach in March!
... And do you have yet even more resources?
You are sure right about the possibility of nice weather! Here's a link to the journal we put on FindPenguins about the Argar. The first stages are especially nice because they go through the protected area of the Parque Natural Cabo de Gata and thus do not have the commercial build-up that dominates so much of the Mediterranean coast.
Below are Wikiloc links to two of the many possible loop trails from San Jose.
Wishing you good luck in finding a route that will be just what you are hoping for...
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
If it's easy and flat and the weather is perfect every day, it's probably not a Camino. It's not supposed to be easy. It's a pilgrimage path.
There are hundreds of easy, short-day hikes available all over the world. You won't find them on this trail network.
 
Perhaps there are different ways of thinking about the Camino, about when it starts and finishes. For me it began 18 months before with a hip replacement and part of the Camino was the work done to get from crutches to the pilgrimage path. Actually walking the pilgrimage path was about thankfulness that I could do it and without too much difficulty. Different people, different paths, different timelines, but a wonderful mix of everyone!
 
If it's easy and flat and the weather is perfect every day, it's probably not a Camino. It's not supposed to be easy. It's a pilgrimage path.
There are hundreds of easy, short-day hikes available all over the world. You won't find them on this trail network.
Well, it seems like there are multiple suggestions that fit much of the criteria, so I beg to differ. I think this question is valuable for people who are physically challenged, like me, or time-challenged.

It sounds like you think what I'm asking for is not really a Camino by your standards, and furthermore, I should stay the heck out of Spain and go walk somewhere else. What a judgmental and unkind comment.
 
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Perhaps there are different ways of thinking about the Camino, about when it starts and finishes. For me it began 18 months before with a hip replacement and part of the Camino was the work done to get from crutches to the pilgrimage path. Actually walking the pilgrimage path was about thankfulness that I could do it and without too much difficulty. Different people, different paths, different timelines, but a wonderful mix of everyone!
I'm assuming you're being supportive of me. Although it could be just the opposite.

But I had similar issues, with a hip surgery, and a failed surgery on my foot that made my ability to walk long distances worse instead of better. I hope to go on after my easy Camino and walk the Camino France this year, which I ended up doing by bicycle a couple of years ago because of foot problems that developed as I walked. But we'll see how it all shakes out!

I'm glad you were able to do it. And I agree. What a wonderful mix of everyone!
 
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One that doesn't seem to have been mentioned so far is the Camino Ingles - you can do the whole Camino from Ferrol to Santiago in 5-6 days. There are some hills but they are gentle ones and not arduous. I used Gronze and John Brierley's guidebook to divide up into stages that fitted me - about 10-11 miles a day. Worth a look. All the very best with your Camino whichever one you choose!
Thank you, I'll also take a closer look at this one, also.
 
Join the Camino Cleanup in May from Ponferrada to Sarria. Registration closes Mar 22.
You are sure right about the possibility of nice weather! Here's a link to the journal we put on FindPenguins about the Argar. The first stages are especially nice because they go through the protected area of the Parque Natural Cabo de Gata and thus do not have the commercial build-up that dominates so much of the Mediterranean coast.
Below are Wikiloc links to two of the many possible loop trails from San Jose.
Wishing you good luck in finding a route that will be just what you are hoping for...
Thank you. Even more information!. I did look at your find penguins, and it's really nice to see it in detail.
 
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Vía Augusta - (Cádiz - Sevilla) is wonderfully flat and full of bird reservations.

A part of the Mozarabe, from Córdoba to Granada, is also nice and flat.
 
Vía Augusta - (Cádiz - Sevilla) is wonderfully flat and full of bird reservations.

A part of the Mozarabe, from Córdoba to Granada, is also nice and flat.
Thank you for your suggestions. I was in Cordoba last year, but never made it to Granada. It would be lovely to do a reverse walk and end up in Granada.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Well, it seems like there are multiple suggestions that fit much of the criteria, so I beg to differ. I think this question is valuable for people who are physically challenged, like me, or time-challenged.

It sounds like you think what I'm asking for is not really a Camino by your standards, and furthermore, I should stay the heck out of Spain and go walk somewhere else. What a judgmental and unkind comment.
you took my statement and filled in the blanks with your own darkness. No one told you to not come and walk. By all means take the suggestions offered here. I hope you enjoy your walk, and your physical challenges are not an issue.
Just don't expect it to be easy.
 
Thank you for your suggestions. I was in Cordoba last year, but never made it to Granada. It would be lovely to do a reverse walk and end up in Granada.
If you do walk this one and end up in Granada, be sure to leave some time to visit the Alhambra. I don't know if being in Granada for the first time and not visiting the Alhambra is technically a crime, but it should be.
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
If you do walk this one and end up in Granada, be sure to leave some time to visit the Alhambra. I don't know if being in Granada for the first time and not visiting the Alhambra is technically a crime, but it should be.
Haha! It would be a crime, although I have been there once in ’98 or ’99. When people still walked around with signs by the train station that said “Zimmer Frei.”
 

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Are there any issues in starting the walk in the afternoon and arriving at the next destination right before the sunset in mid-April so long as you booked your room/bed?

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