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Prices for albergues

Artemis

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2006, Camino Portuguese 2009
#1
Is there a site that has the current prices for each albergue on the Camino Frances? I am trying to make a budget for another trip.
 

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sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#2
Prices charged by albergues

http://caminodesantiago.consumer.es/ is pretty much up-to-date but the albergues run by the church, which operate on a donativo basis now, will probably introduce a compulsory 3 euro charge at all their albergues from January 2008.
Remember that there are also municipal albergues, privately run albergues, some Confraternity run albergues (most which only ask for a donation) and church albergues. Not all charge the same - some might only charge 5 euro but others 10 euro. If you budget for an average of 5 euro you should be alright.
Good luck with your plans!
 

Artemis

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2006, Camino Portuguese 2009
#3
Thanks Sil. As always you came through. Hope you have a safe and wonderful journey this September.
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#4
Albergues etc

You are welcome.

This is a post (on another forum) from a July pilgrim .

Now that I have just returned from a month in Spain, I
wanted to share with you the realities of my own Camino, in hopes that you may gather something helpful from my experiences. Just keep in mind that my friend and I hiked from Leon to Santiago during the first half of July. Also, we tended to favor the private albergues (5-10 euros) rather than the large municipal ones.

1. Leave your sleeping bag at home unless it is particularly small and
light. In every place we stayed, aside from one, we were given a blanket
and a pillow. Pilgrims who hiked the earlier portion had the same comforts. A simple sleeping bag liner seems like a more practical item to take.
2. We only encountered "crowding" in the albergues once. There were three of us and only two beds. Although previous establishments pulled out mats to make more room on the floor, on this occasion we were sent up the hill. It turned out to be a much nicer place to stay in the long run! However, it did cost 8 euros rather than 2, so some Europeans were choosing to sleep in the nearby field. Overall, though, we worried about all the reports of crowding for nothing.
3. Good luck seeing the botafumiero swing. We pushed ourselves to arrive for the Sunday pilgrim mass, hoping to increase our chances. Plus, we were there during the two week festival prior to July 25. Even though we asked all kinds of people when it would swing, all information we were given was wrong, and we were always sent to a different place to find out the schedule. During our three days there, we know there were at least two masses when it was used, but generally the pilgrims were disappointed.
4. We had great tickets on Spanair from Santiago to Madrid for 31 euros
each. I reserved these a couple of months in advance from home, so they are not simply a special pilgrim deal.
5. Everyone has their own method of foot care, so here are a few you can
try. One, use duct tape on hot spots. It stays in place for some and moves for others. Two, buy Compeeds once you get there. They are amazing and better than second skin. Plus, every pharmacy along the way has them, although they are not cheap. Three, use preventative wrappings of cloth tape, although you will need to be thorough. Four, every hour, when you are wisely taking a pack break, take off your boots and air out your feet and socks. Keeping everything comfortable and dry helps to prevent blisters.
6. I didn't take walking sticks because I have never bothered with them as a backpacker. Fortunately, my friend shared hers with me, so we each had one. I would recommend taking a telescoping one with you, especially if you can always remember to take it with you after a panaderia break!
7. There is a great, small topographical map of the Camino available before Leon. If you can find one for yourself, you will appreciate it.
8. Consider staying in the albergue in La Faba if you want to break up the
climb to O Cebreiro.
9. I was so cold in Santiago that I had to buy a sweatshirt in addition to
the warm layer I already had with me. If you imagine Spain as hot and
sunny, which it certainly is in the south where I nearly melted, just be
sure not to underestimate chilly Galicia.
10. As people who hiked "only" 200 kilometers, we managed to fill up every space on our passports. We wanted to collect as many stamps as possible, knowing we would end up with an amazing souvenir. If you would like to do the same, ask everywhere "Tiene un sello?" since the answer will usually be "Si!" One caution though--there are none to be had in Santiago, other than in the Pilgrim Office."
 

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#6
Sillydoll,
Thank you for pasting the postings from another forum of the experience of others who have done the Camino without using the albergues and its limitations. It may not please the purist pilgrims but there are many others who dread the scramble for beds in crowded noisy surroundings with little privacy.

I hope your Camino will be a fulfilling one and we have always read your postings with deep interest, we are sure your forthcoming postings will be read with even more interest as you will be onthe road.

Buen Camino

Grandpa Joe
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
#7
Thank you

Why, thank you Grandpa Joe - you are very kind! I am really looking forward to walking the camino at a more leisurely pace this time. Like Minkey, I do hope that most of the groups have moved on by the time we reach Roncesvalles.
I remember reading a quote from Alamanzor's Caliph (written - I think - in the 1500's) where he said that the crowds of pilgrims on the roads outside Pamplona were so large that he couldn't turn his carriage around! I suppose that if we want to experience a medieval pilgrimage, we might have to experience the crowds as well!
Bendigais,
 

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