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Poor services in stage after Segovia

Time of past OR future Camino
CF 2016
Del Norte, Finesterre 2018
Walking the Madrid at present and it’s beautiful with no problems til after the gorgeous city of Segovia.
We planned to stay in Anes, booking the night before via phone with a reservation saying we’d arrive around 4pm. We don’t speak Spanish but the lady we spoke to was ok with English.
Arrived there, made two phone calls at the Albergue to get in but English not good so we went to the plaza as directed and spotted 3 men rapidly making themselves scare at the Plaza Mayor.
We went into the building and spoke to a young woman at her Pc more interested in her nails than us and were told after speaking to a man on the phone (one of the disappearing 3 it appeared) the Albergue was closed! What? We’d booked yesterday. Much laughter between them on the phone.
We had to walk another 12km to the next village and it was difficult due to our age)
Gronze also states the 2 previous villages had bars, 1 with an Albergue but all closed.
Not complaining but the Madrid Camino is not a good Camino for first timers or non Spanish speakers.
You need to carry food and water which luckily we did - nothing nutritious but it was a filler.
Just saying - disappointed as we’d booked so maybe not a definite if you do book and Gronze may not be up to date so just be prepared.
It’s a beautiful Camino👣👣
 
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@Loretta O'Sullivan Oh dear how disappointing.

It sounds a bit strange though. Was it definitely Añe you had booked for? There is a place called Anes up near the coast.

It is six years since I was there and obviously things may have changed. At that time there was no connection (I think) with the ayuntamiento - we picked up the key from a man in "house no 4" further down the road.

There was nothing in Añe when we were there - no open shop, no open bar.

But I am very impressed at your stalwartness, all of you!!!! 😇

It remains probably my favourite Camino. I hope you have more success in the days ahead. Buen camino.

Tim
 
Definitely Ane…. Typo!
The disappointment certainly made up for it looking back over the vista of mountains, villages and ploughed fields on the way to Santa Maria la Real de Nuevo.
Yes it is a beautiful Camino and I’m sure this was a hiccup but just wanted to let anyone know to be prepared 👣
 
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Definitely Ane…. Typo!
The disappointment certainly made up for it looking back over the vista of mountains, villages and ploughed fields on the way to Santa Maria la Real de Nuevo.
Yes it is a beautiful Camino and I’m sure this was a hiccup but just wanted to let anyone know to be prepared 👣
Yes but it is not the best place for a hiccup! No backup plan there. :eek:
Having said that, it was the quietness and isolation (from time to time) of the CdM that I really appreciated. Plus some very fine towns along the way.
 
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So sorry to hear about your challenges and very glad that you made it to the next town safely.
We stayed in Añe in early March this year.
We had walked in driving rain and 75km/hour winds to arrive soaked and freezing.
Our host in Segovia had to make several calls over the previous day to make contact to reserve a meal and bed.
The old albergue (&bar) is closed but a lovely Bulgarian family are trying to revitalise the town with a bar and a 2 bedroom house two doors down for pilgrims to stay in.
We had a lovely 3 course meal and were able to dry all our soaked clothing & shoes in front of the excellent heater.
If anyone else is heading that way it may be worth asking an earlier Spanish speaking host to ring around in Añe to ensure that the reservation is in the newer arrangement not the old albergue.
Buen camino!
 
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So sorry to hear about your challenges and very glad that you made it to the next town safely.
We stayed in Añe in early March this year.
We had walked in driving rain and 75km/hour winds to arrive soaked and freezing.
Our host in Segovia had to make several calls over the previous day to make contact to reserve a meal and bed.
The old albergue (&bar) is closed but a lovely Bulgarian family are trying to revitalise the town with a bar and a 2 bedroom house two doors down for pilgrims to stay in.
We had a lovely 3 course meal and were able to dry all our soaked clothing & shoes in front of the excellent heater.
If anyone else is heading that way it may be worth asking an earlier Spanish speaking host to ring around in Añe to ensure that the reservation is in the newer arrangement not the old albergue.
Buen camino!
What a challenge to walk in those conditions and it was so fortunate you had a well deserved outcome. So pleased for you.
It was so strange we had made a booking with ‘someone’ who took the call, perhaps the Bulgarian family have the phone number that is listed on Gronze and our interactions had nothing to do the officials we spoke too.
But I think they had a good laugh 😂 on us by their interaction on the phone conversation.
Anyway, I broke my record for the longest ever day walk!! 👣👣
And we survived 💪
BTW we’ve had the very best weather🌞
 
@Loretta O'Sullivan Oh dear how disappointing.

It sounds a bit strange though. Was it definitely Añe you had booked for? There is a place called Anes up near the coast.

It is six years since I was there and obviously things may have changed. At that time there was no connection (I think) with the ayuntamiento - we picked up the key from a man in "house no 4" further down the road.

There was nothing in Añe when we were there - no open shop, no open bar.

But I am very impressed at your stalwartness, all of you!!!! 😇

It remains probably my favourite Camino. I hope you have more success in the days ahead. Buen camino.

Tim
I was delighted to read that this remains your favorite camino. We have walked 8 paths and this remains our favorite. Our experiences were unmatched by any other Camino, including and especially the warmth of the villagers. To be sure, it is not for a first time walker or one who expects a well developed infrastructure. We faced plenty of challenges, but that was part of the overall experience. We have always believed that in the end, the Camino provides, and this was certainly the case on the Madrid. And...if it's not providing... it's not the end!
 
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So sorry to hear about your challenges and very glad that you made it to the next town safely.
We stayed in Añe in early March this year.
We had walked in driving rain and 75km/hour winds to arrive soaked and freezing.
Our host in Segovia had to make several calls over the previous day to make contact to reserve a meal and bed.
The old albergue (&bar) is closed but a lovely Bulgarian family are trying to revitalise the town with a bar and a 2 bedroom house two doors down for pilgrims to stay in.
We had a lovely 3 course meal and were able to dry all our soaked clothing & shoes in front of the excellent heater.
If anyone else is heading that way it may be worth asking an earlier Spanish speaking host to ring around in Añe to ensure that the reservation is in the newer arrangement not the old albergue.
Buen camino!
Looks like the name of the place with the Bulgarian hosts is Bar Añe 😁
 
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One might have hoped the people in the ayuntamiento would have known about it, even if not connected with it.
I think it is extremely unlikely that the ayuntamiento in a town of 69 people would not know about the bar and its albergue. And even if there were a language barrier, it must have been pretty obvious what the peregrinos were looking for. I’m trying hard to find an innocent explanation here, but can’t come up with much.

But on the bright side, the google reviews on the link @timr posted are all outstanding.
 
I think it is extremely unlikely that the ayuntamiento in a town of 69 people would not know about the bar and its albergue. And even if there were a language barrier, it must have been pretty obvious what the peregrinos were looking for. I’m trying hard to find an innocent explanation here, but can’t come up with much.

But on the bright side, the google reviews on the link @timr posted are all outstanding.
As a volunteer camino trainer, I separate walking the Frances, Portugues, Norte, Ingles and Primitivo, all with good infrastructures and higher volumes of pilgrims from the lesser caminos, like the Madrid. I strongly encourage first time peregrinos to walk the Frances, which is indeed the classic. It stands above all others for history, culture, infrastructure, art, architecture, fellowship...I could go on and on.

The lesser walked caminos each have a special character, which is why we keep trying new ones. When we walked the Madrid, we were the only English speakers and we encountered very few other peregrinos. What I teach those who are walking a lesser caminos is the following....and it works:
1. Where to stay. Sit down at a bench in the main plaza of the teeny village if there is no bar in sight or open (which is rare) and act as "the miserable peregrino." Someone will hear or see you and come to your assistance. This, by the way, works in France as well.
2. Food: Despite posted hours and insistence that meals are not served, stand and look miserable. It usually doesn't take much time before the barista sighs and says maybe she or he can put together a bocadillo or even get the cook to whip up a combinado plate. In one place along the way, the cook would only make grilled cheese sandwiches. They were ta die for. We asked for two more!

By the way...it's not hard to act this way after a long day on the camino since one can be very tired, hungry and just plain miserable. BUT...never be pushy, demanding or rude. Being the wounded puppy, regardless of your age, will always bring out the best in people.
 
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What I teach those who are walking a lesser caminos is the following....and it works:

I appreciate that this post is intended to help people who are stranded or who don’t speak good Spanish, but it feels kind of duplicitous to me. I don’t think we want to be instructing people how to act to manipulate others. I know that is not your intention, but I think there is better advice for those who are walking untraveled caminos. Get your Spanish in better shape (and barring that, figure out how to use some app translator); and carry enough food with you to make it further than you expect to have to go. For me one of the real joys of walking untraveled caminos is that you are given frequent opportunities to figure out how to be self-reliant in new and slightly challenging situations, and though you can never be totally prepared for every unexpected twist and turn, you can do a lot to minimize the bad outcomes.
 
Being the wounded puppy, regardless of your age, will always bring out the best in people.
I appreciate that this post is intended to help people
I agree with @peregrina2000 and suspect that the quoted post was intended with humour, but I also found it to be a bit disconcerting.

Being a wounded puppy is definitely not my modus operandi for life, including the Camino.
 
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Walking the Madrid at present and it’s beautiful with no problems til after the gorgeous city of Segovia.
We planned to stay in Anes, booking the night before via phone with a reservation saying we’d arrive around 4pm. We don’t speak Spanish but the lady we spoke to was ok with English.
Arrived there, made two phone calls at the Albergue to get in but English not good so we went to the plaza as directed and spotted 3 men rapidly making themselves scare at the Plaza Mayor.
We went into the building and spoke to a young woman at her Pc more interested in her nails than us and were told after speaking to a man on the phone (one of the disappearing 3 it appeared) the Albergue was closed! What? We’d booked yesterday. Much laughter between them on the phone.
We had to walk another 12km to the next village and it was difficult due to our age)
Gronze also states the 2 previous villages had bars, 1 with an Albergue but all closed.
Not complaining but the Madrid Camino is not a good Camino for first timers or non Spanish speakers.
You need to carry food and water which luckily we did - nothing nutritious but it was a filler.
Just saying - disappointed as we’d booked so maybe not a definite if you do book and Gronze may not be up to date so just be prepared.
It’s a beautiful Camino👣👣
For one thing it is very early. Some places don't open this early.
And Añe has never been open when I was walking through.
Yes, it's a beautiful route!
So sorry for your trouble.
Glad you're ok.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
Way back in the stone age when I first walked the Madrid, Añe was a blot on the Camino trail. There was an albergue there, but it was a pit. The "hospitaleros" were a snarling ancient couple and the one open bar served only potato chips and vermouth.
I am very glad to see someone's taken this on, and opened a civilized place to rest and refresh.
I am sorry the OP had a hard time with the officials. Living in a similar small town with an enterprising Eastern European making a go of a hostal, I suspect a bit of xenophobia. Not every small-town official is happy to share the wealth with interlopers and strangers.
Ugly but true.
 
Way back in the stone age when I first walked the Madrid, Añe was a blot on the Camino trail. There was an albergue there, but it was a pit. The "hospitaleros" were a snarling ancient couple and the one open bar served only potato chips and vermouth.
I am very glad to see someone's taken this on, and opened a civilized place to rest and refresh.
I am sorry the OP had a hard time with the officials. Living in a similar small town with an enterprising Eastern European making a go of a hostal, I suspect a bit of xenophobia. Not every small-town official is happy to share the wealth with interlopers and strangers.
Ugly but true.
Oh I do love a good Vermut though!
 
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I appreciate that this post is intended to help people who are stranded or who don’t speak good Spanish, but it feels kind of duplicitous to me. I don’t think we want to be instructing people how to act to manipulate others. I know that is not your intention, but I think there is better advice for those who are walking untraveled caminos. Get your Spanish in better shape (and barring that, figure out how to use some app translator); and carry enough food with you to make it further than you expect to have to go. For me one of the real joys of walking untraveled caminos is that you are given frequent opportunities to figure out how to be self-reliant in new and slightly challenging situations, and though you can never be totally prepared for every unexpected twist and turn, you can do a lot to minimize the bad outcomes.
This was neither duplicitous nor in jest. It was serious. Here's my reasoning:

1. Practical.. Pride goeth before the fall. I've seen too many pilgrims who are too proud, unable to humble themselves to seek the help they need, whether it's sustainance, accommodations and hygiene, injury, infected foot (there's a long list), their camino ended. If the person had humbled themselves as pilgrims did for centuries and sought the help they needed, they would have been able to continue.

On my first camino, there was no room in the inns in Monjardin. The donativo wouldn't even give us mats to sleep outside. It was extremely hot, and a young Czech couple we were walking with decided to carrying on to Los Arcos. We met them the next day. He was in the hospital with severe heat exhaustion. Their camino was over. I can cite many other cases. And this was on the Frances. On the less traveled caminos, the risks of camino-ending situations are much greater.

2. The spirit of the camino. I realize that today more and more of those on the camino are fully supported (everything booked in advance, meals ready, luggage transported). That's fine. I will never try to second guess their caminos. It's theirs. But as one who has read everything I can about peregrinos over the centuries, let's be clear: the peregrino of today bears no resemblance to those of so many centuries. Many were indeed mendicants, and as mendicants, they came with little, with their humility making them dependent the kindness of the villagers.

I'm not a mendicant; I can pay, and I always pay it forward at low cost of donativos by supplying needed items in the kitchen, showers or bathrooms and paying at least what I would pay in a private albergue. But I also want to feel what millions of pilgrims over the centuries experienced: humbling oneself, depending on the generosity of locals. Every time I have done this on lesser caminos the villagers have embraced me. It's not financial; not at all. It's their time, it's their humanity in being kind to others. And it does bring out a humility that I know is so anathema to many who are proud of their independence, not their dependence, proud of their ability to walk the extra miles, proud of their abilities with the local language. That's fine, and I join them in doing precisely all three of these. But not always, and never with the risk to my health or that of my spouse.

Some call this manipulation. Seriously? Isn't human interaction from the moment we are born seeking what we need? If that's manipulation, guilty as charged. But many of our most memorable camino experiences have been lowering ourselves to be dependent, to be humble, to be at least temporarily a mendicant pilgrim, experiencing what so many others who walked these paths over the centuries experienced.
 
Here's my reasoning:
I've seen too many pilgrims who are too proud, unable to humble themselves to seek the help they need,
I agree with this statement, and all of your reasoning in response to the push back. However, your first post did not communicate any of the subtleties. There is a difference between acting like a wounded puppy as a tactic, which seemed to be the approach you originally presented, and being a wounded puppy who needs help.

Definitely if one needs help, one should ask for it. But that doesn't need to include acting "as the miserable peregrino."
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I think it is extremely unlikely that the ayuntamiento in a town of 69 people would not know about the bar and its albergue. And even if there were a language barrier, it must have been pretty obvious what the peregrinos were looking for. I’m trying hard to find an innocent explanation here, but can’t come up with much.
the way it went in mid-October last year was as follows:
Me and another pilgrim showed up in the village around 2pm. We found the old, closed albergue (still pictured on Gronze) and then went to the little square in front of the Ayuntamiento. We were pretty confident there was an albergue, as Gronze said the albergue was open all year and there had been some recent commentarios referencing acces via the bar. We found the bar but it was closed. Afer an hour of seeing no-one at all in the village, a guy came out of the Ayuntamiento and locked it up. We collared him and he said he'd make a call, which he did. About 45 mins later the guy originally from Bulgaria (I think he's been living in Spain about 20 years) arrived and let us into the albergue and said he and his wife would be back at 7 to open the bar and provide food.
This duly happened. No-one else came into the bar and the couple expressed surprise that the note with the contact phone number was missing from the bar door. We experienced excellent hospitality and a nice albergue, but my 6th sense whispered that this might be a less-than-solid arrangement - everything had worked out well for us, but it might not be like that every night.
Loretta, I'd gently relay your experience to Arturo if you see him at Puente Duero. He takes an interest (officially or unoffcially, I'm not sure) in the workings of the whole of the route.
The good news for you is that Penaflor de Hornija is back open again! :)
 
2. The spirit of the camino. I realize that today more and more of those on the camino are fully supported (everything booked in advance, meals ready, luggage transported). That's fine. I will never try to second guess their caminos. It's theirs. But as one who has read everything I can about peregrinos over the centuries, let's be clear: the peregrino of today bears no resemblance to those of so many centuries. Many were indeed mendicants, and as mendicants, they came with little, with their humility making them dependent the kindness of the villagers.
What I've heard is that it's not SO much different regarding support except for the mere numbers of people walking. Seems those who could afford to have always paid for transport of some sort, carriages, carts, horses, donkeys, and even servants. Is that true? Maybe someone who has studied more can tell us.

As far as mendicants, in all my years walking, I've only seen two - one healed my heart and one healed my hand.
 
Loretta, I'd gently relay your experience to Arturo if you see him at Puente Duero. He takes an interest (officially or unoffcially, I'm not sure) in the workings of the whole of the route.
Thankyou, I will look Arturo up if I can and mention it to him at Puente Duero.
We are in Alcazaren Municipal Albergue tonight and after a microwave hot meal, resting in the most comfortable beds 👣👣
 
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In Santa Maria la Real de Nieva you can also book a room at casa rural Rincón Naif, instead of hostal Avanto. Website: https://www.rinconnaif.com/#contact. Not listed at Gronze
We stayed here after Añe and it was spectacular. The woman (and her partner and mum) who run the Gastrobar was also fabulous.
 
I agree with this statement, and all of your reasoning in response to the push back. However, your first post did not communicate any of the subtleties. There is a difference between acting like a wounded puppy as a tactic, which seemed to be the approach you originally presented, and being a wounded puppy who needs help.

Definitely if one needs help, one should ask for it. But that doesn't need to include acting "as the miserable peregrino."
We had a presentation and discussion here at our national gathering today with some hospitaleros who had served last year. There is a three-day training program that finished this afternoon. Their biggest concern were those who were clearly in trouble who were "acting" as if they were fine. Trying to persuade them to get to a hospital for an examination and possible treatment was like telling them the camino had defeated them. Let's be clear: If one is in distress, one should not be too proud to admit it. And that distress can come in many forms, from hunger to heat to dehyrdration to foot problems to tendonitis., etc.

I know many camino walkers view the camino as a challenge; they want to conquer the camino, adding it to their list of challenges overcome, problems confronted and solved. My mother taught us five kids to live by the following: Life is a mystery to be lived, not a problem to be resolved. To me, the camino is a wonderful mystery to be lived, providing every range of feeling for the senses, from pain to an extraordinary feeling of well being, while giving our inner senses the full range of emotions.

In a lengthy discussion regarding mentoring, we recognized that with the advances in technology, equipment and gear, infrastructure and amenities, the main camino paths bear no comparison to those 20 years ago. How we mentor first-time walkers so depends on where, when, how long, supported, non-supported, use of technology, etc. What is a "peregrino" today...or tomorrow? There is no template, no definition.
 
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There's proud, and there's stupid. And then there's delusional.
In my car one day I literally picked up a pilgrim lying along the Way, he could not move another step. A couple of pilgrims helped pour him into the car. He told them I was "his driver," that he'd "summoned" me. He offered them a ride, too.
 
In Santa Maria la Real de Nieva you can also book a room at casa rural Rincón Naif, instead of hostal Avanto. Website: https://www.rinconnaif.com/#contact. Not listed at Gronze
Well, it is now listed in Gronze. It’s so easy to send them a message. They respond promptly and it’s a great way to keep things up to date. I usually get a response within hours, this one took a little longer, almost a day!
 
I might need them tomorrow! Just about to call the Hostal….
 
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Well, it is now listed in Gronze. It’s so easy to send them a message
Thanks for the tip. I’m a member of Gronze now. Today in Tres Cantos, tomorrow to Manzanares el Real. Unfortunatley RayyRosa are not at home this weekend. The hostel La Pedriza was also fully booked this weekend by a large group juniors (contacted the hostel directly by email). Fortunately Manzanares el Real has also some Airbnb appartments. I booked one of these, cheaper than other left alternatives in Manzanares.
 
the way it went in mid-October last year was as follows:
Me and another pilgrim showed up in the village around 2pm. We found the old, closed albergue (still pictured on Gronze) and then went to the little square in front of the Ayuntamiento. We were pretty confident there was an albergue, as Gronze said the albergue was open all year and there had been some recent commentarios referencing acces via the bar. We found the bar but it was closed. Afer an hour of seeing no-one at all in the village, a guy came out of the Ayuntamiento and locked it up. We collared him and he said he'd make a call, which he did. About 45 mins later the guy originally from Bulgaria (I think he's been living in Spain about 20 years) arrived and let us into the albergue and said he and his wife would be back at 7 to open the bar and provide food.
This duly happened. No-one else came into the bar and the couple expressed surprise that the note with the contact phone number was missing from the bar door. We experienced excellent hospitality and a nice albergue, but my 6th sense whispered that this might be a less-than-solid arrangement - everything had worked out well for us, but it might not be like that every night.
Loretta, I'd gently relay your experience to Arturo if you see him at Puente Duero. He takes an interest (officially or unoffcially, I'm not sure) in the workings of the whole of the route.
The good news for you is that Penaflor de Hornija is back open again! :)
For my trip this fall, Peñaflor de Hornija and Alcazaren are the only 2 stops I’ve not been able to prebook. Is it easy to walk into town and get a bed, or is this something I need to have the hospitalero arrange for me the night before?
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
For my trip this fall, Peñaflor de Hornija and Alcazaren are the only 2 stops I’ve not been able to prebook. Is it easy to walk into town and get a bed, or is this something I need to have the hospitalero arrange for me the night before?
We walked into Alcazarén mid March and the Bar Real that usually has the keys was closed so we went to another bar who rang the ‘back up’ option and then collected the key from there. It was easy and there were four sets of bunks so plenty of room for just the two of us. Buen camino!
 
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For my trip this fall, Peñaflor de Hornija and Alcazaren are the only 2 stops I’ve not been able to prebook. Is it easy to walk into town and get a bed, or is this something I need to have the hospitalero arrange for me the night before?
My experience at Alcazaren last October different from Jeny's, with equally good outcome: Bar Real was closed but Ayuntamiento was open (Thursday) and they were happy to supply keys/accept donativo etc.
 
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@Loretta O'Sullivan Oh dear how disappointing.

It sounds a bit strange though. Was it definitely Añe you had booked for? There is a place called Anes up near the coast.

It is six years since I was there and obviously things may have changed. At that time there was no connection (I think) with the ayuntamiento - we picked up the key from a man in "house no 4" further down the road.

There was nothing in Añe when we were there - no open shop, no open bar.

But I am very impressed at your stalwartness, all of you!!!! 😇

It remains probably my favourite Camino. I hope you have more success in the days ahead. Buen camino.

Tim
Something similar happened to me on April 8th. I had confirmed, via WhatsApp, with the bar owner in Añe that the albergue was open and I could pick-up the keys from him at the bar; however, upon arrival the bar was closed and was told by (via WhatsApp and telephone) the bar owner he wasn’t responsible for the albergue or keys. Luckily, some lovely people of Añe helped me out and found the keys for the albergue. The bar did open at 1900 but no food was being served.
 
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Also, I expected to finish my Camino de Madrid today but ~5km from Sahagún I spied a castle and made a side trip to Grajal de Campos and discovered that the town also had, perhaps, the loveliest albergue of my entire trip. Sahagún can wait a day. I am also birding as I trek and had the wonderful fortune of seeing Great Bustards near Santervás de Campos and Grajal de Campos. The male Great Bustards look like ships moving through the grass…they are HUGE.
 
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Also, I expected to finish my Camino de Madrid today but ~5km from Sahagún I spied a castle and made a side trip to Grajal de Campos and discovered that the town also had, perhaps, the loveliest albergue of my entire trip. Sahagún can wait a day. I am also birding as I trek and had the wonderful fortune of seeing Great Bustards near Santervás de Campos and Grajal de Campos. The male Great Bustards look like ships moving through the grass…they are HUGE.
When we stayed in Grajal, it was just us and a Danish pilgrim, who had been EVERYWHERE as a walker. I agree; it is one of the best, cleanest and convenient albergues on any camino.

We went to the bar for lunch, but they weren't serving. The bar keep could see we were starving, so he phoned his mom to make lunch for us. Wow! She delivered it to our table. One of the best meals we ever had on any caminl
 
Something similar happened to me on April 8th. I had confirmed, via WhatsApp, with the bar owner in Añe that the albergue was open and I could pick-up the keys from him at the bar; however, upon arrival the bar was closed and was told by (via WhatsApp and telephone) the bar owner he wasn’t responsible for the albergue or keys. Luckily, some lovely people of Añe helped me out and found the keys for the albergue. The bar did open at 1900 but no food was being served.
Give Ane a wide berth would be my advice to anyone - no organisation with the Albergue presently. The outside is very rundown, uncared for and I don’t think pilgrims are welcomed??
The Albergues at Alcazaren, Puento Duero and Penaflor de Hornija were all excellent.
We are in Medina de Rioseco tonight and missed the Monasterio de Santa Clara because of a wrong turn so staying in a good hostal, more’s the pity but too tired to walk that little bit further and all the food was close by.
 
Staying in Coca tonight at the albergue. A Danish peregrino also has an unfortunate experience with Bar Añe and ended up having to take the bus. I tried to post a comment on Gronze about the problems but could not get the comment thing to work.
 
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When we stayed in Grajal, it was just us and a Danish pilgrim, who had been EVERYWHERE as a walker. I agree; it is one of the best, cleanest and convenient albergues on any camino.

We went to the bar for lunch, but they weren't serving. The bar keep could see we were starving, so he phoned his mom to make lunch for us. Wow! She delivered it to our table. One of the best meals we ever had on any caminl
My plan had been to walk from Santervas de Campos to Sahagun on my upcoming Camino, which is a very nice distance for me, but you've got me seriously reconsidering stopping earlier in Grajal, with a short walk the next day to Sahagun acting much like a rest day there.
 
Give Ane a wide berth would be my advice to anyone - no organisation with the Albergue presently. The outside is very rundown, uncared for and I don’t think pilgrims are welcomed??
The Albergues at Alcazaren, Puento Duero and Penaflor de Hornija were all excellent.
We are in Medina de Rioseco tonight and missed the Monasterio de Santa Clara because of a wrong turn so staying in a good hostal, more’s the pity but too tired to walk that little bit further and all the food was close by.
I think advising pilgrims to avoid a town where a family is trying to revitalise services is a little bit harsh.
I would suggest again that pilgrims be very careful to ensure that someone who speaks very good Spanish (possibly a local from neighbouring pueblo) has confirmed location of accommodation, meal details and approximate arrival time on the day before.
We could not fault the meal that was provided and the local we met in the plaza mayor was extra friendly and willingly helped us find the location of bar & accommodation.
Just a thought. 🙄
 
My plan had been to walk from Santervas de Campos to Sahagun on my upcoming Camino, which is a very nice distance for me, but you've got me seriously reconsidering stopping earlier in Grajal, with a short walk the next day to Sahagun acting much like a rest day there.
It looks like we will have a similar itinerary, @David Tallan . When you are going to be on the trail? I start from Madrid on 19 May.
 
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I think advising pilgrims to avoid a town where a family is trying to revitalise services is a little bit harsh.
I would suggest again that pilgrims be very careful to ensure that someone who speaks very good Spanish (possibly a local from neighbouring pueblo) has confirmed location of accommodation, meal details and approximate arrival time on the day before.
We could not fault the meal that was provided and the local we met in the plaza mayor was extra friendly and willingly helped us find the location of bar & accommodation.
Just a thought. 🙄
Yes it may be harsh. However, when you’ve rung the number on Gronze for the Albergue and a booking and ETA confirmed and the Albergue appears to be derelict, only to have the officials run away when they see you coming, the secretary saying it’s closed, not knowing a Bulgarian family are unofficially revitalising the town, yes that maybe harsh to say avoid Ane.
Just a thought too 😊
 
and the Albergue appears to be derelict
@Loretta O'Sullivan please check my post #28. The albergue building has been closed for a while and that's why it looks a bit sad. And as I said above, the photo on Gronze is out of date, as it's of the old place you are talking about.
The village has been providing alternative accommodation in a typical house, a few doors along from the bar. When I was there last October it had a full range of facilities, was a pleasant place to stay and was obviously being well looked after.
 
Hi all - it sounds like some people have had some great experiences in Añe, but whatever worked last fall for @peregrino_tom or for @Jeny@53 a couple of weeks ago is not working right now. The woman working in the bar told me a few days ago that there is no place for Peregrinos in Añe. Another pilgrim was also told there are no beds. Maybe there will be again, but right now I would be sure to have a plan B. Los Huertos for a nice short day from Segovia or Hostal Avanto for a big room, huge evening meal, and super typical bar ambiance.
Arturo from Puente Duero has also been hearing about current problems. He said he would try to find out what is going on and get in touch with Gronze to update their info.
 
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Hi all - it sounds like some people have had some great experiences in Añe, but whatever worked last fall for @peregrino_tom or for @Jeny@53 a couple of weeks ago is not working right now. The woman working in the bar told me a few days ago that there is no place for Peregrinos in Añe. Another pilgrim was also told there are no beds. Maybe there will be again, but right now I would be sure to have a plan B. Los Huertos for a nice short day from Segovia or Hostal Avanto for a big room, huge evening meal, and super typical bar ambiance.
Arturo from Puente Duero has also been hearing about current problems. He said he would try to find out what is going on and get in touch with Gronze to update their info.
Thanks @mla1 and very good to hear that Arturo is taking an interest. These smaller local pilgrim associations are so supportive.
 
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My plan had been to walk from Santervas de Campos to Sahagun on my upcoming Camino, which is a very nice distance for me, but you've got me seriously reconsidering stopping earlier in Grajal, with a short walk the next day to Sahagun acting much like a rest day there.
Grajal was wonderful in so many ways.
 

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