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The unpredictable ends of my Camino!

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AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
 

Nana6

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
France ( 2020)
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
I am sorry for your pain. Hopefully, you can walk the rest later on
Take care of yourself.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I am also sorry to read about your injury and that you had to stop - for a while, anyway. How are your legs now - have you received any medical advice and are they getting better?

I hope you don't mind if I remind new pilgrims of a few lessons... It is risky to start the camino by walking 32-40 km/day if you are not experienced in those daily distances. Your body gets fatigued and you are more likely to stumble, fall or get overuse injuries. Once injured, you should respect the body's need to rest and heal. A couple of days of rest can sometimes (but not always) do miracles.

Of course, I don't always follow my own advice, but I keep reminding myself of these things.
 
Last edited:
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2005,2008,2010,2015.camino Portuguese 2007 .primativo2012.camino Norte 2009.sjpdp to finisterre and muxia 2007. Le Puy to jpdp 2006. Via francigena vercelli to Lucca 2014. Lucca to Rome 2016.
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
So sorry that you had to stop your Camino
It will still be there when you want to continue in the future

It's important to plan......a little!
But it's also important to be flexible...and as in life ..things don't always go to plan, or how we want them to go

Our first Camino in 2005 was not planned at all...just packed the bags and took off!!
Really didn't have a clue then.
We had a wonderful Camino...more by luck than anything else

In 2017 we'd planned, planned, planned.....and on the first day out, over the Pyrenees "himself" developed a DVT and multiple pulmonary embolisms.....trip over!!
He was fine and recovered well and since then we've walked the San Salvidor without any problems, and this June/July we're off to walk the Invierno!

So....hang in there as they say and hopefully, you'll be off and running.....sorry walking before you know it

Do let us know how your recovery goes
Best wishes
Annette
 
Camino(s) past & future
Frances(2006) portugues(2013)San Salvador (2017)
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Oh, dear, @AndyTomas ... What can I say? Well, first, congratulations on posting this news. I have been following your preparation, and hoping that all would work out for your timescale on this, your first - but not final -camino. Just get sorted, enjoy the visit to family - are you not going to Italy? and then, another day, Santiago will call you back. I usually don't talk like this, but somehow, I think it applies to you. Sorry, but listen: have you heard of Jean Vanier? Look him up. Life is bigger than our little setbacks. courage et confiance! (courage and confidence, although I imagine with your Italian connection you could understand)
 

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Hi Andy,
Since you came such a long way, is there any possibility for you to book yourself to a Holiday area maybe in Barcelona (not so expensive there) for a week or two and see if your condition with rest and treatment gets better. You look young so you may heal faster. Meanwhile walk in soft shoes like crocks a minimum. Then you maybe can resume it.
You came such a long way and you achieved so much.
 

Chris Gi

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Did April through June 2018 from Pamplona to Santiago. 2020 May or end of September.
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Oh dear. I am so very sorry for your pain and painful decision to stop your Camino. I hope that you recover well and quickly. The Camino will still be there for you.
 

t2andreo

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
C/F: 2013, 2014
C/M: 2016
C/P: 2015, 2017
C/I: 2018
Voluntario: 2014 to 2018
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Remember to save and preserve your Pilgrim credencial. When you return, pick up at Leon where you left off. You only have to finish the second half of this route to have completed the entire Camino Frances.

We are ALL presuming that you WILL be back.
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
I'm sorry for your pain. I hope there was a visit to a health clinic in there.
Not really!
I was walking everyday taking anti inflammatory every morning before start and wishing the day after it would be better.
By the way, many albergues has the massage service for pilgrims. I tried once in Los Arcos, but it wasn’t good enough honestly.
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
I am also sorry to read about your injury and that you had to stop - for a while, anyway. How are your legs now - have you received any medical advice and are they getting better?

I hope you don't mind if I remind new pilgrims of a few lessons... It is risky to start the camino by walking 32-40 km/day if you are not experienced in those daily distances. Your body gets fatigued and you are more likely to stumble, fall or get overuse injuries. Once injured, you should respect the body's need to rest and heal. A couple of days of rest can sometimes (but not always) do miracles.

Of course, I don't always follow my own advice, but I keep reminding myself of these things.
Well, it doesn’t happen always. It’s not a rule!

Sorry if I say it but I have been training myself since 3 months before the Camino, walking 30 to 40kms at day.
I found out that for people like me, that live in a big city as Sydney, the terrain is never or even similar of what the Camino looks like. So, you can prepare your legs to be stronger and your body to be ready to walk long distance, but you can’t prepare it for a 300 metres of downhill putting, even if you use poles trekking, your knees under a big stress.
This is only one example........ I am sure you know better than me, what I am talking about 😉

It doesn’t mean, that training ourselves before the Camino it doesn’t helps.

Ciao
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Hi Andy,
Since you came such a long way, is there any possibility for you to book yourself to a Holiday area maybe in Barcelona (not so expensive there) for a week or two and see if your condition with rest and treatment gets better. You look young so you may heal faster. Meanwhile walk in soft shoes like crocks a minimum. Then you maybe can resume it.
You came such a long way and you achieved so much.
Unfortunately it didn’t works.
I’m still injured and the doctor told me that I have phlebitis plus micro fracture, due to too much stress, on my shin splints of both legs!!! I need a long recovery 😢
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Remember to save and preserve your Pilgrim credencial. When you return, pick up at Leon where you left off. You only have to finish the second half of this route to have completed the entire Camino Frances.

We are ALL presuming that you WILL be back.
Oh yes..... definitely I will keep it!

It is anyway a big memory of what I did and what I will complete in a short time!

I’m already planning to come back next year!!!
 

Raggy

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Mozarabe Almeria (2017)
Cherhill to Canterbury - Pilgrims' Way (2018)
Via Francigena (2019)
Feel better soon. Take it easy on your body.
 

lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
I'm so very sorry to hear about your injury! It sounds like you put alot of effort into planning and training to suffer such an unfortunate injury. I'm just curious....

Did you have some time constraint that made you WANT to do 32-40 kms a day? That sounds extremely fast and contrary to the advice that is repeated here again and again to walk at your pace, listen to your body, the adages that it's not a race, these things are shared with those who want to walk so they will be prepared and not get injured.

When I walk my Camino I'm planning on giving myself 6-8 weeks to do it. Because of my spinal condition I might only want to walk 6-20 kms a day. I don't mind because I want to absorb all the Camino has to offer.

Your pace just sounds so fast and I'm wondering how many pilgrims did you get to fellowship with? How many hours did you spend losing yourself in views of the terrain? How many people did you not get to know because they couldn't walk at your pace? Did you see any of the sights with that pace? I'm asking because I want to know, respectfully and understand.

There is a member who walked from SJPP to Santiago in 24 days plus two rest days in Burgos. He posted a thread recently about his disillusionment with the Camino and his faith (Druidism). He too became injured because of his pace. Not just physically but I suspect his pace prevented him from achieving his spiritual goals as well. His injuries were minor compared to yours so if your goal is to set a record, I'm pretty sure he set it already lol!
 

p_mci

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Francés, Inglés, Portugués (2014) Norte, Primitivo (2015) Vía de la Plata (2017) Mozárabe (2018)
This was very bad luck for you AndyThomas! No matter what preparation we do, it is true that different people's bodies react differently to a hard walking pace. Unfortunately your body had a very extreme reaction. You will know for the future. Take it easy!
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
I'm so very sorry to hear about your injury! It sounds like you put alot of effort into planning and training to suffer such an unfortunate injury. I'm just curious....

Did you have some time constraint that made you WANT to do 32-40 kms a day? That sounds extremely fast and contrary to the advice that is repeated here again and again to walk at your pace, listen to your body, the adages that it's not a race, these things are shared with those who want to walk so they will be prepared and not get injured.

When I walk my Camino I'm planning on giving myself 6-8 weeks to do it. Because of my spinal condition I might only want to walk 6-20 kms a day. I don't mind because I want to absorb all the Camino has to offer.

Your pace just sounds so fast and I'm wondering how many pilgrims did you get to fellowship with? How many hours did you spend losing yourself in views of the terrain? How many people did you not get to know because they couldn't walk at your pace? Did you see any of the sights with that pace? I'm asking because I want to know, respectfully and understand.

There is a member who walked from SJPP to Santiago in 24 days plus two rest days in Burgos. He posted a thread recently about his disillusionment with the Camino and his faith (Druidism). He too became injured because of his pace. Not just physically but I suspect his pace prevented him from achieving his spiritual goals as well. His injuries were minor compared to yours so if your goal is to set a record, I'm pretty sure he set it already lol!
My dear, the Camino is something that every single person does as he/she wishes.
I could think the same of your way how to do the Camino, spending 40 days and walking always, since the first day, with people instead of enjoying the peace of silence walking alone. But I don’t like judging what people love.

The way as you are describing the Camino is the stereotype of thousands of people how they see the Camino.
Did you ever try to do the Camino in your way instead of following the stereotype? I did!!!

However let me tell you something.
If someone walk 30 to 40km at day like me, it doesn’t mean that he is not enjoying the Camino.
I loved every single step done of it. I enjoy the scenery, the terrain, I met a lot of people everyday, always different and I can tell you something more, I walked from Burgos to Leon with a Brazilian guy, who was walking as fast as me enjoying everything.
Anyway, I walked most of my days alone, listening only birds and my steps.

My injury came because I did a downhill towards Burgos (you will see what I’m talking about) too fast and without trekking poles even if I had it and did not happen because I was walking 30 to 40kms at day.

I tell you something, plan as much as you want your journey, but you don’t know what can happen on the way.

After that, I can only say to you GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO MY FRIEND.
 

lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
Andy I have been prevented by life circumstances from doing the Camino for the past seven years. I have not been able to follow my call to walk until this year and still circumstances have not granted me full freedom to get on a plane. I agree that people can do the Camino as they wish but if they want to ignore tried and true advice they proceed at their peril. I won't give you pity because you hurt yourself. Planning means taking poles and you left that out in your original post. I'm glad you were able to enjoy your walk and recieve benefits at the pace you did it. It sounds like you just wanted to from your response. or you might have said no I had to get back to work or family.

I'm glad you walked the Camino you wanted to and got many benefits from it. Getting hurt on day one or day ten would be a nightmare for me as long as I have waited to go. But I think you are doing a disservice to future pilgrims by adhering to this "walk it as you wish" philosophy. Walking it as you wished, without poles, pushing your body like you did lead you to the end you have now. Let's hope all reading now will realize this actually was a failure of planning and not some "chance" circumstance that having poles could have prevented.

Buen Camino and take poles next time! And if I seem trite because I want to follow in the footsteps of the "stereotype" of the pilgrims past who took things slower and live to tell without injuries so be it. I will walk my way. You walk yours.
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Andy I have been prevented by life circumstances from doing the Camino for the past seven years. I have not been able to follow my call to walk until this year and still circumstances have not granted me full freedom to get on a plane. I agree that people can do the Camino as they wish but if they want to ignore tried and true advice they proceed at their peril. I won't give you pity because you hurt yourself. Planning means taking poles and you left that out in your original post. I'm glad you were able to enjoy your walk and recieve benefits at the pace you did it. It sounds like you just wanted to from your response. or you might have said no I had to get back to work or family.

I'm glad you walked the Camino you wanted to and got many benefits from it. Getting hurt on day one or day ten would be a nightmare for me as long as I have waited to go. But I think you are doing a disservice to future pilgrims by adhering to this "walk it as you wish" philosophy. Walking it as you wished, without poles, pushing your body like you did lead you to the end you have now. Let's hope all reading now will realize this actually was a failure of planning and not some "chance" circumstance that having poles could have prevented.

Buen Camino and take poles next time! And if I seem trite because I want to follow in the footsteps of the "stereotype" of the pilgrims past who took things slower and live to tell without injuries so be it. I will walk my way. You walk yours.
If you read my report, I used poles every day except while I was doing the downhill towards Burgos plus I did it too fast without distribution the weight carefully.

I received a lot of advice. I wrote already on my first report, THANKS TO EVERYONE for the advice.
Without them I couldn’t deal with the Camino.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
Let's hope all reading now will realize this actually was a failure of planning and not some "chance" circumstance
@lizlane - You are making some very strong statements that are not very kind and are based on some narrow generalizations about how the camino should be walked.

I made some comments in an earlier post about lessons there might be for future pilgrims. I'm sorry now that I made those comments. At least I tried to present them as something to consider, rather than me knowing better than the OP what was appropriate for him.

@AndyTomas - It sounds like you were well trained and simply had an accident that could happen to anyone. Your distances of 32-40 km/day were not unreasonable for a fit person, and it seems to me that you were well prepared in all the sensible ways. No one should feel that they must walk slower in order to socialize or have more time to gaze at cows, highways and flowers! Some of us walk slower but don't socialize, and I know some very sociable walkers who quickly catch up with everybody on the trail, and spend time chatting with all of them before moving ahead! There is room for all types on the camino.
 
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RumAndChupacabras

Do unto other's as you would have them do unto you
Camino(s) past & future
Jul-Sept 2019 ~Apr. 2018 Oviedo, Santo Toribio, Covadonga~May/June 2016 Portuguese
"...I tell you something, plan as much as you want your journey, but you don’t know what can happen on the way..."
Andy, you experienced and learned so much, I can tell! This that you wrote is the 100% true for us all and, not just on Camino, right? ;) Thank you for taking the time to let us know how it went and what happened to you. I hope you'll heal very well!
Buen Camino...your journey continues every day. :)
 

Leibniz

Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Astorga (2018)
Frances/Invierno from SJPP (2019)
Andy, so sorry that an injury ended your Camino too soon.

I agree with others that you sounded very well prepared and that 32-40km is perfectly reasonable.

Wishing you good luck for the rest of your camino (even off the Camino). ;)
 

CdnDreamer

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (12, 15 & 18) San Salvador (18), Portuguese (19)
Thanks for your honesty and letting us know what happened. Take it easy, rest and let your body heal. Next year you can return stronger, wiser and even more thankful that you can finish.

And you are right that most people who get hurt on the camino just disappear from the message boards and we don't hear what happened to them.
 
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sarria to Santiago March 18 , Camino Frances June 18 Camino Frances May 19
My dear, the Camino is something that every single person does as he/she wishes.
I could think the same of your way how to do the Camino, spending 40 days and walking always, since the first day, with people instead of enjoying the peace of silence walking alone. But I don’t like judging what people love.

The way as you are describing the Camino is the stereotype of thousands of people how they see the Camino.
Did you ever try to do the Camino in your way instead of following the stereotype? I did!!!

However let me tell you something.
If someone walk 30 to 40km at day like me, it doesn’t mean that he is not enjoying the Camino.
I loved every single step done of it. I enjoy the scenery, the terrain, I met a lot of people everyday, always different and I can tell you something more, I walked from Burgos to Leon with a Brazilian guy, who was walking as fast as me enjoying everything.
Anyway, I walked most of my days alone, listening only birds and my steps.

My injury came because I did a downhill towards Burgos (you will see what I’m talking about) too fast and without trekking poles even if I had it and did not happen because I was walking 30 to 40kms at day.

I tell you something, plan as much as you want your journey, but you don’t know what can happen on the way.

After that, I can only say to you GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO MY FRIEND.
You did your best and you will return stronger . As you recover you will plan and maybe do a different approach next time . I am a way older than you and got to Fromista last year in 9 days , Why? because I only had nine days off and got up early and walked . Nobody’s Camino is the same or should be . Good luck on your recovery and look forward to returning.
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Let's hope all reading now will realize this actually was a failure of planning and not some "chance" circumstance that having poles could have prevented.
My dear, I’m speechless of what you said, but I can’t get upset of it because you don’t even know what does mean the word “failure “ says to a pilgrim!!!!!

I really hope you will finish your journey and also the Camino will teach you something....... you need it!
 

Hilarious

Hilarious
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage Camino Frances from SJPdP (Sept. 2019)
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Hi Andy
So sorry to hear about your injury and hope that you have received some medical attention to assist with your recovery and prevent any recurrence. As many others have said we make plans but life often throws up a curved ball.
I’m sure other Caminos will be waiting for you - look after yourself! I am going on my first Camino in mid September from Mackay in Queensland. I am 64 and I know the plane trip will take it out of me before I even begin walking so have booked 2 nights in Bayonne and 2 nights in SJPdP.
Sending positive thoughts and wishes your way!
 

dougfitz

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Spain: Mar 2010, Apr 2012, May/Jun 2016. Norway/Sweden: 2012, 2018. Other: 2011
My injury came because I did a downhill towards Burgos (you will see what I’m talking about) too fast and without trekking poles even if I had it and did not happen because I was walking 30 to 40kms at day.
@AndyTomas, it is great that you have had the courage to share this story with us, and a shame that despite your preparation that this happened to you. I feel for you.

I know that when I have had similar injuries, it is often easy to identify the single catalytic event - that single straw that broke the camel's back. When I have had more time to reflect on this, there are often other things that have contributed in some way. I hope that when you have had time to reflect on what has happened to you, you are able to identify whether there have been other factors that you might want to address when you return to the Camino.
 

Anamya

Keeping it simple
Camino(s) past & future
Frances (2015)
Portugues (2017)
Lebaniego (2019)
Wishing you a speedy recovery, and that you can eventually return to the Camino - if not in this trip, in a future one!

Thanks for sharing and alerting to that hill. It is quite something.
 
Camino(s) past & future
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Hola @AndyTomas . I can understand your desire to continue "regardless". But on reflection I suggest it might have been better to have visited a medical clinic in Burgos before heading out to tackle the Meseta. Despite other comments the Meseta is not flat and some of those hills are reeling testing. The pills and the cream as you found out only provided partial relief and you could have done real (permanent damage). I walked 20+ KM on a numb foot back in 2013 - it took nearly 2 years for a total mend,. Cheers
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Hola @AndyTomas . I can understand your desire to continue "regardless". But on reflection I suggest it might have been better to have visited a medical clinic in Burgos before heading out to tackle the Meseta. Despite other comments the Meseta is not flat and some of those hills are reeling testing. The pills and the cream as you found out only provided partial relief and you could have done real (permanent damage). I walked 20+ KM on a numb foot back in 2013 - it took nearly 2 years for a total mend,. Cheers
You are totally right but unfortunately the love to continue walking was stronger than stop a few days in Burgos for recovery.
Definitely, it has been another lesson!😉

Thanks
 

Moorwalker

Member
Camino(s) past & future
none yet
I’m still injured and the doctor told me that I have phlebitis plus micro fracture, due to too much stress, on my shin splints of both legs!!! I need a long recovery 😢
Sending sympathy, that is so frustrating, but it will heal. I recommend seeing a physiotherapist once it starts to get better, they are very good at correcting your gait so it doesn't happen again.
 

Michael; Camino-addicted

Take your time to enjoy a beautiful moment
Camino(s) past & future
A few Caminos
Next plan - Camino Vasco interior
Hallo AndyTomas,

you had to stop :eek:

I remember you posting from february "Walking 21 day from Pamplona" and I remember what I thought at first: He is crazy. Because your idea to walk the camino was so totally different from mine.
But with every post at your thread it changed more and more to "what a brave guy". Not only the plan, but also the courage to write a posting like you did. It was clear that many people would tear this plan, your plan, apart. And yet you dared and faced criticism.

And now you have the courage to say, that you had to stop, because of problems with your feet.

Others would be embarrassed and slip into a small hole, but you are standing tall and face the critic again.

Chapeau - I take my hat off to you, all due.......!

57425

I remember next year you´ll come back to the camino with your fiance. It will be another way - probably not better not worse, just different. Take care of you👍

Note from mod — I love this post but had to delete the obscenity, it’s against forum rules.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
This is getting nasty and personal. Some judgmental daggers came out. I don’t want to close the thread because I know @AndyThomas can probably use some more cyber support, but I will ask that people refrain from judgments about how his injury happened.

And I will also add my own personal frustration at the way in which the disapproval inevitably flows when someone admits to enjoying walking 35-40 km a day.

I walked caminos for about 13 years before circumstances made me try walking these long distances. I was on the Levante and had met no one in the first 4 days. When I met two nice French peregrinos on day 4, I decided I would try to walk their distances for the companionship, and voila, I enjoyed it! Some people enjoy it, that’s why they do it. Some enjoy getting to their destination at 1, to each his or her own.

Anyway, @Andy, sending you lots of good wishes for a complete recovery. Having had to stop the Vdlp in Cáceres years ago, I can still remember the crushing feeling when I actually decided to stop. It’s not fun and it’s hard to be philosophical, but I am sure you will return. Buen camino, Laurie
 

lynn

C.F. '07, '09, '18'. Not All Who Wander Are Lost.
Camino(s) past & future
C.F.: July '07, July '09, Sept. '18.
I walked faster on my first 2 Caminos---of course I was 10 yrs younger then. I was a lot slower last Sept. Everyone I ever met was on their own journey. So good luck and walk on AndyTomas!
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe (01/2019)
*Derry-SANT (09/2019)?
I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Well done @AndyTomas for your achievement to-date and despite this injury I'm not convinced it's related to the distances you've been unfairly criticised for. I experienced something similar on two separate occasions, the last few days before arriving into Santiago in Francès and last few days one month later on Portuguese. I can't be 100% but my observation would be that it's likely my injury occured on terrain that had rounded stones underfoot. The shape of the stones meets the pressure points at the bottom of the foot over a prolonged period of time coupled with the additional down force weight from pack is potential to cause injury. Regardless of distance this repetitive motion and pressure could well have been the catalyst for injury that followed. I experienced a numb pain at bottom of right foot that only could be compared to feeling as though there's a small stone in shoe, then pain moves up to calf and moves around leg causing limping. On both occasions I foolishly attempted to walk it off and even put more intensity into walking faster, through the pain which ironically eased the pain temporarily. I put it down to my heart and head that had been healed and simply the Camino showing me a physical lesson which I was happy to learn. Fortunately I completed both Caminos but did rest up for a week after each visit to Santiago. You will return with more intention and the journey will be all the more sweeter for the lessons you have learned. Preparation is key and I'm currently researching these socks for future walks. Buen Camino
 
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Anamiri

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino. I
Hi Andy
Although you didn't reach Santiago, you walked a very long way.
I think its about 500 kms, this is something to be proud of. Most people would never do that distance. Im sure you'll be back to walk the last bit
 

CAJohn

New Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances Sept/Oct 2019
I am sorry that this happened to you. I am much more concerned about the downhills. I will try to be careful but you never know.
 

mikebet

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP to Pamplona (2016); Baiona to Santiago (2018); Sarria to Santiago (2018)
Downhills are hard, all right, but mostly on the knees. I think if I were the OP I'd seek a medical opinion from a vascular surgeon -- not just a general doctor -- if he has not done so already. The doctor he saw may say it was phlebitis, but as a veteran of both phlebitis and a deep vein thrombosis in my leg I'd say that the swelling indicates the latter, and that can be serious. I would also advise him to drop the penchant for long distances. If your body tells you that 40km/day is too much (i.e., shin splints, blisters or anything else) that ought to be sufficient evidence that your body is right. Not to be judgemental (oh, OK, a little - LOL) but I see a lot of posts here where people present their long distances as if it is something to be admired by lesser humans. When combined with "and I injured myself in the process" I begin to scratch my head. I thought the Camino was supposed to be an enjoyable experience for modern pilgrims, not the punishing medieval ordeal that cleansed the soul and led to salvation. But maybe that's just a 73-yr-old already-well-punished body speaking.
 

C clearly

Veteran Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Seville-Astorga (Mar 2017). Mozarabe (Apr-May 2018)
I see a lot of posts here where people where people present their long distances as if it is something to be admired by lesser humans. .
You are quite wrong there. We do not see many posts like that. A day of 35 km is not harmful or unusual at all for the many strong walkers on the Camino. It is long for me, yes, but I'm not going to criticise others for their happy abilities. Virtually no one is recommending that others walk long days.
I thought the Camino was supposed to be...
Here you make another mistake - assuming what is the Camino "supposed to be." And the rest of your statement implies quite deliberately that long-day-walkers are typically foolish and create horrible conditions for themselves. That is a silly exaggeration that might be entertaining in certain situations, but it is not, when combined with your other words and the context of this whole thread.
 
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MaineSally

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Cam Frances SJPDP to Santiago ('17): Finisterre ('17); Muxia ('17)
Camino Portuguese - April ('19)
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Andy, you aren't alone. I had to call it quits on the Portuguese at the end of Day 5 with 100 miles down...infected big toes from friction of socks (thicker than socks used two years ago on the Frances). I was crushed, so I share the feeling you have. It's such a disappointment, particularly when you've broken in shoes, donned the backpack, and put in months of training miles. You listened to your body (finally), tried rest days, and were smart to make the decision you did. Our feet and legs are so integral to the success of our camino experience...along with head and heart. Even though I knew my toes were toast, I just hoped the ER doctor might say give it a few more days and then go gingerly...but, he confirmed what I already knew and said I'd have to reschedule my camino. Fortunately for me, the direct flight is fairly short and inexpensive out of Boston. You, on the other hand, plunked down a hefty chunk of change with flights out of Australia and long travel days.

Even disappointment yields gifts and lessons...realized already or down the road. You'll be back. Those trekking poles are a must for me. I marvel at those who don't need them, but they provide stability and create a lovely cadence of sorts for me.

Thanks for sharing and Bravo Zulu to you for what you were able to accomplish! Best wishes as you make plans to return...I have every confidence you will.
 

MichelleElynHogan

Veteran Member
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
Hi Andy,

I have had to stop my Camino twice now, due to leg muscle problems, in August 2016 and exactly one year ago in May, 2018. Do not feel guilt. Get the legs back in shape and the Camino awaits your return, as it also waits for me.
 

Derrybiketours

A journey of 500 miles begins with one step!
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP-SANT-FIN (09/2018)
PORTO-SANT (11/2018)
Caminho Da Fe (01/2019)
*Derry-SANT (09/2019)?
@mikebet
I see a lot of posts here where people present their long distances as if it is something to be admired by lesser humans.
Really, can you specify where in this thread supports your assumption?! Maybe it's more about your own limitations but I'm sure in your prime you achieved similar distance. Some people need to put themselves outside their comfort zone to gain insights and 40km isn't extreme. I don't believe the ops injury was as result of distance. He was very well prepared and only received injury after 500kms. Everyone walks their own Camino and based on evidence your statement is unfounded.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
I don’t want to pile on here, but anyone who says “I thought the camino was supposed to be an enjoyable experience” as a reaction to someone who walks long distances is being judgmental, and IMO way off base. I would never dream of criticizing people who choose to walk 20 km and spend their afternoons sitting in a café, but it would drive me crazy! For me, there is no better way to “smell the roses” (another popular criticism of those who walk long days) than to be out walking and soaking it all in.

I think the best resolution here is to agree that it’s up to everyone to determine the distances that best suit their physical fitness level and their own ideas about how to spend their precious time on the camino. And I will bet that there are just as many camino-ending injuries among those who walk 20 kms a day as among those who walk 40. It’s all about figuring out what works for you.
 

DevereUx

Devereaux
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances Sept-Oct 2018
Hola, Andy!
Thank you for sharing your experience.
It is so helpful for others to learn from those of us who have walked the Camino.
So many plan, practice, start and end up short for a host of reasons, not the least of which are time limitations and injury.
Be patient and rehab.
Then, start again where you left off.
The Camino will always be there waiting for you full of adventure and wonderful people.
Prayers be with you.
 

Anna Cameron

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances sept-oct 2018
Hi Andy
So sorry to hear about your injury and hope that you have received some medical attention to assist with your recovery and prevent any recurrence. As many others have said we make plans but life often throws up a curved ball.
I’m sure other Caminos will be waiting for you - look after yourself! I am going on my first Camino in mid September from Mackay in Queensland. I am 64 and I know the plane trip will take it out of me before I even begin walking so have booked 2 nights in Bayonne and 2 nights in SJPdP.
Sending positive thoughts and wishes your way!
I join with others in wishing you a good recovery, Andy Tomas, and blessings for your continuing Camino. I really like your comments, Hilarious, I feel some connection, having done my first Camino last year at age 65 (not as trained as I would have liked and in the wake of rather serious illness just a few months earlier). I walked at my own pace, had to part ways with my fellow South Australian due to our very different rhythms, had to skip ahead at one point due to illness, but I made it, aches & pains and all. And, I'm going back in 2021! Courage to all, whatever your rhythm.
 

Anna Cameron

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances sept-oct 2018
I join with others in wishing you a good recovery, Andy Tomas, and blessings for your continuing Camino. I really like your comments, Hilarious, I feel some connection, having done my first Camino last year at age 65 (not as trained as I would have liked and in the wake of rather serious illness just a few months earlier). I walked at my own pace, had to part ways with my fellow South Australian due to our very different rhythms, had to skip ahead at one point due to illness, but I made it, aches & pains and all. And, I'm going back in 2021! Courage to all, whatever your rhythm.
...and will add to above, that I did seek out a podiatrist early on (Estella, blisters) and later was seen at the International Clinic in Léon (severe respiratory infection), both necessary decisions which allowed me to keep going after treatment. Remember to take out good travel insurance with medical cover!
 

Aysen Mustafa

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
I plan on walking the Camino April 2018.
Hi Andy I was wondering whether you had developed shin splits. I walked the CF last year in 5 weeks and at the end the soles of my feet were sore and calves swollen and sore. My soles are ok now and I am finally going to see a doctor about my left calf as it still hurts when I do day walks and end of day from cycling to and from work.

I am curious did you see a GP or specialist? Did you have xrays or ultrasound? Note, I didn't do much training before walking but cycle every day. I walked a few short days and did two 30ks. After two weeks, I took it easier as I could feel the impact on my feet and calves and was worried about injuring myself. Hope you are successful the second time around, I am planning on rewalking next year but am going to take it slow and do other bits.
 

Leibniz

Peregrina
Camino(s) past & future
Frances from Astorga (2018)
Frances/Invierno from SJPP (2019)
I would never dream of criticizing people who choose to walk 20 km and spend their afternoons sitting in a café, but it would drive me crazy! For me, there is no better way to “smell the roses” (another popular criticism of those who walk long days) than to be out walking and soaking it all in.
Thank you for saying this. It’s exactly how I feel.
 

AndyTomas

Member
Camino(s) past & future
May (2019)
Hi to everyone,

I can’t believe how this thread became so popular.
Should I be happy or not? No, I don’t think so, because I saw few people writing here that stopped their Camino due to some injuries.
I’m the other hand, this thread is helping a lot of people to understand or clarify that the Camino is something VERY PERSONAL and NOBODY CAN JUDGE OTHERS PILGRIMS ON HOW MANY KMS WALKING. From 5kms to 65kms THE CAMINO IS A UNIQUE EXPERIENCE and THERE ARE NO RULES, NO JUDGMENTS ON WHAT TO DO THERE!!!!

I would like to give you an update of my injuries.
After a week of rest at my fiancé house in Italy, everything is getting better. I’m still applying creams and taking pills but at least now I can walk almost straight again😂😂😂😂
80% of the pain is gone and I think anothers 4/5 days and everything will come back as normal.
I didn’t any X-ray or ultrasound because doctor said, when he visited me, to come back in a week and if the problem would be still there, it was time for a X-ray. Thanks it didn’t happen 😉

By the way, a Camino friend (the Brazilian guy), who was walking with me from Burgos to Leon, he texted me yesterday and sent me a few video in Santiago square 🍾🍾🍾 I was so happy for him....

The Camino is there waiting for me and all the people that for a reason or another had to stop their journey towards Santiago.
 

Hilarious

Hilarious
Camino(s) past & future
Planning stage Camino Frances from SJPdP (Sept. 2019)
I join with others in wishing you a good recovery, Andy Tomas, and blessings for your continuing Camino. I really like your comments, Hilarious, I feel some connection, having done my first Camino last year at age 65 (not as trained as I would have liked and in the wake of rather serious illness just a few months earlier). I walked at my own pace, had to part ways with my fellow South Australian due to our very different rhythms, had to skip ahead at one point due to illness, but I made it, aches & pains and all. And, I'm going back in 2021! Courage to all, whatever your rhythm.
Thank you. Glad to hear you made it and are going back again in 2021. You and so many others on this forum have inspired me and given some very valuable advice on many topics.
 

DebraS.

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Frances June/ July (2015) - incomplete
Frances June (2018)
Hi Andy....Sorry to hear you had to end the camino with an injury but it certainly was not a failure!! It was just preparation and research for the real camino when you return. :) Tuo padre deve essere fiero di te!
 

lizlane

Small Town Girl, Small Town World
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances 2019
You are making some very strong statements that are not very kind and are based on some narrow generalizations about how the camino should be walked.
Actually I didn't. Judgements were made about the kind of Camino I want to walk for my health. See below.

My dear, the Camino is something that every single person does as he/she wishes.
I could think the same of your way how to do the Camino, spending 40 days and walking always, since the first day, with people instead of enjoying the peace of silence walking alone. But I don’t like judging what people love.

The way as you are describing the Camino is the stereotype of thousands of people how they see the Camino.
Did you ever try to do the Camino in your way instead of following the stereotype? I did!!!
A stereotype? That's a strong word.. What's wrong with taking in a couple of cows? Getting to know people Knowing one's limitations doesn't make them a stereotype. Who says I won't get to enjoy being alone? Walking 6-20 kms a day pretty much ensures that. But assuming I won't have my Creator for company is in fact "judging what people love" even if it's the stereotype. Why does making a pilgrimage at a safe pace and stopping to take in views constitute a stereotype. Someone willing to offer a retort so quickly deserves the truth, even if it hurts. Hindsight is 20/20 and I asked you some questions so I could understand your reasons better. A simple "I like the personal challenge" would've sufficed. For many it's because of other obligations. So if you have to choose fast because of them then the title of the thread should be edited because of the word "unpredictable". The more a person pushes themselves when injured, the more likely they will have to end their experience.

My injury came because I did a downhill towards Burgos (you will see what I’m talking about) too fast and without trekking poles even if I had it and did not happen because I was walking 30 to 40kms at day.
I'm not suggesting you hurt yourself with the distance. A fellow member felt hollow at his pace once the end was achieved. I was glad to know that you had meaningful experiences walking your pace. I am also saying use your poles next time. Believe it or not, I do care that people who are able to walk "their Camino" however that may look do so safely and you said "without trekking poles" Sadly that probably didn't help. But my heart does go out to you that you will be out of action for so long. I have compassion for you, just not pity. Pity is for lesser beings and anyone trying the Camino deserves more dignity. I'm sorry if you felt I shamed you. You should be proud of your accomplishments. I know a girl who had to quit because she tore her quadricep muscle, same stretch, probably the same hill, and she won't talk about what she didn't do. I said before, having to quit after waiting so long would be my nightmare. So I hear you, having and USING poles are necessary for personal safety. Because even if one sends them ahead, around the next bend might be the mountain they are needed on.

I will pray that you heal @AndyTomas , quickly so you can resume your travels. Please stay safe!
 
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longwalker60

Member
Camino(s) past & future
09/2018
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
I know you must feel really sad, however it sounds like you pushed your self to hard. The lesson, always listen to your body. Sometimes we all need to slack off and take a rest day, or at the very least only walk a few kilometers. Anyway, look at what you did accomplish and remember the good parts of your journey. Maybe you will be able to finish your journey some time in the future. Buen Camino
 

Kathar1na

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Santiago and beyond (own way - voie de Tours - camino francés - Biskaya - Manche)
This comment is not addressed to the OP since he saw it already when he asked about opinions on walking from Pamplona to Santiago in 21 days. It is for people to consider who have never ever walked a long distance trail before in their lives and in particular not for longer than 2 weeks. Someone posted it in the other thread:

Walking a long distance once a week is very different to walking that distance day after day after day.

I can only provide anecdotal evidence for this statement but I seem to remember having also read more scientifically/medically based explanations for it. Your muscles may be used to it or may get used to it fairly quickly but the rest of your locomotor system doesn't - ligaments, tendons, soft tissue. In general, the walkers who do so easily have walked LOTS on long distance and long duration trails before, whether they are in their prime or 76 years old.

Take this into account if you do not fall into this category. Whether your usual or manageable distance is 20 km or 40 km daily, walking it day after day after day is not the same as walking it every other day or every weekend.

Camino ending injuries may be totally unpredictable and it's sad when it happens and I sympathise. But when I hear that this happens between SJPP and Burgos (within a period of 12-14 days of walking on average), I'm barely surprised.
 
Last edited:

Delphinoula

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino PdC 2018 Finisterre Muxía 2018
C Franconia 2019
Camino desde Algeciras Sevillia (2019)
Hi Andy
Thank you for keeping us updated. Hindsight and told you so are as helpful and sure everybody's darling.
Nowhere I read the big fat f word. You did more than a lot may dream of. Your Santiago was there with you.
In Judo you learn not sweeps and holds but first and foremost falling. So when I come to a keyboard Ill. sjare some of my great falls
My Best
 

Mugatu

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
Camino Frances, Finisterre, Muxia (2018)
Camino Frances or Norte (2019 , June 27-Aug 8)
My dear, the Camino is something that every single person does as he/she wishes.
I could think the same of your way how to do the Camino, spending 40 days and walking always, since the first day, with people instead of enjoying the peace of silence walking alone. But I don’t like judging what people love.

The way as you are describing the Camino is the stereotype of thousands of people how they see the Camino.
Did you ever try to do the Camino in your way instead of following the stereotype? I did!!!

However let me tell you something.
If someone walk 30 to 40km at day like me, it doesn’t mean that he is not enjoying the Camino.
I loved every single step done of it. I enjoy the scenery, the terrain, I met a lot of people everyday, always different and I can tell you something more, I walked from Burgos to Leon with a Brazilian guy, who was walking as fast as me enjoying everything.
Anyway, I walked most of my days alone, listening only birds and my steps.

My injury came because I did a downhill towards Burgos (you will see what I’m talking about) too fast and without trekking poles even if I had it and did not happen because I was walking 30 to 40kms at day.

I tell you something, plan as much as you want your journey, but you don’t know what can happen on the way.

After that, I can only say to you GOOD LUCK AND BUEN CAMINO MY FRIEND.
I got this same response from many, it wasn't until my third day that I started my 38-45km days at a 3-3.5mph pace. There are many judgmental people on trail who like to assume you are unable to find introspection or appreciate what the camino has to offer at this pace. Instead of having a dialogue, they try and force feed their perspective upon you, having already made up their minds on the appropriate way to do things... just smile and move on.
 
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Avromal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP & stopped at Boente after injury April /May2017
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
AndyThomas,

I know this feeling well. In 2017, after walking from SJPdP I had to stop at Boente...a mere 46km short of SDC after an injury to my foot. Ended up having to seek medical attention, and was unable to finish. Heartbreaking.

This year, in 27 days time, we will be travelling to Italy to do the Via Francigena from Fidenza to Rome. At the end of that, we will return to Spain, and I will complete my last 46km. I am very much looking forward to that.

There will be nothing stopping you doing something similar in the future. Buen Camino.

Mal.
 

Avromal

Member
Camino(s) past & future
SJPdP & stopped at Boente after injury April /May2017
I'm so very sorry to hear about your injury! It sounds like you put alot of effort into planning and training to suffer such an unfortunate injury. I'm just curious....

Did you have some time constraint that made you WANT to do 32-40 kms a day? That sounds extremely fast and contrary to the advice that is repeated here again and again to walk at your pace, listen to your body, the adages that it's not a race, these things are shared with those who want to walk so they will be prepared and not get injured.

When I walk my Camino I'm planning on giving myself 6-8 weeks to do it. Because of my spinal condition I might only want to walk 6-20 kms a day. I don't mind because I want to absorb all the Camino has to offer.

Your pace just sounds so fast and I'm wondering how many pilgrims did you get to fellowship with? How many hours did you spend losing yourself in views of the terrain? How many people did you not get to know because they couldn't walk at your pace? Did you see any of the sights with that pace? I'm asking because I want to know, respectfully and understand.

There is a member who walked from SJPP to Santiago in 24 days plus two rest days in Burgos. He posted a thread recently about his disillusionment with the Camino and his faith (Druidism). He too became injured because of his pace. Not just physically but I suspect his pace prevented him from achieving his spiritual goals as well. His injuries were minor compared to yours so if your goal is to set a record, I'm pretty sure he set it already lol!
@lizlane,

The Camino is one of those things that is personal to everyone, and it is something for each person to do in a way that they feel is right for them. Susie and I committed to doing a sub-30 day Camino as a challenge.

For me, I stopped 2 days short with a foot injury having walked from SJPdP. Susie was able to finish, with our longest day being 44km, and averaging about 32-35 km per day. Susie completed her Camino in 28 walking days with one rest day in Burgos. This was our Camino, and we loved it for what it was.

The Camino is personal, for each and everyone of us to do in a way that feels right for us. Personally, whether you walk it slow, or fast, is up to you. It is, after all, your Camino.

Buen Camino,

Mal.
 

bbates225

Active Member
Camino(s) past & future
June/July (2017) Camino Frances (couldn't finish)
June/July (2019) Complete Astorga to Santiago
Hello to everyone,

Some of you already know me due to the many questions I asked trying to be ready for the Camino.
I have to say thanks to everyone for helping me to prepare all the necessary to put on my backpack (at the end it was only 5.3kg) and all the others things that I needed to know.

Unfortunately, as I learnt by myself, the Camino is unpredictable. Nobody can plan it ahead or nobody can be sure that what they planned will be perfect.
There is a long list of things that can change your plan, from meeting and making new friends to share the Camino with to an Albergue better than the other or weather conditions and last but not least INJURE!

I want to talk exactly about my injury that I couldn’t planned and arrived while I was walking, like the other days, doing one step as millions before it during my journey.
Day number 8, I was walking downhill, after a steep hill with a very bad terrain (maybe the worst of the Camino till Leon), towards Burgos. Was a normal day as 7 before, walking between 32km to 40km since I started in Pamplona. I could see Burgos from the hill and all the way going down, it was there close to me!
I walked around the airport, I started to walk through the periphery of Burgos quiet enjoying it because was Sunday and the streets were empty and a one point it happened. I felt on my right leg a very bad pain coming exactly from the neck of my foot going up until half of the way of my front calf.
I started limping and I was worried about it because it was a “new feeling” for me. Never a pain like that from my calf.
Anyway, I was already in Burgos, so I said to myself that I needed just a rest and the day after would be ok.
I arrived at the albergues spending the night there and I tried walking as less as possible. I was still in pain.
The day after it wasn’t the same because I had the same problem in the other leg too. In addition, both legs were puffy. I didn’t care!!! I was hungry of kms. Not a good way to start the Mesetas 😂😂😂
I walked all day limping.

I arrived at the Albergue and I asked for a pharmacy.
I bought an anti inflammatory pills and cream.
I started to take it since I bought it. It helped me a lot with the pain.
The day after I took the pill in the morning and it did the job for 50%. I walked again for another entire day thinking positive for the day after.

I want to make it shorter.
At the end I walked 5 days with this injury, taking pills and applying cream but without any positive effects.
The pain was killing me step after step for all the 5 days and at the end I took the decision to stay in Leon for 2 days of rest.

The 2 days didn’t helps at all and at the ends i took the hardest decision for a pilgrim to stop my Camino, in Leon.

Sorry if it was a big too long to read it but this is what happened to me.
Many times people talk only when they finish it, but rarely pilgrims write about injuries or similar.

Keep in mind planning is part of us, but it doesn’t mean that it is wise to do so!

Buen Camino
So sorry this had to happen to you. I feel your pain. In 2017 I had to give up in Astorga after walking from SJPD, limping with serious pain for half of it. I had planned for five years and thought I was prepared. I'm an avid walker and hiker and have never had as much as a blister. No blisters this time either. Bursitis in both heels. I plan on trying again next year, 2020. Hoping for the best, but the future in unforeseeable. Take care and feel better.
 

Just Karin

Member
Camino(s) past & future
Vía de la Plata 2019
Sorry to hear about your injury.
Just a question: why walk so many kilometres per day? So many people walk too big stretches,getting injured knees, ankles, getting shin splints and blisters all over. We walked 15-25 kms a day and did not get one injury or blister.
I read that a human body is able to walk 20 kms a day. Everything more is too much, even for a trained body. It’s just too much.
Hope you’re alright now and able to finish the Camino some other time.
 

peregrina2000

Moderator
Staff member
Sorry to hear about your injury.
Just a question: why walk so many kilometres per day? So many people walk too big stretches,getting injured knees, ankles, getting shin splints and blisters all over. We walked 15-25 kms a day and did not get one injury or blister.
I read that a human body is able to walk 20 kms a day. Everything more is too much, even for a trained body. It’s just too much.
Hope you’re alright now and able to finish the Camino some other time.
Just to say that comments like these are not helpful and are unnecessarily judgmental. I don't want to rehash our earlier discussion, but if you read the entire thread, you will see plenty of comments explaining why what you have written is out of line.

Anyway, I guess it's time to close the thread, but I can assure you that there are many people who walk 30 or even 40 kms a day for weeks and weeks on end and their bodies are fine. Yours might not be, mine might not be, but there are plenty of bodies that not only can do it but thrive on it.
 
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