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Shops in St Jean

isabelle304

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (SJPP-Santiago) (Oct-Nov 08)
Santiago to Finisterre (Nov 08)
Via de la Plata/Camino Sanabres (Sevilla-Santiago via Ourense) (Oct-Nov 09)
Camino Primitivo (Oviedo-Santiago) (Sep-Oct 14)
I've just bought my rucksack for the trip - I have settled for the Osprey Aura 35, and it is my intention to take it with me on the plane as hand luggage (if I don't pack it too full, it just about fits Ryanair's size requirements) rather than checking it in. Is there anywhere in St Jean Pied de Port therefore where I can buy: a pair of walking poles, and a Swiss army knife?

Isabelle
 

sillydoll

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
2002 CF: 2004 from Paris: 2006 VF: 2007 CF: 2009 Aragones, Ingles, Finisterre: 2011 X 2 on CF: 2013 'Caracoles': 2014 CF and Ingles 'Caracoles":2015 Logrono-Burgos (Hospitalero San Anton): 2016 La Douay to Aosta/San Gimignano to Rome:
As you walk down - or up - Rue de la Citadelle you will be spoilt for choice in dozens of little souvenir shops selling walking poles and everything else a peregrina could want.
 

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KiwiNomad06

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Le Puy-Santiago(2008) Cluny-Conques+prt CF(2012)
There is also a general sports goods shop away from the main tourist shopping area. Can't remember the exact name of it, or the street, but it is in the same shopping area as a large supermarket. It was 'on the flat' and I think I maybe walked about 800m from the PO to get there. Someone local will be able to give you directions anyhow.
Margaret
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Swiss Army Knife on a Sunday

We are not checking any baggage this time on arriving in France, so I will need to purchase a swiss army knife in St. Jean. But we also are there only on a Sunday, so... I was hoping some of you locals would know a shop that will be open on a Sunday AND sells swiss army knives. I prefer to not spend the whole day going from shop to shop.
Thanks.
Rambler
 

Cejanus

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJDP - Santiago April "2013"; European Peace Walk"2015"; VIa de la Plata "2016"
I've just bought my rucksack for the trip - I have settled for the Osprey Aura 35, and it is my intention to take it with me on the plane as hand luggage (if I don't pack it too full, it just about fits Ryanair's size requirements) rather than checking it in. Is there anywhere in St Jean Pied de Port therefore where I can buy: a pair of walking poles, and a Swiss army knife?

Isabelle
Plenty of choice for you in St Jean de Port. As a tip I also bought a spare pair of rubber tips for my hiking poles as they wear out.
 

mlouiset

New Member
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
 
M

Mark Lee

Guest
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?

That question will bring about a variety of opinions. Some people swear by them, others have no use for them.

If you end up deciding to use them, please get some rubber tips to put on the business end of them. Nothing will disturb the quiet serenity of a beautiful Camino morning more than the annoying "click-clack" of some peregrino going by with non-rubber tipped hiking poles, ha ha. :D
 

WalkMWalk

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
September 2014 - God willing
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
I have, and love, my Black Diamond Ultra Distance Zpoles (16in folded/11oz ttl) ... My hands tend to swell if I let them dangle by my sides for long periods of time, the poles keep them at a nice 45degree angle ... no swelling after 9-12 mile hikes - Yay!!! I am not planning to check my pack and
I am going to take my poles to TSA here in San Antonio to confirm they can be carried on the plane... Oh, they have rubber tips for quiet trekking!
 

RannyAlba

New Member
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?

I'm still not sure about whether or not I will need hiking poles. I recently went hiking in West Scotland and before I left home I bought a cheap (£5) hiking pole to test it out. I definitely found it an advantage going up hill but a few more excursions will allow me to really understand if I want to carry them with me. If I do decide to bring them, I will likely invest in a slightly better quality model that will withstand the wear and tear of the Camino. If not, then I've lost £5, but gained the experience.

Hope this helps.......
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'CP, Frances,Norte,Salv/prim;Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, Vdlp 2019>Táb/ Prt Levante 2020
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
Hi mlouiset
Have you tried walking with poles yet? Perhaps get a set and start walking with them in training. To many of us, they are parts of us, just extensions of our arms. You'll come across quite a few ups and downs going to Sdc, apart from over to Roncesvales.
They give you 4 points on the ground and make you feel so much more secure when walking on loose stones, assist going uphill a lot. I notice 'some' walkers without poles and heavy backpacks appear to lean forward and often look at the road rather than the view. The point made, about arms hanging by your side is so true. The hands tend to swell without poles.
Regarding the rubber tips, a fellow walker never took her tips off and needed replacements but found this no problem. Shop in O'Cebrero sells them.

I'd say take them, but if you want to decide later, you can buy them in SJPDP or in Spain.
Annie
 

barber1586

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, (September 2014); Camino Primitivo (August 2016)
He wrote back that he does sell Swiss army knives so we are set. Anyone else not traveling with a knife, FYI.
He is open 7 days a week.

Rambler
Rambler, thanks so much for this information. I was wondering about this today, and now I know! Much appreciated!
 

indyinmaine

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances - SJPdP to Santiago - Sept/Oct 2013
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
You can try if you want! I walked almost to Santo Domingo del Calzado without sticks and finally bought a pair there. They have a great "outdoor sports" shop about 100 meters off the Camino. You also have to walk past a wonderful pastry shop to get there!
 

KinkyOne

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
I'am not perfect, but I'm always myself!!!
I'm still not sure about whether or not I will need hiking poles. I recently went hiking in West Scotland and before I left home I bought a cheap (£5) hiking pole to test it out. I definitely found it an advantage going up hill but a few more excursions will allow me to really understand if I want to carry them with me. If I do decide to bring them, I will likely invest in a slightly better quality model that will withstand the wear and tear of the Camino. If not, then I've lost £5, but gained the experience.

Hope this helps.......

Hi!

I myself am walking with colapsible poles, but don't want to sound like an advertisment for them. Just want to make sure if you really bought just ONE walking pole? Because later you are asking yourself whether bringing THEM with you... I mean, it's so much easier to walk with two (or both, if you wish) poles than just one IMO.
Maybe it's even easier to walk without instead of just one :cool:

Ultreia!
 

Jeniffer

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Starting in early May 2014
I bought a great pair w shock absorbers at the sporting goods store in town. Just downhill from where you will enter SJPDP. There are two shops that sell them right by the albergues, but I needed a smaller grip for my small hands and found a larger variety and better prices at the outdoor shop.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Hi!

I myself am walking with colapsible poles, but don't want to sound like an advertisment for them. Just want to make sure if you really bought just ONE walking pole? Because later you are asking yourself whether bringing THEM with you... I mean, it's so much easier to walk with two (or both, if you wish) poles than just one IMO.
Maybe it's even easier to walk without instead of just one :cool:

Ultreia!
I agree with KinkyOne that one pole is very different from using two poles. Especially going downhill, having two poles provides a balanced cadence that allows you to not have to use your knees as much to slow down your speed, which can be stressful on the joints.

In making the decision whether to take poles or not, evaluate whether you tend to have knee/hip problems or balance problems when hiking normally. Also, how much have you been able to train. Then learn to use the poles in the correct fashion. There are Youtube videos that will teach you this.

And you can always get a staff or poles on the Camino if you find you really need them.
On my previous Camino I carried them the entire wy on my pack, only using them on the climb to OCebreiro and then not really needing them.
Rambler
 

mlouiset

New Member
Thanks for all the responses re hiking poles. I think I will be bringing mine. I have used them on the past and definitely find them helpful for going uphill.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
Quite simply, poles are not essential. They are a walking aid. Footwear isn't essential either. but I doubt you will walk without shoes or boots - its really a matter of where you put these things on your priority list.

If you end up deciding to use them, please get some rubber tips to put on the business end of them. Nothing will disturb the quiet serenity of a beautiful Camino morning more than the annoying "click-clack" of some peregrino going by with non-rubber tipped hiking poles, ha ha. :D
I think this issue is oversold. I have yet to meet anyone who could not hold a conversation because of the noise of unprotected pole tips, and it is unlikely that anyone would propose to silence anyone who is carrying on an annoying conversation. Nonetheless, I agree with @Mark Lee that it is good pole etiquette to have pole tips fitted in urban areas on hard surfaces.

Not all pole tips are created equal, and I have found the Black Diamond Classic Tip Protectors a good balance between durability and price here in Australia. If you are able to get them, the Leki and Zwiss walking tips are excellent value as well. Noting that I give my poles a fairly good workout, a set of the BD tip protectors will last about 250 km, less depending on the percentage of gravel and natural path. This year I took two spare sets for the Camino Ingles and Camino Muxia/Finisterre. The set I put on in Ferrol needed to be replaced just before Finisterre. If you are a light user, and fairy tap your poles rather than plant them firmly, you might expect tips to last longer.

On my previous Camino I carried them the entire wy on my pack, only using them on the climb to OCebreiro and then not really needing them.
There are a couple of things that make absolutely no sense to me, and this is one of them. If you are going to carry 600-800 gms of equipment whose greatest benefit comes from being in your hands and used constantly, why keep it in your pack for goodness sake. I use my poles continually - this year I made a concession because of the number of people around, and strapped them to my pack before entering the pilgrims office! Otherwise they were in my hands.

As a final point, if you do choose to use poles and want to avoid the airline safety issues of having them as checked baggage by buying them on arrival, I strongly recommend that you borrow a pair of poles and learn to use them properly before you arrive. While they are not complicated to use properly, getting some walking experience with them beforehand will be a distinct advantage.

Regards,
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
Thanks for all the responses re hiking poles. I think I will be bringing mine. I have used them on the past and definitely find them helpful for going uphill.
Yes, they are useful uphill, but for me, they proved most useful working my way down steep paths, especially in the rain where the water and mud/clay made the going very slick indeed. The problem with paths in rain is they often become running water courses.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
There are a couple of things that make absolutely no sense to me, and this is one of them. If you are going to carry 600-800 gms of equipment whose greatest benefit comes from being in your hands and used constantly, why keep it in your pack for goodness sake. I use my poles continually - this year I made a concession because of the number of people around, and strapped them to my pack before entering the pilgrims office! Otherwise they were in my hands.
Regards,
Doug:
I don't enjoy using poles. They make noise, make your "foot print" much larger as you walk, and make your hands sweaty. But there were times before my Camino when I wished I had them. So on the Frances, folks said you will need them for the climbs and later in the days when your legs were tired. But I found that starting out in a town, I would never want them to be clicking along on the sidewalk, and I would never think to stop and take them off the pack. Why carry them in your hands just to carry them? After the first few days, it was apparent the walking was not that rigorous and I wished I hadn't brought them. Personally, I think they are over used. For those with weak knees or balance issues they may be necessary, but most people do just fine everyday walking without them. When I see the commuters in New York and Paris carrying them, I may change my mind.

To each his own.

Rambler
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
But I found that starting out in a town, I would never want them to be clicking along on the sidewalk, and I would never think to stop and take them off the pack.
Not trying to convert you; this response is for those who would otherwise use them on hills but not in towns or flats (which is what I do).

I slide them inside the shoulder strap so that they nestle at an angle between my arm and body. I can use a micro-biner to attach the wrist straps to a loop on front of my shoulder strap, or I feed them in reverse and then rotate them forward, and the resultant crimp in the strap holds it secure. I can then conveniently access them or stow them while walking without stopping, and I don't even feel them once stowed.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Doug:
I don't enjoy using poles. They make noise, make your "foot print" much larger as you walk, and make your hands sweaty.

If you don't enjoy using poles, nothing that I will say will change that. What I can say is that these are your excuses, and other than some noise with sprung poles, I have never observed the other effects that you claim. The way that I use poles makes little if any difference to the area I occupy from moment to moment. The front pole is planted beside my leading foot, the rear pole leaves the ground at the same time as my trailing foot, and I don't flail my arms around but move them close to my body. I don't grip the pole handles, but let the pole strap do the work, so my palms never get sweaty from gripping the handles.

The big issue here is unprotected pole tips on hard surfaces in urban areas, when the metal tip will be noisy as it strikes the ground that echoes along the hard surfaces of buildings. That is easy to fix by using a tip protector.

But there were times before my Camino when I wished I had them. So on the Frances, folks said you will need them for the climbs and later in the days when your legs were tired.
Better in my view to use the poles continually, and reduce any strain on your lower body from the outset by having your upper body contribute across the whole of the walking day.

But I found that starting out in a town, I would never want them to be clicking along on the sidewalk, and I would never think to stop and take them off the pack. Why carry them in your hands just to carry them? After the first few days, it was apparent the walking was not that rigorous and I wished I hadn't brought them.
I have them in my hands to use them. If you weren't going to use them, why even bother carrying them. They aren't helping, they are not ready to assist with stability should you slip, they are just useless weight.

Personally, I think they are over used. For those with weak knees or balance issues they may be necessary, but most people do just fine everyday walking without them. When I see the commuters in New York and Paris carrying them, I may change my mind.
We can disagree on this. Many people I have seen use them poorly, and don't achieve all the benefits they might. The issue is not about weak knees or balance, but about reducing the loads being carried by your lower body by having the upper body do some work. That benefit comes to any and every one, young or old, weak or strong.

As for commuters using poles, I would have to rely on hearing about the behaviour of commuters in these cities, because I rarely visit one, and have no desire to visit the other to actually make the observations you are fortunate enough to make personally it would appear. In any case, my observation of commuters in Australia is that they are unlikely to walk either the distances or with the loads carried by pilgrims. When I hear that they do, I might consider your acceptability test more valid.

I have no issue with people who don't like using poles. It is a personal decision whether to use them or not, and if you don't like using them, there is no real need to attempt to rationalise that.

Regards,
 
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dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Not trying to convert you; this response is for those who would otherwise use them on hills but not in towns or flats (which is what I do).

I slide them inside the shoulder strap so that they nestle at an angle between my arm and body. I can use a micro-biner to attach the wrist straps to a loop on front of my shoulder strap, or I feed them in reverse and then rotate them forward, and the resultant crimp in the strap holds it secure. I can then conveniently access them or stow them while walking without stopping, and I don't even feel them once stowed.
I have also seen packs designed so that collapsed poles can be easily stowed while on the move. I have never seriously considered these, because I have no particular issue with using poles in urban areas. For those who, for whatever reason, don't want to use poles in cities, they might be worth considering.

Regards,
 

koilife

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF w/ son #1 (2013); Logrono-Leon/Salvador/Primitivo w/ son #2 (2016); Portugues w/ son #3 (2020)
I have also seen packs designed so that collapsed poles can be easily stowed while on the move. I have never seriously considered these, because I have no particular issue with using poles in urban areas. For those who, for whatever reason, don't want to use poles in cities, they might be worth considering.
Many Osprey packs have just such a pole attachment until you get into their very light packs.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
The big issue here is unprotected pole tips on hard surfaces in urban areas, when the metal tip will be noisy as it strikes the ground that echoes along the hard surfaces of buildings. That is easy to fix by using a tip protector.
Regards,
Doug:
Your points are well taken. I agree that many people do not get rubber protectors or do not use them in urban areas. And you are VERY correct that it is best to learn the correct way to use them. Here is a good video:

We can agree to have differences of opinions and I would never suggest that a person not use them that wants them.

Rambler
 

xin loi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Walked May 14, 2014 from St Jean France

starting to walk again August 25, 2016 --SJPDP to Finisterre
Makes me wonder how I manage to hunt deer/bear all day walking on our steep mountain sides without holding poles instead of a rifle.
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Doug:
Your points are well taken. I agree that many people do not get rubber protectors or do not use them in urban areas. And you are VERY correct that it is best to learn the correct way to use them. Here is a good video:

We can agree to have differences of opinions and I would never suggest that a person not use them that wants them.

Rambler
Thanks for the video. I agree with some of what was said, but the suggestion not to use the straps while walking puzzles me - its like suggesting that one use a chain saw without starting the engine! There is a good explanation for this on Pete's Pole Page - the granddaddy of internet resources on pole use. Basically, the strap allows the arm to generate a downward force without the hand having to continually grip the pole. Gripping the pole can only be sustained for short periods; use the straps correctly and poles can pretty much be used all day for days on end.

The figure of 30% used in the video doesn't make a lot of sense to me in a static sense, but there may be sources that have tested the dynamic load reduction of pole use. My reasoning is that for my current sprung poles (Komperdel and Black Diamond) it takes the equivalent of a 15kg force to fully compress the spring mechanism. I have done that on steep downhill sections, but never on flatter terrain in normal walking. Reducing the static load on my ankle, knee and hip joints by 15kg is a long way short of 30%, even accounting for the weight of the leg below these joints. .

I have seen reports from skiing accidents where the pole strap has compounded the injuries, but never from accidents at walking speed. The difficulty here is that I may not be looking in the right places, so it might be possible that shoulder dislocations have occurred that could be directly attributed to wearing the strap while walking, and have not been reported in a way the information is not appearing in search results.

Regards,
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2014, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011, 2019. CP (tbc)
Makes me wonder how I manage to hunt deer/bear all day walking on our steep mountain sides without holding poles instead of a rifle.
Really. Perhaps because you are walking carefully and more slowly to avoid noise and animals detecting your movement, etc. I suspect that there are other reasons why there are no game animals left on or near the camino, but I cannot imagine many of them staying with a bunch of fast, noisy pilgrims wandering past every day. We would really disrupt their peace.
 

Travellingman

Active Member
My observations: I have to say that it seems to me that most on the camino do keep their poles strapped to their packs, and many of those actually holding them haven't a clue how to use them properly, and wave them around like some manic marching drum major.
I have tried 2 poles, 1 pole, no poles, pacer poles, and I feel most comfortable walking without any poles. But, that is just my take on it, and what do I know?:cool:
It does appear that some regard walking poles as an essential fashion accessory.
 
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biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Yipes, shopping in STJPdP got hijacked by a poll about poles.
FYI, there is a Lidal a few steps north of St. Jean in Cizur and they have organized the store to supply pilgrims!
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
FYI, there is a Lidal a few steps north of St. Jean in Cizur and they have organized the store to supply pilgrims!
Where is that? I have not heard of that town before, and don't find it on a map.
Sounds worth stopping. If it is walking distance from St Jean.

Rambler
 

mlouiset

New Member
Thank you for all the hijacked comments about poles. Very enlightening. I would love to leave my poles behind as on the mostly flat I am sure I would not want them. I am mainly worried about SJPD to roncesvalles. Especially the uphill. Can anyone comment on the steepness or toughness of that section? How about in Galicia?
I leave home in a week so must decide soon. I did just buy new tips.
 

biarritzdon

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF11, CF12, CP13, CF14, CA15, S.Anton15, CF&CI15
Ditch Pig16, CF&CP17, CdN18, CM18, CF18, LePuy19
Firstly, I walk with poles and would not do the Camino sans poles!
That being said if you walk about 500m+ out of town headed towards Bayonne, I guess that is northeast, you will find the Lidal in Cizar Uharte. There are rows and rows of supplies I am sure the local are not buying, chocolate bars, bottled water, etc.
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
Firstly, I walk with poles and would not do the Camino sans poles!
That being said if you walk about 500m+ out of town headed towards Bayonne, I guess that is northeast, you will find the Lidal in Cizar Uharte. There are rows and rows of supplies I am sure the local are not buying, chocolate bars, bottled water, etc.
Will do. Are they normally open on Sundays?
Thanks.
Rambler
 

OzAnnie

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
'CP, Frances,Norte,Salv/prim;Le puy, Inglés, CDM, Invierno, Fin/Mux, Vdlp 2019>Táb/ Prt Levante 2020
Thank you for all the hijacked comments about poles. Very enlightening. I would love to leave my poles behind as on the mostly flat I am sure I would not want them. I am mainly worried about SJPD to roncesvalles. Especially the uphill. Can anyone comment on the steepness or toughness of that section? How about in Galicia?
I leave home in a week so must decide soon. I did just buy new tips.
Hi mlouiset
It really comes back to you. You mentioned earlier that you use poles at home. If you like poles bring them. For all the (positive) reasons mentioned before.

With regard to the steepness /toughness of the section sjpdp to Roncesvales , this is dependent on my physical fitness as opposed to yours. I admit I did not leave enough time for my body to recover from long trip from oz to Paris then o/nite train to Bayonne -taxi to sjpdp and walk to ORISSON . Also not enough prep beforehand, and had not known about this forum then either! Having said all that - it isn't some steep (Everest type) climb (as some may imagine when they read Pyrennees ) but it is strenuous. More so, if your body is tired. If you do the right thing, get enough balance of sleep, rest, exercise, food and water and you set out fresh, you'll be singing to the sheep etc. ' the hills are alive '. You won't have a problem at all.
But.......you don't seem to accept that the going down (if you're on the loose stuff ) is where you'll so appreciate the poles .. 2nd best friends.


Similarly further along on the Frances, there are many ups and downs. (O'Cebrero) etc. Again, if you're fresh, most of the ups are not too steep, they are just up and there is always another one. Walking day after day, for quite a few hours with a weight on your back (depending too on heat), your legs will get tired and this is why the safety net of those poles on the downhills will be a bonus.

Happy decision making
Annie
 

Rambler

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June 2008 Camino Frances with Daughter, 2014 Camino Frances with Son
It's LIDL,
RN 134, 64220 Uhart-Cize, France ‎
tele. +33 800 00 54 35 ‎ ·
Heures d'ouverture :
lun-sam 8h30-19h30

ie. CLOSED on Sunday

MM
Thanks again MM.
We will only be there Sunday so we'll stick to St. Jean....

Rambler
 

RannyAlba

New Member
Hi!

I myself am walking with colapsible poles, but don't want to sound like an advertisment for them. Just want to make sure if you really bought just ONE walking pole? Because later you are asking yourself whether bringing THEM with you... I mean, it's so much easier to walk with two (or both, if you wish) poles than just one IMO.
Maybe it's even easier to walk without instead of just one :cool:

Ultreia!

I have bought one so far; I will see how it feels to walk with this, then I might try two........and then I'll know how I want to walk the Camino :)
 

jrewrite

Be Brave, Be Curious, Be Kind - e ho mai
Camino(s) past & future
Portugal from Lisbon June/July 2017 - Francis from St Jean May/June 2014
3 miles on trail in 2011
I vote for poles - thought I would hate them but have grown to love them. They help with my posture for hiking and give my arms more exercise. - in SJPP in 2 days - John
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
Wondering how necessary hiking poles are? Seems like they would be great for SJPD to rincesvslles but maybe not needed after that. I hate to carry them if they are not necessary. Any thoughts ?
Hi - I had never thought much of them before, but taking great advice on this forum, bought some and took them. They were a tremendous help. Going over the Pyrenees may seem intimidating before you start, but other than being uphill rather steeply at times, an awful lot of it is on paved one lane roads. But there are several rougher and steeper sections later on. They really help when you're going downhill through a rushing stream, trying to step on the tops of rocks (re: Acebo to Molinaseca after a heavy rain) rather than on the bottom of the stream bed which is now your path. I kept rubber tips on the whole way - had an extra pair which I put on somewhere. Those clicks are very annoying. I also used one of my poles to steady my camera when I wanted to zoom in on something and my hand was a bit too shaky.
 

cherrys

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept/Oct (2013), Finisterre/Muxia Oct (2013), Camino Frances and on to Finisterre Sept/Oct (2016)
Firstly, I walk with poles and would not do the Camino sans poles!
That being said if you walk about 500m+ out of town headed towards Bayonne, I guess that is northeast, you will find the Lidal in Cizar Uharte. There are rows and rows of supplies I am sure the local are not buying, chocolate bars, bottled water, etc.
The Lidl's there is laid out exactly the way the one in Skibbereen, West Cork, Ireland is! So I didn't have any trouble finding the same chocolates, juice, biscuits, etc. that I regularly get there. Cheese, fruit and wine selections varied a bit. All unfortunately made my pack a little heavier than I had intended for the next couple of days, but I survived, having plenty of treats to munch on and drink!
 

reg2450

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
March 2013
You can buy everything you want in SJPP. I could live there. We bought our poles and rain ponchos - both the most essential items on our trip (outside the sarong). I wish I had bought everything (except my boots) from SJ. I spent a fortune stocking up in Australia.
As useful as the poles were (up and DOWN hills) we tended to forget them a lot. We ended up buying 3 pair each during our trip. It was never long into the day before we realised something HUGE was missing from our lives.
 

Sraaen

Steven Raaen
Camino(s) past & future
Via Podiensis (Le Puy - Pamplona) [2013]
Via Turonensis (Tours - SJPdP) [2013]
Camino Frances (SJPdP - SdC) [2013]
Via Tolosana (Montpellier - Pau) [2015]
Camino del Norte (Irun - SdC) [2015]
I'm a single stick man myself. Whether one or two I think it helps maintain decent posture and counter-intimidate (the rare) Bad Dog!
 

kmccue

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
2015
I have, and love, my Black Diamond Ultra Distance Zpoles (16in folded/11oz ttl) ... My hands tend to swell if I let them dangle by my sides for long periods of time, the poles keep them at a nice 45degree angle ... no swelling after 9-12 mile hikes - Yay!!! I am not planning to check my pack and
I am going to take my poles to TSA here in San Antonio to confirm they can be carried on the plane... Oh, they have rubber tips for quiet trekking!

WEre you allowed to take them in your carry on???
 

LauraK

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Leon-Santiago (2004) Roncesvalles-Leon (2006) Camino Frances (2012) Kumano Kodo-Japan (2014) Camino Sanabres/Salamanca-Santiago (March 2015) Camino Del Salvador and Camino Primativo (Oct 2015)
Thanks for the video. I agree with some of what was said, but the suggestion not to use the straps while walking puzzles me - its like suggesting that one use a chain saw without starting the engine! There is a good explanation for this on Pete's Pole Page - the granddaddy of internet resources on pole use. Basically, the strap allows the arm to generate a downward force without the hand having to continually grip the pole. Gripping the pole can only be sustained for short periods; use the straps correctly and poles can pretty much be used all day for days on end.

The figure of 30% used in the video doesn't make a lot of sense to me in a static sense, but there may be sources that have tested the dynamic load reduction of pole use. My reasoning is that for my current sprung poles (Komperdel and Black Diamond) it takes the equivalent of a 15kg force to fully compress the spring mechanism. I have done that on steep downhill sections, but never on flatter terrain in normal walking. Reducing the static load on my ankle, knee and hip joints by 15kg is a long way short of 30%, even accounting for the weight of the leg below these joints. .

I have seen reports from skiing accidents where the pole strap has compounded the injuries, but never from accidents at walking speed. The difficulty here is that I may not be looking in the right places, so it might be possible that shoulder dislocations have occurred that could be directly attributed to wearing the strap while walking, and have not been reported in a way the information is not appearing in search results.

Regards,
Completely agree on using the straps. Really takes the pressure off of the hands and allows more of the arm to bear the weight. Very comfortable for a long day of trekking. No sweating or blisters on the hands too.
 

Cam1952

www.camcamino.com
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept-Oct (2013)
Frances Sept-Oct (2017)
Portuguese June (2019)
Madrid (2021)
I purchased a pair of carbon fibre, collapsible, hiking poles from Walmart. I was worried these would not last but proved themselves a fabulous investment.
Carefully consider a pair of poles for all of the reasons people have offered. (dog defence, swelling hands, support walking down hill......)
BTW, my poles cost me less than $60 for the pair.
Buen Camino Pellegrina!
 

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