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koknesis

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances June/July 2014
Camino Aragones August 2015
Camino Sanabres (Ourense-SdC) August 2015
VdlP 2017
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
35-40, are they daily km? This match my preferences as well :)
The tread is only a part of the issue here. Running shoe cushioning is designed to carry certain weight for the certain time/distance. I have done some 600 km in Asics Pulse. Thread (their propertary abrasive resin) was still ok, but the sole itself collapsed and turned into the "pancake" shape. Clearly overweight - my own + about 10kg backpack. There is a lot more rigid trail runners/mixed terrain shoes to choose from, so you may find a right one I guess.
Edit. and yes, Reebok Rigderider Leather lasted all CF+ Finistere/Muxia both tread and sole ... the mesh was heavily worn though
 
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C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
I'd agree with @koknesis about the tread not being the key issue. I use Brooks Ghost shoes and find that after 800-1000 km, the tread does not look too bad, but the cushioning is noticeably less and my feet tend to get a bit sorer. I'm not a large/heavy person, but my feet are rather fussy.
 

koknesis

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances June/July 2014
Camino Aragones August 2015
Camino Sanabres (Ourense-SdC) August 2015
VdlP 2017
a little OT, or just something more to consider... on CF 40km daily means doing roughly 20 Marathons in row. even if one may enjoy this, I doubt that there is a single running shoe designed to last such load unaffected. The stock insoles usually is the weakest part, so I change them to something more solid like Spenco Ironman or similar from very beginning. Actually well made insoles may run as much as a half of the shoe price, but they are well worth this. And possibly taking a spare pair with is not a bad idea either ..
 
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Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
Most distance runners consider 300-400 miles the life expectancy of shoes for the reasons meantioned above—the soles may look fine but the support is gone. So in theory you could break in a new pair of shoes and they’d die just about in SdC. In some ways regular running shoes might feel better because they’re designed to travel on roads (asphalt) to a large degree while trail shoes assume you won’t be on pavement. I’d say find one pair of each you find comfortable, break them in, and wear one/carry one. You can alternate them depending on the terrain or if they get wet.

anyone’s recommendation won’t be a proven success for you as everyone is different. I’d suggest going to a running shoe store (not a big box like foot locker or even REI but a store designed to sell shoes to runners). Tell them your planned route (asphalt and trail), distances daily and over all, and the weight you will carry. They will measure your feet, watch you walk, look at your current shoes and find some good picks. The size they recommend may be larger than you think you need. Believe them.
Buen Camino!
 

Airfix

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
Hi, walked previously with lightweight gortex lined walking boots for wet days and Merrells for the dryer days. Feet ached and had a few manageable blisters.
So, next Camino (From Porto starting Friday) I'm changing to Hoka Arahi 4's (Very little tread but nice wide sticky sole), a pair of great padded running shoes I've had for a few months. Still taking the boots for wetter rough terrain days but hopping Hokas will be kinder to my feet.
Will let you know how it goes. 👟🏃‍♂️
 

nycwalking

Veteran Member
Past OR future Camino
Ourense to Santiago (2019), CF: (2014, 2004, 2002, 2001). On to Fisterra, (2002, 4, 14).
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?

I have walked four caminos in Nike running shoes with nary a blister and enough support.

My longest camino was SJPP to Santiago; Nike running shoes lasted all the way.

I must be able to roll through my foot otherwise my ankles scream and feet cramp. That’s why I were them.

The only time I switched out of the Nike sneakers to boots was during a winter camino. The mud and ice rendered Nikes too slippery.

There’s no one size fits all.

Buen camino.
 
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Lhollo

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
CF pt2, Belorado to Sarria, May 21 – June 12, 2022
I walked the first 10 etapes of the Frances in a pair of Nike Zoomx Invincible Flyknit, and also put some miles on them before leaving. Around 300 miles in total. There’s no noticeable degradation of the sole and tread. I did size up to put an extra 3mm sheet of poron foam in them, but that was because of my own health issues. They were absolutely brilliant. I tried SO many shoes before landing on them. Each to their own, of course, but if you’re looking for options they’re worth considering.
 

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Past OR future Camino
2014
My concern, after 3 Camino Frances, is that the weakness of most running shoes is when you walk on the rocky gravel paths. The protection from "pointy" rocks is missing on most running or trail running shoes. A sturdy insole is, to me, the most important part of the system. A bruised sole or forefoot makes for a very long Camino.
 
Past OR future Camino
Us:Camino Frances, 2015 Me:Catalan/Aragonese, 2019
My concern, after 3 Camino Frances, is that the weakness of most running shoes is when you walk on the rocky gravel paths. The protection from "pointy" rocks is missing on most running or trail running shoes. A sturdy insole is, to me, the most important part of the system. A bruised sole or forefoot makes for a very long Camino.
A post by @davebugg addresses this issue.
 
Past OR future Camino
Frances (July 2016), Primitivo (July 2018), Portuguese (March 2019)
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
I’ve used Adidas supernova running shoes for my recent caminos having switched from Merrell boots. The same pair of Adidas covered the Primitivo and the Portuguese from Porto plus daily use at home. I replaced the insoles with sorbothane insoles and took a second pair with me. I alternated daily between the insoles. Next to no blisters and comfortable throughout but running shoes are a very personal choice. I suggest that if you’re happy with a particular pair, use them with extra insoles and you’re unlikely to go far wrong. If you’re really worried about distance, take two pair of the same trainers and alternate daily.
 

Coverbid

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2018
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
North Face - Excellent results
 
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Felice

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
SJPP to Santiago Sept 2014
On my first camino, I had intended to use a pair of Merrill Moabs, but at the very last minute, I decided (correctly as it turned out) that they would be too hot for me. Instead I took my pair of Reebok running shoes, that had already had several hundreds of miles of use for walking. Having been bought in the middle east, where you buy what you can get, they were too big for me and had been adapted. The original insole had been thrown away months before, and replaced with a customised orthotic (a full length Orthoheel sports insole, with a slight wedge to the heel) and the front half of another pair of insoles under it. This had two effects: the primary one of making the toe box smaller and so the correct size, but also, giving me a soft and cushioned walk. When other people were complaining about how stoney the ground had been that day, I smiled and quietly thanked my luck that I made that last minute decision. The shoes did the full 800km walk, though a bit of the tread needed gluing back on in Navarette, and were retired with thanks once I was back home. I've done all my subsequent caminos in near identical shoes + insole arrangement.

I'm off to walk the Welsh coastal path and I am intending to use my latest pair of Reeboks for that, provided it does not rain too much when I will reluctantly switch to walking shoes.
 
Past OR future Camino
2018
I wore Salomon XA Trail shoes, which are trail runners, but felt more like road shoes on the CF. Wore them for another year after the CF. Great shoes with good support in arch and padding around the lower ankle. The problem with most running shoes is lack of support/cushion after about 250-300 miles, and on uneven terrain road shoes often have stability issues, i.e., rolling an ankle is a higher probability than with trail shoes. Salomon's were sturdy, but very comfortable for the entire trip and beyond. Wear what suits your feet... Also, there are excellent sporting goods stores in Pamplona, Burgos, Leon, Astorga, etc... if your shoes "die" before 500 miles.
Buen Camino.
 

ladyvyper

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Just started CP on Monday. Have been using Saloman trail runners, but am having real trouble with the cobblestones. I am going to try my heavier Saloman boots tomorrow since with the trail runners I feel every rock.
Hi, walked previously with lightweight gortex lined walking boots for wet days and Merrells for the dryer days. Feet ached and had a few manageable blisters.
So, next Camino (From Porto starting Friday) I'm changing to Hoka Arahi 4's (Very little tread but nice wide sticky sole), a pair of great padded running shoes I've had for a few months. Still taking the boots for wetter rough terrain days but hopping Hokas will be kinder to my feet.
Will let you know how it goes. 👟🏃‍♂️
 

Eleonore

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Portuguese
Ingles
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
I walk with Hooka, they last for me. I especially need the cushioning.
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
I walk with Hooka, they last for me. I especially need the cushioning.
I love Hoka's. I walked the Le Puy route in them and they did great on smooth slippery rocks. I also love the feeling they have of walking on marshmellows, or as others have said...walking on pillows.
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
Just started CP on Monday. Have been using Saloman trail runners, but am having real trouble with the cobblestones. I am going to try my heavier Saloman boots tomorrow since with the trail runners I feel every rock.
Solomon typically doesn't incorporate a rock plate into their trail runners, but it is easy to make one. A few posts upthread is where Rick posted a link for DIY rock plates.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Solomon typically doesn't incorporate a rock plate into their trail runners, but it is easy to make one. A few posts upthread is where Rick posted a link for DIY rock plates.
I have saved a few possible rock plate options to cut up and use underneath my insoles if the need should ever arise... genius idea and basically free.😊
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
Hi.
The tread is not going to be a problem. As a UKA distance running coach I advise my athletes to change their training shoes every 500 miles (800K), although some shoe sponsors now change them for their athletes after 300 miles (500K). The problem is that you will not be using them for the purpose they have been designed and for a long period of time. Other sections of the shoe will disintegrate and possibly give you problems with your gait and cause injury. I was a 14.17 5K and 29.48 10K runner, have been on the Camino 4 times and am going again later this month. I would never consider using training shoes for this purpose and always opt for boots as I like the ankle support offered. If you don't like boots then consider walking shoes. This is only my opinion based on my experiences and I hope it helps.
Buen Camino
Vince
 

Oravasaari

Helsinki, Finland
Past OR future Camino
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
I’ve walked in running shoes that have been ‘retired’ from running duty with 700-800 km on the clock, and although as other posters have said, they had seen their last running days/ optimum support, they were fine for walking and zero blisters suffered due to them fitting like a glove (logrono, Leon, Oviedo, Santiago in 2017). I also ran/walked from Pamplona to Sahagun in 2018. The tech in running shoes means that even shoes that might cause issues with continued use for running are still good for walking. Asics have very hard wearing soles. I have neutral feet (no pronation issues) so the wear was minimal even on such a well used pair. Ideal in dryer months giving fantastic ventilation, but I would not use them in the wetter shoulder months of the camino season. Runners offer zero ankle protection though, so be careful on the (very few) sections where the path is a bit rocky. Minimal tread for any amount of mud means trouble too, so avoid the wet. I hope to walk a part of the CF this November (1 week) but will be using my light hiking boots then (Keen - the ones in my avatar).
 

Smallest_Sparrow

Life is rarely what you expect or believe it to be
Past OR future Camino
2012: most of some, all of a few, a bit of others
I'll start by reinforcing my plea that you head to a runners' shoe store and get a proper evaluation and recommendation, then add in some other things that will of course conflict with other advice above (which may be totally correct and I could be full of it...hence, runners shoe store), but these were beat into me by my sub-three hour marathon coach (him, not me!) so FWIW:
1. nothing new on race day, get your footwear and break them in (but not wear them out, 300 mile life expectancy) and be sure they work
2. consider taking two pairs, preferably not the same shoes. this was difficult for me, a real Saucony fan, to accept when I started marathon running, "but these feel so good" i would whine... but in theory, no shoe will be perfect for you, and repeated distances every day may start to strain your foot/leg muscles. changing the shoes (brand or style) will help prevent this
3. two pairs allows the shoes to rest for a day (helping the cushioning to fully bounce back), and allows them to dry if wet (this is important to blister prevention)
4. yes, distance runners "retire" their running shoes to walking, but not walking essentially a marathon a day for 30 days carrying 10 pounds of extra weight. Obviously some have walked in old running shoes successfully. Some smokers live to be 100. I would strongly suggest against walking in old shoes or boots.
5. some say "but the extra weight". I say (after more years of road marches I care to recall) that NOTHING for this trip is more important than your footwear. if your feet are injured, your camino may end. With the right shoes and support the "extra" weight will feel like nothing. the next most important piece is your pack, if it's right for you the weight won't matter. spend most of your time and $ getting these two things right.

wishing you and your feet a buen camino!
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
I do not let longevity of footwear determine what I wear. I focus on on comfort of the footwear's fit and feel, and what the overall energy expenditure will be in using them. Then I consider what the conditions are expected to be like (cold, snow, ice). From there, I make my decision.

The actual reasons for choosing a trail or road running shoe is what makes their overall lifespan shorter.

I used 5 pairs of trail runners on my thru-hike of the 2,650 mile long Pacific Crest Trail, mailing a pair at designated resupply points at defined mileage intervals. I converted to this type of footwear after decades of using hiking 'boots' for several reasons: significantly lighter weight, lessened risk for injury, comfort with the cushioning, and the lessened drain on energy levels caused by lifting the weight on my feet while walking 24 to 26 mile days.

For my Colorado Trail thru hike, and on my Caminos, I switched from the Brooks Leadville trail runner (no longer in production), to 1 model of Hoka One One, than later to a different Hoka One One model.

Not all trail runners have severely aggressive tread, and not all street running shoes provide adequate cushioning levels for use with hiking or distance walking.

Brands of street runners, like Saucony, Adidas, Nike, etc include models which a designed to be very light. These sacrifice cushioning to save weight because they are targeted to short distance running activities and do not need to provide all day walking support or comfort.

Other brands, like Hoka One One and New Balance, are focused more on cushioning and motion control; they remain far lighter than trail shoes (not trail runners) but can support distance walking over many hours. Saucony and Nike, for example, also feature more cushiony models of street runners, but the range of such models is not as broad as in other brands.

Also, if a shoe you try on does not feel comfortable when you try it on, it will never get better. This is a category of footwear that does not 'break in' like a heavier trail shoe or hiking shoe. They will somewhat mold in the footbed with some wear, but they need to feel good right out of the box.

If the shoes generally feel good, but have a teensy spot that is slightly tight, like at a toe joint, a shoe shop (not a shoe store) can stretch the shoe fabric somewhat which may deal with that teensy issue. This will do the same thing that wearing them for 100 miles would do. So if that stretching does not resolve the issue, return them and try a larger/wider size.

Of course, if you are like me and willing to take a knife of scissors to modify a niggling spot on the upper of a shoe, than you might decide that you are OK with waiting to see if walking stretches out that fabric upper just enough. :)
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Past OR future Camino
Frances 2015;
Norte/Primitivo 2016;
Frances 2017;
Le Puy 2018;
Portuguese/FishermanTr. 2019
Of course, if you are like me and willing to take a knife of scissors to modify a niggling spot on the upper of a shoe,
I have no inkling to think of doing that, Dave...perish the thought! 😳😅
 

JONKSIE

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
My concern, after 3 Camino Frances, is that the weakness of most running shoes is when you walk on the rocky gravel paths. The protection from "pointy" rocks is missing on most running or trail running shoes. A sturdy insole is, to me, the most important part of the system. A bruised sole or forefoot makes for a very long Camino.
You can look for trail runners that have rock plates midsole which gives protection without being overly stiff. There are several brands out there that have models with that design.
 
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trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
You can look for trail runners that have rock plates midsole which gives protection without being overly stiff. There are several brands out there that have models with that design.
In this post @davebugg tells how to make a rock plate out of a plastic milk jug. If you don't have a plastic milk jug you can use a thin flexible cutting board. I have purchased them 2 for $1 at a Dollar Store.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
Very early on it began to be assumed that these numbers were referring to distance walked each day but I assume that they are the expected number of days to complete the Camino.

Interestingly, the OP has not returned to comment.
I was thinking the same thing.
 
Past OR future Camino
Planning on the pilgrimage 2015
35-40, are they daily km? This match my preferences as well :)
The tread is only a part of the issue here. Running shoe cushioning is designed to carry certain weight for the certain time/distance. I have done some 600 km in Asics Pulse. Thread (their propertary abrasive resin) was still ok, but the sole itself collapsed and turned into the "pancake" shape. Clearly overweight - my own + about 10kg backpack. There is a lot more rigid trail runners/mixed terrain shoes to choose from, so you may find a right one I guess.
Edit. and yes, Reebok Rigderider Leather lasted all CF+ Finistere/Muxia both tread and sole ... the mesh was heavily worn though
I used Swiss running shoe qc. Super great tread light and comfortable. I walked most of Norte in them. I recommend. Buen camino
 
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pjacobi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
I recommend that you walk the Camino in the same shoes that you have used for training. You should have a couple hundred kilometers of break-in from training in the shoes before the Camino.

Walking the Camino in new shoes without training is just begging for problems.


-Paul
 
Past OR future Camino
Planning on the pilgrimage 2015
I recommend that you walk the Camino in the same shoes that you have used for training. You should have a couple hundred kilometers of break-in from training in the shoes before the Camino.

Walking the Camino in new shoes without training is just begging for problems.


-Paul
Agreed 100%
 
Past OR future Camino
2019
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
Hoka One One. They are expensive. I didn't wear them, but walked with someone who did, and since returning home I've gone through a couple of pairs. My friend made me a convert.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I recommend that you walk the Camino in the same shoes that you have used for training. You should have a couple hundred kilometers of break-in from training in the shoes before the Camino.

Walking the Camino in new shoes without training is just begging for problems.


-Paul
I completely disagree. Modern running and trail running shoes don't need a break in period.
I wore a brand new the same model of trail runners that I had trained in. I wore them for a couple of 5 mile walks before hand just to make sure that they didn't have some defect in them that would make them uncomfortable.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
I recommend that you walk the Camino in the same shoes that you have used for training. You should have a couple hundred kilometers of break-in from training in the shoes before the Camino.

Walking the Camino in new shoes without training is just begging for problems.

Modern running and trail running shoes don't need a break in period.
I wore a brand new the same model of trail runners that I had trained in. I wore them for a couple of 5 mile walks before hand just to make sure that they didn't have some defect in them that would make them uncomfortable.
I agree with both, with some clarification. As @trecile does, I am on my 5th pair of the same model shoe, so I only need to test a new pair on a few walks before going on a Camino. However, if I were to change shoes, I would be very nervous about taking them on the Camino without a couple hundred kilometers including some consecutive 20-km days. I would not call it "break in" because I don't expect the shoes to change; rather I want to see how my feet react to them. Some fitting issues don't become obvious without those consecutive long days.
 
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JONKSIE

New Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Hoka One One. They are expensive. I didn't wear them, but walked with someone who did, and since returning home I've gone through a couple of pairs. My friend made me a convert.
Agreed. Hoka Speedgoats. Best trail runner I have tried yet. I’ve also had good luck with Brooks Cascades.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Past OR future Camino
2019
I recommend that you walk the Camino in the same shoes that you have used for training. You should have a couple hundred kilometers of break-in from training in the shoes before the Camino.

Walking the Camino in new shoes without training is just begging for problems.


-Paul

This can be great advice, but it really depends on the shoes. For trail runners or street runners, they are good to go out of the box, IF they are sized and fitted properly. If they do not fit and feel good out of the box, no amount of wear will change that.

Unlike leathers, synthetic fabrics do not break in, so trail and street runners have little benefit from extended wear. In fact, the required friability of the midsole to accomplish significant cushioning means that extended wear prior to a Camino or backpacking trip decreases their usable life. I will generally wear a pair on just a few training hikes to allow me to spot unexpected problems with the shoes.

For trail shoes and hiking shoes, the amount of leather vs synthetic fabrics, where that leather is used on the shoe or boot, and what type of leather that is used will determine how much 'break in' will be beneficial.

To help with definitions of shoe types, this is from a previous post I wrote:

Running shoes. These fall into two subcategories: Road running shoes and Trail running shoes.
These are generally the lightest of the basic category of shoes. The differences between the two subcategory types are: traction and tread, materials used and durability, levels of cushioning, motion control and support, protection from getting poked in the sole by rocks and sharp trail debris -- which can make the bottoms of your feet sore or injured. A properly fitted shoe in this category should require no break in. In fact, if there are suspicious pressure points, or they feel a bit tight, they will typically not get significantly better until the materials start to break down.

Trail shoes. These are the beefy cousins to road and trail runners. They have a heavier design structure, sometimes more cushioning, sometimes better and more aggressive tread and traction, are stiffer in the forefoot. Generally, their usable life is somewhat better than either a road or trail runner, but it isn't a given. A proper fitting trail shoe may not generally require much, if any, 'breaking in' to feel good on the foot. it depends on the materials used in the construction of the 'uppers'.

A variation of the 'trail shoe' is the 'trail boot', which is basically an extension of the trail shoe's height to approximate coverage above the ankle.

Hiking boots. I am not going to talk about hiking boots. These are the decades old, iconic, above ankle boots, with heavily lugged soles and heavy leathers, that many think of when talking about backpacking or mountaineering.

Suffice it to say that this is the heaviest category of footwear that can be chosen for backpacking or distance walking. They are much stiffer than the other categories of footwear, and they can generally be resoled. They can come insulated for cold weather walking, like my Lowa Camino boots that I use in the winter, or not insulated. This footwear will outlast the other two categories by wide margins. Depending on the boot's manufacturer and materials (fabric vs leather vs hybrid) it can take a considerable time to break a pair in so that they feel comfortable and respond well to the feet.
 

Airfix

Member
Past OR future Camino
2021
Just to be clear, the One One is a running shoe, not a trail shoe. Hoka does make trail runners, but I have no experience with those.
We have been on the Portuguese Camino for a few days now, started in Porto, currently in Barcelos.
Wearing Hoka One Ones, Arahi 4's on advice of wife and many Australians met on previous Camino's.
So far the are great, planning to wear lightweight boots when ground gets a little rough in a few days.
 

Dilbin

Member
Past OR future Camino
Irun to Santander del Norte
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
Hi. My go to are Merrell fst moab gortex but I use insoles that were designed for my feet instore(50 euros). Completed 600 of the Camino del Norte in these and not a blister to be had, nor any leg pains etc. Other trail runners and hiking shoes from same manufacturer and my feet were destroyed albeit that time my first 75km were entirely asphalt. If you Google exact as I have written and make sure they have Fst in the branding then they are worth a look. Daniel
 
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Lloyd Woodall

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Camino Frances 2016 & 2018. Cherry picking routes 2019.
Just to be clear, the One One is a running shoe, not a trail shoe. Hoka does make trail runners, but I have no experience with those.
The Hoka Speedgoats are excellent trail runners and definitely suitable for Camio use. My SO has walked the Frances once with them and her comment was, “it’s like walking on marshmallows even when it’s rough cobble”. I have a pair that I use when hiking on cobble and I would have the same comment. I alternate between the Hokas and my ASICS, that fit MY feet perfectly. But, in over 20 years of long distance running and hiking I find that the Hokas have the softest feel of anything. They have excellent traction with a softer compound but also a corresponding quicker wear rate. With virtually all shoes I recommend getting good insoles. I use the thick SOLE insoles that you mold to your foot by heating them and imprinting them with your foot. Miles ahead of the flimsy stock insoles.

And as many others have said, you really should plan to resolve your footwear selection way before you begin your Camino. The shoe stores and brands available in Spain are unlikely to be like your home country.
 

walkinglover

New Member
Past OR future Camino
Frances, '16 and '18; Portuguese '17; Ingles - 19
Planning to walk the France, 35 - 40, would love to walk in running shoes. Have tried trail runners and I don’t enjoy the treading.

Can anyone recommend a running shoe with a tread that lasted the entire 800 kil?
Hoka Ones
 

pjacobi

Active Member
Past OR future Camino
2015, St. Jean Pied de Port to Burgos
2016, Burgos to Ponferrada
2017, Ponferrada to Atlantic Ocean
It not that the shoes need a break-in period, but it is your entire body that needs a break-in period to walk 20-30K per day with a full pack. Start slowly at home and gradually build up distance. Test out your footwear and other equipment at home and make changes where required.

There is not one magic brand of shoes or ruby slippers! What works for others may not work for you. Suggestions can be helpful to start but you really need training at home to discover what works best for you.


-Paul
 

zimmecp

Member
Past OR future Camino
Summer 2017
I wore Hoka One Ones Bondis for my first Camino (Norte from Irun) and they were perfect. I tried a portion of the CF with a different shoe and it was horrible. I need the cushioning of the bondis.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Past OR future Camino
Most years since 2012. Hoping now for 2022.
The original question asked about tread. So far, I think that there has not been a big problem of tread wearing out over 800 km.
 
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Oravasaari

Helsinki, Finland
Past OR future Camino
2015 SJpdP to Fistera, 2016 Leon to Fistera, 2017 CF-Salvadore-Primitivo, 2018 CF run/walk
Running shoes - One additional thing I forgot to mention was that because the ones I used (Asics) had very narrow/ minimal tread, I got very few stones flicked up back into the shoe from the heel. Runners also dry super fast if they do get a bit damp. I’ll be using running shoes again if I go in the drier months. I also like to do some run + walk days too, so it saves messing around changing shoes (I ran/walked Pamplona to Sahagun on my 4th/ most recent camino back in 2017.)
 

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