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Video: How to Avoid Blisters - It Can be Done

Robo

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OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

 
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Arn

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@Robo Hate to burst your bubble (er, blister)...its only a matter of time! Twenty plus year's of walking on varied surfaces with quality footwear and seldom blister one. First time on Camino and massive blisters almost forced me to go home. Anything “unusual” can cause a blister. Small pebble, fold in your sock, dampness, cramp in your knee or hip that changes your gait, etc. If you don't stop and check a source of discomfort, a blister is not far away. In my case it was hubris. I wanted to prove I could conquer the Camino by pressing along too fast and ignore many of the “signals” previously mentioned.
Buen Camino
Arn
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
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I would be interested in seeing any reports of research behind the suggestion that hydration (through drinking water) affects blister formation.

Of course severe dehydration can have many effects on the body - in which case, blisters should be the least of your worries. Putting aside that extreme, is there is any observed relationship between quantity of water drunk and frequency/extent of blisters?
 

C clearly

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Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
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If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?
Also, it might be even more interesting to hear from the people who have had blisters and learned to reduce their frequency. When I hear from people who have never had a blister, I suspect that their skin is less susceptible to blisters. Otherwise I just feel like a failure! :(
 

Camino Chrissy

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I have only had one teeny weeny blister on five caminos and I know exactly how I got it; from scampering downhill like a rabbit, showing off to my camino girlfriends. They were faster on the uphills, so I often made it up on the downhills whizzing past them, having fun on the particularly long runs on the Le Puy. I have had a few hot spots that I caught early as my feet are not calloused, but I think my luck has been due to the shape of my feet and toes...we are all different. A variety of shoes have all worked well.
 
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Harland2019

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Camino Frances April/May "2019"
The first time I walked a long-distance path, the Pennine Way, I had a few blisters - one really bad on my heel. I learnt that a) I needed bigger boots and b) to use zinc oxide tape before starting on those areas that were prone to blister and c) the toes next to the smallest ones are "bent" so I tape them up as well to stop them rubbing against the one next to them. In addition, a few of my toenails get "knackered" so my current footwear is 2 sizes more than usual. My first and currently my last Camino Frances was accomplished without a blister although at Orrison I stopped for a rest (and for some tortilla de patatas) and put more tape on my heel as I could feel it getting bruised having obviously gone uphill to get there.
 

Robo

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Also, it might be even more interesting to hear from the people who have had blisters and learned to reduce their frequency. When I hear from people who have never had a blister, I suspect that their skin is less susceptible to blisters. Otherwise I just feel like a failure! :(

LOL.
My feet are not immune.
I used to blister terribly in my past Military and Hill Walking days.
Old leather boots, single socks, wet feet......

Maybe I've been lucky on Camino so far,
But it takes a lot of care and a strict regime to avoid them I think.

I managed to get Pat through 2 caminos blister free using this regime.
Though we did run out of Hikers Wool.
She worked on the basis that if it helps, more must be better!



 

Arn

Veteran Member
Building on my previous reasons for blisters and @C clearly question on hydration. Water is not the answer. We found that in the desert for extended periods of time over-hydration without replenishing electrolytes caused many problems: cramping, dizziness, muscle weakness, etc.
Any of these will affect your ability to function at optimal levels.
So, drink water with added electrolytes and possibly avoid blisters.
 
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Robo

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I would be interested in seeing any reports of research behind the suggestion that hydration (through drinking water) affects blister formation.

Of course severe dehydration can have many effects on the body - in which case, blisters should be the least of your worries. Putting aside that extreme, is there is any observed relationship between quantity of water drunk and frequency/extent of blisters?

I think @davebugg provided some insights / research into that.
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Building on my previous reasons for blisters and @C clearly question on hydration. Water is not the answer. We found that in the desert for extended periods of time over-hydration without replenishing electrolytes caused many problems: cramping, dizziness, muscle weakness, etc.
Any of these will affect your ability to function at optimal levels.
So, drink water with added electrolytes and possibly avoid blisters.
Agreed! But I still question whether there is any connection between blisters and hydration - with or without electrolytes.
 

Robo

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@Robo Hate to burst your bubble (er, blister)...its only a matter of time! Twenty plus year's of walking on varied surfaces with quality footwear and seldom blister one. First time on Camino and massive blisters almost forced me to go home. Anything “unusual” can cause a blister. Small pebble, fold in your sock, dampness, cramp in your knee or hip that changes your gait, etc. If you don't stop and check a source of discomfort, a blister is not far away. In my case it was hubris. I wanted to prove I could conquer the Camino by pressing along too fast and ignore many of the “signals” previously mentioned.
Buen Camino
Arn

Very true @Arn I realise I might be on borrowed time :(

But you raise some really good points. 'any' small thing can lead to a blister.
a tiny pebble, fold in the sock, bad seam in a sock, incorrect laced footwear.

I try to make a pint of being aware of all these things and 'fixing' them right away.

Even to the extent, that my spare socks used to change into during the day, are a different material/brand.
They fit and rub in a different way and so don't aggravate any particular area further.

Fresh socks midday also mean fresh vaseline, tape, hikers wool etc.

It really is a 'regime' and 'focus on the detail' type of thing I reckon.
 

Camino Chrissy

Take one step forward...then keep on walking..
Year of past OR future Camino
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If you feel a ‘hot spot’ coming, just use some sheep wool . It works .
I'll have to try sheep's wool if/when we in the US get to eventually "go" again. I've always treated hot spots with compeed or duct tape...just gotta catch them early! Both work well for me. After about the first week of walking I never seem to get any more hot spots.
 
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Robo

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Year of past OR future Camino
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@davebugg was it you who produced that advice /research about a lack of hydration potentially leading to increased risk of blisters. I know it was very sound and has stuck with me ever since.

If it wasn't you I'll try to find it.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Very true @Arn I realise I might be on borrowed time :(

But you raise some really good points. 'any' small thing can lead to a blister.
a tiny pebble, fold in the sock, bad seam in a sock, incorrect laced footwear.

I try to make a pint of being aware of all these things and 'fixing' them right away.

Even to the extent, that my spare socks used to change into during the day, are a different material/brand.
They fit and rub in a different way and so don't aggravate any particular area further.

Fresh socks midday also mean fresh vaseline, tape, hikers wool etc.

It really is a 'regime' and 'focus on the detail' type of thing I reckon.
@Robo if only more pilgrim's had the discipline you entail...they to might avoid the onset of blisters. Well done!
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Co
Agreed! But I still question whether there is any connection between blisters and hydration - with or without electrolytes.
consider this...if you do not hydrate your skin loses its elasticity. A way to check this is pinching your skin. If it snaps back into place...you are hydrated. With your feet its a bit different. The more water you drink, without replacing the electrolytes the more elastic the skin becomes. There are folks that toughen up the soles of their feet thus developing calluses. Still, with the movement of the soft tissue of the foot, they developed blisters under the calluses. Over hydration, without replacing the electrolytes cramps the muscles of the foot creating two hard surfaces between which is soft tissue... This a blister!
I'm not a podiatrist, but after walking thousands of miles, that appears how it might happen to me.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
But you raise some really good points. 'any' small thing can lead to a blister.
a tiny pebble, fold in the sock, bad seam in a sock, incorrect laced footwear.

That's what happened to me when I wore toe socks! I got a big bubbly blister right between my big toe and second toe. Fortunately, it wasn't in an area that got any pressure on it, so it didn't hurt. I just left it alone and it finally just healed.

The other time that I got a blister on the Camino was during my first Camino. I had been walking with a "Camino family" from Roncesvalles, and we always took good breaks, the weather was hot and I always aired out my feet and checked them out during those breaks. Eventually the family drifted apart, and I found that when I was walking alone I didn't take the time to rest, and therefore wasn't checking my feet. I remember finally stopping for lunch in San Juan de Ortega, and there it was - a blister on one of my toes! Even though it was tiny it hurt!!
Strangely, the following year while I was walking that stretch between Villafranca Montes de Oca and San Juan de Ortega that same toe started to be sore - it was almost like it had a memory of developing a blister at that point on the Camino! That time I did stop and checked it out, but there was no redness or other evidence of a hot spot, though I did wrap a small bandage around it.

My "secret" for avoiding blisters is to put some Omnifix or Hypafix tape on the "trouble spots" - the balls of my feet and a couple of toes every morning.
 

Robo

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That's what happened to me when I wore toe socks! I got a big bubbly blister right between my big toe and second toe. Fortunately, it wasn't in an area that got any pressure on it, so it didn't hurt. I just left it alone and it finally just healed.

The other time that I got a blister on the Camino was during my first Camino. I had been walking with a "Camino family" from Roncesvalles, and we always took good breaks, the weather was hot and I always aired out my feet and checked them out during those breaks. Eventually the family drifted apart, and I found that when I was walking alone I didn't take the time to rest, and therefore wasn't checking my feet. I remember finally stopping for lunch in San Juan de Ortega, and there it was - a blister on one of my toes! Even though it was tiny it hurt!!
Strangely, the following year while I was walking that stretch between Villafranca Montes de Oca and San Juan de Ortega that same toe started to be sore - it was almost like it had a memory of developing a blister at that point on the Camino! That time I did stop and checked it out, but there was no redness or other evidence of a hot spot, though I did wrap a small bandage around it.

My "secret" for avoiding blisters is to put some Omnifix or Hypafix tape on the "trouble spots" - the balls of my feet and a couple of toes every morning.

I love that section through the Forest. It might have been the steep down and up near the Civil war Monument! ;) Yes I've used tape sometimes too.
 
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Robo

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Co

consider this...if you do not hydrate your skin loses its elasticity. A way to check this is pinching your skin. If it snaps back into place...you are hydrated. With your feet its a bit different. The more water you drink, without replacing the electrolytes the more elastic the skin becomes. There are folks that toughen up the soles of their feet thus developing calluses. Still, with the movement of the soft tissue of the foot, they developed blisters under the calluses. Over hydration, without replacing the electrolytes cramps the muscles of the foot creating two hard surfaces between which is soft tissue... This a blister!
I'm not a podiatrist, but after walking thousands of miles, that appears how it might happen to me.

Sounds very logical @Arn .

I now have a habit of carry little packs of electrolytes.
I pop a sachet into a spare 3 ml bottle and sip that through the day. Seems to help.
A bit like Aquarius without all the sugar.

Though I find Aquarius is a great energy boost on a long hot day. :)
 

Robo

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@Robo if only more pilgrim's had the discipline you entail...they to might avoid the onset of blisters. Well done!

I'm just a coward @Arn . I don't like pain :)

Between by bad knees, bad back, bad tendons, excess weight (reducing) and tendency for shin splints......
The very last thing I need to add to all that is Blisters!

So blister avoidance has a regime.
I have a stretching regime for back and legs.
A 'roller' regime for shins.

Just takes a few minutes here and there through the day.

But if I don't do it, I know I'll get problems.
And walking a Camino is hard enough without adding more burdens ;)
 

Arn

Veteran Member
I'm just a coward @Arn . I don't like pain :)

Between by bad knees, bad back, bad tendons, excess weight (reducing) and tendency for shin splints......
The very last thing I need to add to all that is Blisters!

So blister avoidance has a regime.
I have a stretching regime for back and legs.
A 'roller' regime for shins.

Just takes a few minutes here and there through the day.

But if I don't do it, I know I'll get problems.
And walking a Camino is hard enough without adding more burdens ;)
My deepest respect my friend!
 

C clearly

Moderator
Staff member
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
consider this..
Yes, I'm considering 🤓. Certainly all the systems in our bodies function together, and an upset in one system can lead to unexpected effects elsewhere, but I'm still skeptical about how direct a relationship there is between blisters and modest differences in hydration! It would be hard to prove. But since people have made that claim, I am asking what it is based on.
 

Arn

Veteran Member
Yes, I'm considering 🤓. Certainly all the systems in our bodies function together, and an upset in one system can lead to unexpected effects elsewhere, but I'm still skeptical about how direct a relationship there is between blisters and modest differences in hydration! It would be hard to prove. But since people have made that claim, I am asking what it is based on.
In my case it's based on being responsible for hundreds of individuals walking hundreds of miles carrying packs three times the weight of a pilgrim on Camino.
 
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davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
@davebugg was it you who produced that advice /research about a lack of hydration potentially leading to increased risk of blisters. I know it was very sound and has stuck with me ever since.

If it wasn't you I'll try to find it.

I didn't post specific information about hydration as it relates to blisters. I did post information on the overuse of electrolyte drinks as it relates to various systems and their function. Perhaps that was what you may have read?

I do have two guides that I have posted in the past; one on blister prevention, and another on how to treat blisters if they occur. Perhaps those and the one on electrolyte overuse blended together?

I really enjoy your videos, Rob; when I was recovering during treatment, I found you had a YouTube channel; how I missed it before I don't know. Anyway, it provided a wonderful distraction and lead to visiting Camino memories. :)
 
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OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

G'Day Robo. I have been using the two sock trick for about 6 years (plus three climbs on Mt Kilimanjaro) and can also report no blisters. I have been wearing the "toe socks" for the past 5 years, they keep your toes separated from each other, hence no rubbing.
I also take my footwear off every two hours and also the out layer of socks. It lets the feet cool down and the socks dry out, as do the boots. As for what type of boots/shoes - I have a broad foot so I have been sold on Keen Boots for 5 or so years. Yes they are a bit heavier, but they provide the support and protection I need.

PS I have also tried the hikers wool, found it satisfactory.
Thanks for the post.
 
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D

Deleted member 86813

Guest
Sounds very logical @Arn .

I now have a habit of carry little packs of electrolytes.
I pop a sachet into a spare 3 ml bottle and sip that through the day. Seems to help.
A bit like Aquarius without all the sugar.

Though I find Aquarius is a great energy boost on a long hot day. :)
Agree on the benefits of Aquarius. It is actually quite low sugar (c.13g) vs a can of regular Coke (c.40g) for example. It is only c.78kcal vs c.140kcal for regular Coke. All figures for 330ml serving. I have also found sugar free Aquarius is widely available on the Frances.
 

Robo

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@davebugg was it you who produced that advice /research about a lack of hydration potentially leading to increased risk of blisters. I know it was very sound and has stuck with me ever since.

If it wasn't you I'll try to find it.

Still trying to track down some research on dehydration potentially increasing the risk of blisters.
This article is really good on hydration overall but it makes mention of the issue of reduced shin elasticity with dehydration.

that's starting to make sense. I'll keep looking. Sorry I did not keep the original reference!

 
D

Deleted member 86813

Guest
Still trying to track down some research on dehydration potentially increasing the risk of blisters.
This article is really good on hydration overall but it makes mention of the issue of reduced shin elasticity with dehydration.

that's starting to make sense. I'll keep looking. Sorry I did not keep the original reference!

When you drink water, it doesn't automatically go to the skin - it hydrates cells once absorbed into the bloodstream and filtered by the kidneys. So at the cellular level, drinking water is great as it flushes the system and hydrates our bodies overall. Water will actually head straight for all your other essential organs before the skin. So, hydration is best fed to the skin on the surface. Therefore, with respect to blisters, topical moisturisers can actually be much more effective than drinking water.
 
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HelenVanW

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2017
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

This is good information, Rob. Thanks. In addition, I would say a product that we took with us from the USA that kept us walking after getting blisters was a wonderful item by Spenco called "Second Skin Blister kit" and particularly the gel squares. I haven't seen anything like this anywhere else, although there could be. We discovered these prior to our first Camino, and oddly enough my first blister was not on my feet. (We follow a similar regimen as you with our feet for preventing friction, moisture and heat.) It was on my collar cone from my overloaded pack! These gel squares are super helpful. Another item that helped us prevent friction in our hikers is a nifty product by Engo called Blister Prevention Patches. Essentially they are pliable teflon patches with adhesive on one side that you cut to fit and apply to your shoe if you have a spot that is rubbing too much. (We use these on all types of shoes back home, too, especially new ones we are breaking in.) These items are available from Amazon here. It's always helpful to share this information in case it can help someone. Thanks for yours.
 

mike mcbroom

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Francis June 17, 2015 ,Portagusee from Porto to Santiago August 2016, Francis may 2018 this year wil
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

I have done 4 Caminos, Norte, Primativo, Portuguese and of course Finisteri. Last walk was in 2018 for 90 days.

NO BLISTERS on the last trip.
1. Take breaks and change socks every couple hours or so,
2. Used a silk liner for about the first week.
3. Thick Marino Darn Tough socks.
4. Give hot spots attention right away..
 

Sean Lad

Member
I would How or Why do you get blisters
I have walked over 10000km of Caminos in Spain France and Portugal over 10 years and never got blister
I never use vaseline and a no no never take a shower in the morning
I wear a lite waterproof trekking boot
Well broken in at least 6 months
During the last year I have walked 7000km and worn out a pair of boots and no blisters now breaking in New pair for late Autumn Camino hopefully
I managed to lose 11kg of weigh during lockdown walking
Been Camino all whenever you make it
 

lt56ny

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF(2012) Le Puy/CF (2015) Portugues (2017) Norte (2018) CF (2019) VDLP?
Ah Blisters!!! I think there are as many blister stories as there are feet walking on the Camino.
So many blisters so many remedies!
I read what everyone writes and I agree with some things and then disagree with others.
I only use vaseline for about 10 days and then don't need it.
I only wear trail runners and never wear boots. I have walked in snow and survived.
I wear a very thin synthetic sock underneath and have worn both a thin smart wool in fall and a medium cushion smart wool for November/December Camino kept me warm and snug and no blisters at all.
As soon as I get a blister I stick that needle in and drain it and will do it a few times a day if possible. Only a band aid and Neosporin after each poke.
Brooks Cascadias one size larger and wide fit. Although my wife just bought me some Hokas Speedgoat and they are fantastic. Not sure if I will take them on next camino as I think, especially with feet and backpacks that you should stick to what works.
Be meticulous about pebbles and other stuff that gets in your shoes and socks.
Finally and most importantly you won't really know what works for you until you walk.
Each person is different. Some people's feet are disaster areas and others are super lucky and then there is everything in between. Thankfully for me a border on the super lucky. About 5 blisters in 5 caminos. Only the first camino did they bother me for a few days.
Who knows? Try the basics first and be prepared for the worst.
One of the worst things you can do is keep walking when you have blisters or any pain because you don't want to lose your camino family. If your "family' won't stop with you for a day or two to rest than they are not your family. They are friends. The acid test is would my mom, dad, brother, sister, son or daughter stop if I was hurting? Of course they would they loves you and they are your family. You have to take care of yourself first and foremost. The "Camino Family" are not bad people they are taking care of themselves also and walking their own caminos. Risking pain and maybe permanent injury is NOT WORTH IT.
Remember there are people a day or two behind you that after you rest and feel better you will meet who will be just as interesting and kind and wonderful as the ones who left you behind. Who knows that pilgrim that you meet after your rest stop may be the one to impart wisdom or love that may change your life or at least your day.
One final example. Some people swear by Compeed an think it is the greatest invention since the invention of a tortilla con papas. I think it is about the worst invention known to man. It was invented by sadists and should only be used by masochists.
Trial and error and pain and some suffering are part of the Camino. You have to embrace it all.
What a wonderful world we live in.
 
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Aidan21

Active Member
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SJPP to SDC 2013/14
SJPP to SDC 2016
Porto to SDC 2017
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Hi Rob,
I too am in the very fortunate position of never having a blister in 2000+ kms of Camino walking. I also have a regime that includes a daily dose of Vaseline, boots a size too big, boots properly laced and tied to anchor the heel and allow the toes to wiggle freely and when I have a hot spot to STOP immediately and treat it. Just STOP what you are doing the second you feel any discomfort and deal with the hop spot!!!! I use a compeed on a hot spot (not on a blister, just on the hot spot). If the blister has formed then you move to plan B and treat the blister, but treating hotspots is Plan A. Good preparation and immediate treatment I have found to be very effective.
Aidan

PS, on day one of my Caminos I have used a compeed as a Prophylactic on my heels and sometimes on the balls of my feet. I have found that to be helpful also as the first few days are when the feet are most likely to acquire a blister as they adapt to a new walking regime.
 
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Walton

Active Member
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2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)
Hi Robo

Thank you for the thread and your passion for all things "camino!" I love reading your thought provoking posts and all the wonderful replies that invariable follow.

I would like to mention the infamous Camino Portuguese cobblestone effect on feet for those planning to do the Portuguese Camino, especially for those planning to walk from Lisbon.

For those who have been to Portugal would know that the Portuguese people love their cobblestones.

There are tens of millions of them everywhere, on every road, footpath, walkway, stairs and maybe even airport runways for all I know.

We discovered that on a hot day, cobblestones are really tough on footwear soles. The soles of shoes become very warm indeed, hot in fact, and the heat tends to cause the soles to become flexible. Heat increases foot perspiration, and foot perspiration can cause blisters very quickly as we discovered on one particular day on our Camino.

Even very seasoned European Pilgrims complained about unexpected foot problems that day.

We learned two lessons.

1. On hot days, allow the feet to air a bit more frequently than normal and apply a lot of Dave Bugg goop, merino wool etc to try to keep your feet blister free.

2. Cobblestones require special consideration with regards to what kind of sole your footwear has.

There was debate about boots versus shoes versus sandals etc on our Camino.

If you are going to walk for considerable distances on cobblestones, I think a hard leather like sole is better to cope with the uneven cobblestone surfaces, rather than soft trail runner type soles.

Cheers

Graham
 

Yoyo

✿ Se hace el camino al andar. ✿
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Thanks for the video, @Robo !
On my first camino, I suffered from various painful blisters on the back and outer edge of my heels.
When I walked again, I had no blisters at all. So what was the difference?
I had changed from waterproof boots to lightweight walking shoes, I had changed my foot cream for a deer tallow product. I performed extensive preventive taping on my feet every morning, and I walked shorter daily distances.
What exactly did the trick? 🤔 I have no idea. Maybe the combination of all of the above.

Hiker's Wool seems such a fabulous and practical solution for hot spots! I really feel like giving it a try next time to substitute the tape which can be quite time consuming to put on in the mornings. Thanks for the tip!
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I would How or Why do you get blisters
I have walked over 10000km of Caminos in Spain France and Portugal over 10 years and never got blister
I never use vaseline and a no no never take a shower in the morning
I wear a lite waterproof trekking boot
Well broken in at least 6 months
During the last year I have walked 7000km and worn out a pair of boots and no blisters now breaking in New pair for late Autumn Camino hopefully
I managed to lose 11kg of weigh during lockdown walking
Been Camino all whenever you make it

Great point I forgot to mention.
Keep the feet dry in the mornings! :)
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
I would like to mention the infamous Camino Portuguese cobblestone effect on feet for those planning to do the Portuguese Camino, especially for those planning to walk from Lisbon.

For those who have been to Portugal would know that the Portuguese people love their cobblestones.

There are tens of millions of them everywhere, on every road, footpath, walkway, stairs and maybe even airport runways for all I know.

Interesting. It's one of the reasons I don't plan to walk the Portuguese.

My feet just can't handle too much hard surface. cobblestones, concrete, tarmac.......

That pounding just wrecks my knees and tendons.

15-20 kms on a road, for me, will often require a rest day to recover.

But..........I was walking vastly overweight too :rolleyes:
 
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Merrill23
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
I would How or Why do you get blisters
I have walked over 10000km of Caminos in Spain France and Portugal over 10 years and never got blister
I never use vaseline and a no no never take a shower in the morning
I wear a lite waterproof trekking boot
Well broken in at least 6 months
During the last year I have walked 7000km and worn out a pair of boots and no blisters now breaking in New pair for late Autumn Camino hopefully
I managed to lose 11kg of weigh during lockdown walking
Been Camino all whenever you make it
I agree, had an assortment of blisters until a Pilgrim told me that showering in the morning predisposes the feet to blisters. It seems to have worked, just saying.....🙋‍♀️ 🥾
 
Year of past OR future Camino
cycled from Pamplona Sep 2015;Frances, walked from St Jean May/June 2017. Plans to walk Porto 2020
Re the issue of dehydration maybe being a cause of blisters. Well I can't provide definitive research but on my three climbs of Mt Kilimanjaro the advice from the people at the Marangu Hotel (who have over 40 years experience organising Kili climbs) and the team at Climb Mt Kilimanjaro the advice was 4 litres of water in each day and at least 2 litres of it to be excreted via the kidneys. Changing socks also helps the blister issues.
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Coastal {Feb-March 2020}
Camino Frances {March 2019 & 2020}
Great video and good comments.

With more blisters on my first Camino than my previous 60 years, I finished the Portuguese Senda Litoral from Porto with no blisters, I walked the Frances to Hontanas before getting a friction blister in my lateral arch area, just a few days before the lockdown last year.

The big differences from my first Camino and other walks and subsequent Caminos was increasing frequency and duration of breaks or “recovery time”. Instead of 4 to 8 hour walking with rest stops I took 8-12 hours with longer breaks to air out my feet and rehydrate, where I noted that the same Spanish and Portuguese peregrinos used a similar protocol. Another blister free person claimed to cool his feet in every stream on the Frances.

To echo and add to the great comments above:
1) The key to medium running or hiking socks (Feetures, Darn Tough, Smart Wool) (I prefer no liner) is that they fit as tight as possible without cutting off circulation.

2) Sportslick is a hybrid a waterproof lubricant, antifungal and antibacterial. In addition to lubrication it helps prevent fungal infection and jock itch. A Fungal infection is no fun.

3) The lighter the shoe the better. Dave Bugg (welcome back) pointed out that every ounce saved in shoe weight is equivalent to 5 ounces in pack weight.

4) Trekking poles provide support for ankles, knees, etc, especially on hills. Rubber tips are much quieter on asphalt and cobble.

5) Shoes must accommodate the foot splay, any swelling, and movement between the outer layer of protective sock and the shoe.

6) Lacing techniques can reduce friction and lock the heel to prevent impact injury of toes on hilly sections.

7) ENGO patches applied to the shoes/insoles, along with 2Toms Sportshield Roll On (body glide) dramatically reduced friction and eliminated chafing. IMHO duct tape does not provide glide.

8) Test tape, and anything else, you plan to use. For me, the adhesive on Leukotape caused rashes and light water blisters that were far worse than the one little friction blister the Leukotape and lubricant were intended to treat.

Hope this helps
 

Marbe2

Active member
Year of past OR future Camino
2015-2019 walked all or more than half of CF 7 times... CP recently cancelled by Covid 19!
I have had blisters but not on the camino. Why and where did I get them?....on long, very rocky steep sustained surfaces in the Alps.. after many hours. Eventually I figured out thatI needed larger shoes than normal (before internet). I also realize that the hot tubes, pools and baths, softened my callouses.
Forty years ago, I ran a few NYC marathons, and learned about using lubricants, such as vasoline on my feet and applied this concept to hikng.

So before Caminos

1) I make sure the shoes I am wearing, fit right, provide enough space for swelling feet, are supportive enough for my light backpack.

2). I use a very lite pack....about 6 -7 lbs and I practice with it for a few weeks prior to leaving.

3). Working my way up to it...I put in at least 50 miles per week walking before we go...for at least 4 weeks.

4). I walk on hard surfaces (60-70 percent) of the time..which tend to be more level. However, I supplement this road work on uneven trails with ruts, rocks and in rain as well.

On Caminos:
1). I do NOT use Gortex shoes. No matter how wet or the temperature. Dry them by stuffing them with paper twice during the night.

2) I do not swim or take a bath on caminos as I do not want to soften feet and callouses.

3). I walk at the same pace on the camino as I do as when preparing for it. I am not tempted to walk beyond my pace!

4).I walk slower on hard surfaces than on ground surfaces

5). We try not to walk when it is very hot.....will rise very early to avoid hot surfaces.

6) Though we walk slow, we stretch, do foot exercises, including 3 writing alphabet with each foot 3times, and Core body streching before we sleep and when we get up. If feet or ankles are sore, at all, we ask for ice to prevent any additional swelling when we arrive. We carry socks and try to change them about every two hours. I will relubricate feet during the day if necessary. I ONLY use thin wicker sox liners..which is enough protection with the lubricant and hard feet.
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
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The big differences from my first Camino and other walks and subsequent Caminos was increasing frequency and duration of breaks or “recovery time”. Instead of 4 to 8 hour walking with rest stops I took 8-12 hours with longer breaks to air out my feet and rehydrate, where I noted that the same Spanish and Portuguese peregrinos used a similar protocol. Another blister free person claimed to cool his feet in every stream on the Frances.

Love that point! I think that's partly why I like walking alone. A couple of times a day I'll stop somewhere with some nice scenery, boots and socks off, lie down, with my feet raised on my pack, and just chill for 30 mins.

I managed to get Pat to adopt this approach a bit. Though she prefers to keep going and 'get it over with'...... :rolleyes:


 
Year of past OR future Camino
Portuguese Coastal {Feb-March 2020}
Camino Frances {March 2019 & 2020}
Doing your own Camino is important. I got that single blister on a day I did a double. It's usually better to take the time and arrive late to the surprise of the students on March break who were encouraged that the 'old man' eventually made it.

The rehydration reminded me of a friend who, in the 1970s, told me that bikers only ride from bar to bar. Some things are the same the world over, as I noticed numerous snowmobiles parked outside of a couple of pubs this past weekend. :)

Not sure how that works with Covid.
 

Icacos

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2013)
Those of you who follow this year’s “Where did you walk (locally) ...” thread might know that I developed a blister during yesterday‘s walk. It was/is the only blister I’ve got since the one I developed three weeks into my Camino back in 2013.

Yesterday, i spent 40 minutes trekking down the hill earlier in the morning to take the seabus across the inlet, then about another 20 minutes on other public transport to get to the ‘trail head.’ The day before I had logged 9,500 steps which, in itself, is nothing spectacular, but I did wonder at the wisdom of my undertaking what would be a 7+k trek around the Stanley Park seawall, after not having been very active for a few days, save for the 9,500 steps I had done the day before.

All morning I was conscious of my water intake, gauging my consumption as to the location of the next toilet facilities but, at the same time, I was aware that something in me was lacking in energy and perhaps a 7+ trek might not be a good idea just then. However, the weather was good and I had been planning this trek for a while .... so, I ventured forth.

At 1k I felt the first hint of a hot spot on the ball of my left foot. That was my clue to do something about it, but I had no hiker’s wool, no Compeed, no Second Skin, nothing. After all, i was only going on a 3 hour walk, I’d followed my usual foot care routine - which works well for me - and I don’t get blisters. Why would I have any first aid supplies? Silly me!!

Who knows why I developed the blister yesterday? But one thing is sure ... I felt the same fatigue yesterday as I felt in 2013 when I developed that blister and, likewise, I ignored the warning hot spot. In 2013 I was surviving on bocadillos and cafes con leche, neither great on the nutrition scale. Recently - I’m ashamed to admit - I’ve been indulging a bit much on home baked scones - also not high on nutrition. I‘m no nutritionist, but I can’t help but wonder if some electrolytes might have made a difference yesterday, and to think I have on hand some bottles of G Zero that I bought just for such an occasion. Silly me!
 

Walton

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
Great point I forgot to mention.
Keep the feet dry in the mornings! :)

Ahh great point there - but I really love a quick shower in the mornings.

I've tried to shower by sitting down on the floor, with feet poking out the shower cubicle, so as to keep them bone dry - but I then can't reach the taps! :eek:

So if you see a guy in a bathroom using a blow dryer to dry his feet, that'll probably be me.

Dry feet in the mornings is seriously good advice.

Cheers

Graham
 

Walton

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 Sjpp to Sdc. 2018 Lisbon to Sdc to Finisterre. Next up hopefully VDP or Del Norte.
On a separate note, hopefully not off topic - I've wondered whether or not we might inadvertantly be poisoning ourselves by applying all kinds of substances (Some use vaseline, foot goop, vicks vaporub, gaffer tape, compeed, and goodness knows what else) to our feet for long periods of time.

Surely, some of this stuff gets absorbed by our feet skin and thus enters our bodies as time progresses.

Some serious questions;

Would this have any possible long term health consequences, I wonder?

Perhaps it would be possible to invent something that adds health benefits as we walk.

Anyway, it's just a thought

Cheers

Graham
 
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Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
Ahh great point there - but I really love a quick shower in the mornings.

I've tried to shower by sitting down on the floor, with feet poking out the shower cubicle, so as to keep them bone dry - but I then can't reach the taps! :eek:

So if you see a guy in a bathroom using a blow dryer to dry his feet, that'll probably be me.

Dry feet in the mornings is seriously good advice.

Cheers

Graham

As I often have my feet taped up by a physio, I have been known to put plastic bags on my feet :rolleyes:
 

Owen Duguay

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2016 Le Puy to SJPP to Santiago de Compostelle to Finisterre. Environ 1700 km.
All helpfull comments. Thank you everyone. On one Camino the Le Puy a young man saw me hobbling along in great pain. He came to me and told me he walked from Austria and that he wore woman's nylon stockings. He gave me a pair of ankle length stockings to try. I think they helped.
 

AllanHG

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino France 2015
Camino Portuguese 2017
LOL.
My feet are not immune.
I used to blister terribly in my past Military and Hill Walking days.
Old leather boots, single socks, wet feet......

Maybe I've been lucky on Camino so far,
But it takes a lot of care and a strict regime to avoid them I think.

I managed to get Pat through 2 caminos blister free using this regime.
Though we did run out of Hikers Wool.
She worked on the basis that if it helps, more must be better!



We also avoided blisters by using carded wool to wrap around any hot spots - or areas that we thought might rub. It is cheap, lightweight, easy to use (and reuse) and antibacterial. We always brought extra and gave it away to people who had blisters.

Another thing that really helped was to tie our boots “Camino style” (this according to the woman who taught us how to do it). We now keep the toe box really loose in order to avoid tight spots that could lead to blisters. We do not criss cross the laces on the toe part of the boot but start the criss cross closer to the ankle and tie them at the ankle to keep them stable/prevent movement in the heel.

The other thing we learned was to stop right away if we felt like a stone got in our boots or if anything part of our feet were rubbing - and not wait until they turned into blisters. For blisters, like many other things in life, prevention is so much easier than repair.
 

stinmd

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

Leukotape works for me :)
 
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
Waiting to do my first Camino (should have been spring 2020). Lessons learned for me in other hiking (national park trails and local trails): 1. Boots are not always the best. Switched to trail runners. More flexible, feel what is under my feet, lighter, etc. 2. Sizing up - although it took awhile for me to get this. Sizing up may be one - two sizes. 3. It may not be the shoes. My right foot has had issues with black toenails, even after sizing up,etc. while walking I have become more aware of foot mechanics. I constantly curl my toes and dig in on the right foot. which contributed to the toenail issue not healing. My solution was - using toe gel caps on two toes and switching to Altras. The gel toe caps provided cushioning and reduced friction. The Altras allowed my feet to have more toe room. 4. Slowed my pace. I naturally walk at a good clip, so have adjusted my speed, which changes my gait and less toe curling/digging in. 5. Experimenting with socks like darn tough and Smartwool.
 
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Jodean

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I walk for a living as a tour guide and though I have gotten blisters at work occasionally with new shoes or boots, I didn't get any on my 3 Caminos.
The 2 sock rule works for me, but I wear nylon knee highs for the one pair and I turn them inside out as well as my socks unless I have a pair with no seams. This is easy, cheap, and works really well. I fell in a creek on the Portuguese Camino and continued walking for another 5 hours with boots that were of course soaking wet and still did not get a blister.
 

C clearly

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As a blister free hiker can I throw two things into the melting pot.
1. Don't put a Compeed blister plaster on a hot spot. That is not what they were intended for.
2.try and ensure you get properly fitted boots or shoes in the first place. When getting fitted, by properly qualified fitters, always go in the afternoon, try and be on your feet as much as possible before going, and wear the socks you intend to wear whilst walking. This should allow your feet to "swell". Learn how to lace those particular items of footwear to stop toes banging off the front of the footwear and heels rubbing against the back. (The worst blisters I saw were on one person's heels due to the shoe not fitting properly and being improperly laced. They had to give up by Logroño)
Shoes/boots that fit in the morning with a pair of thin nylon socks may not fit very well in the afternoon having walked up and down hill for 6 hours or more with thick socks.
Lacing is often overlooked but is very important. Plenty of help via YT6.
 

trecile

Camino Addict
Year of past OR future Camino
Francés (2016 & 2017), Norte (2018), Francés-Salvador-Norte (2019), Portuguese (2019)
1. Don't put a Compeed blister plaster on a hot spot. That is not what they were intended
Thank you. You are correct, and it's a rather expensive use for this purpose when tape will do.
 

stinmd

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
Oh, one more thing - I make a point of stopping every hour or so to remove my boots and dry my socks. Not enough can be said about keeping those feet dry to prevent blisters.
 
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I find that I curl my toes if the shoe is too big (long). Your feet may swell but they don't get much longer! Instead of "sizing up" more than one size, consider finding a wider shoe. Unfortunately this is not easy. Maybe we consumers need to keep asking for the option of wide shoes.
Good point if sizing up too big. As a kid remember slipping on my Dad’s shoes to go get the mail at the end of our long gravel driveway. Toes were holding them on! I have sized up one size. I curl/dig in my toes in most shoes I wear, be it hiking, casual walking in the grocery store! Not sure why and only right foot. Definitely concur with wider shoe. The Altra‘s have more of a square toe vs. round, which works better for me. Who knows!!?? What is happening in the foot may be due to what is going on in the knee, or hip, or back, or shoulder, or neck. Not to mention the mental aspect!!!
 

Nocheechako

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances in 2015 & 2016. Portuguese, Muxia next.
1st Camino I had numerous blisters. One was the result of having to switch to new shoes 1/2 way through. I then started using compression socks. Not the "medical" one you get at the drug store but high-quality hiking ones. The ones I am using currently are from Cabelas. Every person is different and the solution for one may not work for another.
 

taigirl

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Frances 2019
That worked for me too. My shoe was only a half size bigger but much wider than I would normally wear - fortunately I have narrow feet. Feet swell "wider" than " longer". Lace your shoes so there is no tightness across the front but firm towards the ankle. If that makes sense!
 

Roby

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2021
Quality shoes (waterproof GoreTex because I want to avoid wet feet at all costs), quality seamless socks for hikers (I prefer synthetic materials because they dry quickly and the foot is always dry in them) and on every break longer than 10 minutes, I take off my shoes to let the socks dry a bit and to have the shoelaces adjusted again to a foot that is probably a little swollen.
Sometimes I massage my feet a little.
If I feel a stone in the shoe or a hot place, I react immediately, take off the shoe and solve the problem, time must not be wasted because a blister can form very quickly.
Every 4-5 days I smeared my feet with Vaseline before bed or after an afternoon shower.

I would be very careful with larger shoes because slipping your feet in them will also lead to rubbing of the skin and then to blisters.
In an oversized shoe, contact between the toes and the shoe can also occur and this can lead to a black toenail.

Other than that, I don’t use absolutely anything else, nor do I need extra attention on my feet.
 
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Le Puy route 2014; Le Puy route continuation 2016; Le Puy route 2017; Le Puy route 2019 [incl. Célé]
Hikers Wool ... the best 🐑🐑🐑 ... works well wrapped around individual toes ... with sandals ... and without socks too [quelle horreur] 😱
 
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Robo

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We also avoided blisters by using carded wool to wrap around any hot spots - or areas that we thought might rub. It is cheap, lightweight, easy to use (and reuse) and antibacterial. We always brought extra and gave it away to people who had blisters.

Another thing that really helped was to tie our boots “Camino style” (this according to the woman who taught us how to do it). We now keep the toe box really loose in order to avoid tight spots that could lead to blisters. We do not criss cross the laces on the toe part of the boot but start the criss cross closer to the ankle and tie them at the ankle to keep them stable/prevent movement in the heel.

The other thing we learned was to stop right away if we felt like a stone got in our boots or if anything part of our feet were rubbing - and not wait until they turned into blisters. For blisters, like many other things in life, prevention is so much easier than repair.

Nice point on lacing. There are loads of YouTube videos on the different techniques.
Pulling the heel down more for long descents, to stop the foot sliding forwards.
Looser perhaps for long flat stages.

Well worth looking at a few techniques I think.
 

Brandy

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF,VDLP,NORTE,ARAG,SANABR,SALVAD,PRIMIT,MOZAR,JAUME,LEVANT,MADRID,HUELVA,PORT,EPW,ESTRECHO;
Well, I used to practice the routine many described before: stop often, take boots off, dry feet and socks, use vaseline or similar, etc etc.
One day I changed from shoes to sandals. Now I always take a shower in the morning :) , I never take sandals off, I never stop, I never get blisters.
Buen Camino
Brandy
 
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances (2014)
Camino Via Podiensis (2018)
Waterproof/Goretex boots one size larger and wide toe box (Aku) for me - invaluable on a very wet and muddy Le Puy camino in 2018 - with one pair of Bridgdale merino/bamboo blend socks. I agree with others about resting/airing feet and changing socks along the way. I'm the pilgrim with socks drying attached to the outside of my pack! Hyperfix tape for hotspots - and yes, stop and treat early! I had a seed head in my sock that caused a small 'blister' as I didn't stop til I was hobbling - I was trying to find a dry spot out of the mud to deal with it but ended up hoping around on one foot trying to put tape on, change socks etc while trying to keep everything clean!
 

OzAlex

Camino Frances Autumn 2014 and Spring 2018
Year of past OR future Camino
2022
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

After several caminos, hiking long distance for over 20 years.....I recommend the following , boots that fit your feet well and quality medium weight socks , get miles up to toughen your feet, if prone to blisters , know your hots spots and religiously tape up with fixomull stretch tape every day. This tape can be cut with the paper backing on to suit your foot.
 

aname4me

aname4me
Year of past OR future Camino
2013, 2015, 2017, 2019, (2021)
My Blister tip is... Check your Wedding Ring.

Often, your Hands and Feet swell at the same time.

Give your Ring a twirl right now. That is what normal feels like.

If you think you're experiencing swelling from Over Hydration, Dehydration, 30+C, a Big Hill (what ever)...


Check your Ring. If it is tight, it's now time to loosen (retie) your Boots.
Give your Feet some extra room.
 
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David Tallan

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
1989
My Blister tip is... Check your Wedding Ring.

Often, your Hands and Feet swell at the same time.

Give your Ring a twirl right now. That is what normal feels like.

If you think you're experiencing swelling from Over Hydration, Dehydration, 30+C, a Big Hill (what ever)...


Check your Ring. If it is tight, it's now time to loosen (retie) your Boots.
Give your Feet some extra room.
And if you are unmarried, get married. At best, it will help prevent blisters, using the tip outlined above. At worst, blisters are the least of your problems.
 

Lady M

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Year of past OR future Camino
September - October (2019)
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

I didn’t avoid the blister debacle on my first camino in 2019 but I have been training wearing armaskin socks. They have a light rubbery lining and do not slip on your feet causing friction. They are pricey at $35 a pair.
 

Robo

Veteran Member
Year of past OR future Camino
CF SJPdP to SdC
(May 2015)
CF Sarria to SdC
(May 2016)
CF SJPDP-SdC
(May 2018)
VdlP (2022?)
When I hear from people who have never had a blister, I suspect that their skin is less susceptible to blisters. Otherwise I just feel like a failure! :(

I got a blister walking 3 kms in my business shoes last week! Very painful.

I think it comes down to the right gear and preparation.
 

Lady M

New Member
Year of past OR future Camino
September - October (2019)
OK, this should create some 'Healthy' debate. :)

This is what works for me.
3 Caminos, 2,000 kms or so and about 100 days on Camino.
Not ONE blister. Same for my wife Pat.
(I'm tempting fate just saying that)

Not saying it's the only approach of course, just one that I have found works well.
If you have never had a blister on Camino, what worked best for you?

I had blisters on my first camino in 2019. For my preparation for my camino this year I bought a pair of armaskin liners. So far, and it’s only training, I have had no problems with blisters. These liners have a sticky surface on the inside that prevent the liner from shifting on my foot thus preventing friction. They were not cheap, $35 a pair. I bought two. I even soaked one foot in water before a 4 mile walk with no problems at all.
 

stinmd

Member
Year of past OR future Camino
Camino Frances - May 2015; Camino del Norte/Primitivo - July/August 2016; Camino Portugues - Sept 2017
Blister-avoidance theories are like navels - everybody has got one ;-) The proof is who has the least blisters at the END of a camino.
 
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WanderingBrian

Active Member
Year of past OR future Camino
2018
LOL.
My feet are not immune.
I used to blister terribly in my past Military and Hill Walking days.
Old leather boots, single socks, wet feet......

Maybe I've been lucky on Camino so far,
But it takes a lot of care and a strict regime to avoid them I think.

I managed to get Pat through 2 caminos blister free using this regime.
Though we did run out of Hikers Wool.
She worked on the basis that if it helps, more must be better!



This. I also did this and never even had a hot spot.
 

davebugg

A Pilgrimage is time I spend praying with my feet
Year of past OR future Camino
2019
Blister-avoidance theories are like navels - everybody has got one ;-) The proof is who has the least blisters at the END of a camino.

Well, if you mean Blister-avoidance 'techniques', I agree. The actual cause for blistering is pretty well established, but the approaches folks use to prevent the cause ARE extremely varied, often done without knowing why they may or may not actually work.

Many of the approaches to blister avoidance are done with folks knowing why they work, but these can bee far less convenient than other approaches, or work for short periods before wearing off, or create other issues such as sweating and overheated feet. However, because those favored approaches do work, many are loathe to abandon that which works for them in order to use a different approach which would also work better, but, to them, is untested and therefore makes them nervous.

I sometimes joke, as an absurdity which actually would work, that my favored approach is to stuff a sock full of bear grease then immerse my foot inside the goopy sock. :-:
 
D

Deleted member 61803

Guest
I sometimes joke, as an absurdity which actually would work, that my favored approach is to stuff a sock full of bear grease then immerse my foot inside the goopy sock. :-:
Well actually if the bear family was near you when you immersed your feet then blisters would be the absolute least of your worries. 😂
Being one of the few, up to this point in my life, not knowingly having ever had a blister I wonder if genetics has a big role to play, or was I lucky enough always to have had the absolute correct footwear, or wore mam knitted wool stockings until I was in my twenties. I don't now ever use polyester or nylon stockings, silk, bamboo cellulose and merino being my choice. But I do (and have done for decades) rub my feet with olive oil with a touch of t tree oil daily. As an aside it keeps my hands in good condition also.

I am sure we have some properly qualified doctors on the forum who could point us in the correct method of treatment whilst we are on the hoof, you know, for when prevention fails.
 
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