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Story: The 3 Camino Amigos – Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a Question)

Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
(2015) Frances
(2018) Portuguese
(2019) VdP Seville to Salamanca
(2020) VdP Salamanca to Santiago
Pretty early on, I discovered (like many others) that the best way to retain a Camino friendship is to let each person walk at their own pace. Everybody usually meets up at the end of the day in the same place. Fast walkers can help the slower ones by getting an idea of accommodations ahead of the others. Slower walkers end up being in a much better place at the end of the day. You also end up with more friends than the original group (and much better stories). Everybody and every body has their own pace that you can't avoid. One of the little lessons that you carry back to the real world later on as well.
 

caminka

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
see signature
Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
sometimes, yes, though usually I just tell them to hold on till we get to the accommodation. it usually works. or I ignore them and they figure it's too troublesome to bother?

I do remember this trick from my first camino. I've had some thigh pains for years, even had therapy, but no doctor quite managed to pinpoint what was wrong. I've also been having occasional problems with my knees since teenage years.
when the pain started - that was on the crazily long third day when I walked from roncesvalles to larrasoana and literally couldn't budge for two hours when I got there - I said to my legs: ''Look, darlings, I want to walk this camino, there is not going to be a debate about that, so stop complaining and hurting, and get moving.'' since then I've never had thigh pain again, and only in recent years some knee pain on those very annoying steep stony descents.

my own pace and the freedom of making my own choices are very important to me. they are some of the reasons I prefer walking alone.
 
Last edited:

VNwalking

Wandering in big circles
Camino(s) past & future
Francés ('14/'15)
San Olav/CF ('16)
Baztanés/CF ('17)
Ingles ('18)
Vasco/CF/Invierno ('19)
Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me?
It's not just you! 😊
Day three of my second Camino had me sitting despondently in the dirt by the side of the road, practically in tears, talking to my left foot. When I finally shut up and listened, the boots came off in favor of the light watershoes I was carrying, and we could finally make some comfortable progress.
 

Stroller

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Norte (2015), Frances (2016)
in my case it usually ends up as "listen you sniveling sack of jelly you got us into this, there is no food here, there is no where to sleep here and no water so shut up and keep moving" followed by the reply "But, but, I hurt" and so the conversation goes.
 

walkingstu

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino SJPP to SDC 2007 Frances
Camino Aragon Pau Fr. to Pamplona 2010
Camino Burgos to SDC 2012
Camino Porto to SDC 2015
Camino VDLP Seville to SDC March 2016
Good story, I enjoyed it! Thanks.
The cost of beginning the Pilgrim experience is often pain and discomfort.
 

Bonita

Member
Camino(s) past & future
September ( 2015)
This is the reason I like to walk alone. I don’t want someone telling me what I should do. My husband planned on walking in May but COVID cancelled that. He wanted me to walk with him. I told him no because he needed to walk his own Camino. I know he was disappointed, but I got so much out of walking alone when I walked in 2015. I also know he would have pushed me and I really don’t like being pushed. I’m sure it wouldn’t have ended nicely.
 

WalkingJane

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
May and October 2015
(2015 October)
June 2018 Portuguese
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
My two amigos, left and right, spike up clearly before we ever got to Spain. I had ordered hiking boots, thinking they were “what one had to do”. The amigos actually agreed to have them in and laced, but when we stood up the left and right “said” VERY CLEARLY that not one step would be taken in these monstrosities. Not one. Sent them back and began the walk in sneakers, Got Keen sandals in Burgos, wear them still. Happy amigos, all 3 of us. 😏😎
 

marilyn van graan

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2012) VDLP (2014) Portuguese (2015)
Whats that nursery rhyme about the little red train - I know I can yes I can etc - well that is sometimes my mantra but mostly "suck it up buttercup" and keep moving!! You nearly had me in the beginning and I had thoughts of how nice and how considerate!!! Oh I can't wait to get out on the camino paths again - I have missed it so much this year - stay safe everyone and meet you out there real soonXXXX
 
Camino(s) past & future
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Whats that nursery rhyme about the little red train - I know I can yes I can etc - well that is sometimes my mantra but mostly "suck it up buttercup" and keep moving!! You nearly had me in the beginning and I had thoughts of how nice and how considerate!!! Oh I can't wait to get out on the camino paths again - I have missed it so much this year - stay safe everyone and meet you out there real soonXXXX

When I'm struggling to make those last few kms I recite a simple Mantra

Paella v Vino , Paella y Vino

Reminding myself of the prize at the end of the day!

OK, OK, I realise most of the Paella on the CF is that micro-waved Frozen Brand, but it still tastes great at the end of the day with a glass (or 5) of Rioja! :p
 

Joyce Dunn Rogers

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Camino Portugal 2021
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
I had (sometimes verbal) conversations with my original hiking stick I'd picked off the ground in the SJPP park.
I discovered the stick was a "He" and I named him Stick. He was my buddy, my pal, my emotional support and I became nearly hysterical when I thought I'd lost him in a small town (back tracked & found him, Thank God!). Had to buy him a necklace as an apology for leaving him the corner of a portable toilet stall.
Then I accidentally broke him trying to play golf with an apple on a paved path. OMG! What was I thinking?...I can't even play golf! Attempted to splint him but that was futile.
I became so emotionally attached to Stick that my children told me I needed a Mental Health Break in Logrono. I did. It helped.
Straped Stick to my backpack and carried him all the way to Santiago, where I mailed him home.
Stick is now on display on my Camino Wall.
RIP faithful little stick.❤️
 

freespirit

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Lourdes v SJPDP - Santiago (June/July 2010) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (July/August 2015) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (June/July/August 2017)
sometimes, yes, though usually I just tell them to hold on till we get to the accommodation. it usually works. or I ignore them and they figure it's too troublesome to bother?

I do remember thick trick from my first camino. I've had some thigh pains for years, even had therapy, but no doctor quite managed to pinpoint what was wrong. I've also been having occasional problems with my knees since teenage years.
when the pain started - that was on the crazily long third day when I walked from roncesvalles to larrasoana and literally couldn't budge for two hours when I got there - I said to my legs: ''Look, darlings, I want to walk this camino, there is not going to be a debate about that, so stop complaining and hurting, and get moving.'' since then I've never had thigh pain again, and only in recent years some knee pain on those very annoying steep stony descents.

my own pace and the freedom of making my own choices are very important to me. they are some of the reasons I prefer walking alone.
 

Gingerseed

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances July-Aug 2011
Camino Portugues Oct 2012
Camino Frances starting in Pamplona 2017
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:


I enjoyed reading your short story. It’s very much coincides with life. We are all on our individual journeys. We must follow what’s in our hearts and listen to our bodies.
We must learn to listen to one another’s feelings, encourage as much as we can but ultimately respect their decisions. Some people’s visions make no sense to us but to that person it’s very clear and completely rational.
There are times on the Camino that we thrive in the company of others but there are also times where we thrive having solitude. It’s ok to part ways and start walking at your own pace, following your own agenda and opening yourself up to new people and experiences.
At the end I hope your relationships were salvaged and you were able to celebrate and reflect fondly on your journey. Challenges and all x
 

freespirit

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances - Lourdes v SJPDP - Santiago (June/July 2010) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (July/August 2015) Camino Frances - SJPDP - Santiago (June/July/August 2017)
sometimes, yes, though usually I just tell them to hold on till we get to the accommodation. it usually works. or I ignore them and they figure it's too troublesome to bother?

I do remember thick trick from my first camino. I've had some thigh pains for years, even had therapy, but no doctor quite managed to pinpoint what was wrong. I've also been having occasional problems with my knees since teenage years.
when the pain started - that was on the crazily long third day when I walked from roncesvalles to larrasoana and literally couldn't budge for two hours when I got there - I said to my legs: ''Look, darlings, I want to walk this camino, there is not going to be a debate about that, so stop complaining and hurting, and get moving.'' since then I've never had thigh pain again, and only in recent years some knee pain on those very annoying steep stony descents.

my own pace and the freedom of making my own choices are very important to me. they are some of the reasons I prefer walking alone.
Having done the Camino twice once with fellow pilgrims and once without, I preferred my second choice, and when i go back for my third Camino I will go it alone, I have found that walking alone I can walk where I want, when i want,stop when I want,eat when and where I want, and sleep where I want, and also leave in the morning what time I want, and walk with who I want with no arguments, Its different if you do the Camino with family or loving partner or really good friend but thats just my apinion
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Camino(s) past & future
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
I enjoyed reading your short story. It’s very much coincides with life. We are all on our individual journeys. We must follow what’s in our hearts and listen to our bodies.
We must learn to listen to one another’s feelings, encourage as much as we can but ultimately respect their decisions. Some people’s visions make no sense to us but to that person it’s very clear and completely rational.
There are times on the Camino that we thrive in the company of others but there are also times where we thrive having solitude. It’s ok to part ways and start walking at your own pace, following your own agenda and opening yourself up to new people and experiences.
At the end I hope your relationships were salvaged and you were able to celebrate and reflect fondly on your journey. Challenges and all x
Did you really read the entire story??
😉
 

CMD

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Sarria to Santiago next week
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
You had me convinced that there were 3 of you😂
 

nathanael

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances, Norte, Plata,
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
no most times I walk alone a few times have hooked up with people who were of the same frame of mind. I believe it only happened three times that I walked with individuals for more than two and a half weeks. And I have done 12 Caminos.
 

4 Eyes

Member
Camino(s) past & future
CF from SJPP 14, VDLP from Seville 15, DN&P from Irun 16, Portuguese from Lisbon 17, CF from SJPP 18
Yes my walking companion, actually my constant companion, Belle, tends to belly ache. Twice she had food poisoning on the camino and once just an excruciating bellyache for unknown reasons. I starved her and dragged her along without food or mercy and she always complied. When she's good I reward her with Cola Cao, pao de deus, Merluza, and pimiento de Padron. I love walking solo but I cannot walk without her. Did I say Belle? Oh I mean my Belly.

Love your story Robo. So here is my pale imitation.
 

FionaMcG

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
May-June 2017: Camino Frances
Sept-Oct 2019: Camino Frances
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
Oh, thank you SO much for that much needed laugh!
 
Camino(s) past & future
Portugues '15, '16, & '19
Via Francigena '17
Frances '18
Muxia & Finisterre '18
Tahoe Rim Trail '19
I have walked three caminos with friends and family and one camino by myself. I really looked forward to my solo camino for all the usual reasons and by the time I got to Roncesvalles I was in the midst of the group I spent the next 35 plus days with. We somehow moved our final destination from SdC, to Finistere, to Muxia, to the tattoo shop in SdC, to future adventures. I don't know of another place where this is so natural.
 

David Tallan

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (1989 and 2016), Portugues - from Porto (2018)
I enjoyed reading your short story. It’s very much coincides with life. We are all on our individual journeys. We must follow what’s in our hearts and listen to our bodies.
We must learn to listen to one another’s feelings, encourage as much as we can but ultimately respect their decisions. Some people’s visions make no sense to us but to that person it’s very clear and completely rational.
There are times on the Camino that we thrive in the company of others but there are also times where we thrive having solitude. It’s ok to part ways and start walking at your own pace, following your own agenda and opening yourself up to new people and experiences.
At the end I hope your relationships were salvaged and you were able to celebrate and reflect fondly on your journey. Challenges and all x
I absolutely agree that it is ok to part ways and start walking at your own pace. But in this case, since Len was Rob's left foot and Reg was his right foot, doing so for Rob would have been a real challenge!
 

Hilarious

Hilarious
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage Camino Frances from SJPdP (Sept. 2019)
A Short Story - Why it started to fall apart on the Camino Frances (and a question)

We were full of excitement on that first day out of St Jean. It was our first time and so everything was new and just amazing. The landscape, the other Pilgrims, and oh, did I mention the landscape!

Reg, Len and I were having the time of our lives. We felt like Hobbits starting an adventure!

Though Len started to struggle a bit on that really steep stretch up to Hunto (Achilles Tendonitis) but some additional heel wedges helped a lot. In fact, we three were rather ‘walking wounded’ due to age, lack of exercise, being a bit (a lot) overweight, and carrying a few training injuries.

You know what they say “Don’t walk your Camino before your Camino”. Well we had it seems…

That first day set the tone though. In a good way. “Set the pace to the slowest man” That has been drummed into me in the Army and later in life through amazing team management books like Eli Goldratt’s The Goal, in which, Goldratt gives the example of the scout troop on a hike.

The goal of Alex Rogo the Scout Leader, was to get the troop to the campground in some reasonable amount of time while keeping the group close enough together to maintain adult supervision.

The constraint was identified as Herbie, the slowest moving boy in the troop. He was easily identified by the queue of boys behind him and the growing space between Herbie and the boys in front of him.


We didn’t have this problem though. Our slowest member was Len, and we walked at Len’s pace.

Of course there were minor irritations at times, as all three of us would want to stop at different times, to adjust boots and socks, tend to sore spots, merely take rest or to take on food and water.

Thankfully we all three were in 100% agreement on water!

We found through painful experience, that not enough water, and even mild dehydration would increase joint and foot pain. This was generally managed by making sure we were drinking enough and by careful use of pain killers and anti inflammatories.

A doctor had given us specific advice on what to take and when. And it was working fine.

Don’t think that we were being overly cautious. Len had quite severe Achilles Tendonitis, and Reg had it also but not as bad. (They both had cortisone shots before departure) And I was suffering most of the way with knee and back pain.

We really were rather a sorry outfit. All self-induced of course through poor preparation.

But we managed, through the days and the weeks and built up a sound regime of hydration, stretching, rest stops and medications. Not to forget of course, regular breaks and raising the feet at breaks.

What’s that acronym? RICE. Rest, Ice, Compression, Elevation. Well it works……. To a point.

Maybe the problems started due to over confidence? Maybe the heat? Maybe because we were starting to walk longer distances.

But it all came to a head on Day 20 I think it was. We were walking from Terradillos to El Burgo. 32 kms on quite a hot day. We’d been used to distances averaging 22 kms so far, which were manageable. We’d done one day of 32 kms before and it took a rest day in Burgos to recover from it.

And here we were again……pushing our limits.

It was a few kms before Bercianos del Real Camino. We’d stopped for a rest and a drink. We were hurting by now, all three of us. We’d already walked 20 kms and the day was hot. Joints and feet were really starting to hurt.

So things got tense, fast.

Lex wanted to take more meds right away, but as I pointed out, it was only 3 hours since the last lot and we only had about 4-5 kms to go till Bercianos del Real Camino, where we could stop at a café for a snack, as it’s better to take the meds with food. “We’ll be there in an hour Lex” I pleaded.

No”, was the reply. “Let’s just sit here for another hour then. We’ll have a proper rest and take our meds before we get going”.

(I don’t know why they say to take these meds every 4 hours, because I can tell you right now, at about 3 hours, they start wearing off fast!)

Lex, if we wait here another hour, in this heat, we’ll just be an hour later getting to El Burgo. Where we can stop for the day, we can get ice for your Achilles and relax for the day

No” was the response.

I appealed to Reg. “Does it make sense to sit here another hour”?

I don’t mind going on” replied Reg, “but we agreed that the slowest sets the pace and that’s worked for almost 3 weeks now

OK” I said. “How about this as a compromise

Len, I have a compression ‘sock’ you can use to help with the Tendonitis”. “We’ll drink our remaining water to hydrate as much as possible, and when we reach Bercianos del Real Camino, we’ll stop for a break, get some ice and then take more painkillers and anti inflammatories” “We then only have 7.5 kms to go to El Burgo, at worst case 2 hours, given our current pace

OK” said Len. “Deal

I breathed a huge sigh of relief, as I really didn’t want to sit around in this heat for another hour.

I got out the compression sock, and some fresh walking socks to do a complete ‘change over’ for Len.

I was just so glad he agreed to keep going.

You see it would have been impossible to go on without him……..

Len was my left foot, and Reg my right………


I had to use all my persuasive powers to coax them that last 12 kilometres to El Burgo Ranero!

Have you found yourself having these 'internal' conversations on Camino?
Or is it just me? :rolleyes:
Love this story❣️
 

susanawee

susanawee
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances-(2013/14/18
Camino Salvado Perth -(2015)
West Highland Way (2016)
Lyon France 2017
Whats that nursery rhyme about the little red train - I know I can yes I can etc - well that is sometimes my mantra but mostly "suck it up buttercup" and keep moving!! You nearly had me in the beginning and I had thoughts of how nice and how considerate!!! Oh I can't wait to get out on the camino paths again - I have missed it so much this year - stay safe everyone and meet you out there real soonXXXX
My mantra was always from The Little red engine, "Ithink I can, I think I can" and itvalways got me through in the end, hard though ut was at times.
 

Avenelite

Member
Camino(s) past & future
[April 2014] Camino Frances; St Jean -Finisterre & Muxia. [2019, May-July] Le Puy -St Jean
This is the reason I like to walk alone. I don’t want someone telling me what I should do. My husband planned on walking in May but COVID cancelled that. He wanted me to walk with him. I told him no because he needed to walk his own Camino. I know he was disappointed, but I got so much out of walking alone when I walked in 2015. I also know he would have pushed me and I really don’t like being pushed. I’m sure it wouldn’t have ended nicely.
Yes, relaying to someone close and dear that, 'No, this time I'm going solo' can be tricky. Then to do the same to all and sundry who hear about the trip, before, during and after the actual event, can give rise to lots of (hopefully concealed) emotions. Rarely, but often enough, depending on my mood (generally tiredness and/or having answered the same question multiple times that day), replies could veer towards curtness. However, in an effort to be cordial, and as I generally perceive myself as polite and courteous, I started to entertain myself on long stretches by making up intriguing and enigmatic replies. But, forgive me gentlefolk, there was the odd occasion when asked why my husband was not walking/hadn't walked with me, I said with a smile and in a very calm voice: "I didn't invite him!" Often a conversation stopper...
 

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