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Unfortunate, but true... I need to skip some sections

Time of past OR future Camino
May - June 2024
I begin my first Camino in mid-May from SJPdP. Due to time constraints related to available PTO, I unfortunately have to skip a few towns along the way if I am to start in SJPdP and end in Santiago de Compostella. I am open to changing my plans, but I am currently planning to find transportation from Carrion to Villadangos or Astorga. Looking for feedback on recommended transportation options, the towns I'm choosing to "skip" or anything at all for that matter. I always appreciate the willingness of this group to share insight and experiences!

Thanks in advance.

Steve
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
“A few days” meaning how many? If we know the total length of your walking time, it’s much easier to give advice. In general, I recommend an uninterrupted walk, simply walking without bus/train transport. if reaching Santiago is important to you, start closer to your goal. If starting in SJPdP is what you prefer, then walk until you run out of time, returning in the future to finish.
 
“A few days” meaning how many? If we know the total length of your walking time, it’s much easier to give advice. In general, I recommend an uninterrupted walk, simply walking without bus/train transport. if reaching Santiago is important to you, start closer to your goal. If starting in SJPdP is what you prefer, then walk until you run out of time, returning in the future to finish.
Thanks for the feedback, Vacajoe. Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino. I definitely plan to come back at some point to experience what I miss as retirement is just a few short years away. I am making my way from Paris to SJPdP to start the Camino on May 14th. I already have plans to fly from SdC to Paris on June 11th for the return trip home. With the exception of pre-booking the first several days out of SJPdP, everything else is open.

Steve
 
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I take my groups on a 3 week itinerary that you might find interesting. Maybe you can do some version of it. It hits the major cities. You start out and SJPP and go over the Pyrenees and you do the last 100 K Santiago. You can find the rough itinerary at this link.

PS: I am not fishing for people. Both of my groups are full this year. I am just sharing my itinerary.

 
Much as I hate to suggest it, you could just skip from Burgos to Leon. That would likely be the easiest or if you want to walk the meseta, skip from Logrono to Burgos (good bus service). I don't know if that would give you the cushion you need for days, but those are probably the better transit opportunites.
 
The 2024 Camino guides will be coming out little by little. Here is a collection of the ones that are out so far.
I begin my first Camino in mid-May from SJPdP. Due to time constraints related to available PTO, I unfortunately have to skip a few towns along the way if I am to start in SJPdP and end in Santiago de Compostella. I am open to changing my plans, but I am currently planning to find transportation from Carrion to Villadangos or Astorga. Looking for feedback on recommended transportation options, the towns I'm choosing to "skip" or anything at all for that matter. I always appreciate the willingness of this group to share insight and experiences!

Thanks in advance.

Steve
probably the best section to skip, entering and leaving león (end of the Meseta and the Páramo) can be tedious. i would make a pit stop n león though, at least a morning.
 
It looks like you have 4 full weeks, How about biking a segment of the CF (say, from Burgos to Leon or Astorga), which could shave off a few days (versus walking)? That way, you wouldn’t need to skip any part of the CF.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
I take my groups on a 3 week itinerary that you might find interesting. Maybe you can do some version of it. It hits the major cities. You start out and SJPP and go over the Pyrenees and you do the last 100 K Santiago. You can find the rough itinerary at this link.

PS: I am not fishing for people. Both of my groups are full this year. I am just sharing my itinerary.

Thanks for the feedback!
 
Much as I hate to suggest it, you could just skip from Burgos to Leon. That would likely be the easiest or if you want to walk the meseta, skip from Logrono to Burgos (good bus service). I don't know if that would give you the cushion you need for days, but those are probably the better transit opportunites.
This looks like a good option to consider. I think it gives me the cushion I need. Thank you!
 
I recommend an uninterrupted walk, simply walking without bus/train transport. if reaching Santiago is important to you, start closer to your goal
Another grumpy old so-and-so here, not giving you the advice you are asking for. I strongly recommend what Vacajoe is suggesting and starting closer to Santiago and doing one long walk. If SJPdP is important to you then give it its fair due and make it the starting point for your epic thru-journey when you come back in retirement. And knowing it's still to be done will help keep you honest about returning ;- )
Start in Burgos and begin with that iconic stretch of the meseta that is the most photographed section of the camino. It's also one of the most peaceful. The wide flat plains will tire you after a while and then you'll see the mountains with both relief and a little trepidation. And if you find yourself with a few days left over at Santiago you can walk on to the Atlantic at Muxia/Finisterre
 
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There are a number of companies in the Burgos area that rent bicycles that can be dropped off in the León area. That way you can see all of the meseta under your own power and save some days.
I hadn't even considered biking part of the Camino as an option. Thanks for the suggestion! Definitely something to think about.
 
It looks like you have 4 full weeks, How about biking a segment of the CF (say, from Burgos to Leon or Astorga), which could shave off a few days (versus walking)? That way, you wouldn’t need to skip any part of the CF.
Thanks for the suggestion. Getting ahead of my walking pace on a bike is a good option to consider.
 
Another grumpy old so-and-so here, not giving you the advice you are asking for. I strongly recommend what Vacajoe is suggesting and starting closer to Santiago and doing one long walk. If SJPdP is important to you then give it its fair due and make it the starting point for your epic thru-journey when you come back in retirement. And knowing it's still to be done will help keep you honest about returning ;- )
Start in Burgos and begin with that iconic stretch of the meseta that is the most photographed section of the camino. It's also one of the most peaceful. The wide flat plains will tire you after a while and then you'll see the mountains with both relief and a little trepidation. And if you find yourself with a few days left over at Santiago you can walk on to the Atlantic at Muxia/Finisterre
Thanks for the insight! I'm very close to being a grumpy old so-and-so myself (if you ask my wife of 36 years, I'm already there) and I appreciate the straightforward response. My wife recently had her knee replaced and can't join me this time around but she'll be the one keeping me honest about coming back in retirement. :)
 
Very light, comfortable and compressible poncho. Specially designed for protection against water for any activity.

Our Atmospheric H30 poncho offers lightness and waterproofness. Easily compressible and made with our Waterproof fabric, its heat-sealed interior seams guarantee its waterproofness. Includes carrying bag.

€60,-
So... somewhat summing up stuff already said in previous posts above
1. Public transportation
a. Logrono to Burgos
b. Burgos to Leon (effectively skipping whole Meseta)
c. Burgos to Sahagun (gets you that 1/2 Way certificate and some Meseta Walk)
d. Fromista to Leon (gets you 3 day at the beginning of Meseta)
2. Rent a bike through Meseta - I truly wish I knew of this option when I walked. IMHO that is the cool option!

Good Luck and Buen Camino
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
Another grumpy old so-and-so here, not giving you the advice you are asking for. I strongly recommend what Vacajoe is suggesting and starting closer to Santiago and doing one long walk. If SJPdP is important to you then give it its fair due and make it the starting point for your epic thru-journey when you come back in retirement. And knowing it's still to be done will help keep you honest about returning ;- )
Start in Burgos and begin with that iconic stretch of the meseta that is the most photographed section of the camino. It's also one of the most peaceful. The wide flat plains will tire you after a while and then you'll see the mountains with both relief and a little trepidation. And if you find yourself with a few days left over at Santiago you can walk on to the Atlantic at Muxia/Finisterre
I completely agree with @peregrino_tom
Save St Jean Pied de Port to Burgos for a future trip with your wife. I think that it will be a better experience for both of you if it's all brand new and wondrous.
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
Thanks for the feedback, Vacajoe. Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino. I definitely plan to come back at some point to experience what I miss as retirement is just a few short years away. I am making my way from Paris to SJPdP to start the Camino on May 14th. I already have plans to fly from SdC to Paris on June 11th for the return trip home. With the exception of pre-booking the first several days out of SJPdP, everything else is open.

Steve
I’d stop then when you run out of time. Missing the Meseta is not a good idea. If you can come back, do. End where you stop, and return, pick up from there, and finish in Santiago.
 
In 2011, for my first Camino, we also had time constraints. We flew to Pamplona, taxied up to Roncesvalles and walked from Roncesvalles to Pamplona. In Pamplona we took the train to Leon, and walked from Leon to Santiago. Since you say beginning in St. Jean and ending in Santiago is important to you, you could do something similar -- go from St. Jean to Pamplona and then train onward. Leon is where we went but you can also go to Astorga- depending on time. Note I did this on my first camino. We returned in 2015 to walk the entire Frances, but this allowed us to experience the many aspects of the Camino . Buen camino!
 
Another grumpy old so-and-so here, not giving you the advice you are asking for. I strongly recommend what Vacajoe is suggesting and starting closer to Santiago and doing one long walk. If SJPdP is important to you then give it its fair due and make it the starting point for your epic thru-journey when you come back in retirement. And knowing it's still to be done will help keep you honest about returning ;- )
Start in Burgos and begin with that iconic stretch of the meseta that is the most photographed section of the camino. It's also one of the most peaceful. The wide flat plains will tire you after a while and then you'll see the mountains with both relief and a little trepidation. And if you find yourself with a few days left over at Santiago you can walk on to the Atlantic at Muxia/Finisterre
I recommend an uninterrupted walk, simply walking without bus/train transport.
Thanks for the feedback, Vacajoe. Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino
I completely agree with @peregrino_tom
Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino.

Personally this grumpy old man could not agree more with the other grumpies and the wonderfully vibrant and far younger @trecile who say walk an uninterrupted camino. This is not to brag but to tell you we have a bunch of caminos between us and are all camino addicts. We have accumulated a fair amount of knowledge over the years of walking. I am not judging or saying you are wrong when you state that walking starting in SJPP is important for you. I can only tell you this and I think many others would agree. For many, there is a great beauty, often a spiritual quality, a feeling of rhythm and being completely in tune with what your body needs and not what your head wants in walking every day. I am not sure this will make sense to you yet but I believe there is a great difference from walking some days and then hassling to make arrangements and bussing or renting a bike and having to take a day off, from your body telling you that it is time to stop and rest. I am 70 years old and I take rest days on my caminos. But the feeling that I get in the mid afternoon that my body tells my mind, lets go, I am a pilgrim and a pilgrim only is here to walk. Nothing more or less. This feeling is so wonderful to me. It is almost like a drug. When I get up the next morning I am full of energy and can't wait to put on my pack and go. No matter rain, snow, wind cold or heat I am a pilgrim and a pilgrim walks. A camino gives (as the saying goes and we all learn) you what you need, not what you want. It is surprising what we say is important very often is forgotten after we begin our pilgrimage.
Finally I know there was a few suggestions about skipping the Meseta. @J Willhaus thought it may be best because of the limited transportation options. This is very true. Others talked about biking. All well intended and good ideas. I think this is a huge mistake. I love the Meseta. I think some wonderful things can happen there. In many ways I believe it is a magically stretch. I walk some combination caminos now. Like this year I will do the Aragones to the Madrid to the Coastal Portugues. I have included to Meseta in a few of these because I do love it so much. Even though when I get to the Meseta it is usually in November when it is stark and the weather is not the best.
Maybe I have given you some food for thought. EVERYTHING I have said is only my opinion. Lots of others would probably disagree. We all have our own preferences and needs. Whatever you do Buen Camino.
 
A selection of Camino Jewellery
You have a lot of good advice here, so I’ll just share my experience on the CF, which I walked in 2022, beginning Sept. 12 and arriving in Santiago Oct. 17. A bit longer than you have, but because Oct. 17 was a hard deadline, I took two taxis on the camino—one from Belgrado to Burgos and another from Molinaseca to Los Herrerías. The first taxi was a necessity as my feet were badly swollen and in pain, and my understanding is that walking into Burgos is not the most lovely part of the Camino, so I’m actually glad I skipped those two days of walking. I wouldn’t miss SJPP to Pamploma for the world—it is so uplifting and gorgeous and inspiring to begin with other pilgrims. After my short rest in Burgos, I found my stride on the Meseta and loved the long flat stretches—by Leon I was feeling very capable and strong and was easily walking 15-20 miles a day. But my time was limited and by Astorga I decided to grab another taxi from Molinaseca to the bottom of the climb up to O’Cebreiro. I hope to return and walk that section at a later time. Neither of my cab rides was planned—until they were. So don’t feel you need to make a firm decision before starting. hope this helps. Buen Camino!
 
Every inch of the Camino is important!

I suggest starting in SJPP, walk as far as time permits, then come back to that spot when time permits and continue.

There is no need to rush to Santiago. It's the journey, not the destination!


-Paul
 
Another grumpy old so-and-so here, not giving you the advice you are asking for. I strongly recommend what Vacajoe is suggesting and starting closer to Santiago and doing one long walk. If SJPdP is important to you then give it its fair due and make it the starting point for your epic thru-journey when you come back in retirement. And knowing it's still to be done will help keep you honest about returning ;- )
Start in Burgos and begin with that iconic stretch of the meseta that is the most photographed section of the camino. It's also one of the most peaceful. The wide flat plains will tire you after a while and then you'll see the mountains with both relief and a little trepidation. And if you find yourself with a few days left over at Santiago you can walk on to the Atlantic at Muxia/Finisterre
I recommend an uninterrupted walk, simply walking without bus/train transport.
Thanks for the feedback, Vacajoe. Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino
I completely agree with @peregrino_tom
Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino.

Personally this grumpy old man could not agree more with the other grumpies and the wonderfully vibrant and far younger @trecile who say walk an uninterrupted camino. This is not to brag but to tell you we have a bunch of caminos between us and are all camino addicts. We have accumulated a fair amount of knowledge over the years of walking. I am not judging or saying you are wrong when you state that walking starting in SJPP is important for you. I can only tell you this and I think many others would agree. For many, there is a great beauty, often a spiritual quality, a feeling of rhythm and being completely in tune with what your body needs and not what your head wants in walking every day. I am not sure this will make sense to you yet but I believe there is a great difference from walking some days and then hassling to make arrangements and bussing or renting a bike and having to take a day off, from your body telling you that it is time to stop and rest. I am 70 years old and I take rest days on my caminos. But the feeling that I get in the mid afternoon that my body tells my mind, lets go, I am a pilgrim and a pilgrim only is here to walk. Nothing more or less. This feeling is so wonderful to me. It is almost like a drug. When I get up the next morning I am full of energy and can't wait to put on my pack and go. No matter rain, snow, wind cold or heat I am a pilgrim and a pilgrim walks. A camino gives (as the saying goes and we all learn) you what you need, not what you want. It is surprising what we say is important very often is forgotten after we begin our pilgrimage.
Finally I know there was a few suggestions about skipping the Meseta. @J Willhaus thought it may be best because of the limited transportation options. This is very true. Others talked about biking. All well intended and good ideas. I think this is a huge mistake. I love the Meseta. I think some wonderful things can happen there. In many ways I believe it is a magically stretch. I walk some combination caminos now. Like this year I will do the Aragones to the Madrid to the Coastal Portugues. I have included to Meseta in a few of these because I do love it so much. Even though when I get to the Meseta it is usually in November when it is stark and the weather is not the best.
Maybe I have given you some food for thought. EVERYTHING I have said is only my opinion. Lots of others would probably disagree. We all have our own preferences and needs. Whatever you do Buen Camino.
 
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I hadn't even considered biking part of the Camino as an option. Thanks for the suggestion! Definitely something to think about.
You should be able to rent a bike at Burgos and return it at Leon with little problem. Ask here. There are likely many forum members who can recommend bicycle rental places in Burgos.

It affects how you pack. But, you can always use the Correos to ship unneeded items (while biking) ahead to Leon.

Hope this helps,

Tom
 
Hi Steve,
You came to the right place for feedback! I find this tool very useful for "planning." https://godesalco.com/plan/frances
For fun, I used your time constraints and came up with an itinerary that might work for you if you walk 20km - 30km per day and skip from Fromista to Leon. But that doesn't sound fun. :)

As stated by many above, I don't think you should plan what to skip. Not because you shouldn't skip anything, but because you do not know how you are going to be feeling or what your pace is going to be until you have been walking for awhile. Just go and see where you end up and make the decision when you get to that point. You might decide to change your flight to a later date or you might catch an earlier flight home because you miss your wife.
Enjoy being in the moment!
 
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This is all great advice and I truly appreciate the guidance and opinions that everyone has offered in this thread. I value your recommendations and realize they come from your experience and from a position of good will. Thank you all for that.

As I mentioned somewhere above, my accommodations are booked for the first several nights, through Estella. I have learned enough from all of the valuable guidance in this thread to know I have options and I was reminded by many of you that I shouldn't try to make it too prescriptive. THANK YOU for that! I'll make decisions about how my Camino progresses when I am on The Way and experiencing the Camino firsthand. How it unfolds between Estella and SdC is now a mystery, as I think it should be after reading your guidance.

While I won't go into the details on here, starting in SJPdP and ending in SdC on this trip is very important to me so I will find a way. I'll accept what the Camino brings and make the decisions I need to make as the Camino unfolds in front of me. This is a fantastic group.

Buen Camino
 
I hope you have a wonderful trip! Your last comment sounds like a great decision. One of the biggest joys of the camino, in my opinion, is not always knowing (where I am, what I will experience next, where the next coffee shop is, and even where I will stay, etc.). That's not everyone's comfort zone - but once you've completed the first few days, you'll be in the swing of things and in a much better position to determine how you want to continue from day to day, and how to make the best decision for yourself, before returning home. All the great suggestions above will no doubt help you with those decisions. Buen camino Sidewinder!
 
I begin my first Camino in mid-May from SJPdP. Due to time constraints related to available PTO, I unfortunately have to skip a few towns along the way if I am to start in SJPdP and end in Santiago de Compostella. I am open to changing my plans, but I am currently planning to find transportation from Carrion to Villadangos or Astorga. Looking for feedback on recommended transportation options, the towns I'm choosing to "skip" or anything at all for that matter. I always appreciate the willingness of this group to share insight and experiences!

Thanks in advance.

Steve
Hi Steve. I’m starting my Camino from SJPdP on May 14th but planning to arrive in SDC on 11th June. I’m (unashamedly) going by bus from Burgos to Leon. I’m planning some very big days and some short days and whatever! Hope to meet you on the trail. Buen Camino
 
The one from Galicia (the round) and the one from Castilla & Leon. Individually numbered and made by the same people that make the ones you see on your walk.
I begin my first Camino in mid-May from SJPdP. Due to time constraints related to available PTO, I unfortunately have to skip a few towns along the way if I am to start in SJPdP and end in Santiago de Compostella. I am open to changing my plans, but I am currently planning to find transportation from Carrion to Villadangos or Astorga. Looking for feedback on recommended transportation options, the towns I'm choosing to "skip" or anything at all for that matter. I always appreciate the willingness of this group to share insight and experiences!

Thanks in advance.

Steve
You will be skipping the part where you are about to have that moment of epiphany...like being about to receive enlightenment and then the dinner bell rings, so you leave. I suggest you use your PTO days, then tell your employer you got sick in Spain and are quarantined. It's not about Santiago or getting the piece of paper or even walking the miles. The real meaning of the Camino is written between the lines. If you walk every step of the way and get to the finish, you will know what I'm talking about. You can see it in the eyes of the people who walked the entire way. They are different. If you skip ahead, you won't know what you've missed. Skipping ahead, you will be separated from your Camino family. At the finish you will be alone or with people you didn't really spend much time with. It's like switching schools a month before graduating.
 
Ummm...with all Respect Due, I do not believe that lying to your boss properly conveys "the real meaning of Camino".
Also, there's been enough threads on the topic of Camino Family. I for one was a slow walker. Anyone whom I started with more or less from Orisson disappeared within a week, maybe 10 days. I didn't get what I would consider to be my TRUE Camino Family until well past Sarria and most of them started in Sarria... and I liked what I saw in their eyes! Its not about who walked 'the entire way' ( and there are enough posts on that as well) it's about personal connections pure and simple...
I'm also not sure about "skipping the part where you are about to have that moment of epiphany...". HOw do you know where exactly someone else will have that moment? May it perhaps happen on the plane from say JFK to MAD and not happen again for the duration of the walk with say Muxia extention thrown in for a good measure?
We all had our Caminos which had our moments; I'm sure that @SideWinder will have his and it will be special to him no matter what he ultimately decides to do
Peace and Buen Camino
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
I walked from Astorga, it was lovely. My advice would be figure out how long astorga to santiago will take you, probably 2 weeks? and then walk what you have now until you get to a town with train, an just take the train to astorga, you can get there from most of the big towns with one transfer. Alternatively... you could go to Sarria, but i'd strongly recommend Astorga.
 
I was in the same situation as the OP on my first Camino, as I had a strict return date. Upon reaching the hub of Carrion de Los Condes, about halfway through the Meseta, I took a bus to Leon, spent a night, and then took another bus to Hospital D’Orbigo, from where I resumed walking the rest of the way to Santiago.

I returned later in the year to Carrion to walk the section I had missed ((about 6 days).

There is only one bus per day from Carrion to Leon, it leaves from outside the Cafe Espana (which you cannot miss) at 10:50 AM, although not on Sundays.
 
Thanks for the feedback, Vacajoe. Starting in SJPdP and finishing in SdC are important to me for my first Camino. I definitely plan to come back at some point to experience what I miss as retirement is just a few short years away. I am making my way from Paris to SJPdP to start the Camino on May 14th. I already have plans to fly from SdC to Paris on June 11th for the return trip home. With the exception of pre-booking the first several days out of SJPdP, everything else is open.

Steve
If you are already planning a return why not walk as far as you can and finish the route on your next journey. The first year I walked I met daily with a man during my first week who had walked from his home in Austria. Two weeks each year. What ever your decision enjoy the journey.
 
€2,-/day will present your project to thousands of visitors each day. All interested in the Camino de Santiago.
Ummm...with all Respect Due, I do not believe that lying to your boss properly conveys "the real meaning of Camino".
Also, there's been enough threads on the topic of Camino Family. I for one was a slow walker. Anyone whom I started with more or less from Orisson disappeared within a week, maybe 10 days. I didn't get what I would consider to be my TRUE Camino Family until well past Sarria and most of them started in Sarria... and I liked what I saw in their eyes! Its not about who walked 'the entire way' ( and there are enough posts on that as well) it's about personal connections pure and simple...
I'm also not sure about "skipping the part where you are about to have that moment of epiphany...". HOw do you know where exactly someone else will have that moment? May it perhaps happen on the plane from say JFK to MAD and not happen again for the duration of the walk with say Muxia extention thrown in for a good measure?
We all had our Caminos which had our moments; I'm sure that @SideWinder will have his and it will be special to him no matter what he ultimately decides to do
Peace and Buen Camino
I would point out that your boss would likely fire you rather than miss a single quarter's bonus and wouldn't lose a wink of sleep over it. You owe nothing to your boss and it has nothing to do with the Camino. If your boss cared anything for you he wouldn't let you skip any part of your pilgrimage. He would insist you finish the whole thing and would tell you "don't worry about it...tell us about your experience when you get back." I've done the Camino from start to finish 3x, not as much as many people, but you spend the first two weeks trying to deal with sore feet and if you take off ahead after two weeks, you leave every person you met behind and you start all over wherever you land. Why do people do this? So they can march in a 25km parade from Sarria and wait an hour in line to get a cup of coffee? The last 5 days is the least enjoyable part and it's only manageable because you've done the other 4 weeks to mentally prepare.
 
I really do not wish to engage in some drawn out debate about what one owes his/her boss and vice versa but I will merely repeat what I already say to wit - suggesting to someone to lie in order to do ANYTHING IMHO defies the TRUE meaning and Spirit of Camino.
You may disagree and as such that is our prerogative- we'll agree to disagree.
Have a Wonderful Day, Sir!!!
 
As others have stated, I would opt to start at a location where you will have enough time to arrive in Santiago without having to take a bus or something. Aside from there being beauty and simplicity in a continuous walk I would point out that if a Camino family is something that is important to you, you will be saying a lot of goodbyes once you break up the walk.

For what it is worth when I walked the CF , finishing was important to me and I only had 32 days. I started in Pamplona and arrived in 29 days. This start city was because I knew I had a good chance of finishing from there and I didn't want to risk injuring myself on the Pyrenees section (I had injured my knee earlier in the year).
 
The focus is on reducing the risk of failure through being well prepared. 2nd ed.
My $0.02 -
Start walking in SJPDP. You’ve already made some reservations (*sigh*). Continue walking and breathing in your Camino for as long as you can.
Stop when you run out of time. Keep your credencia.
Return and either pick up where you left off, or start from the beginning again.
Don’t skip or hurry through/past all those priceless locations on the CF.
 
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I was in the same situation as the OP on my first Camino, as I had a strict return date. Upon reaching the hub of Carrion de Los Condes, about halfway through the Meseta, I took a bus to Leon, spent a night, and then took another bus to Hospital D’Orbigo, from where I resumed walking the rest of the way to Santiago.

I returned later in the year to Carrion to walk the section I had missed ((about 6 days).

There is only one bus per day from Carrion to Leon, it leaves from outside the Cafe Espana (which you cannot miss) at 10:50 AM, although not on Sundays.
I too took the bus from carrion to Leon. That worked out well for me. Note , There is an evening bus on Sundays and no bus on mondays .
 

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Hi all! Have you used Pilgrim.es to plan your Camino? The reviews that I have found make me a bit nervous. Bit I can’t find any other company that will work with my group size. I don’t mind paying...
I saw the list posted with all the transfer companies for different routes, super helpful! What I haven't seen yet is a good estimation tool/reference for budget consideration. Top Santiago has a...
Hi Everyone, This second Camino seems to be a go, even though I am far from ready! (1st Camino 2016, 2nd attempted 2019, needed surgery then tried for 2020). I still don't have shoes! Lol I...
I wanted to share my experience using the luggage forwarding/storage service offered by Casa Ivar. I flew from Dallas to Paris, arriving in Paris on March 29th. I’d requested DHL shipping from...
Is there a discount card available for seniors' travel in Spain?

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